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JOSH HENDERSHOT Assoc. AIA, LEED AP BD+C

DESIGN PORTFOLIO


collaborative projects

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academic projects 06

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LĂ­ve On Ashley

A trio of downtown Ann Arbor mixed-use, live-work towers

type: Housing Mixed- Income, Studio - 3 Bedroom

site: Ann Arbor, MI size: 271,100 FT2 setting: Academic

Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning

skills: Autodesk Revit collaborators: Nathan Anderson


The Ann Arbor Livework Studio presented the challenge of proposing the design and redevelopment of a city-owned plot of land in downtown Ann Arbor, MI. The primary focus of the project was to achieve a project design that adhered to a philosophy of transit-oriented and walkable urban development, joined with high density housing of mixed type. Our proposal sought to harness the vibrant pedestrian traffic already present on adjacent Main Street, and draw it in, through a streetfront European-style arcade to a newly created plaza on Ashley Street. The project’s massing consists of three towers, with heights ranging from 10 to 14 stories, containing residential, retail, and entertainment uses. More than 200 new units (340+ beds) are introduced to help bring the downtown residential density to a critical mass in order to support even more walkable services, such as markets or light rail.


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East Liberty Street

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A.1

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1 Front Desk Crate & Barrel Office Lobby

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Rental Office

Mail

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7 South Ashley Street

South Main Street

Rental Office

Checkout

8 Lobby

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Mail

Display

Retail

Retail

Retail

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12 Tickets

Retail

Retail

Bar

Green Room

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Men

292 Seats + Standing Room

Women

Stage

14 Kitchen

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Lobby

16 Retail

Live-Work

Front Desk

Rental Office

Live-Work

Live-Work

Live-Work

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11 West William Street


Flat Plate Solar Collectors Thermal Hot Water System

133’ 2”

Seasonal Panel Adjustment Manual Adjustment allows for panel angle optimization without the added cost of a mechanical tracking system

130’ 0”

129’ 0”

Aluminum Panel Facade Modular, 4’ x 3’ Panels that clip into vertical support mullions with rigid insulation beyond supported by light guage steel studs spanning between precast floor panels

120’ 0”

119’ 0”

Exterior Ceiling Insulation Protects against cold thermal bridging in cases where an exposed floor plate is above an open balcony

113’ 8”

Glass Balcony Door Swing glazed doors allow for preferred views while providing more superior infiltration control compared to sliding glass doors 110’ 0”

109’ 0”

Bunched Louvers At balconies, horizontal shading louvers are “bunched” upward to allow for ideal southern views

Handrail Aluminum extrusion top rail with steel wire mesh panelling, ½” spacing

103’ 8”

100’ 0”

99’ 0”

Interior Ceiling Insulation Protects against cold thermal bridging in cases where an exposed baclony is above a non-balcony zone 97’ 1”

Window Fixed, double glazed fenestration in standard sizes to fit with the aluminum panel facade system

92’ 6”

90’ 0”

89’ 0”

Operable Window Allows for natural ventilation through residential units in summer months

83’ 8”

Prefab Balcony Insulator Rigid insulation and resteel system designed to prevent thermal bridging through concrete floor plates 80’ 0”

79’ 0” Balcony Resteel Provides additonal support for the cast-in-place balconies due to their custom insulation system

73’ 8” Horizontal Shading Louvers Folded sheet aluminum louvers, 4” deep, that span the southern facade of the building, and “bulge” out at balcony locations, to provide more ideal shading

70’ 0”

69’ 0”

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Handrail Aluminum extrusion top rail with steel wire mesh panelling, ½” spacing

103’ 8”

100’ 0”

99’ 0”

Interior Ceiling Insulation Protects against cold thermal bridging in cases where an exposed baclony is above a non-balcony zone 97’ 1”

Window Fixed, double glazed fenestration in standard sizes to fit with the aluminum panel facade system

92’ 6”

90’ 0”

89’ 0”

Operable Window Allows for natural ventilation through residential units in summer months

83’ 8”

Prefab Balcony Insulator Rigid insulation and resteel system designed to prevent thermal bridging through concrete floor plates 80’ 0”

79’ 0” Balcony Resteel Provides additonal support for the cast-in-place balconies due to their custom insulation system

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Storeroom

Mechanical Room

Open To Below

Open To Below

Ark Office

Retail

Retail

DN DN

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DN Open To Below

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17.1 Lower Level Parking 1 1/16" = 1'-0"

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Open To Below

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Lobby Open To Below

Mechanical Room

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C

Upper Level Parking 1 1/16" = 1'-0"

1

Level 2 1/16" = 1'-0"


Elevator Penthouse

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Upper Level - North Tower 1/16" = 1'-0"

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Roof Plan - North Tower 1/16" = 1'-0"

Community Room

Elevator Penthouse

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Penthouse Level - Central Tower 1/16" = 1'-0"

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Roof Plan - Central Tower 1/16" = 1'-0"

Elevator Penthouse

Community Room

1

Level 3 1/16" = 1'-0"

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Penthouse Level - South Tower 1/16" = 1'-0"

3

Roof Plan - South Tower 1/16" = 1'-0"

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CADE DESIGN mponent organization and construction

N ganization and construction

component close-up

great views in all directions

component close-up

vertical louver wrap-around

breaks to give horizontality

louvre configuration combats solar elevation

rigid support aluminum tubing that prevents movement against wind loads and transfers load

facade surface aluminum paneling, three windows and a balcony wall mount system

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one-story module that hangs and ties the louvers to the facade


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East Liberty Street

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20

Ground Level 1/16" = 1'-0"

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A.1

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1 Front Deskk Crate & Barrel Office Lobbyy

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Rental Office

Mail

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7 South Main Street

Rental Office

Checkout

South Ashley Street

The Ashley Street frontage is primarily devoted to a large “destination� retail, such as Crate and Barrel in this case. This operation succeeds due to the large amount of foot and vehicular traffic moving on Ashley, and fills an existing gap in the Ann Arbor retail market. Adjacent to the larger retail store are three smaller local retail operations which benefit from Plaza frontage and high visibility from Ashley and Main St. Behind these stores is access to two levels of underground parking.

8 Lobbyy

9

Mail

Displayy

Retail

Retail

Retail

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11

12 Tickets

Retail

Retail

Bar

Green Room

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Men

292 Seats + Standing Room

Women

Stage

14 Kitchen

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Lobby

16 Retail

Live-Work

Front Desk

Rental Office

Live-Work

Live-Work

Live-Work

17 17.1

West William Street


East Liberty Street

A

A.1

B

C

D

E

1 Front Desk Crate & Barrel Office Lobby

2

Rental Office

Mail

3

4

5

6

7 South Ashley Street

South Main Street

Rental Office

Checkout

8 Lobby

9

Mail

Displayy

Retail

Retail

Retail

10

11

12 Tickets

Retail

Retail

Bar

Green Room

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Men

292 Seats + Standing Room

Women

Stage

14 Kitchen

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A civic plaza is designed to provide a new space for gatherings, celebrations,festivals, and everyday urban interactions. The various retail and entertainment attractions on this plaza are designed to serve as beacons to draw pedestrian traffic through the block from the successful Main Street corridor to the east. This connection is achieved through a storefrontcapped arcade, which features sidewalk dining and three retail tenants to maintain human scale throughout.

Lobby

16 Retail

Live-Work

Front Desk

Rental Office

Live-Work

Live-Work

Live-Work

17 17.1

West William Street

1

Ground Level 1/16" = 1'-0"

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Suspended sheetrock ceiling supported by a thin wooden structure gives height to the space

Curved walls and ceiling break conventional design of the double loaded corridor

Also allows for utilities to run through vertically and double as display pockets for the tenants

The inset light allows the source to remain hidden while spilling light along the entire ceiling

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Equinox

- 46° Solar Altitude Angle -100% Flat Plate Exposure - 90° Solar Incident Angle (Ideal)

Rooftop Mechanical Room Scenario

South Tower 111 4’x8’ Flat Plate Collectors 3,552 ft² Collection Area

Summer Solstice

- 72° Solar Altitude Angle -100% Flat Plate Exposure - 68° Solar Incident Angle

Winter Solstice

- 24° Solar Altitude Angle -100% Flat Plate Exposure - 116° Solar Incident Angle

North Tower 114 4’x8’ Flat Plate Collectors Central Tower 111 4’x8’ Flat Plate Collectors 3,648 ft² Collection Area 3,552 ft² Collection Area

Flat Plate Collecter Summary 336 4’x8’ Flat Plate Collectors 10,752 ft² Collection Area

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Level 3

Level 4

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Level 5

Level 6

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Level 7

Level 8

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Level 11

Level 12

Level 11

Level 12

Level 13

Level 14

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Ginsberg Center Function Through Opposition

type: Institutional Adaptive Reuse of Historic Farmhouse

size: 17,543 FT2 site: Ann Arbor, MI setting: Academic

Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning

skills: Historic Preservation


The Ginsberg Center is an 113 year old farmhouse on the main campus of the University of Michigan that currently houses the community service learning division. The house, while outdated and obviously originally designed for residential purposes, is still cherished by employees for its antiquated charm and unique character. Despite this, the organization has outgrown its cramped spaces, and is in pressing need of an expansion. Given the staff’s appreciation of their current location, they prefer to remain on the same site, as opposed to moving to an alternative location. My proposal seeks to create a workable and fruitful tension between the old space and the new, between an old guard and a younger staff of university student volunteers, all while preserving what is admired about the existing building.


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Perimeter

Scale

Proportion

Separate

Precedent

Partition

Pierce

Partition

Shape

Slice

Slide

Surround

Smooth

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function through opposition

0 ft

+2 ft

-4 ft

+8 ft

-8 ft

+4 ft

+4 ft

-9 ft

-12 ft

+0 ft

-6 ft +3 ft -12 ft

-9 ft

1,628 ft2

+6 ft

1,705 ft2 0 ft

0 ft

-5 ft

+8.5 ft

+2 ft

4,793 ft2

2,553 ft2

1/8” = 1’ Basement Plan

1/8” = 1’ Ground Floor Plan

Gallery Lobby/Entry Offices Student Project Space

Courtyard

Storage

Meeting Space

Meeting Space

Resource Library

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+17 ft

+15 ft

+12 ft

+20 ft

+20 ft

+16 ft

+12 ft

+24 ft +24 ft

+12 ft

+22 ft

+22 ft

1,174 ft2

1,680 ft2

+12 ft +22 ft

+8.5 ft

+12 ft

+28 ft

+24 ft

2,094 ft2

1,916 ft2

1/8” = 1’ Third Floor Plan

1/8” = 1’ Second Floor Plan

Student Project Space

Informal Gathering

Storage

Kitchen Offices Student Project Space

Student Project Space Offices

Informal Gathering Balcony

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1/4” = 1’

Longitudinal Section

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3x Density Steel Facade Grid

Mullion 1x Density Steel Facade Grid Dual Layer Glazing Handrail

Inset Accent Light Glazed Reveal Ramp Surface

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1/2” = 1’ Ramp + Facade Detail


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1/8” = 1’

Transverse Section

1/8” = 1’

Transverse Section

1/8” = 1’

Longitudinal Section

1/8” = 1’

Longitudinal Section

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HATCH BuildingHKSRenovation 2011 Detroit Design Fellowship

type: Non-Profit Adaptive Reuse of Civic Building into a Community Art Center

site: Hamtramck, MI size: 6,400 FT2 setting: Pro Bono Collaboration / Design Competition HATCH Artist’s Collaborative & HKS Inc.

skills: Community Charrette collaborators: Brian DuBois, Krista Wilson, Amy McNamara, Priya Iyer, Lamont Edwards


The HKS Detroit Design Fellowship is an invited panel of emerging architectural professionals who undertake a two-day design charrette concerning a community project which could benefit from design know-how. The 2011 Fellowship focused on assisting the HATCH Artist’s Collaborative in re-imagining their newly acquired studios in Hamtramck, MI. The organization’s primary objectives were to create usable studio space in this 60+ year old former police station in addition to sprucing up the front facade to better match their status as a community amenity. Our team of six architecture students proposed street front seating and modest, but effective, signage for the front of the building, while the interior would benefit from the removal of old, non loadbearing walls to create a more open and flexibly partitioned upper level as an artist’s studio.


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Tool Library / Artist Workspace

Office Kitchen

Gallery

Artist Showcase/ Portal

Gallery Education Station Darkroom Kiln Room

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Bathrooms Stair

Flex Studio Space

Gallery

Central Corridor Gallery

Stair

Flex Studio Space Artist Window Workstations Social Gathering Space Locker Room

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Advanced Material Studies Deployable Exhibition Stand | Structurally Optimized Chair

type: Research Product Design and Material Science

setting: Academic

Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning

skills: Ansys Structural Analysis collaborators: Doug Sharpe


Our design was inspired by the ability of pneumatic structure case studies to accomplish many architectural, structural, and aesthetic feats using a singular, uncomplicated system of inflatable tubes. This approach appealed to us due to its elegance; the structure wouldn’t require complicated sub-structures to handle secondary stresses because a pneumatic structure could be intelligently designed in such a way as to provide cover, support a roof, allow for transparent cladding, and create substantial rigidity and stability using a singular system. Furthermore, we were seeking a system that could be easily assembled and disassembled on a small site quickly (so as to not disturb neighboring traffic or businesses) while using a minimum amount of labor. Pneumatic structural ribs obtain their rigidity through forced air as opposed to rigid materiality such as metal arches, and are thus very light. Also, the blown air can inflate these tubes very rapidly to minimize construction time. It is our estimate that this pavilion could be assembled from scratch in under an hour, although with an experienced crew, the assembly time would likely be closer to 20 minutes or less. Disassembly would be similarly fast.

Pneumatic Arches PVC coated fabric tubes inflated to XXX psi Transparent Poly Panels

Rigid panels that clip into the tubes and provide cladding and stiffness

Steel Cables “Prestressed” due to arched inflated tubes Steel End Supports Hollow, elliptical, arched tube to accept tube ends

Ground Pins

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Structure is constrained to the ground at four corners to prevent uplift


11’ 6”

8’ 2”

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3

3

2

2 1

Unload Materials: 1) Pneumatic Tubes, 2) Transparent Panels, 3) Steel End Supports

1 Arrange Materials on Site: 1) Unroll pneumatic tubes, 2) Assemble rows of transparent panels, 3) Move steel end to proper distance.

Tensile Strength / Loading Test 60

Place two pneumatic tubes into slots located at the steel ends, then inflate tubes.


Place one of the transparent panels between the tubes and secure in place with clips.

Repeat the process of inserting the pneumatic tubes and inflating, while also attaching the transparent panels between the tubes.

The completed pavilion assembly.

The two primary elements of our design that needed to be optimized in terms of material selection were the fabric for the pneumatic tubes and the clear rigid cladding/support panels that are clipped between these tubes. The materials we pre-selected for the tubes due to their common use in pneumatic structures were PVC, PE, ETFE, and PTFE. We then analyzed these options for tensile strength (as the inflated fabric will ideally always be in pure tension, not compression), weight, and low eco-impact, specifically low production embodied energy. PE and PVC performed the best in both the Strength/ Density test as well as the Eco-Audits and Production Embodied Energy test. Of the two, we chose PE, due to the fact that it is lighter and performs slightly better in a 10-year lifetime eco-audit than PVC. PMMA and PS performed the best in both the Strength/ Density test as well as the Eco-Audits and Production Embodied Energy test. Of the two, we chose PMMA, due to the fact that it significantly stronger than PS, while still having a respectable eco-audit value. 61


Total Deformation Overall Deflection: 0.99 in (Limit 1”)

Max. Principal Stress (Tension) Aluminum: 5,281 psi (Limit 17,500 psi) Plywood: 561 psi (Limit 700 psi)

Min. Principal Stress (Compression) Aluminum: 9,482 psi (Limit 12,500 psi) Plywood: 424 psi (Limit 1,400 psi)

Back 1/4” curved, perforated plywood

Frame 1/16” thick aluminum, tapered and perforated side profile Seat 3/8” thick plywood

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FIG1_Tapered Frame

FIG2_Perforated Back

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FIG3_Profiled Seat


Taubman College Reading Room 2010 Graduating Class Design Competition | Finalists

type: Installation Reading Room Retrofit & Magazine Rack

site: Ann Arbor, MI size: 380 FT2 setting: Design Competition HRK Design

collaborators: Dennis Knoff & Ben Rambadt


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The Taubman College periodical rack serves as the focal point for everyday discussions of current architectural discourse and pedagogy. This modular, adaptable system allows for convenient access to the latest issues of architecture, planning and design periodicals. This system allows students and faculty to quickly scan the wall of magazines to observe current trends across multiple publications, while interested users can zoom in on a specific issue and use its hinged module as a convenient reading shelf. Each module features a wide metal band across its front face. This thin rib holds the most current issue of that module’s respective periodical, with the pages of the magazine split on either side of the metal. When the latest issue is checked out, back issues of the same publication will be exposed through an acrylic window. Removing the latest issue also exposes the title of the magazine that has been cut into the metal band.

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The arrangement of these individual magazine modules allows for the expansion of the College’s periodical collection, with the possibility of displaying up to 55 unique publications on one wall.


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Computer Workstation & Bench

Book and Journal Storage

Dual-ribbon plywood perimeter elevates to accommodate standing work

Integrated reading shelf and open book distribution

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Reading Bench

Magazine Rack

Dual-ribbon plywood perimeter descends to accommodate seating

Periodicals are stored in unique cells with innovative hinged mag-doors 73


inf端 home

Dow Chemical Design To Zero International Competition

type: Housing Triplex Unit | Net Zero Passive Design

size: 5,094 FT2 site: Detroit, MI setting: Design Competition

International, Peer-Reviewed Competition

skills: Passive House Design


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This design seeks to create a nearly “Net Zero” home where the energy demands of typical household are offset through two different, but equally critical elements: On-site energy generation and passive, architectural strategies that reduce the baseline load for the entire building. My approach is to tackle both of these elements, and use a combination of the two to completely offset the energy loads of a residential structure. Solar photovoltaic panels, angled at 45°, line the southern facade on both levels to generate electricity for the home in addition to charging two electric vehicles that are shared by the building’s residents. A balcony railing integrated solar hot water heating system reduces baseline load while a geothermal system harnesses local ground heat to offset heating loads.

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1 - Bar Optimal Solar Form 2 - Twist Match Site Condition 3 - Orient Maximize Southern Exposure 4 - Mold Meet Corner Street Frontage 5 - Punch Hollow Out Carports 6 - Pull Up Raise Central Mass For Clerestory 7 - Pull Out Cantilever Living Spaces 8 - Cut Carve Out Balcony Space 9 - Final Ideal Passive House

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6 Person Dwelling Unit 2,806 FT2

2 Person Dwelling Unit 1,014 FT2

4 Person Dwelling Unit 1,274 FT2 83


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High Albedo Roof | A good example of the trade-offs common in sustainable design. While green roofs have many advantages for buildings in terms of water retention and insulation, they can also be heavy and expensive. A simple light-colored roof, which has high reflectivity or “albedo�, effectively prevents urban heat island effect at low-cost.

Window/Wall Ratio| Ann Arbor is in the Northern hemispere, and so Southern exposure is desirable for capturing solar energy, but glazing on the Northern facade can be a liability due to excess heat loss during winter months. Therefore, this design has a window-to-wall area ratio of 60% on the South facade, and only 15% on the North facade.

Optimized Massing | The design captures as much solar energy as possible with an East-West oriented longitudinal axis

Solar Shading| Horizontal shading louvers on the South, along with vertical louvers on the East and West, prevent excess solar heat gain, which reduces the overall cooling load during summer months 86


summer solstice morning

equinox morning

winter solstice morning

summer solstice noon

equinox noon

winter solstice noon

summer solstice evening

equinox evening

winter solstice evening

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Holland Civic Center Municipal Convention Hall Redesign

type: Public - New Construction Civic Center and Cycling Transit Hub

site: Holland, MI size: 89,300 FT2 setting: Academic

Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning

skills: Transit Oriented Development


Existing Civic Center

Holland Farmer’s Market

Proposed Convention Center

The new Holland Civic Center needed to accommodate the existing demands of a vibrant weekly farmer’s market and the city’s popular annual tulip festival, while also accommodating new programs that would occupy the space on a more regular basis. This proposed strategy of dual convention halls allows for maximum additional flexibility while still accommodating the existing programmatic demands of the Civic Center. A sunken athletic hall is sized for two regulation basketball courts which can also accommodate concerts and town hall meetings. The concourse hall along 8th Street is supported with a visually exciting branching structure that occupies a minimum amount of floorspace and allows for maximum flexibility. Wide market-style doors on the north side allows this space to be opened up to allow the Farmer’s market inside. Community Meeting space is available in the upper level mezzanines.


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Project Location Pine Ave

River Ave

Business District College Ave Central Ave

Site Aerial | Downtown Holland, MI

Civic Center | Existing Conditions

Farmers Market| Existing Conditions

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Green Roof Cyclist Ramp

1/32” = 1’

Second Level Plan

Concourse

Cycling Transit Station Upper Level Gym Seating Gym Lobby and Ticketing Pine Avenue Plaza

1/32” = 1’

Ground Level Plan

Retractable Seating Below-grade Basketball Court

1/32” = 1’

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Basement Level Plan


Meeting Rooms Mezzanine Triple Height Concourse

1/32” = 1’

evel

Level

Third Level Plan

Mezzanine Cafe

Cyclist Bridge

Green Roof Cyclist Ramp

1/32” = 1’

Second Level Plan

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The 8th Street and Pine Avenue siting for the new Civic Center allowed for an interesting duality between the opposed facades of the east-west oriented concourse. The Pine Avenue facade faces the farmer’s market to the north, and will be a key urban edge for pedestrians walking from Holland’s downtown to the waterfront. To maintain this edge in a visually striking, yet appropriate manner, the north facade leverages the brick material typology of downtown to take on a more illustrative effect. Nine brick textures are arranged in a pixilated fashion to create patterns seen from across the street in the market, while the facade itself is parametrically varied to undulate out where program is located in the interior. The south faced is completely glazed to allow for a brilliantly lit interior concourse for conventions and events. Three longitudinal facade panels are staggered horizontally, which in combination with the mullions that mirror the structural pattern, reduce summer heat gain while allowing indirect illumination.

Job Fair

Railroad Convention

Farmers Market

Car Show

Basketball Game

Concert

Town Hall Meeting

Basketball Practice

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Portfolio  

Architectural Design Portfolio