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Sixth Form Courses September 2013


Contents 1. An introduction to the Sixth Form Curriculum 2. Key Dates 3. The International Baccalaureate !

What is the IB Diploma?

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The IB and A Levels compared

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Making subject choices for the IB

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IB options form

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Subject details for the IB These can be found on the School web site and collected from individual subjects at the Open Evening

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Details of the core Creativity Action and Service The Theory of Knowledge The Extended Essay

4. A Levels and Applied A Levels !

Introduction to A levels

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Subject choices and option forms

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Subject details for A Levels These can be found on the School web site and collected from individual subjects at the Open Evening

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1. An introduction to the Sixth Form Curriculum The purpose of this information booklet is to provide you with an introduction to the courses and the process of making choices for the Sixth Form. We have increased the range of courses on offer in the Sixth Form at Kent College. In addition to A Level and Applied A Level courses Kent College is an IB World School and offers the International Baccalaureate. This highly regarded and internationally recognised course is an exciting addition to the existing high quality options available through our A Levels and Applied A levels. We received the first set of results for the IB Diploma this summer with the first group of students graduating with an average point score of 37.5 points, this put us 10th in the UK for all IB schools. Deciding which course is most appropriate can be a difficult process. To make this easier we are providing information in a number of ways this year. All the course details for both the IB and A levels are available on the school web site along with copies of this document and forms. The Sixth Form Open Evening provides a valuable opportunity to discuss the alternatives with subject staff and senior members of staff. In addition we are happy to meet with individuals, parents and guardians to discuss this further. The Head Master will also be interviewing all year 11 and prospective Sixth Form students to discuss their choices with them. Bespoke individual timetables We aim to be as flexible as possible when constructing the timetable for students and it may be possible to accommodate other subjects or combinations of subjects than those in this information booklet. If there are any courses or combinations that are not included here then do contact the Learning Strategies Coordinator (Mrs Glass) who will be able to check availability. It is sometimes possible to create bespoke programmes for individuals. Wherever possible we will strive to satisfy individual choices and requirements in terms of choices and patterns of study. Should you require further information about any of our courses then do not hesitate to contact the school directly and we will be happy to arrange a meeting to discuss this with you. Mr Graham Letley, Director of Studies

gletley@kentcollege.co.uk

Mr John Burnage, Head of Sixth Form

jburnage@kentcollege.co.uk

Mrs C Balsdon, Assistant Head of Sixth Form

cbalsdon@kentcollege.co.uk

Mrs J Glass, Learning Strategies Coordinator

jglass@kentcollege.co.uk

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2. Key Dates November 2012 Sixth Form Open Evening GCSE Mock Examinations January 2013 Year 11 Parents’ Evening January – Early February Ongoing discussions re choices February 8th 2013 IB and A Level choices made Second half of Spring Term 2013 Further discussion concerning choices Summer Term 2013 Choices confirmed with students May – June 2013 GCSE Examinations June – July 2013 Preparatory work for IB and A Levels August 2013 GCSE Results and final course confirmation for the Sixth Form September 2013 Sixth Form induction and courses start

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3. The International Baccalaureate (IB) The International Baccalaureate (IB) is an international examination of high academic standing throughout the world. The IB is very well established throughout the world and has seen significant expansion in the UK in recent years. It is recognised by all UK universities and is highly regarded internationally. The Diploma offers a breadth and range of skills that are sought after by employers and higher education alike. We strongly believe the IB offers an excellent preparation for higher education and employment in an international and competitive environment. Whilst the IB might not suit every student we recommend that all our potential Sixth Form students consider this option carefully given the breadth and diverse range of sills offered through the Diploma. The Diploma will suit those students that are hardworking, well organised and have a genuine curiosity for the subjects they wish to study. Our first cohort of IB students graduated this summer with an average point score of 37.5 points which places us 10th in the UK for all IB schools. This year we are offering an IB Scholarship worth 50% of tuition fees, the details of this can be obtained from Mr Letley, applications for this must be submitted by 8th February. The Diploma consists of six subject groups: Group 1 English Literature (or other first language literature) Group 2 Second language studied as a language course, a beginners course is available Group 3 Science Group 4 Maths, one of three levels chosen including Maths studies which is only a little more demanding than GCSE. Group 5 The Humanities Group 6 The Arts Three subjects are studied at Higher Level and three at Standard Level. There will be a number of different subjects within each of the groups and there is the possibility of studying more than one subject from groups 15. In addition to the subjects studied there is also a compulsory core that comprises three elements: An Extended Essay (an independent research paper on a topic of their choice) Theory of Knowledge (a course in critical thinking) CAS (a programme of Creativity, Action and Service) At Kent College, the extra-curricular programme is extensive and we are pleased with this formal recognition of achievement. Progression into the second year of the IB Diploma is not automatic. Students will be expected to perform well in the internal examinations and assessments during Year 12. Any student not achieving level 4s by the end of Year 12 may not be allowed to progress into the second year, the final decision will be made by the Director of Studies.

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The IB and A Levels compared Questions What is the difference between A Level and IB?

A Level For A Level most students study 4 or 5 AS Levels in year 12, reducing to 3 or 4 in year 13.

How do the examinations work?

The AS units are examined during year 12 and the A2 units at the end of year 13 year. AS plus A2 units make up a full A Level in each subject. Some subjects have coursework. Is there an element of The A Level pathway allows students a free compulsion in each route? choice of subjects, although students will be guided as to the sensible combinations of subjects appropriate to their proposed university studies. How do universities regard A Level and IB?

Are both pathways suitable for courses such as Medicine?

What about grading?

Universities are very familiar with the A Level. University offers are normally based on 3 subjects and typical offers from prestigious universities are in the range AAA to ABB, the A* (90% in the second year) will also be used. Some universities make offers based on points rather than grades, the UCAS web site explains this. A Level candidates are expected to have studied Chemistry and a second Science subject or Mathematics to A2 Level, and Biology at least to AS Level. Some medical schools like a subject outside the sciences as the remaining subject. The A Level is marked on an alpha scale, A*,A,B,C etc. The overall A Level grade in each subject is based on the marks from the AS and A2 units. An A* grade is awarded at A Level where 90% must be achieved as A2 and an A overall. Universities may use the A* grade in making their conditional offers to students.

IB Diploma Students will study 6 subjects over the two sixth form years, 3 at Higher Level and 3 at Standard Level. In addition, each student will complete an Extended Essay, a Theory of Knowledge course (TOK) and the CAS programme. (Creativity, Action and Service) The IB Diploma is examined at the end of year 13 year. There are no public examinations in year 12, although there will be elements of coursework to complete. High levels of continuity as there are no module examinations. The IB Diploma students study English, a second language, a Humanity or Social Science, a Science, a Maths course and either a Creative Art or a second subject from one of the previous groups. You may choose whether to study a subject at Higher or Standard Level (there are 3 separate Maths courses to suit all candidates) Higher Level courses can be thought of as similar to A Level. Universities have become familiar with the IB and offers from good universities will be in the range of 32-40 points. Offers may stipulate a 6 or a 7 in the subject to be studied at university.

IB candidates are expected to have studied Chemistry and Biology at Higher Level (although Maths Higher Level is also acceptable). The breadth of the IB means all students can offer a Humanity and Languages as well as their Science subjects. The IB Diploma is marked on a numeric scale. The maximum mark for each subject is 7, leading to a total of 42 points for the six subjects. 3 additional points are available for the core (Extended Essay & TOK) The maximum possible Diploma score is 45 points.


Continued! Questions Will the A Level and IB students be taught together? Will I have time for extracurricular activities? What are the advantages/ disadvantages of each programme?

Who would be best suited to the course?

The IB and A Levels compared A Level A Level students will normally be taught separately from IB.

IB Diploma IB students will normally be taught separately from A Level.

A wide range of extra-curricular activities is offered across the sixth form and all students are encouraged to take part. Students have a freer choice of subjects, but have 2 years of public examinations. Universities can find it harder to differentiate between students because 26 % of all students gain an A. (2008 stats.) It is estimated that nationally 6-8% of students will achieve the new A* grade this will increasingly be used by universities. Students who have a very good idea of the subjects they want to study beyond GCSE and possibly at university. They do not want to continue with many of the subjects studied at GCSE. They will be hardworking, well motivated and organised.

A wide range of extra-curricular activities is offered across the sixth form and students’ involvement in these activities can count towards their IB Diploma, through the CAS programme. Students have a more prescribed range of subjects, although there is flexibility within the options for each subject. Students only have one set of public examinations, at the end of year 13. Universities find it easier to differentiate between students, therefore offers can be favourable.

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Students that want to study a broader range of subjects thus keeping their options open for university / careers. They want to undertake some independent research and report writing through the Extended Essay, they want formal recognition for their extra curricular activities through CAS and would enjoy the challenge posed by TOK where they will think and write critically about aspects of knowledge and it’s acquisition. They are hardworking, motivated and well organised.


Making subject choices for the IB The full details of all the subjects / courses being offered in the IB can be found on the school web site and will be available on the Sixth Form Open Evening. We have arranged the subjects on offer into provisional blocks from which choices can be made, these can be seen on the following page. Unless otherwise stated all subjects are available at both Standard and Higher Level. All IB students will have to make sure they : •

Have 3 Higher and 3 Standard Level subjects

Have chosen one subject from each of the blocks seen on the next page.

Make it clear which level Maths and which level Language course they wish to follow on the options form

If there is a particular combination of subjects that is not possible with the blocks arranged as they are then this should be discussed with Mr Letley. It may be possible to move some subjects around to satisfy individual preferences. The choice of Higher Level subjects, mostly equivalent to A levels, is clearly very important and this will depend upon an individual’s strengths and future interests in terms of possible university courses. A minimum of a GCSE grade B would normally be expected in a subject before studying it at Higher Level in the IB or similar grades in related subjects where the subject has not been studied at A level. Students must discuss their suitability for particular subjects with the relevant Head of Department prior to filling in the options form as requirements for different subjects will vary. The UCAS web site, http://www.ucas.ac.uk/ , provides some guidance about what subjects to study at Higher Level for particular degree courses. The options form for IB must be returned to Mr Letley by February 8th 2013. We will endeavour to satisfy individual choices but this will depend on timetabling constraints and the level of demand for subjects. We will confirm the position with students and keep them informed of any changes that may be needed.


Subjects on offer in the International Baccalaureate All subjects are offered at Higher and Standard Level unless stated otherwise Block 1 Literature

Subjects English and World literature or other first language literature courses TBC

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Spanish1 German1 German Language and Literature ( native speakers of German only ) English1 ( for those studying literature in a language other than English in block 1)

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History Geography ( SL only ) Business and Management

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Physics Biology

5 Maths 6

Art Maths, Maths can be studied at three levels: Maths Studies which counts as Standard Level, Standard Level and Higher Level. Anyone considering Higher Level Maths must discuss this with the Head of Maths. Economics Chemistry Film French1

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Group 2 languages may be studied at three levels: ab initio or beginners level which counts as Standard Level, Standard Level and Higher Level.

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Subject choices form for the IB Complete this form by Friday February 8th 2013, make sure that you hand it in to Mr Letley by then.

Checklist before handing in this form

Name: ________________________________ Form:_________

1. Have you included one Maths course making it clear which of the three courses it is? 2. Have you included at least one language and made it clear at what level, again remember there are three possible levels. 3. Have you selected three Standard or equivalent subjects? 4. Have you selected three Higher level subjects, remember it is worth discussing with the relevant Head of Department your suitability for Higher level courses. 5. Have you chosen only one subject from each block? 6. Have you included a couple of reserve subjects? 7. Is there a combination that you would like to do but do not seem able to do ? – check with Mr Letley. Remember it may not be possible to satisfy every combination of subjects, we will let you know if you need to modify your choice.

My three Higher Level subjects are: 1. ______________________________ 2. ______________________________ 3. ______________________________ My three Standard Level subjects are: 1. _____________________________ 2. _____________________________ 3. _____________________________ My reserve higher level subject is: _______________________________ My reserve standard level subject is: _______________________________

List any university courses or jobs / careers that you might be considering: ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________ Student’s signature: _______________________ Date: ________________ Parent’s signature: _________________________ Date : ________________

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Individual Subject details for the IB Art The Visual Arts course will allow all individuals the opportunity to develop artistically. It would suit all pupils who gained enjoyment from the freedom offered by the GCSE Art and Design course. Pupils who have not previously studied Art are welcome but should consult with the Head of Art before making their final choice. Both the IB Standard and Higher Levels for Art and Design have two main elements; Practical studio work and an Investigation Workbook. Studio Work (60%) The course is structured to ensure that an exciting and balanced programme is followed in which students are allowed a large amount of freedom. Each individual student is actively encouraged to undertake work which reflects their own interests. Students may use any medium of their choice to produce work but should have utilised several by the end of the course. Investigation Workbook (40%) The Investigation Workbook is an essential aspect of the IB Visual Arts programme and takes the form of a sketchbook and a notebook combined. It is used as a central element of the student’s work developing different practical ideas and relating these to aspects of Art history, theory and the Art of other cultures. Assessment At the end of the course there is no formal examination. Students will mount an exhibition of their work backed up by their Investigation Workbooks, illustrating each individual’s creative development over the two year period. The Investigation Workbook is assessed internally and moderated by the senior examinations team in Cardiff . The studio work is not assessed internally but by a visiting Examiner who interviews each candidate informally about their work. This is then further moderated by the Senior Examiners in Cardiff . Course requirements / Who is the course intended for? Pupils who have taken Design Technology at GCSE and would like to continue their studies in a creative sphere are also encouraged to pursue this option. However, it must be noted that this is a course with an Art, rather than a design bias and pupils considering this route should contact the Head of Art to discuss how this might affect them. Head of Department: Mrs M Montague

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Biology Standard Level Biology includes the following topics: Topic 2 – Cells

12hrs – Cell structure and ultrastructure. Practical element to include preparation of slides and use of light microscopes. Substantial practical element to investigate transport across membranes.

Topic 3 The chemistry of life 15hrs – Water, Carbohydrates, Proteins, and Fats Wide range of practical work to investigate properties of biological molecules specially enzymes. Separation of photosynthetic pigments from leaf extract and assessment of absorption of different wavelengths. Topic 4 Genetics

15hrs – Chromosomes and genes DNA electrophoresis - practical demonstration or individual practical work.

Topic 5 Ecology and evolution 16hrs – Involves practical work on the school farm. Substantial practical element using the school’s own farm and conservation areas Option G Ecology and conservation 15hrs Substantial practical element using the school’s own farm and conservation areas. Range of sampling techniques to measure population size and measurement of Simpson’s index. Topic 6 Human Health and physiology 20hrs – A study of the organ systems in Humans. Use of interactive powerpoint presentations written by pupils themselves Practical demonstration of need to digest large molecules before absorption. Use of data logging and spirometers to measure breathing rate / tidal volume / etc. Option F Microbes and biotechnology SL 15hrs Measurement of nutrient levels in local water courses in relation to sewage works. Measurement of population growth in aerobic and aerobic conditions. Use of aseptic technique in plating bacterial cultures and investigating the effect of antiseptics and antibiotics. The Higher level course includes all the standard level topics but extends certain areas with the following topics: (The topics have been placed in the sequence they will be taught so that they link clearly with Standard level topics.) Topic 9 Plant science 11hrs – Plant transport and plant development. Practical work to involve the use of light microscopes, experiments using auxins and the study of transpiration using a simple potometer. Topic 7 Nucleic Acids and proteins 11hrs – The structure of genetic material. Practical element to include demonstrations of enzyme inhibition in action.

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Topic 10 Genetics

6hrs – Understanding Inheritance. Modelling genetic crosses using beads.

Option G Ecology and conservation HL 22hrs Substantial practical element using the school’s own farm and conservation areas. Range of sampling techniques to measure population size and measurement of Simpson’s index. Topic 11 Human Health and physiology 17hrs Pupils writing interactive powerpoint presentations to explain defence against disease. Practical measurement of muscle power using weights and lever theory. Topic 8 Cell respiration and photosynthesis 10hr – The biochemistry of life processes. Practical element to include use of respirometers and photosynthometers to study the effect of limiting factors. Internally assessed work. The Course involves a substantial amount of practical investigative work. This is part of the internal assessment. In addition there is a Group Four Investigation. This involves working as part of a small group investigating a selected problem from the Biological viewpoint. Head of Department: Mr F Sochacki

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Business and Management Topics: Business organisation & environment Human Resources Accounts and Finance

Marketing Operations management Business Strategy (HL only)

Business and management is a study of the different ways in which individuals and groups interact in a vibrant business environment. It is an academic regulation that examines how business decisions are made and how these decisions affect the internal and external environments. The IBO Business and Management programme is designed to give students an understanding of business principles, practices and skills. Emphasis is also placed on understanding technical innovation and day-to-day business functions of marketing, human resource management and finance. However, a fundamental feature of the programme is the concept of synergy. In its technical sense, it is a concept that means an organization should seek an overall return greater than the sum of its parts. Applied to the Business and Management programme, it necessitates a style of teaching and learning based on integrating and linking the various modules to give students, by the end of the course, a holistic overview. This is particularly emphasised in Higher Level, with the extra Topic 6, which requires a strategic understanding of business decisions. Kent College has a diverse international community, which is a significant strength in this department, as students are able to share their own different cultural references, particularly in areas such as advertising and fashion trends, which greatly adds to all the students’ appreciation of business and its operation in different countries. The variety and diversity of the business environment will be examined through a wide range of case study material, visits to local and national businesses, and one international residential trip, designed to foster a broader understanding of business operations in a different cultural context (2010 Berlin; 2011 Barcelona). Students will be given the opportunity to present work in PowerPoint format at different stages, as well as carry out independent research for essay topics, encouraging independent learning. In addition to formal classroom time and the visits and trips, students are also encouraged to participate in the Young Enterprise programme. This programme enables students to put into practice concepts learned in class, and to experience first hand the highs and lows of business decision-making. It also facilitates team building, improves communication skills and encourages integration in our sixth form community. Assessment: A variety of assessment methods will be used during the course. Continual formative assessment will occur through the school’s own grading and reporting system, with target reviews and opportunities for both teacher and student reflection on progress. There will be an internal exam at the end of Year 12, as well as a mock IB exam in Year 13. Smaller topic tests/peer assessed presentations will also be used. Two written exam papers, the first being based around a pre-researched case study and an Internal Written Assignment make up the final assessment. Head of Department: Mr S James

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Chemistry The course specification is designed to enable candidates • • • • • • • • •

To generate understanding of the broad scope of Chemistry in the development of universal principles and life concepts; To develop essential knowledge and understanding of the concepts of Chemistry, and the skills needed for the use of these in new and changing situations; To develop an understanding of the link between theory and experiment; To sustain and develop their enjoyment of and interest in Chemistry; To recognise the value of Chemistry to society and how it may be used responsibly; To learn the pan-global nature of this science, in terms of both underlying fundamentals and the international nature of its study, through research and group interaction. To prepare the necessary skills to promote further study in Chemistry and related areas. To develop a broad based knowledge of the principles and applications of Chemistry to a high level consonant with university entrance or equivalent standard. To embrace the moral framework of science, understanding that scientific development can be limited by social, political and personal agendas.

Basic Structure of the Course: The Standard Level (SL) course comprises a core of eleven topics (80 hours) plus two additional option topics chosen from a suite of seven possibilities (30 hours). The Higher Level (HL) course incorporates this core material in addition to a further nine Additional HL (AHL) topics (55 hrs) and extensions to the option topics (15 hrs). The AHL topics expand on the content and scope of the core material.

Course content Core Material (SL + HL) Topic (Weeks)

Additional Higher Level Material (AHL) Hours

Year 1 Additional Material (Weeks)

1. Quantitative Chemistry. 12.5 (5) Formulae, equations & Mole Concept 2. Atomic Structure. 4 (1.5) The Atom: Nuclear structure & Electronic Configuration 3. Periodicity. 6 (2.5) The period table; variation in physical & chemical properties of the elements 4. Bonding & Structure. 12.5 (5) Ionic, covalent & metallic bonding GI, GM, GC & SC structures & properties 5. Energetics. 8 (3) Exo- & endothermic reactions, Hess’ Law & enthalpy calculations.

Hours

1. N/A 2. Quantum chemistry & ionisation energies 3 (1) 3. Periodicity of oxides & chlorides & (1.5) characteristics of the transition metals

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4. Hybridisation & shapes of molecules 5 (2) 5. Enthalpy of formation & combustion, (3) Born-Haber cycle, entropy

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6. Rate constants, mechanism &

6

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6. Kinetics. (2) Rates of reaction & collision theory

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(2.5) activation energy

Year 2 7. Equilibrium. 5 (2) Dynamic equilibrium; position of equilibrium & yield. Le Chatelier principle and the equilibrium constant. 8. Acids & Bases. 6 (2.5) Bronstead-Lowry & Lewis acid-base theories, strong & weak acids & the pH scale. 9. REDOX & Electrolysis. 7 (3) Oxidation & reduction, redox equations, Voltaic & electrolytic cells. 10. Organic Chemistry. 12 (5) Alkanes, alkenes, halogenoalkanes & alcohols. reaction pathways 11. Measurement & Data Processing. 2 (1) Uncertainties, errors & graphs. Total (32)

7. Liquid & vapor equilibria & (1.5) determination of Kc 8. Equilibrium constants, Ka, Kb & Kw. (4) Buffers, titration & indicators

4

10

9. Standard electrode potentials & cell 5 (2) potentials 10. Nucleophilic substitution & elimination. (4) Stereoisomerism.

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11. N/A

80 55 (22)

Whilst the core and additional syllabuses provide the comprehensive detail to enable full understanding of the principles and applications of chemistry, additional material will be covered which broadens the scope and content of the subject and provides a link with higher level study. Additional topics include: Atomic & molecular orbital theory, periodic table, electronic configuration, oxidation number & formulae, organic reaction mechanisms, biochemistry extensions & spectroscopy. Options Whist there are seven possible option topics, the facilities and resources available, together with the inherent teaching expertise and interests enable a sensible choice of two from four of the options. Option Core (SL + HL) Hours Extension (HL only) Hours B. Biochemistry The principle nutrient 15 Enzymes, nucleic acids & 7 groups respiration D. Medicines & The principle categories 15 Drug delivery & abuse 7 Drugs of drugs & medicines E. Environmental The principle 15 Advanced understanding of 7 Chemistry environmental factors & environmental effects pollution G. Further Additional mechanisms, 15 Advanced mechanism & reaction 7 Organic arenes and pathways Chemistry organometallic chemistry Total B or D + E or G 30(12 Add SL+HL to Extension hours 30+14 ) (12+6)

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Practical Chemistry Whilst there is no specific minimum requirement, there will be a heavy emphasis on the practical and research aspects to the subject. The components detailed above contain significant practical components and these will be complemented by and subsumed into larger, broader scope investigations, involving synoptic synthesis of material from different syllabus areas. In addition, further broadening of student intellect and skills is provided by the group 4 project in probable collaboration with physics, biology, mathematics and other relevant departments. Total Hours Investigations Group 4 Project

Core (SL + HL) 30 (12) 10 (4)

Extension (HL only) 30 + 20 (12 +8) 10 (4)

At Kent College the course is strongly practically oriented with a sound emphasis on traditional broad-based theory in order to develop the above skills; it is presented in an exciting and innovative fashion. Both external and research components will be an essential feature of the course, including work at local Universities. Assessment All students will be regularly assessed throughout the course using a range of methods including summative assessment and formative assessments. The students will be assessed following the school reporting and assessment schedule. Written reports are issued twice a year with target setting and goals fundamental to this, indicative grades and target grades are also included for units of work. Each year there are discussions with parents concerning progress and achievement. Every half term grades are also issued to help track progress and inform development targets for individuals through tutor discussions and individual teaching staff. The framework for internal assessment is based on the investigation and project work, which will have components of both a prescriptive and student generated nature. During the course there will be mock examinations and tests used to help provide indicative grades and formative feedback for development. These will be based on past papers and sample papers from the IB and the relevant mark schemes will be used. Students will receive specific training on how to use these mark schemes themselves to self assess and peer asses in order to develop a greater understanding of the various assessment criteria and assessment objectives. Assessment Summary Continued overleaf

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Standard Level

Higher Level

Written examinations (Total 3 hours, 76%)

Written examinations (Total 4! hours, 76%)

Paper 1 (" hour, 20%)

Paper 1 (1 hour, 20%) –Core + 50% AHL

Multiple choice questions based on core

Multiple choice questions based on core and AHL material

Paper 2 (1# hours, 32%)

Paper 2 (2# hours, 36%) Core + 50% AHL

Section A (16%) One data-based question and several short answer questions based on the core (compulsory). Section B (16%) One extended response question based on core (option of one out of three questions)

Section A (18%) One data-based question and several short answer questions based on the core (compulsory). Section B (18%) Two extended response question based on core and AHL (option of two out of four questions)

Paper 3 (1 hour, 24%) Options

Paper 3 (1# hour, 20%) Options

Internal Assessment (Coursework) This is worth 24% of the total mark at both levels and is based on investigation and project work as detailed in the topic content.

Course Requirements GCSE OCR Gateway Chemistry or Science at minimum grade C is essential (or AQA, Excel or overseas equivalent). Career and Further Education Implications The broad-based knowledge and understanding imparted by the course will provide a good grounding for any career in any technical area, especially the Sciences, but will also be applicable to other degrees, including Law, Engineering, Sports Science, Psychology etc. The qualification will be particularly appropriate for such degree courses as Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Natural Sciences and Human Sciences, and will be especially adapted to provide a solid foundation for Medicine, Veterinary Science, Pharmacology, Forensic Science and related areas. Head of Department: Mr S Fell

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Economics Economics is in group 3 of the IB diploma, subjects concerned with individuals and societies. As a dynamic social science, Economics deals with the concept of scarcity and the allocation of resources. Using theory as the framework for analysis and evaluation of economic issues and events, the course is a blend of theory and application and acknowledges the interrelationships with other areas of study such as history, geography, psychology, sociology, political studies and so on. The course enables students to embrace the standard methodology of Economics. This involves a progression from problem identification, through to hypothesis formulation and testing, arriving finally at a conclusion. By distinguishing between positive (= True/False) statements and normative (=Right/Wrong) issues, students of Economics should develop a logical and sophisticated approach to understanding and commenting on central questions. In addition to the aims of all subjects in group 3, the aims of the Economics course at higher and standard level are to: • develop an understanding of microeconomic and macroeconomic theories and concepts and their realworld application • develop an appreciation of the impact of individuals and societies of economic interactions between nations • develop an awareness of development issues facing nations as they undergo the process of change. These aims, if fulfilled, will produce intellectually curious students whose judgments, skills, ethical awareness, decision-making and self-awareness all conform to the desired outcomes listed under the Learner Profile of the IB. Course Content The Foundations of Economics Section 1: Microeconomics Competitive Markets: Demand and Supply, Elasticity, Government Intervention, Market Failure, Theory of the Firm (Higher Level only) Section 2: Macroeconomics Economic Activity, Aggregate Demand and Aggregate Supply, Macroeconomic Objectives, Fiscal Policy, Monetary Policy, Supply-side Policies Section 3: International Economics International Trade, Exchange Rates, The Balance of Payments, Economic Integration, Terms of Trade (Higher Level only) Section 5: Development Economics Economic Development, Measuring Development, The Role of Domestic Factors, The Role of International Trade, The Role of Foreign Direct Investment, The Roles of Foreign Aid and Multilateral Development Assistance, The Role of International Debt, The Balance Between Markets and Intervention Economics SL External assessment (3 hours) 80% Paper 1 (1 hour and 30 minutes) 40% An extended response paper (50 marks) Assessment objectives 1, 2, 3, 4 Section A

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Syllabus content: section 1—microeconomics Students answer one question from a choice of two. (25 marks) Section B Syllabus content: section 2—macroeconomics Students answer one question from a choice of two. (25 marks) Paper 2 (1 hour and 30 minutes) 40% A data response paper (40 marks) Assessment objectives 1, 2, 3, 4 Section A Syllabus content: section 3—international economics Students answer one question from a choice of two. (20 marks) Section B Syllabus content: section 4—development economics Students answer one question from a choice of two. (20 marks) Internal assessment (20 teaching hours) 20% This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course. Students produce a portfolio of three commentaries, based on different sections of the syllabus and on published extracts from the news media. Maximum 750 words x 3 (45 marks) Economics HL External assessment (4 hours) 80% Paper 1 (1 hour and 30 minutes) 30% An extended response paper (50 marks) Assessment objectives 1, 2, 3, 4 Section A Syllabus content: section 1—microeconomics Students answer one question from a choice of two. (25 marks) Section B Syllabus content: section 2—macroeconomics Students answer one question from a choice of two. (25 marks) Paper 2 (1 hour and 30 minutes) 30% A data response paper (40 marks) Assessment objectives 1, 2, 3, 4 Section A Syllabus content: section 3—international economics Students answer one question from a choice of two. (20 marks) Section B Syllabus content: section 4—development economics Students answer one question from a choice of two. (20 marks) Paper 3 (1 hour) 20% HL extension paper (50 marks) Assessment objectives 1, 2 and 4 Syllabus content, including HL extension material: sections 1 to 4—microeconomics, macroeconomics, international economics, development economics Students answer two questions from a choice of three. (25 marks per question) Internal assessment (20 teaching hours) 20%

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This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course. Students produce a portfolio of three commentaries, based on different sections of the syllabus and on published extracts from the news media. Maximum 750 words x 3 (45 marks) Internationalism in Economics As an international qualification, it is important that teaching of Economics for IB considers theories, ideas and events from the points of view of different individuals, nations and cultures in the global economy. Even if students' experiences are largely based in the UK, they will be encouraged to appreciate the nature and scope of the subject in the abstract and its applications to the global economy. Theory of Knowledge Economics contributes to this element of the course through its status as a highly developed and sophisticated social science, using scientific and (where appropriate) mathematical techniques to study human societies where behaviour is ultimately unpredictable and uncertain. Extended Essay Possible topics might include 1.To what extent has bus deregulation in Canterbury been a success?. 2.How does the rise in excise duty affect the demand of Shepherd Neame beer in Kent? 3.To what extent is the Indian restaurant market in Whitstable monopolistically competitive? Teacher in charge of Economics: Mr A Dean

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English A1 The IB English A1 course (a Literature course) aims to build on and develop the skills acquired during GCSE English Literature. These aims of the English A1 course are to provide a rigorous and challenging study of English literature and its place within World literature. The literature studied will enable students to recognize, appreciate and understand common themes and literary styles and practices that underpin literature across continents and traditions. The nature of the course and the style of teaching will place great emphasis on developing students as independent learners who take an increasing responsibility for their own learning, and the course will strive to develop students as critical thinkers who are adept and confident in promoting their own ideas, but also responding to those of others. English A1 can be studied at Higher Level (HL) or Standard Level (SL) (see information below for course outlines). A ‘core’ syllabus is followed by both the Standard and Higher Levels, with the Higher Level students covering further material/texts in their additional teaching time. Our entry requirements are 2 Grade Bs at GCSE in English Literature and English Language. The course will be taught by two teachers. Differences between the IB and A Level English Literature: Unlike A Level English Literature, which focuses on the study of Literature written in the English language, the IB English A1 course also includes the study of World Literature texts (texts originally written in a foreign language but studied in translation.) Another major difference between the two qualifications is that for the IB, students are assessed through coursework and examination (as with the A Level) and through an oral presentation (unlike A Level.) Finally, the IB is not modular and students will sit one examination at the end of their second year of study. Course outline: World Literature – 3 texts studied (HL and SL). Assessed by coursework essay. (1essay SL, 2 essays HL) Texts will include: Thomas Mann – Death in Venice; Gustav Flaubert – Madame Bovary; Sophocles – Oedipus Rex Detailed Study – 4 texts studied (HL) / 2 texts (SL). Assessed by 1 oral presentation (about15 minutes in length.) Texts will include: Shakespeare – Hamlet and Chaucer – The General Prologue and The Pardoner’s Tale Groups of works – 4 texts studied (HL) / 3 texts (SL). Assessed by external examination. Texts will include: Wilde – The Importance of Being Earnest; Wycherley – The Country Wife and Shaw – Pygmalion School’s free choice - 4 texts studied (HL) / 3 texts (SL). Assessed by 1 oral presentation (about15 minutes in length.) Texts will include: Austen – Pride & Prejudice and Browning – Dramatic Monologues Course structure: Year 1 – World Literature texts and Detailed Study texts studied. Coursework essay(s) completed and oral presentation delivered. Year 2 – School’s Free Choice texts and Group of works texts studied. Oral presentation delivered and final examination sat in summer term.

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Method of Assessment: Higher Level: External assessment (70%) • Written examination (50%) o Paper 1 – Commentary 2hrs (25%) o Paper 2 – Essay 2hrs (25%) • World Literature assignments (20%) o Assignment 1 – 1,000 to 1,500 words (10%) o Assignment 2 – 1,000 to 1,500 words (10%) Internal assessment (30%) • Individual oral commentary 1 based on Detailed Study texts. (based on an extract chosen by the teacher, accompanied by guiding questions) (15%) • Individual oral presentation based on School’s free choice texts (based on a presentation of a topic, chosen by the student) (15%) Standard Level: External assessment (70%) • Written examination (50%) o Paper 1 – Commentary 1.5hrs (25%) o Paper 2 – Essay 1.5hrs (25%) • World Literature assignments (20%) o Assignment 1 – 1,000 to 1,500 words (10%) Internal assessment (30%) • Individual oral commentary 1 based on Detailed Study texts. (based on an extract chosen by the teacher, accompanied by guiding questions) (15%) • Individual oral presentation based on School’s free choice texts (based on a presentation of a topic, chosen by the student) (15%) Head of Department: Mr S Gant

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English Language B The study of English Language B requires some previous knowledge of English at a standard level and is for students at an intermediate level of English. At the higher level students need to have an upper intermediate command of English. The main focus of the course is on the acquisition and development of the language system in the four skills; reading, writing, listening and speaking. At both levels the emphasis is on the use of language for effective communication and an awareness of appropriacy, register and cultural characteristics in a variety of contexts. Students will be able to use the language spontaneously and appropriately in familiar and unfamiliar settings. The study of English Language B gives students the opportunity to explore the cultures of English speaking countries and International English. Language texts and listening materials range from everyday usage to more literary texts, especially at a higher level. Students are expected to use the language in activities which provide the opportunity for enjoyment, creativity and intellectual stimulation. Course Objectives: The IB English Language B Higher Level Course enables students to: • Communicate clearly and effectively in a wide range of situations • Understand and use accurately oral and written forms of English that are essential for effective communication in a range of styles and situations • Understand and use a wide range of vocabulary • Select a register and style that are appropriate to the situation • Express ideas with general clarity and fluency • Structure arguments in a clear, coherent and convincing way • Understand and analyse moderately complex written and spoken material • Assess subtleties of the language in a wide range of forms, styles and registers The IB English Language B Standard Level Course enables students to: • Communicate clearly and effectively in a range of areas • Understand and use accurately oral and written forms of English that are commonly encountered in a range of situations • Understand and use a range of vocabulary • Select a register that is appropriate to the situation • Express ideas with general clarity and some fluency • Structure arguments in a generally clear, coherent and convincing way • Understand and respond appropriately to written and spoken material of average difficulty • Assess some subtleties of the language in a range of forms, styles and registers • Show an awareness of and sensitivity to some elements of the cultures related to English Assessment: At the end of Year 13, students take part in both internal and external assessment tasks. Oral assessment is done internally with the IB instructors. Reading and writing achievement is assessed through a final examination set by the International Baccalaureate Organisation. Head of Department: Mrs K Plumb

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Film Studies IB Film Studies Film is both a powerful communication medium and an art form. The Diploma Programme film course aims to develop students’ skills so that they become adept in both interpreting and making film texts. Through the study and analysis of film texts and exercises in filmmaking, the Diploma Programme film course explores film history, theory and socio-economic background. The course develops students’ critical abilities, enabling them to appreciate the multiplicity of cultural and historical perspectives in film. To achieve an international understanding within the world of film, students are taught to consider film texts, theories and ideas from the points of view of different individuals, nations and cultures. The IB film course emphasises the importance of working individually and as a member of a group. Students are encouraged to develop the professional and technical skills (including organisational skills) needed to express themselves creatively in film. A challenge for students following this course is to become aware of their own perspectives and biases and to learn to respect those of others. This requires willingness to attempt to understand alternative views, to respect and appreciate cultural diversity, and to have an open and critical mind. Thus, the IB film course can become a way for the student to celebrate the international and intercultural dynamic that inspires and sustains a type of contemporary film, while appreciating specifically local origins that have given rise to cinematic production in many parts of the world. For any student to create, to present and to study film requires courage, passion and curiosity: courage to create individually and as part of a team, to explore ideas through action and harness the imagination, and to experiment; passion to communicate and to act communally, and to research and formulate ideas eloquently; curiosity about self and others and the world around them, about different traditions, techniques and knowledge, about the past and the future, and about the limitless possibilities of human expression through film. Distinctions between SL and HL Although the standard level (SL) and higher level (HL) syllabus outlines share elements, there is a clear distinction between both the explicit and implicit demands at these levels. Through a variety of teaching approaches, including the construction and deconstruction of film texts, all students, whether SL or HL, are encouraged to develop their creative and critical abilities and to enhance their appreciation and enjoyment of film. The differentials between SL and HL are both quantitative and qualitative. The nature of the course enables HL students to develop creative skills, theoretical understanding and textual analysis more fully. An HL student should display a continuous resolve of personal challenge and a sustained engagement with the ideas, practices and concepts encountered within the course over the extended learning time available. How is the course assessed? External Assessment Independent study: Rationale, script and annotated list of sources for a documentary production of (SL); (HL). Presentation An oral presentation of a detailed textual analysis of an extract from a prescribed film of up to a maximum of 10 minutes (SL); or, of up to a maximum of 15 minutes (HL). Internal Assessment Film Production: One completed film project of 4 - 5minutes including titles (SL). One completed film project of 6–7 minutes including titles and associated trailer of 40–60 seconds (HL). Documentation in relation to the film production: Rationale of no more than 100 words and a written

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commentary of no more than 1,200 words (SL); Rationale of no more than 100 words and a rationale for the trailer of no more than 100 words and a written commentary of no more than 1,750words (HL). Syllabus Component Textual Analysis

Film Theory and History Creative process (Film production)

SL

HL

Study one extract, of approximately 5 minutes, from a prescribed film* and offer a detailed textual analysis of the extract within the context of the film as a whole. Study of at least two films from more than one country. Create and produce an original film as part of a team or as an individual

Study one extract, of approximately 5 minutes, from a prescribed film* and offer a detailed textual analysis of the extract within the context of the film as a whole. Study of at least two films from more than one country. 1. Create and produce an original film as part of a team or as an individual. 2. Create an individual trailer for the film production.

World Cinema Study Practical work: Making a short film Oral presentation (recording) close analysis of prescribed film text. Where does it lead? Students can progress to Film and related courses at university, as well as a wide range of other courses. This course will also give you a useful portfolio of work to show when applying for work experience. Study of at least two films from more than one country Students can write about film directors, national cinema movements or themes, which involve an international dimension or explore cultural differences and identities. Teacher in charge: Mrs D Joy

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Geography Core Themes – to be taken by both SL and HL students. (1) Population in transition: a look into population change, migration and gender inequalities. (2) Disparities wealth & development: regional and global disparities, why these disparities exist and how they can be reduced. (3) Patterns in environmental quality and sustainability: a look at the atmosphere, the use of water, the problems of soil degradation and sustainability and the environment. (4) Patterns in resource consumption: the changing global trends of resource use, and conservation strategies to overcome the problem of resource consumption. Optional themes – to be taken by both SL and HL students. (1) Oceans and their coastal margins: the role oceans in influencing climatic conditions, oceans as a resource base and the management of coastal margins. (2) Natural hazards and disasters, risk assessment and response: a look at the range of human adjustments and responses to hazards at a variety of scales. Optional theme – to be taken by the HL students only. (1) Urban environments: a study of cities and their diversity of wealth and deprivation along with a look at sustainable management to minimise environmental impacts of urban areas. Extension topics – to be taken by the HL students only. (1) Measuring global interactions: an examination of globalisation spatially (2) Changing space – the shrinking world: the role of improved information and communications globally (3) Economic interactions and flows: financial, labour and information flows globally (4) Environmental change: negative impacts of agro-industrialisation, the effects of transnational manufacturing and the homogenization of urban areas. (5) Socio-cultural exchanges: cultural diffusion, consumerism and culture and sociocultural integration. (6) Political outcomes: the loss of sovereignty and responses (7) Global interactions at the local level: a look into responses of globalisation. Fieldwork – to be carried out by both SL and HL students Location: Slapton Sands, South Devon or equivalent location A coastal study that ties into the optional theme (1) Oceans and their coastal margins. A charge is made for the accommodation costs for this trip. Head of Department: Miss A McCardle

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History History is a wonderful subject for developing the skills of communication and argument. People with qualifications in history follow an enormous variety of career paths in business, journalism, the law, government and academia. Our IB course will appeal to anyone who has an interest in world affairs; anyone with curiosity about the past, and anyone who enjoys research, problem solving and presenting a solution. It offers students the chance to build on the work done at GCSE, and to engage with some entirely new topics, in order to develop a thorough understanding of modern world history. The Standard Level course contains an analysis of two dictatorships: Mussolini’s in Italy and Mao Zedong’s in China; a module on the Cold War and a source-based study of the crisis faced by China and the Soviet Union in the 1980s. For the more challenging work at Higher Level, we have opted to follow a Russian theme, alongside a unit of interwar work that may be more familiar to some students. However, students need not have studied history prior to starting this course. The specific skills and knowledge required are developed throughout the course itself. Trips IB history students have several opportunities to take their learning out of the classroom. We have built excellent links with the Canterbury universities: lecturers visit Kent College several times a year and our students have the opportunity to attend university events and use the university libraries. There are also trips to the Houses of Parliament and the National Archives. Broadening the Curriculum It is hoped that IB history students will take an interest in history which goes beyond the strict confines of the syllabus. This may be by attending local Historical Association lectures and events, by taking part in our popular Debating Society or just by using some of the extensive range of resources available in the Department and the school library. Standard Level Courses Standard Level history is examined by a combination of coursework (the Internal Assessment), essays and document work. We have selected the following topics:

•

Communism in Crisis, 1976-1989

The major challenges facing the leading socialist (Communist) states, China and the Soviet Union, between the years 1976 and 1989.

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Origins and development of authoritarian and single-party states

Material for detailed study to include Mao in China and Mussolini in Italy.

The Cold War

Material for detailed study to include: Germany (especially Berlin (1945-61)), Afghanistan (1979-88), Korea, Cuba, Vietnam; Castro, Kennedy, Reagan, Stalin, Truman.

Internal Assessment

A deconstructed essay on a topic of the student’s own choosing. Higher Level Courses Higher Level history is examined through essay work. We have selected the following topics:

Interwar years: conflict and co-operation, 1919-1939

The interwar period with special emphasis on Germany, Italy and Spain; the impact of the Great Depression and the search for collective security.

Imperial Russia, revolutions, emergence of Soviet State 1853 – 1924

The decline of imperial power in Tsarist Russia and the emergence of the Soviet State.

The Soviet Union and Eastern Europe 1924 - 2000

The consolidation of the Soviet state from 1924 and the methods applied to ensure its survival, growth and expansion inside and outside the borders of the Soviet Union. Head of Department: Mr G H Noble

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Languages Introduction The first and most important life-skill for a human being throughout his or her life is that of communication – and the most essential tool for communication is language! Almost everything we learn is through the medium of language and most if not all of the major disasters created by man are due to a break-down in communication, a lack of ability to understand each other’s language and through that, each other’s cultures, values and priorities. Language learning is not only about the mechanics of contemporary vocabulary and structures, but must involve the study of culture, history and literature, which enables us to learn from both current and past times and places. It is this pivotal role of language which inspired those who first conceived of the IB to give language such a high priority in their hexagon of learning. Language learning continues throughout our lives, much of it passive, but bearing in mind what have I said above, it should not be possible to give up the formal learning of language at the age of sixteen! This is therefore a huge benefit of the IB curriculum. The acquisition of language should not be seen as an academic exercise, although it may be taken up as such by some, but as the acquisition of a vital life skill, which will help to produce an all-rounded human being, with the confidence and the skill to communicate with others at all levels and from all backgrounds and experiences. Depending on aptitude and experience some will achieve a higher standard than others, but everyone is capable of pushing the boundaries of what they have already achieved by the age of sixteen, whether it be in their mother tongue or in a second or third language. No matter how brilliant we are in any sphere of knowledge or expertise, without language skills we are powerless, isolated and vulnerable. However the converse is also true – the more language skills we have, not only do we possess more power, more control and understanding of other cultures and people, but most importantly perhaps the better equipped we are to use that power and understanding appropriately and compassionately. The IB is the foundation of a programme for life and Kent College is perfectly suited to such a programme : the focus on internationalism, tolerance and communication is already a way of life, as is the concept of every teacher being a language teacher. The IB courses are challenging, not only or even in the material covered, but also and more importantly in the approach and in the essential participative role played by the pupil. It is a move away from the spoon-feeding

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approach of A-levels, so the most important requirements are an eagerness to learn, a desire to achieve ones best, the self-motivation to seek knowledge, not to wait for it to be delivered, and therefore to regard a teacher as a director and an enabler rather than simply as a source of knowledge. The Courses on offer The Group 2 language component can be studied at either Higher, Standard or ab initio level. 7 points is the maximum which can be achieved at all three levels, so it is important to discuss carefully which level will be most appropriate, depending on the standard already achieved in the language and on the future plans of the individual pupil. Higher Level is designed for those who have already achieved a high level at GCSE, who are serious about developing their language skills to the highest level possible and certainly for those who intend to study the language at university. Standard Level is for those who have already passed a GCSE in the language and have already studied the language for three to five years, but who are unlikely to continue their study to degree level. The ab initio course is for those who have not taken a language at GCSE or who are keen to start a new language. The exact combination of language courses / levels running will be decided once it is clear what the makeup of students is opting for different languages. As at GCSE all four skills are developed – Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing. The final assessment takes place at the end of Year 13, although the interactive oral assessments can take place at any time. Pupils will be taught in a largely monolingual environment using authentic materials which inherently reflect an international dimension and will include literary and non-literary texts. Pupils will be expected to demonstrate flexibility when communicating both in speech and in writing, and to use appropriate registers in both the spoken and written language. They will learn how to manipulate the language accurately, to organise facts and ideas, present explanations, opinions and information, to understand and apply the grammatical structure of the language, and to transfer meaning from the language into English and vice versa. Pupils will have to make every effort to communicate outside the classroom, on a regular basis with the Language Assistant, and also with other native speakers in the school and via email. Taking part in school exchanges in particular, and also in cultural trips, will be an automatic expectation. Each language will be taught through various Areas of Experience, including Family and Relationships, Travel and Tourism, Youth Issues, the Environment, Leisure and Change in Society, including the use of technology, racism, wealth and poverty and ethical issues. The IB Languages Programme offers a very exciting approach to the acquisition of language, not only developing knowledge of the language studied but also study, research and independent learning skills in a way which A-levels do not. Former IB students at undergraduate level enjoy a work ethic and study skills well in advance of most other students of their age who have entered higher education from a different route.

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Languages in the IB offer an exciting opportunity for our pupils to prepare themselves for their future careers and for Higher Education, whatever they intend to study, it is hoped that as many pupils as possible will be sufficiently open-minded, ambitious and motivated to accept the challenge! Heads of Department: Ms H Valentine German Miss C Devanney French Mrs B-Alonso Harris Spanish

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Mathematics A Mathematics (group 5) course is compulsory as part of the IB diploma. The IB realises the importance of mathematics for our everyday lives, without mathematics it is difficult to make informed decisions about almost anything. We use mathematics to decide on a bank account, order carpet, estimate a length, or read a news paper. Mathematics provides an important key to understanding the world. Mathematics, for most of us, also extends into our chosen profession: artists need to learn about perspective; musicians need to appreciate the mathematical relationships within and between different rhythms; economists need to recognise trends in financial dealings; and engineers need to take account of stress patterns in physical materials. Scientists view Mathematics as a language that is central to our understanding of events that occur in the natural world. Some people enjoy the challenges offered by the logical methods of mathematics. Mathematics also provides us with the skills to be problem solvers and logical thinkers. Unlike the A level, the Graphical display calculator (GDC) forms an integral part of IB Mathematics. There are three Mathematics courses available and it is important that you choose the right Mathematics course for you: Option 1 : Mathematical Studies (SL) This course is designed for students who do not intend to continue with Mathematics after leaving school or in their future studies. This course caters for students with varied backgrounds and abilities in Mathematics, nevertheless students taking this course need to be already equipped with some fundamental skills. Students would normally have achieved a grade C at GCSE Mathematics and probably at the higher tier or equivalent for overseas students. The aims of the course is to enable students to: • appreciate the multicultural and historical perspectives of Mathematics • enjoy the courses and develop an appreciation of the elegance, power and usefulness of Mathematics • develop logical, critical and creative thinking • develop an understanding of the principles and nature of the Mathematics • employ and refine their powers of abstraction and generalization • develop patience and persistence in problem solving • appreciate the consequences arising from technological developments • transfer skills to alternative situations and to future developments • communicate clearly and confidently in a variety of contexts. Most importantly the course aims to boost student’s confidence in Mathematics. Where possible, concepts and skills will be learnt within a practical context. Students will also learn through group work, extensive use of a graphical calculator, individual research and paired work. The intention is to make the experience of learning Mathematical Studies as different as possible to their previous experience of studying mathematics. Topics covered over the two years will include: Use of the Graphical Display calculator, functions and graphs Sets and probability Approximations and standard form, types of number. Trigonometry Financial Mathematics Statistics Coordinate Geometry 3D geometry Logic

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An introduction to differential calculus. Assessment Written Assessment (external assessment) Paper 1: 15 short response questions [1 hour 30 minutes] (40%) Paper 2 5 extended response questions [1 hour 30 minutes] (40%) The graphical calculator can be used on both papers. Project (Internal assessment) 20% The project is an individual piece of work involving the collection of information or the generation of measurements, and then the analysis and evaluation of their information or measurements. The subject of the project is the student’s choice. Planning and choice of project will take place during the summer term of year 1. Deadline is likely to be set for late in the Autumn Term of year 2. Option 2: Mathematics Standard Level The majority of students taking this course need a sound mathematical background as they prepare for further studies in subjects such as Physics, Chemistry, Economics, Psychology and Business Administration. This course caters for students who already possess knowledge of basic mathematical concepts, and who are equipped with the skills needed to apply simple mathematical techniques correctly. Students would normally have achieved, at the very least, a B grade at GCSE Mathematics or an equivalent qualification for overseas students. The aims of the course is to enable students to: • A knowledge and understanding of new mathematical concepts and techniques, whilst placing these in a historical and geographical context. • Skills to communicate in a mathematical way and present a concise and logical argument. • Investigational skills; dealing with unfamiliar situations, using a logical and systematic approach, recognising patterns and structures, and making generalisations. • An organised approach, presenting information and data in a tabular, graphical and/or diagrammatic forms • Use of appropriate notation and terminology. • Skills to apply knowledge to practical situations and appreciate the reasonableness of results and solutions. • Ability to problem solve by selecting the appropriate strategy or mathematical technique. • Use of appropriate technological devices such as a graphical calculator, graph drawing and dynamic geometry software. Students will be provided with a variety of learning opportunities including teacher lead discussions and demonstrations, exploring concepts and ideas using investigations, group work, paired problem solving tasks and tasks placing concepts in a practical context. The graphical display calculator, unlike in the A level, forms an integral part of teaching and learning. The department already has a culture of regular assessment as part of the A level programme and will continue with the diploma. Weekly prep assignments based on exam style questions, investigations, or research will be set and assessed with feedback given to inform future learning. Short tests will also be set on the completion a section of work. Students will also complete a mathematical investigation of their choice. Topics covered over the two years: Topic 1—Algebra Topic 2—Functions and equations Topic 3—Circular functions and trigonometry

9 hrs 24 hrs 16 hrs

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Topic 4—Vectors Topic 5—Statistics and probability Topic 6—Calculus

16 hrs 35 hrs 40 hrs

The timings listed are very approximate but give a guide to the proportion of time spent on each topic. Broadly the “Pure Mathematics” topics covered are similar to the A-level, however the approach to topics is a little less rigorous and more holistic. Assessment Written Assessment (external assessment) Paper 1 (no calculator allowed) 1 hour 30 minutes (40%) Paper 2 (Graphic display calculator required) 1 hour 30 minutes (40%) Mathematical Exploration (Internal assessment) 20% Students explore and investigate an area of mathematics of their choice. Option 3: Mathematics Higher Level The majority of students taking this course will be expecting to include Mathematics as a major component of their university studies, either as a subject in its own right or within courses such as Physics, or Engineering.. Others may take this subject because they have a strong interest in Mathematics and enjoy meeting its challenges and engaging with its problems. This course caters for students with a good background in Mathematics who are competent in a range of analytical and technical skills. Students would normally have achieved equivalent to at least an A grade (preferably A*) at GCSE Mathematics or an equivalent qualification for overseas students. This course is a much more demanding course that the standard level; students will develop the topics found in the standard course to greater depth and in a much more rigorous way. In addition students study an option topic which is chosen by the subject teacher and is then studied by the whole class. The aims of the course are to enable students to: • A knowledge and understanding of new mathematical concepts and techniques, whilst placing these in a historical and geographical context. Thus providing links with theory of knowledge and internationalism. • Skills to communicate in a mathematical way and present a concise and logical argument. Discussions of how notation varies for students from different countries. • Investigational skills; dealing with unfamiliar situations, using a logical and systematic approach, recognising patterns and structures, and making generalisations. • An organised approach, presenting information and data in a tabular, graphical and/or diagrammatic forms • Use of appropriate notation and terminology. • Skills to apply knowledge to practical situations and appreciate the reasonableness of results and solutions. • Ability to problem solve by selecting the appropriate strategy or mathematical technique. • Use of appropriate technological devices such as a graphical calculator, graph drawing and dynamic geometry software. Students will be provided with a variety of learning opportunities including teacher lead discussions and demonstrations, exploring concepts and ideas using investigations, group work, paired problem solving tasks and tasks placing concepts in a practical context. The graphical display calculator, unlike in the A level, forms an integral part of teaching and learning. The department already has a culture of regular assessment as part of the A level programme and will

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continue with the diploma. Weekly prep assignments based on exam style questions, investigations, or research will be set and assessed with feedback given to inform future learning. Short tests will also be set on the completion a section of work. Students will also complete a number of short assignment tasks during the course and the best of these will form part of the final assessment for the course. Topics covered over the two years: Topic 1—Algebra Topic 2—Functions and equations Topic 3—Circular functions and trigonometry Topic 4—Vectors Topic 5—Statistics and probability Topic 7—Calculus

30 hrs 22 hrs 22 hrs 24 hrs 36 hrs 48 hrs

Then one of the follow is chosen by the teacher as the option topic: Topic 8—Statistics and probability 48 hrs Topic 9—Sets, relations and groups 48 hrs Topic 10—Series and differential equations 48 hrs Topic 11—Discrete mathematics and number theory 48 hrs The timings listed are very approximate but give a guide to the proportion of time spent on each topic. Assessment Written Assessment (external assessment) Paper 1 (no calculator allowed) 1 hour 30 minutes (30%) Paper 2 (Graphic display calculator required) 1 hour 30 minutes (30%) Paper 3 assessment of the option topic (Graphic display calculator required) 1 hour (20%) Mathematical Exploration (Internal assessment) 20% Students explore and investigate an area of mathematics of their choice. Head of Department: Mr S Wiles

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Physics The IB Physics course is intended to build upon the principles established in GCSE Physics or Science/ Additional Science or any equivalent level studied outside the United Kingdom, such as the IGCSE. The aims set out in the Learner Profile will be used to influence the way in which students study Physics as part of the IB Diploma Programme. This will include development of: • a knowledge and understanding of the laws and vocabulary of Physics which will also include recognition that it results from the world-wide collaboration of scientists over many years. • experimental and investigative skills, which will include following instructions, designing experimental tests and investigations, using apparatus and materials safely and effectively, recording and analysing data appropriately and the recognition and analysis of uncertainties and drawing conclusions. A series of practical exercises will be undertaken which will support the theoretical ideas under consideration and develop experimental skills. • mathematical and graphical skills, as appropriate to the assessment at SL or HL and according to the mathematical background of students within each group. • the ability to analyse, evaluate and synthesize scientific data which will enable students to focus on the process of Scientific Method and its limitations as a part of the Theory of Knowledge. • information and communication technology as used within Physics which will include data logging, presentation software such as ‘power point’, the use of spreadsheets, computer modeling and animations/simulations and internet search techniques. A series of open-ended investigations will encourage students to develop their understanding across the whole of Physics, to exercise initiative in applying their cognitive and practical skills, to tackle complex problems and arrive at reasonable and balanced conclusions. Some solutions to practical problems require students to be open-minded and explore new strategies. Students will be expected to complete formal write-ups of all practical assignments and will collaborate with other sciences to complete a Group 4 Project of duration 10 hours. Practical work corresponds to 24% of total assessment marks and will be assessed internally within the school. Class prep assignments will be set weekly and assessed. Some of these will be assessed by the students themselves, allowing them to reflect upon their own learning within class and providing an opportunity to understand their strengths and limitations in support of their personal development. Students from different countries will be able to put their progress in the context of that of the class as a whole. Each member of the class will be expected to give a presentation on a topic of their choosing related in some way to physics or science. This may include an international student showing the contributions made to scientific progress from within their own country. The standard level course (SL) consists of seven core topics plus two additional topics chosen from seven possibilities. The higher level course (HL) consists of the core material, a further five additional higher level topics (AHL) plus two additional topics chosen from seven possibilities. Topics Year 1 Core Physics and physical measurement Mechanics Thermal Physics Oscillations and Waves Electric Current Forces and Fields Atomic and Nuclear Physics Energy Power and Climate Change (continued into year 2)

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AHL Motion in Fields Thermal Physics Wave Phenomena Electromagnetic Induction Quantum and Nuclear Physics Digital Technology Year 2 Core Energy Power and Climate Change Standard Level Option: Astrophysics Option: Electromagnetic Waves Higher Level Option: Astrophysics Option: Electromagnetic Waves The group 4 project counts as about 3 hours practical work in this analysis. Standard level

Higher Level

Written examinations

Written examinations

Total 3 hours, 76 % of marks.

Total 4.5 hours, 76% of marks.

Paper 1 (0.75 hour, 20%) 30 multiple- choice questions

Paper 1 (1 hour, 20%) 40 multiple choice questions..

Paper 2 (1.25 hour, 32%) Section A: one data-based question and several short the core. core and AHL.

Paper 2 (2.25 hours, 36%) Section A: one data-based question and several short- answer questions on the answer questions on

Section B: one extended response Paper 3 (1 hour, 24%) Several compulsory shortanswer questions in each of the two options studied.

Section B: two extended response Paper 3 (1.25 hours, 20%) Several compulsory short-answer questions and one extended-response question of the two options studied.

Internal Assessment This has a weighting of 24% of the total mark at both levels and is based upon investigation and project work set and assessed by the school. Head of Department: Mr S Worth

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Details of the compulsory core of the IB 1. Creativity Action Service Creativity, Action, Service (CAS) is at the heart of the Diploma Programme. It is one of the three essential elements in every student’s Diploma Programme experience making up part of the core of the Diploma. It involves students in a range of activities alongside their academic studies throughout the Diploma Programme. The three strands of CAS, which are often interwoven with particular activities, are characterized as follows. Creativity: arts, and other experiences that involve creative thinking. Action: physical exertion contributing to a healthy lifestyle, complementing academic work elsewhere in the Diploma Programme. Service: an unpaid and voluntary exchange that has a learning benefit for the student. The rights, dignity and autonomy of all those involved are respected. CAS enables students to enhance their personal and interpersonal development through experiential learning. At the same time, it provides an important counterbalance to the academic pressures of the rest of the Diploma Programme. A good CAS programme should be both challenging and enjoyable, a personal journey of self‑discovery. Each individual student has a different starting point, and therefore different goals and needs, but for many their CAS activities include experiences that are profound and life‑changing. For student development to occur, CAS should involve: • real, purposeful activities, with significant outcomes. • personal challenge—tasks must extend the student and be achievable in scope. • thoughtful consideration, such as planning, reviewing progress, reporting. • reflection on outcomes and personal learning. All proposed CAS activities need to meet these four criteria. It is also essential that they do not replicate other parts of the student’s Diploma Programme work. Concurrency of learning is important in the Diploma Programme. Therefore, CAS activities should continue on a regular basis for as long as possible throughout the programme. May of the existing extracurricular activities at Kent College will count towards CAS, other projects and specific activities will also need to be planned. Successful completion of CAS is a requirement for the award of the IB diploma. CAS Coordinator: Mr T Williams

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2. The Extended Essay The extended essay is an in-depth study of a focused topic chosen from the list of approved Diploma Programme subjects – normally one of your six subjects for the IB diploma. It is intended to promote high-level research and writing skills, intellectual discovery and creativity. It provides you with an opportunity to engage in personal research in a topic of your own choice, under the guidance of a supervisor, who will be a teacher at the school. This leads to a major piece of formally presented, structured writing, in which ideas and findings are communicated in a reasoned and coherent manner, appropriate to the subject chosen. Completion of the written essay is followed by a short interview, or viva voce, with the supervisor. The extended essay is • compulsory for all Diploma Programme students and must be awarded at least a grade D to enable the Diploma to be awarded, at maximum of 1.5 points are available from the extended essay. • externally assessed and, in combination with the grade for Theory of Knowledge, contributes up to three points to the total score for the IB diploma • a piece of independent research/ investigation on a topic chosen by you in cooperation with a supervisor from the school • chosen from the list of approved Diploma Programme subjects • presented as a formal piece of scholarship containing no more than 4,000 words • the result of approximately 40 hours work • concluded with a short interview, or viva voce, with the supervising teacher In the Diploma Programme, the extended essay is the prime example of a piece of work where the student has the opportunity to show knowledge, understanding and enthusiasm about a topic of his or her choice. At university interviews, the extended essay is often used as a valuable stimulus to discussion. Extended Essay Coordinator: Mrs Register

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3. The Theory of knowledge Theory of Knowledge sits at the core of the IB programme. It is one of the things that makes the IB different from more conventional courses of study. Many educational courses lay great emphasis on the acquisition of facts. Unfortunately, this can sometimes result in students thinking that it is a simple matter to acquire knowledge or perhaps even truth. In Theory of Knowledge, the complexities and problems associated with knowledge are closely considered. We aim to introduce students to the 'real' world of knowledge, the world which they will encounter later on at university and beyond. We look at what we believe to be true, the reasons we have for holding these beliefs and whether or not the reasons for holding them are good reasons. Issues addressed can be subject-related (Is there such a thing as the scientific method? What makes a great piece of art? How reliable are history books?) They can also be personal or current (How can I know what is right? To what extent can we trust the media? How am I influenced by my culture?) . Traditional philosophical problems are also considered (Are humans predictable? Do our senses give us the truth?) While Theory of Knowledge demands and develops rigour and logical analysis, it is not simply a course in critical thinking. The aim is not only to introduce students to a range of ideas and debates but to encourage them to view their own ideas, views, beliefs and opinions in light of the ideas, views, beliefs and opinions of others. The course therefore requires students to demonstrate openness, sensitivity and respect. In order to receive the IB Diploma, students must achieve a pass grade in Theory of Knowledge. The course is assessed in two ways. Students must deliver a 10 minute oral presentation and produce a 1200-1600 word essay. The grades from these are combined with the grade from the Extended Essay to give up to 3 points towards a candidate’s total score for their Diploma. Although this may seem a little light for such an ambitious course, this system allows students to pursue Theory of Knowledge and explore their own ideas without undue pressure on results. TOK Coordinator: Mr S Sorokos

A Levels

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A Levels are two year courses. In the first year AS levels are studied which are the first half of the A Levels and then A2 courses are studied in the second year to complete the A Level. The first year (6.1, or year 12) Students will normally choose four AS (“Advanced Subsidiary”) subjects. These are examined by means of modular-style tests in January or June of the first year. The subjects being offered for September 2012 are listed below. The results of the AS examinations will be known by the end of the first year and will be an indicator of an individual’s potential performance at the end of the second year. The predicted grades for A level used on University application forms will therefore be based partly upon this information. There are opportunities to resit AS modules during the second year. Study lessons will make up a proportion of the timetable, many of these must be taken in departments. Students are on the whole expected to continue with all of their AS subjects until the end of the Summer Term in the first year, since most cannot make informed decisions as to what subject to drop until results are known. One year courses, those offered as AS only, will stop at the end of Year 12. Please note that pupils who wish to pursue a subject at A2 level must achieve at least the equivalent of a grade E, an E grade would however be a very poor foundation from which to pursue second year A Level studies. Exemptions from this requirement may be granted only by the Head Master subject to specific targets being met by the student. Exceptions Some less able pupils may wonder if they should take only three AS subjects in 6.1, but we do not recommend this. The possibility of dropping one out of four after a year offers much more flexibility. At the start of the Sixth Form, it is not always possible to say which subjects a pupil will find congenial. In any case, the standard of AS levels is not as demanding as that of A2s Some very able pupils may wish to take five subjects at AS level in 6.1. On the whole, we do not recommend this either (unless one of the options is Further Maths): five subjects constitute a very heavy burden. A better option would be for an able pupil to see if it is possible under the following year’s 6.1 Option Scheme to take up their fifth AS in 6.2, joining a 6.1 class in order to pursue the desired subject. However, if we were sure the student concerned is capable, we would allow them at least to start 6.1 with five subjects. The second year (6.2, or year 13) Most pupils will drop one of their AS subjects at the start of the second year. The second half of the course is called “A2”, and is more demanding. This is not least because each subject will have a synoptic module, testing knowledge, skills and the power to synthesise ideas across the whole syllabus. It will be possible to resit AS modules in January and/or June of 6.2, the school will pay for one re-sit of any modules. To help differentiate between the top students an A* can now be achieved at A Level. To achieve this a student will have had to achieve an A grade overall and a minimum of 90% in their second year / A2 modules . How the options System works for A Levels Students must discuss their suitability for particular subjects with the relevant Head of Department prior to filling in the options form as requirements for different subjects will vary. The UCAS web site, http://www.ucas.ac.uk/ , provides some guidance about what subjects to study at A Level for particular degree courses. The Director of Studies will ask Year 11 students to make subject choices by February 8th , following the Sixth Form Open Evening and mock GCSE results. After they have indicated firm subject choices the Head Master will decide which courses have insufficient numbers to justify their provision. Pupils affected by this will of course be informed as soon as possible so they can make alternative choices. The Timetabler and the Director of Studies will then draw up a draft Options Scheme.

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It should be realised that it may not be possible to satisfy every possible combination of choices, but we will do our best. This Scheme will be published to Year 11 pupils, who are asked to keep Mr Letley informed of any changes of mind, so that the scheme can be adjusted if possible. The final pattern will be fixed by half-term of the Summer Term. The A Level options form should be returned to Mr Letley by Friday 8th February.

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The courses being offered this year Art

Government and Politics ( AS only)

Biology

History

Business Studies

ICT ( as a single or double A Level equivalent)

Business (Applied)

Mathematics and Further Mathematics

Chemistry Design and Technology

Music

Drama and Theatre Studies Economics

Physical Education

English Literature

Philosophy of Religion And Religious Ethics

French

Physics

Geography

Psychology (AS only)

German

Spanish

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A Level subject choices form Complete this form by Friday February 8th 2013, make sure that you hand it in to Mr Letley by then. Name: ________________________________ Form:_________ The 4 AS Levels I would like to study are, in order of preference: 1. _____________________________________________________ 2. _____________________________________________________ 3. _____________________________________________________ 4. _____________________________________________________ My reserve choices are, in order of preference: 1.______________________________________________________ 2.______________________________________________________ List any university courses or jobs / careers that you might be considering: ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________ Checklist before handing in this form 1. Have you chosen at least 4 subjects to study for AS level? 2. Have you discussed your suitability for the course with the relevant Head of Department? 3. Have you checked that these are the subjects required for any career / university course that you might want to pursue? 4. Have you read the subject details carefully to find out about the course and what is involved? Remember it may not be possible to satisfy every combination of subjects, we will let you know if you need to modify your choice. Student’s signature: _______________________ Date: ________________ Parent’s signature: _________________________ Date : ________________

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Subject details for A Level Art Exam Board: AQA Endorsement: Art, Craft and Design At AS, candidates will be introduced to a variety of experiences employing a range of media, processes and techniques. At A2, candidates are required to build upon the knowledge, understanding and skills gained in the AS with greater depth of study. AS Unit 1 - Portfolio Development of a coursework portfolio where candidates produce a collection of work, which will be based on appropriate starting points set by the teacher. All the work produced for this unit will be marked as a whole. 80 marks 50% of total AS marks / 25% of total A Level marks Unit 2 – Externally Set Assignment Lead-in-period – no more than 8 weeks Supervised time – 5 hours In Unit 2, candidates will choose ONE question from a set paper from the exam board. They will have 8 weeks to do preparatory studies which will lead to a final piece of work to be completed during 5 hours of supervised time (unaided). All the work produced for this unit will be marked as a whole. 80 marks 50% of total AS marks / 25% of total A Level marks A2 Unit 3 – Personal Investigation In Unit 3, candidates are required to develop a personal investigation based on an idea, issue, concept or theme supported by 1000 – 3000 words. This could be a study of work by a particular artist or a genre in art such as ‘Portraiture’ or ‘Landscapes’ or a theme such as ‘War’ or ‘Still life’. All the work produced for this unit will be marked as a whole. 80 marks 25% of total A level marks Unit 4 – Externally Set Assignment Lead-in-period – no more than 8 weeks Supervised time – 15 hours In Unit 4, candidates will choose ONE question from a set paper from the exam board. They will have 8 weeks to do preparatory studies which will lead to a final piece of work to be completed during 15 hours of supervised time (unaided). All the work produced for this unit will be marked as a whole. 80 marks 25% of total A Level mark

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What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course? The best foundation for success in AS and Advanced GCE Art is a good grade at GCSE; which is preferable but not compulsory. If you have an aptitude for the subject, if you are creative or ‘good at drawing’, you may have the basic skills to succeed but as Advanced GCE Art is not an easy option, you should be prepared to work hard at developing your abilities. What will I learn on this Advanced GCE Course? The main purpose of any course in art, craft and design is to develop your ability to appreciate the visual world, respond in a personal and creative way and perhaps even contribute for the benefit of everyone. The skills you will develop will be varied. Among them, you will develop a working knowledge of materials, practices and technology within art. You will develop the skills to interpret and convey your ideas and feelings using art, craft and design. You will develop your imaginative and creative powers and your experimental, analytical and documenting skills. You will also develop a specialist vocabulary and the knowledge and understanding of the place of art, craft and design in history and in contemporary society. The skills you acquire will be determined to some extent by the area of study you choose. However, whether you see yourself as a painter, a graphic designer or a filmmaker, the same basic rules and skills apply. What kind of student is this course suitable for? Students who wish to undertake further studies in art, craft and design, usually at Art College or Further Education. Students who are looking to take up careers for which an art background is relevant might consider advertising, publishing, architecture, museums, theatre or art gallery work. Head of Department: Mrs M Montague

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Biology We will be teaching the OCR AS / A level specification in Biology: •

Kent College Biology Department has a wealth of experience with OCR including examination experience. This specification includes all the more interesting components of the old specification and has been updated to include modern topics.

The resources supplied by OCR and their partnership publishers look very interesting and well presented. Again, we were involved in the production of many of the resources supplied by OCR and their partnership publishers.

Basic Structure of the Course: There will be four teaching Units: AS Unit 1 (F211) AS Unit 2 (F212) A2 Unit 1 (F214) A2 Unit 2 (F215) • • •

Cells, Exchange and Transport Molecules, Diversity, Food and Health Communications, Homeostasis and Energy Control, Genomes and Environment

Unit 1 at AS and A2 is shorter so that it can be taught before Christmas and can be tested in January of that year. This should spread the burden of assessment over the course. There will be an A* grade on offer for candidates who achieve high marks at A2. How Science Works is incorporated throughout the course.

Practical Assessment Practical work makes up a good proportion of the course and is used to consolidate the theory teaching. We use the school farm and surrounding areas to carry out fieldwork at both AS and A2. In addition, we have the opportunity to carry out field trials on growth and competition between plants as part of an exciting new joint venture with Canterbury College. Assessment of practical skills takes the form of tasks set by OCR. These are conducted as practical sessions under controlled conditions. There will be three categories of task: • A qualitative task • A quantitative task • An evaluative task These will be assigned as practical sessions during the course – they will be conducted at the appropriate time during the teaching of the relevant topic. These will be marked internally and a sample will be sent for external moderation by the examination board. Details of the Units: AS Biology Unit 1 (F211) Cells Exchange and Transport Module 1 Cells Cell Structure Membranes Cell Division and Diversity Module 2 Exchange and Transport Exchange Surfaces and Breathing Transport in Animals Transport in Plants

Unit 2 (F212)Molecules, Biodiversity, Food and Health Module 1 Biological Molecules Biological Molecules Nucleic Acids Enzymes Module 2 Food and Health Food and Food Production Health and Disease Module 3 Biodiversity and Evolution Biodiversity

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Classification Evolution Maintaining Biodiversity A2 Biology Unit 1 Communication, Homeostasis and Energy Module 1 Communication & Homeostasis Nerves Hormones Homeostasis Module 2 Excretion The Kidneys and Excretion Module 3 Photosynthesis Plants and Photosynthesis Module 4 Respiration Respiration

Unit 2 Control, Genomes and Environment Module 1 Cellular Control and Variation Genetic control of the cell Meiosis and variation Module 2 Biotechnology and Gene Technologies Cloning in Plants and Animals Biotechnology Genomes and Gene Technologies Module 3 Ecosystems and Sustainability Ecosystems Populations and Sustainability Module 4: Responding to the Environment Plant Responses Animal Responses Animal Behaviour

How the A level is assessed: AS Units Unit 1 Question paper with a range of structured questions Unit 2 Question paper with a range of structured questions, including extended writing Unit 3 Completion of tasks set by OCR, marked by teachers using specific OCR mark schemes A2 Units Unit 1 Question paper with a range of structured questions which may be synoptic Unit 2 Question paper with a range of structured questions, including extended writing. Includes synoptic topics Unit 3 Completion of tasks set by OCR, marked by teachers using specific OCR mark schemes

Time allowed One hour One hour 45 minutes Approximately one double lesson per task One hour 15 minutes

Weighting 15% 25% 10% 15%

Two hours 25% 10% 100%

Course Requirements There are no specific skills required but the course is quite different from GCSE in both content and in the demand placed on the student. An interest in and a desire to study Biology are essential. Pupils who are willing to spend time studying on their own will do very well and will enjoy the course. We aim to instil a deep interest in the subject, which can be maintained in courses of further education and beyond. Beyond A level Biology? There are numerous university courses linked with Biology, all of which can lead to careers in that discipline. These include to name but a few: Biology, Horticulture, Agriculture, Forestry, Medicine, Veterinary Science, Dentistry, Genetics, Microbiology, Pharmacy, Radiography, Biotechnology, Physiotherapy, Nursing - and Teaching. Head of Department: Mr F Sochacki

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Business Studies Examination Board: AQA The Advanced Level Business Studies course is composed of two parts. The first part is the Advanced Subsidiary course, which must be combined with the second part, A2, in order to complete the Advanced Level qualification. The course is divided into four modules, two in each year. ! ! ! !

Unit 1 - Planning and Financing a Business Unit 2 - Managing a Business Unit 3 - Strategies for Success Unit 4 - The Business Environment and Managing Change

Assessment The AS course is assessed in two separate examinations: Unit 1 and Unit 2. These exams focus on the knowledge and understanding of the first two modules developed during the course, and consist of a mixture of short answer and data response questions. The A2 course will be assessed through two examinations. The Unit 3 examination will be questions requiring extended answers based on an unseen case study, and drawing on knowledge from all modules of the course. The Unit 4 examination consists of two sections. Section One contains questions based on a pre-release research task. Section Two consists of a choice of essays, all of a synoptic nature, drawing on knowledge from all four units. Course Approach The study of each of the four modules is undertaken via a range of methods, including the use of case studies, video material, information technology, visits, conferences, and business competitions. The emphasis is on the application of business techniques to case studies, business scenarios and real-life business problems. Practical problem-solving is encouraged throughout the course. Course Requirements Business Studies requires a broad range of skills and interests, and any standard combination of GCSEs is appropriate. The course combines quantitative and qualitative elements; therefore a minimum of a grade C in both English and Mathematics is advisable. How the course may be of benefit in the future Because it involves a range of skills, both quantitative and qualitative, Business Studies complements virtually any other A level course. It represents an excellent choice for candidates who are seeking breadth without venturing into wholly unfamiliar territory. For those planning university studies, it encourages skills useful for any course. For those planning a career in business, or one where business techniques will be useful, it provides opportunities for developing practical skills, as well as an overview of business theory and issues. For anyone, it encourages an interest in the world outside school and provides some excellent life skills in basic financial understanding. Head of Department: Mr S James

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Applied Business Exam Board: AQA Introduction The Applied Business course is worth two A-levels. It is a double module where 12 units are completed over the two years. The course consists of two parts. The first part is the Advanced Subsidiary course, which must be combined with the second part, A2, in order to complete the Advanced Level qualification. In the first year (AS) six units will be completed: 1.) Investigating Business 2.) People in Business 3.) Financial planning and Monitoring

4.) Meeting Customer Needs 5.) Developing a product 6.) Career Planning

In the second year (A2) a further 6 units are to be completed: 1.) Business Planning 2.) Marketing strategy 3.) Promotional activities

4.) Marketing environment 5.) Managing people 6.) Managing Change

Assessment The majority of the course is portfolio assessed. The students are given opportunities to apply the theory they learn to the business environment. They will research particular organisations both individually and in groups and present their findings in the form of detailed and thorough coursework. There are four units out of the twelve that are externally assessed. Here the pupils will sit examinations that require a mix of short answers both quantitative and qualitative as well as extended written responses. The following units are externally assessed: 1.) Financial planning and Monitoring 2.) Meeting Customer Needs

3.) The Marketing Environment 4.) Managing People

The programme of learning and assessment of AS units is significantly lower level of demand in comparison to those at A2 Course approach The fundamental philosophy of the course is to not only to provide students with the theoretical knowledge but to give a practical and active experience of the business environment. This will be achieved through links with local organisations. Head of Department: Mr S James

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Chemistry Exam Board: AQA Course Description The course specification is designed to enable candidates • • • • • • •

To generate understanding of the broad scope of Chemistry in the development of universal principles and life concepts; To develop essential knowledge and understanding of the concepts of Chemistry, and the skills needed for the use of these in new and changing situations; To develop an understanding of the link between theory and experiment; To sustain and develop their enjoyment of and interest in Chemistry; To recognise the value of Chemistry to society and how it may be used responsibly; To prepare the necessary skills to promote further study in Chemistry and related areas. To develop a broad based knowledge of the principles and applications of Chemistry to a high level consonant with university entrance or equivalent standard.

Basic Structure of the Course: There will be six teaching Units: A. AS Unit 1 (CHEM1) B. AS Unit 2 (CHEM2) C. AS Unit 3 (CHM3T) D. A2 Unit 1 (CHEM4) E. A2 Unit 2 (CHEM5) F. A2 Unit 6 (CHM6T) •

Foundation Chemistry Chemistry in Action AS Practical Skills Kinetics, Equilibria and Organic Energetics, Redox and Inorganic A2 Practical Skills

Unit 1 at AS is shorter so that it can be taught before Christmas and can be tested in January of that year. This should spread the burden of assessment over the course, ensuring that AS is a genuine modular course. There will be an A* grade on offer for those candidates who achieve high marks at A2.

Practical Assessment The practical assessments at AS and A2 are conducted as practical sessions under controlled conditions. There will be three categories of task: • An inorganic task • A physical task • An organic task These will be carried out as practical sessions as a part of the course – they will be conducted at the appropriate time during the teaching of the relevant topic. These will be marked internally and a sample will be sent for external moderation by the examination board. AS Units Unit CHEM1: Foundation Chemistry • Amount of substance • Bonding and Periodicity • Alkanes Unit CHEM2: Chemistry in Action • Energetics, equilibria and kinetics • Redox and metals extraction

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• Periodic Table • Organic and analytical techniques Unit CHM3T: Practical Skills in AS Chemistry • This AS (practical skills) unit is teacher assessed and externally moderated by AQA. • Candidates are assessed on one task from a choice of two, comprising an investigation of a synoptic nature. A2 Units Unit CHEM4: Kinetics, Equilibria and Organic Chemistry • Kinetics, equilibria, acids and bases • Organic nomenclature, isomerism and structure determination • Carbonyls, aromatics, amines and polymers Unit CHEM5: Energetics, Redox and Inorganic Chemistry • Thermodynamics • Transition metals and redox chemistry • Inorganic chemistry in aqueous solution Unit CHM6T: Practical Skills in A2 Chemistry • This A2 (practical skills) unit is teacher assessed and externally moderated by AQA. • Candidates are assessed on one task from a choice of two, comprising an investigation of a synoptic nature. At Kent College the course is strongly practically oriented with a sound emphasis on traditional broad-based theory in order to develop the above skills; it is presented in an exciting and innovative fashion. Both external and research components will be an essential feature of the course, including work at local Universities. The course comprises six compulsory modules, including a practical component at both AS and A2. Modular exams are taken with re-sits if necessary for all permitted modules in a well-structured two-year programme: 6.1 January A 6.1 June A, B 6.1 C Internal assessment 6.2 January D B re-sit 6.2 June E A,D re-sit 6.2 F Internal assessment Components D-F are synoptic components. Course Requirements GCSE OCR Gateway Chemistry or Science at minimum grade C is essential (or AQA, Excel or overseas equivalent). Career and Further Education Implications The broad-based knowledge and understanding imparted by the course provides a good grounding for any career in any technical area, especially the Sciences, but is also applicable to other degrees, including Law, Engineering, Sports Science, Psychology etc. The qualification is particularly appropriate for such degree courses as Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Natural Sciences and Human Sciences, and is especially adapted to provide a solid foundation for Medicine, Veterinary Science, Pharmacology, Forensic Science and related areas.

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Head of Department: Mr S Fell

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Design & Technology Exam Board: AQA

Course: Product Design

Course Structure The AS forms 50% of the assessment weighting of the full A level. AS is assessed at a standard between GCSE and A level and can be taken as a stand-alone specification in 6/1 or as part of the full A level in 6/2. The scheme of assessment over the two-year course is as follows: 6/1 (AS) Written Paper (2 hrs) - externally marked. Product Design (coursework portfolio) - internally marked / externally moderated. 6/2 (A2) Written Paper (2 hrs) – externally marked. Product Design (coursework project) - internally marked / externally moderated. Course Description All pupils are given a copy of the syllabus at the start of term 1. The first lesson is spent going through this so that the structure and requirements of D/T at this level are fully understood. A schematic flowchart provides the pupils with an instant, clear and concise picture of the full A level course in relation to the six terms available to complete it. The document provided by AQA is closely adhered to in the teaching of this subject; and extracts are photocopied, highlighted and discussed in reference to particular aspects of the syllabus, especially the marking schemes for the assessed projects. Mr. Williams and Mr. Van Hinsbergh teach equal amounts of the course and split the teaching according to their interests and specialisms. Coursework Project work forms a large part of the assessment of this course. Candidates embark on their assessed projects during this first term. This enables them to experience a range of design process techniques, so that their own individual design styles begin to develop as a result. Even though the pupils are working on the tasks individually, they are encouraged to comment on and actively criticise each other’s work; this itself acts as a form of ongoing evaluation. It also gives them the chance to experiment with the equipment and materials available to them in the department which are relevant to this particular course. Pupils work on their projects during lessons, study time and prep time. These projects are checked weekly and advice is given regularly. The final marks allocated for each section are made clear and pupils are advised to spend an appropriate amount of time on each. Deadlines are insisted upon and the projects are marked as soon as possible; on return to the pupils, the marks are discussed. All these aspects are vital practice for the assessed coursework. The projects also encourage candidates to develop their confidence in researching information outside school. At this level it is our aim to encourage pupils to develop real solutions to real problems by dealing with real people. The pupils who conquer this objective are those who produce high quality 'A' grade coursework. This philosophy is clearly encouraged in the syllabus and is rewarded in the marking schemes. As pupils progress through the course, they are expected to spend an appropriate proportion of their study time on their coursework projects, particularly the major project in 6/2. The department is open all day, every day of the term! Theory Much of the theory outlined in the syllabus is covered in the first two terms of the course. This then allows the candidates to spend the maximum amount of time on their coursework project in 6/2. A great proportion of the theory work is delivered in the formal classroom sense with the aid of videos, textbooks, periodicals, magazines and the personal experience of the staff. Preps are set and these can take the form of essays, personal research into specific topics, preparation for presentations or the learning of notes for class tests, internal and external exams. The theory work covered in 6/2 does become more specialised.

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Course Requirements This subject is unlike any other at A level, as it demands a great deal of self-motivation due to the large coursework element, particularly as the pupils progress to the full A level in 6/2. It is also advisable, but not essential, to have studied one of the GCSE D/T subjects and to have passed this at grade ‘B’ or above. However, we are happy to offer the course to candidates who have attained a pass at Art and Design GCSE, again at grade ‘B’ or above, having examined a selection of their work. Course Benefits Design and Technology combines well with almost all other subjects at this level. This enables pupils to select from the wide variety of courses offered by Universities. Some of our best students have gone on to study Interior Architecture at Brighton, Product Design at Loughborough and Mechanical Engineering at Imperial. Others have decided to widen their experiences by following foundation courses at a variety of Design Colleges and then specialise in areas such as Fashion and Jewellery making. Head of Department: Mr T Williams

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AQA Drama and Theatre Studies AS Level The AQA Theatre Studies course is well respected by all Universities and Drama schools alike. It has been running for over twenty years. Like all AS qualifications the course is modular and contains two units - a written examination and a practical examination. Although the written examination accounts for 60% of the overall AS mark, much of the course is practical exploration to allow the group to explore key themes and ideas within the course. How is the course structured? Unit 1 - 60% of the AS - DRAM1 - Written examination - 1 hour and 30 minutes - Two essay questions worth 50 marks each DRAM1A - Response to live theatre You will respond to live theatre seen throughout the first year. You are allowed to take in two sides of A4 notes for each production into the examination with you. You select one question from a choice of four and be asked to write about very specific elements of that production. DRAM1B - Set text You will study ‘A Doll’s House’ by Henrik Ibsen. You will explore all aspects of the play through practical workshops and lessons. In the examination you will be required to adopt the perspective of an actor, director or designer and refer to a very specific section of the text. You are allowed to take your text into the examination with you. Unit 2 - 40% of the AS - DRAM2 - Practical examination - 20 to 40 minutes DRAM2 - Presentation of an extract from a play You will explore the theories of the French theatre practitioner Antonin Artaud and his ideas towards creating a ‘Theatre of Cruelty’. You will then apply these ideas to a scripted play. You also write a short piece of coursework to support your practical work. Where will this course lead? Because the course is respected by all Universities and Drama schools, it is a perfect choice of A Level. There has been a range of progression to a range of Universities including Balliol College, Oxford, Manchester, Exeter and UCL to read a range of subjects from English, Philosophy and, of course, Theatre. In the past students have also been fortunate enough to secure places at highly respected Drama Schools including Bristol Old Vic, Central School of Speec and Drama, East 15, Mountview and RADA. Head of Department: Mr A Williams

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Economics Exam Board: OCR

1 2 3 4

Markets In Action The National and International Economy Optional module (see below) The Global Economy

(AS) (AS) (A2) (A2)

There is no coursework element. AS 1. Markets In Action This is the foundation of the course. It covers the workings of free markets - how capitalism delivers to consumers the goods and services that they want; the factors which motivate firms, and the costs and revenues from which they derive their profits; the markets in which these forces operate - in particular, the cases of pure competition (e.g., the foreign exchange market), imperfect competition (e.g., independent schools or supermarkets), and monopoly (e.g., water supply). The central question of efficiency - when can the capitalist system be said to operate in accordance with the wishes of consumers? What happens when markets fail to deliver and government has to intervene to correct for ‘market failure’ - e.g., traffic congestion, health care, drug abuse. Situations in which government intervention creates problems instead of solving them (such as farm subsidies, tax avoidance). 2. The National and International Economy This covers issues such as inflation, economic growth, unemployment and the balance of payments, and the policies which governments adopt in order to try to achieve a satisfactory performance in all four fields. We also study the arguments for and against free international trade. These modules are examined as follows: Modules 1 and 2: 1! hours each - The question paper for each unit contains compulsory questions based on a particular theme or a short unseen case study drawn from real or synthetic material which may also contain quantitative information. You may be required to answer by means of a sentence or two of definition or explanation, by means of a diagram, or by making a calculation (or some combination). A2 To complete the A level course, we choose one of two optional modules, plus the final compulsory module. The optional modules are The Economics of Work and Leisure or Transport Economics After some years of opting for Work and Leisure, we have switched to Transport. We study the major transport modes, namely Road, Rail, and Air. As we all know, congestion and global warming are two of the most topical issues in this area, so the module links up well with the first module covering Market Failure. These optional modules are examined by means of a 2-hour paper consisting of a structured data-response question - i.e., similar to the case studies of the AS modules - plus one essay (chosen from three). The final compulsory module is titled The Global Economy. A great deal of the material focuses on the management of the UK economy: how can we achieve economic growth, low, stable inflation, low unemployment, growing employment opportunities, and a satisfactory performance in international trade. It

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then widens the discussion to cover sustainable economic development (which might be of relevance to Geography students too), and the pressing issues raised by globalisation. The exam for this Module also lasts 2 hours and is based on pre-issued material. Candidates answer a small number of short essay questions. Course Benefits Economics studies some of the most important and interesting problems facing us as consumers, workers or employers, citizens of Europe, and citizens of the world. Although it has something in common with subjects such as History, Politics, Geography and Business Studies, its methods are unique, and once you acquire the Economics “mind-set” you will be able to explain and analyse the world in a way which is intriguing, thoughtprovoking and useful. Economics is highly thought of by university admissions tutors, and - if you decide to make it the basis of your degree course - you can expect employers to take the same view. (Economics graduates are among the highest paid of all!) Course Requirements To be good at the subject you need three things: you need to be interested in what is reported at the front end of a decent newspaper; you need to be comfortable with numbers and diagrams (at least a grade B in GCSE Maths); and you need to be reasonably articulate and fluent in speaking and writing English (overseas pupils with an IELTS score of less than 6.5 – or equivalent – will not normally be allowed to take the course).

Head of Business and Economics: Mr S. James Teacher in Charge of Economics: Mr A Dean

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Engish Literature Exam Board: OCR An important question: Why study English Literature AS & A Level at Kent College? Well, there are a number of reasons why studying English Literature at Kent College has major advantages to studying the subject elsewhere. •

The subject is taught only by experienced A Level teachers, whose wide areas of literary expertise underpin their teaching;

Compared to most other schools, the class sizes at Kent College are relatively small and this has further benefits: o firstly, the teacher to student ratio is low, meaning you get more of your teachers’ time and attention, both in and out of the classroom, (this is invaluable when working on your independent coursework study!); o as a reflection of this, our results for the independent study module are excellent. Each year students regularly attain maximum marks for their coursework. In the summer 2012 examinations 85% of students were awarded A to B grades at AS Level, and 80% achieved grade A at A Level. o secondly – and equally importantly – in a subject where discussion of your ideas about the texts being studied is hugely important, smaller classes give you a greater opportunity to share ideas and contribute to lessons, allowing you to verify, develop and enhance your views in a supportive environment; o thirdly, the small classes allow the teachers to tailor the literature studied to the interests and strengths of the class;

Weekly academic clinics are available for students to attend who would benefit from extra tuition and teacher support;

Resources are excellent. Students receive brand new texts, (rather than re-used texts where the text is often unintelligible with other students’ notes scrawled across it!); video & DVD resources are excellent; the Library contains a very well-stocked English Literature section, with texts on the studied authors constantly up-dated; most A Level teaching is carried out in a dedicated A Level teaching room;

The department runs regular trips to the theatre, to see the texts studied in performance, or other works by the same or similar writers. Not only do we take students to see critically acclaimed performances in London (in the West End and at the Globe), but we are currently planning a residential theatre trip to the RSC in Stratford-upon-Avon, which would give you the opportunity to enhance your study of Shakespeare, who you will study as a compulsory element of the course;

Perhaps most importantly, students enjoy their learning experience and this is reflected in their results. In the summer 2012 A Level examinations, 100% of pupils achieved grades A to C. 80% achieved grade A* to B. Since the grade was created, we have had students attaining grade A* each year. In the summer 2012 AS examinations 92% achieved grades A to C (62% grades A to B) •

The Course The AS and A Level courses aim to encourage and develop students’ interest in English Literature, giving them a wide and varied literary experience, covering a range of poetry, drama and prose texts from Chaucer through to modern day writers. Both AS and A2 courses will include an element of continuous assessment, and

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students will also be required to compare texts at certain points of the course and write an extended essay on a Literary topic of their choice, as part of the A2 course, for the full Advanced Level. Students should find the AS course enables them to build on the skills they have developed at GCSE, although the standard will be rather more sophisticated. Similarly, A2 will build on the skills of developed at AS.

AS Unit 1: Poetry & Prose 1800 – 1945: (2 hours, closed text exam.) Two texts will be studied, selected from a range of authors. To develop and enhance their skills, students will also read a literary-critical text, and use this to inform their study of the prose text for this unit. [worth 60% of marks for AS] Unit 2: Literature post-1900 (Coursework): a folder containing TWO items of writing, one of which may be creative or re-creative. [worth 40% of marks for AS]

All AS examinations for English Literature will be taken at the end of 6.1 (allowing the possibility of a resit in January of 6.2) and will be precisely 50% of the full Advanced Level A2. Various weightings will be attached to the skills involved and these will be introduced early in the course.

A2 Unit 1: Drama & Poetry pre-1800: (2 hours, closed text exam.) Students study a play by Shakespeare and another play and poetry written pre-1800. [worth 30% of marks for A Level] Unit 2: Texts in Time (Coursework): a folder containing ONE essay written on 3 texts, selected from any time period and across periods, depending on the student’s interests. [worth 20% of marks for A Level]

The authors studied cover a very wide range: at AS level, poets include Robert Browning, Emily Dickinson, Edward Thomas and W.B. Yeats; novelists include Mary Shelley, Charlotte Brontë, Henry James, Oscar Wilde, Virginia Woolf and Joseph Conrad . At A2 level the dramatists studied include Shakespeare, John Ford, Ben Jonson, John Webster and R.B. Sheridan, whilst the range of poets includes Geoffrey Chaucer, John Milton, Andrew Marvell and William Blake. As far as is possible, we try to ensure that AS and A Level students experience a balanced course in terms of the study of drama, poetry and prose, and also in terms of C20th /21st texts and pre-C20th texts. Course Requirements As a general rule students will require a minimum grade B in both English Language and English Literature to follow the full A2 course. However, in certain circumstances, a good C grade will be considered acceptable, especially for the AS course only. As examinations can be taken on a modular basis, students will have the ability to assess their performance after the first year and make decisions based on results. Most students, however, opt to continue with the subject into A2

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After A level: Course Benefits An AS or A Level in English Literature is an extremely valuable qualification to have, both in terms of university studies and the wider world beyond. The skills developed during the course, such as the ability to analyse, to communicate effectively, and to develop a skilful written or verbal argument, are skills much sought after and highly regarded by universities and employers alike. The notion of “relevance” is changing rapidly and the study of Literature clearly fosters the skills needed for communication generally. Of course, English is a key subject for any career in the Law, Journalism, Publishing, the Performing Arts, and Teaching and Lecturing, but it is also a subject which complements a wide range of subjects which lead to careers in other areas, subjects such as History, Drama & Theatre Studies, modern foreign languages and the sciences. Historically, pupils have linked English with Languages, Geography, History, Art, Biology, Psychology and Economics, but we have also had several who have gone on to study Medicine and even Engineering. It is our aim to make the study of Literature a stimulating and thought-provoking activity, giving students an insight into some of the world’s greatest authors and their works, whilst also helping to nurture students’ own individual interests and tastes. Teachers teaching to their own strengths and specialisms makes for more engaging and enjoyable lessons, where the emphasis is very much on developing students’ skills, particularly their ability to think critically and independently. Head of Department: Mr S Gant

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Geography Exam Board: OCR Introduction A feature of this course is that it includes two weeks of residential fieldwork, one to Slapton in South Devon for AS studies and the other to Malham in North Yorkshire for A2 work. The department strongly believes that much of the work required at AS and A level is best taught in the field, these trips have proved to be very popular with the students. A small charge is made for the fieldtrip. There is no coursework in this A level: fieldwork is assessed through written papers. The course has been written to offer an exciting insight into many of the contemporary issues that we face in both physical and human environments. We have enjoyed some excellent results in recent years and regularly send a high proportion of our students onto University to follow Geography-related courses. As part of the AS fieldtrip we often visit the University of Exeter to provide an insight into a campus university. AS Module F761 The Physical Environment Hydrology The study of rivers, the problems and opportunities that they present. Cold Environments The study of frozen landscapes their evolution and current threats due to resource extraction and climate change. Coastal environments Examining different coastal landforms their formation and the management of coasts under threat. Desert environments The processes giving rise to desert landforms and the strategies to conserve fragile arid areas. Module F762 The Human Environment Current urban issues Urban problems ranging from housing to pollution and the sustainable strategies used to tackle these around the world. Current rural issues The pressures for rural housing, the decline of traditional ways of life and strategies for the future. Energy supplies of the future The looming energy crisis and the options for the future. Expansion of the service sector Managing the rapid growth of tourism and the impacts on the physical world. Fieldwork, 4-day residential trip in the last week of the first half term in 6.1 A2 Module F763 Advanced Environmental Issues Two of the following topics will be taught: Earth Hazards Natural Hazards explained, a detailed look at earthquakes, volcanoes and slope failure. Exploring the role that people play in managing these natural hazards. Ecosystems under threat A detailed examination of an ecosystem under threat and approaches to the sustainable management of the ecosystem, supported by fieldwork. Climatic Hazards Explaining hurricanes, tornadoes, drought and snow storms and the impact these have on people. Recent methods used to reduce the severity of these hazards.

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And Population and Resources The pressures of population expansion and the supply of resources. Explaining famines and global resource shortages. The crisis in Darfur and the role of the international community. Module F764 Fieldwork Skills 5 Day residential fieldtrip to Malham in North Yorkshire during the penultimate week of the summer term. A written paper based on fieldwork experience gained at Slapton and Malham, no extended coursework. Students compile a fieldwork notebook to reflect on their fieldwork experiences. A written paper asks questions about the range of techniques that could be used in particular pieces of fieldwork. A thorough understanding of these skills is developed through the two fieldwork courses. General Course Requirements The most important requirement to study this subject beyond GCSE is a genuine interest in the world in which we live. Contemporary issues dominate throughout this course and so an interest in current affairs is important. A good pass grade at GCSE is desirable. It is possible to start the Sixth Form course without having taken Geography in Year 11, provided a good set of GCSE passes has been achieved. Students will be expected to have the skills of accurate written expression, simple numerical and graphical ability, and a willingness to tackle practical work. At present Geography is combined with every other subject in the curriculum. It has been successfully combined with Science and Art based subjects and can act as a bridge between both areas. After the Sixth Form? A good number of students who study Geography at A level go on to read Geography at university. Due to the interdisciplinary nature of the subject it is also well regarded by university admissions departments when considering applicants for a wide variety of subjects. A level Geography students are also equipped with an excellent range of skills to support many pathways beyond the Sixth Form. Our students are well represented in many of the main professions. Head of Department: Miss A McCardle

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Government & Politics Exam Board: Edexcel Introduction This qualification is offered at AS level only. It is studied in the first year of the Sixth Form. Students taking this course are encouraged to develop a critical awareness of the nature of politics and the relationship between political ideas, institutions and processes. They will develop an understanding of the structures of authority and power within the political system of the United Kingdom and how these may differ from those of other political systems. In order to enhance their understanding of the political process, students will visit the Houses of Parliament. AS Unit 1: People and Politics This unit introduces students to the key channels of communication between government and the people. It encourages them to evaluate the adequacy of existing arrangements for ensuring representative democracy and participation. Unit 2: Governing the UK This unit introduces students to the major governmental processes within the UK. It encourages them to develop a critical understanding of the role and effectiveness of key institutions and of the relationship between them. General Course Requirements Students wishing to take this course should have a keen interest in current affairs. They will be expected to regularly read broadsheet newspapers. They should be able to demonstrate a good standard of English reading comprehension and written expression.

Mr S Sorokos

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History Exam Board: OCR Course Description A-level history comprises three examined modules and two coursework essays. Our chosen course offers a variety of modern and early modern topics from Britain, Europe and the United States. At AS-level • •

Mid-Tudor Crises, 1536-69 Italy, 1896-1943.

At A2-level • •

Civil Rights in America, 1865-1992 The Vietnam War, 1955-1975 .

The second coursework essay can focus on a particular area of personal interest to the student.

Course qualifications History appeals to anyone with a lively and enquiring mind. Those wishing to take the subject in the sixth form will usually have a good GCSE grade in it, but this is not a formal qualification for the course and many good students come to us without having taken history at GCSE level. A GCSE in English language (or IELTS etc equivalent) is essential but equally important is the willingness to work hard and think for yourself. Broadening the Curriculum It is hoped that A-level history students will take an interest in history which goes beyond the confines of the AS/ A2 syllabus. This may be by attending local Historical Association lectures and events, by taking part in our popular Debating Society or just by using some of the extensive range of resources available in the Department and the school library.. Trips A-level history students have several opportunities to take their learning out of the classroom. We have built excellent links with the Canterbury universities: lecturers visit Kent College several times a year and our students have the opportunity to attend university events and use the university libraries. There are also trips to the Houses of Parliament and the National Archives. Course Benefits History is a wonderful subject for developing the skills of communication and argument. People with qualifications in history follow an enormous variety of career paths in business, journalism, the law, government and academia. Anything, in fact, where the abilities to analyse a problem and present a solution are required. Head of Department: Mr G. H. Noble

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Information & Communication Technology Examination Board: Year 13 – OCR Year 12 - OCR OCR – OCR Nationals in ICT Level 3 National Certificate in ICT (Single Award) - 06502 National Diploma in ICT (Double Award) - 06505 About the Course IT is one of the most popular vocational qualifications subjects offered by OCR. The Cambridge Technicals build on the legacy and reputation of the OCR Nationals. IT is at the heart of everyday life, at home, work and in our leisure time from computer graphics and control systems to communications and problem-solving, IT has an ever increasing role to play. The Cambridge Technicals offer a broad range of modules that allow the student to develop their IT capabilities and understanding. The IT course is 100% coursework based with no terminal examination. Benefits •

Wide choice of units including hardware, software and online

Includes practical activities in all units – learn, do, review

Develops transferable skills for the workplace or future studies

Course Structure Single Award 6 Modules (2 Compulsory) over 2 years Double Award 12 Modules (2 Compulsory) over 2 years Compulsory Modules - Communication and Employability Skills - Information Systems Optional Units -

Computer Systems Managing Networks E-Commerce Computer Networks IT Technical Support Developing Computer Games Maintaining Computer Systems Website Production Installing and Updating Software 2D Animation Production

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- Interactive Media Production - Spreadsheet Modelling - IT Systems Troubleshooting and Repair - Database Design - Digital Graphics for Interactive Media - Digital Graphics How the course may benefit in the future These qualifications offer learners the opportunity for a programme of study to prepare for further learning or training and develop knowledge and skills in a subject area that interests them with the aim of enhancing their employability. The Cambridge Technical qualifications have been developed to provide learners with: • the opportunity to develop essential knowledge, transferable skills and personal skills necessary for further education and/or employment • the opportunity to achieve a nationally recognised vocational qualification. UCAS Tariff Level 3 Cambridge Technical Certificate (AS Equivalent) Pass 20

Merit 40

Distinction 60

Distinction* 70

Level 3 Cambridge Technical Introductory Diploma (A-Level Equivalent) Pass 40

Merit 80

Distinction 120

Distinction* 140

Level 3 Cambridge Technical Diploma (Double A-Level Equivalent) Pass/Pass 80

Merit/Pass 120

Merit/Merit 160

Distinction/Distinction Distinction*/Distinction 240 260

Distinction/Merit 200 Distinction*/Distinction* 280 Head of Department: Mr B L Rothwell

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Mathematics Exam Board: Edexcel Modules available: Core Mathematics 1and 2 Core Modules 3 and 4 Further Pure Mathematics 1 Further Pure Mathematics 2 and 3 Mechanics 1 Mechanics 2 and 3 Statistics 1 Statistics 2, 3 and 4 Decision Mathematics 1

AS A2 AS A2 AS A2 AS A2 AS

Courses available Mathematics can be studied either as one or as two A level courses; A level Mathematics and A level Further Mathematics, which can both be studied at either AS or A2. AS Mathematics takes up eight periods a week and consists of Core Mathematics units C1 and C2 plus Statistics unit S1 or Decision unit D1 A level Mathematics consists of Core Mathematics units C1, C2, C3 and C4 plus two Applications units (S1 and M1 or D1) Mathematics and Further Mathematics takes up fourteen periods each week. The six modules of A level Mathematics are completed in Year 12 with AS Further Mathematics and A2 Further Mathematics completed in Year 13. Kent College is one of very few schools in the area to offer Mathematics and Further Mathematics as a fully timetabled option in the sixth form. AS level Further Mathematics consists of a Pure Mathematics Unit FP1 plus two other Units. A level Further Mathematics consists of Pure Mathematics Units FP1, FP2 or FP3, and applications units M1, S2, M2, S3 and plus another unit from the list above. Modules and their assessment All modules are assessed by a one hour thirty minute examination. Each module counts towards 33$ % of each AS course. Course Requirements For A and AS level, you must have studied GCSE at the Higher Level. You should ideally have an A or A* grade, but those who have a B grade should discuss the prospects with their teacher. To follow Mathematics and Further Mathematics you must have a grade A or A* at GCSE. University Courses where Mathematics may be relevant. Further Mathematics is advisable for those wishing to study Mathematics, Statistics or Actuarial Science. For those intending to study Engineering at the more prestigious universities, Further Mathematics is very helpful.

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Mathematics is useful for many subjects at degree level. The prevalence of statistical techniques of analysis in a wide variety of courses means that Economists, Geographers, Medics, Biologists, Psychologists and even Historians can benefit greatly from A level Mathematics. It helps promote logical thinking and is therefore useful to Law and Philosophy students. Of course Accountancy, Computing, Engineering, Business Studies, Surveying and Architecture amongst many others also rely on the student having mathematical skills. Head of Department: Mr S Wiles

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Modern Foreign Languages Examination Board: AQA Why learn a Modern Language at A Level? Become one of an increasingly rare breed! Why is it that so many even highly-educated Brits continue to claim that it is unnecessary to learn foreign languages because everyone speaks English? It is true that many people do speak English to a greater or lesser extent, but according to many surveys it is also true that business is all too often lost in this country due to a lack of foreign language skills and cultural intelligence. It is widely accepted that people are happy to sell in a foreign language but are more likely to buy in their own! As a result of this, those with foreign language skills have a marked advantage in the job market – at all levels and in most professions, even if those skills are not directly required or even utilised. Languages are perceived as difficult, so people with language skills are perceived as being intelligent, conscientious and interesting – properly getting to grips with a different culture involves travelling and immersing oneself in a community, which indicates a sense of adventure and independence! In short, the ability to communicate in another language is exciting, satisfying – and admired! According to the CLLA (Centre for Languages, Linguistics and Area Studies) ‘Globalisation and other socioeconomic developments in Europe and beyond make communication across national and cultural borders more important then ever. In order to achieve this, we need foreign language communication skills.’ Why learn a Modern Language at Kent College? At a time when enthusiasm for Modern Languages nationally is waning, the Modern Languages Department at Kent College is recognised as one of the most vibrant in the Canterbury area. We are one of the few schools of this size still able to offer three languages to A-Level. The Modern Language teachers at KC are known for their infectious enthusiasm for their subject and for their commitment to transferring this enthusiasm to their pupils. They make no claims that a Modern Language is an easy option, but they know exactly what is required to maximise the potential of all their pupils and have the expertise and the determination to ensure that their pupils achieve this! Description of Course – Just think how exciting it will be to begin to speak another language without thinking about every single word? This is what we work towards! A-level MFLs are much more accessible now than they have ever been. If you are prepared to work steadily throughout the course you will be delighted by what you can achieve – a practical and life-long skill! It is challenging, but it deals with interesting and relevant topics. You will learn how to discuss and write about issues which are relevant to young people and society today.

At AS-level these include Media : Television, Advertising, Communication Technology Popular Culture : Cinema, Music, Fashion Trends Healthy Living/Lifestyle : Sport/exercise, Health and well-being, Holidays Family Relationships : Relationships within the family, Friendships, Marriage, Partnerships. At A2-level Environment : Pollution, Energy, Protecting the Planet Multicultural Society : Immigration, Integration, Racism Contemporary Issues : Wealth and poverty, Law and order, Impact of scientific and technological progress Cultural Topics : this involves an in-depth study of one of the following : - a region/community - a period of 20th century history

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- a novelist - a dramatist - a director/architect/musician/painter Lessons include at least one weekly conversation class on your own with an MFL language assistant and you will be encouraged to make the most of the opportunities which arise for visits, study days and exchanges. How could I use my MFL in the future? Universities not only offer specialist courses in MFLs, but also link it with many other disciplines Marketing, Business Studies, Law, etc. All such courses normally involve spending one year in the target language country. European funding is also available for able, well-motivated students. In the world of employment there is a great shortage of linguists, even if you do not study it beyond Alevel. Industry and business are crying out for specialist linguists, so if you are interested in a career either in those areas or in the media, journalism, travel and tourism, an MFL A-level will be of immense value. Your job prospects in any sphere will be greatly improved if you can also offer language skills. Language graduates have one of the highest rates of employability of all non-vocational subjects. The European Union also offers great opportunities for able linguists. All large companies and business need specialists who can communicate in another language. All those who study A Level will have gained an insight into the culture and civilisation of some of Europe’s and South America’s most vibrant communities. Heads of Department: Ms H Valentine Miss C Devanney Mrs B Alonso-Harris

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German French Spanish


Music Examination board: Edexcel (Curriculum 2008) It is useful to have taken Music at GCSE level, but not essential as long as you can already play a musical instrument to at least a Grade 5 standard and are able to read music proficiently. The course is based around performing, composing, listening and analytical skills in almost equal measure. As well as listening to a wide variety of music to develop a more informed appreciation of how and why it was written and/or performed, you will continue to develop your skills as a performer on an instrument or voice. You will also develop skills in composition with the opportunity to use music software and technology to develop ideas. The course is suitable for anyone who has a keen interest in creating and listening to different styles of music, and who wishes to broaden their experience and deepen their understanding of both live and recorded music. The outline of the course and how it is assessed is given below. The full specification can be found at the following website address: http://developments.edexcel.org.uk/gce2008/ and navigate via ‘subjects’ to Music AS level The AS qualification consists of the following three modules Unit 1: Performing (30% of AS level: 15% of the full A level) Candidates are required to record a 5 - 6 minute performance on any instrument(s) and/or voice(s). This may be as a soloist and/or as part of an ensemble and the music can be of any style. Improvised performances may also be submitted. •

The performance is assessed in school and then moderated by the examination board

Unit 2: Composing (30% of AS level: 15% of the full A level) Candidates are required to write a composition in response to a chosen brief, lasting approximately 3 minutes in length A choice of briefs are set by the examination board in September each year. Candidates are also required to write a CD sleeve note, describing aspects of their final composition and explaining how other pieces of music have influenced their work. •

Both the composition and CD sleeve note will be externally assessed

Both sections of this Unit must be completed under controlled conditions in school (15 hours)

This Unit is assessed externally by the examination board

Unit 3: Developing Musical Understanding (40% of AS level: 20% of full A level) Students study a number of set works from the New Anthology of Music, providing the focus for the first two sections of the final examination. Pupils will learn how to identify important musical features in both vocal and instrumental music and also learn to place the music into a social and historical context. For the third section,

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pupils will learn to analyse tonal and harmonic features of a piece of unfamiliar music and write simple 4 part harmony for SATB voices. Assessment is through a 2-hour examination paper in three sections set and marked by the examination board. Section A:

Listening Candidates will listen to short excerpts of some of the music they have studied and answer questions about the musical features they hear.

Section B:

Investigating musical styles Candidates will write about either the vocal or instrumental set works that they have studied, commenting on technical musical features as well as the social and historical context in which they were composed.

Section C:

Understanding Chords and lines. Candidates will analyse keys, chords and cadences in a piece of unfamiliar music then harmonise a short passage of music for SATB voices.

A2 level The full A level qualification consists of a further three modules Unit 4: Extended Performance (15% of the full A level) This Unit provides students with opportunities to extend their performance skills as soloists and/or as part of an ensemble. Candidates are required to record a 12-15 minute recital on any instrument(s) and/or voice(s). Candidates should present a balanced programme of music. This may be as a soloist and/or as part of an ensemble and the music can be of any style. Improvised performances may also be submitted. •

The performance is assessed at school and then moderated by the examination board

The recommended performance standard for this Unit is at least Grade 6

Unit 5: Composition and Technical Study (15% of the full A level) For this Unit, students may choose to either specialise further in free composition, and/or build on their knowledge of harmony and counterpoint through the study of more traditional compositional techniques. Technical Study Topics

Bach Chorales Baroque Counterpoint Pop Songs

Composition

A choice of briefs are set by the Examination Board in September each year.

Candidates must complete two tasks in this unit choosing either one composition and one technical study or two compositions or two technical studies. • • •

Compositions should be approximately 3 minutes in length Technical Studies are released in April each year Compositions and Technical studies must be completed under controlled conditions in school (3 hours

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for each technical study and 14 hours for each composition) Unit 6: Further Musical Understanding (20% of the full A Level) This Unit focuses on listening to unfamiliar music, aiming to provide students with a technical and contextual awareness of a broad range of musical styles, and the study of a number of further set works from the New Anthology of Music. Through the study of these set works, students will gain more advanced skills in music analysis and in essay writing. Set works are studied through focusing on two different Areas of Study: Applied Music Instrumental Music Assessment is through a 2-hour written examination paper in three sections, set and marked by the examination board. Section A

Aural Analysis Candidates are required respond to questions relating to unfamiliar excerpts of music. They will be required to place music into its historical context as well as recognise key technical features, including chords and keys.

Section B

Music in Context Candidates are required to write about the Applied Music set works they have studied, commenting particularly on the features that help place the music into a social and historical context.

Section C

Continuity and Change in Instrumental Music Candidates are required to write an essay commenting on specific technical musical features from a group of Instrumental set works they have studied.

•

Candidates are able to use the New Anthology of Music in the examination and are encouraged to make very specific reference to the scores in their written work Head of Department: Mr J L Ross

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Physical Education Examination Board: OCR Units of assessment Units

Level

Name

Duration

AS

A Level

G451

AS

2 hours

60% 90 marks

30%

G452

AS

An introduction to Physical Education A) Anatomy and Physiology. B) Acquiring Movement Skills. C) Socio-Cultural Studies. Acquiring, developing and evaluating practical skills in Physical Education.

40% 80 marks

20%

G453

A2

2.5 hours

G454

A2

Principles and concepts across different areas of Physical Education. ! Historical Studies. ! Sports Psychology. ! Exercise and Sport Physiology. The improvement of effective performance and the critical evaluation of practical activities in Physical Education.

35% 105 mark 15% 60 mark

The specifications take a multi-disciplinary approach, encouraging the development of different methods of enquiry drawn from a wide range of disciplines, with the focal point being the performer and the performance. These specifications relate well to other disciplines in the Social and Natural Sciences. These specifications provide an excellent foundation for candidates intending to pursue careers in teaching and coaching, sports development, the leisure industry, recreational management, the health and fitness industry and professional sport. The aims of the specifications are to encourage candidates to: • Develop an understanding of the factors influencing performance and the ability to apply these to a range of physical activities. • Develop knowledge and skills of selected physical activities. • Develop the skills necessary to analyse, evaluate and improve performance. • Develop an appreciation of social, moral and cultural issues which affect participation and performance in physical activity. • Develop the capacity to think critically about the relationships between the different factors influencing performance. • Develop a capacity to explain current provision for participation in physical activity in the context of social issues and global trends. Modules Unit G451 An introduction to Physical Education (2 hours) Section A: Anatomy and Physiology ! The skeletal and muscular systems. ! Motion and movement. ! The cardiovascular and respiratory systems in relation to the performance of physical activity. Section B: Acquiring Movement Skills. ! Classification of motor skills and abilities.

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! ! ! !

The development of motor skills. Information processing. Motor control of skills in physical activity. Learning skills in physical activity.

Section C: Socio-Cultural Studies. ! Physical activity. ! Sport and culture. ! Contemporary sporting issues. Unit G452 Acquiring, developing and evaluating practical skills in Physical Education. • Performance of 2 chosen activities or performance of 1 chosen activity and coaching/officiating of a second activity. • Evaluating and planning for the improvement of performance. Unit G453 Principles and concepts across different areas of Physical Education (2.5 hours) Section A: Historical Studies in PE. • Popular recreation in pre-industrial Britain. • Rational recreation in post-industrial Britain. • 19th Century public schools and their impact on the development of physical activities and young people. • The development stages of athleticism in 19th century public schools. • Case studies. • Drill, physical training and PE in state schools. Section B1: Sports Psychology. • Individual aspects of performance. • Group dynamics of performance and audience effects. • Mental preparation for physical activity. Section B2: Exercise and Sport Physiology. • Energy. • Health components of physical fitness. • Application of the principles of training. • Performance enhancement. Unit G454 - The improvement of effective performance and critical evaluation of practical activities in Physical Education. •

Performance or coaching or officiating of 1 chosen activity – must be one of the activities studied for AS. Head of Department: Mr N.Clark

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Physics Exam Board: OCR Below is a summary of the specifications of the GCE, AS and A Level (also known as A2) for Physics. The AS specification has been designed to provide progression from GCSE Science and Additional Science, or from GCSE Physics, as well as providing the necessary preparation for the full A level course. Kent College Physics department is very experienced with OCR as an Examination Board. The new specifications include the most interesting and relevant parts of the previous specification, made more accessible for the new GCSE qualifications. There are three AS Modules/Units taught in 61, and three A Level Modules/Units taught in 62. For the A Level qualification, 50% of the final score comes from the AS Module/Unit results, and 50% from the A Level Modules/Units. There are several aims of the new AS and A Level specifications: • • • •

To stimulate and develop interest for Physics towards further study and related careers. To develop an understanding of the importance of physical science to modern society. To develop an appreciation of ‘How Science Works’. To gain knowledge and understanding in the subject of Physics, and how the different parts relate to each other.

The new resources supplied by OCR and their partnership publishers are dedicated to the new courses, and look both stimulating and clearly presented. They will provide a clear and thorough preparation for the qualifications in Physics. The first Module/Unit at both AS and A Level (A2) has been designed for examination in January of Year 12 (AS), and Year 13 (A Level/A2). These are starred (*) in the tables below: Tables showing Module/Unit titles, content, method of assessment, and weighting: AS Level%First testing of AS modules Description Assessment method and weighting 1 hour written exam • Motion Mechanics * AS Level only%30% • Forces in Action • Work and Energy A Level %%%.15% (8) Electric current Electrons, Waves and Photons (9) Resistance 1 hour 45 mins written exam (10) DC AS Level only%50% Circuits A Level%%%...25% (11) Waves (12) Quantum Physics OCR set specific tasks, Practical Skills in Physics which are marked by KC Internal assessment staff, according to an AS Level only% 20% official mark scheme. A Level %%%..10% Module (Unit) title

Module (Unit) title

A Level (A2) Description

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Assessment method and weighting


Newtonian World *

Fields, Partcles and Frontiers of Physics

Practical Skills in Physics

Newton’s Laws and momentum • Circular motion and oscillations • Thermal Physics (13) Electric and magnetic fields (14) Capacitor s and exponential decay (15) Nuclear Physics (16) Medical imaging (17) Modelling the Universe OCR set specific tasks, which are marked by KC staff, according to an official mark scheme. •

1 hour written exam A Level %.%...15%

1 hour 45 mins written exam A Level%%%.25%

Internal assessment A Level %%%.10%

All questions in the written papers are structured, often with diagrams. Practical skills are all internally assessed (marked by KC staff): For both AS (completed in 6i) and A Level (completed in 6ii): Students are required to carry out three tasks: • • •

Qualitative task Quantitative task Evaluative task

(10 marks)%testing observation. (20 marks)%testing measurement. (10 marks)%testing critical thinking of data quality and experimental procedures.

Students may attempt more than one task for each category. The best mark will be used for the final assessment. The tasks are set by OCR and must be completed under controlled conditions. They are marked according to the relevant OCR mark scheme. Course entry requirements From past experience, we have found that anyone taking the current AS Physics course with a grade at GCSE in Physics or Additional Science below B will struggle with much of the content. There is a significant mathematical element within the course and a grade B at GCSE in Maths is required from any pupil who is not continuing with Maths at AS level. The same situation is anticipated for the new AS and A Level Physics courses continuing from Science & Additional Science, and Physics GCSE.

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Further Education and Careers A qualification in Physics at GCE level may be used in a wide variety of ways. It is a popular choice for those who go on to university to study Accountancy, Dentistry, all branches of Engineering (Aeronautical, Civil, Electronic, Mechanical), Geography, Maths, Management, Music, the Physical and Biological Sciences. Pupils from KC, taking Physics as one of their A levels, have recently gained places at Oxbridge for many of these courses and also Architecture, Computing, Economics, Law and Medicine. Head of Physics: Mr Stuart Worth

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Psychology This course is offered as an AS course only and is studied for one year in Year 12. Psychology is about people; about how their minds work, their behaviour and their experience. This course provides a general introduction to psychological theory and research across a wide area and it provides an awareness of the application and limitations of psychological knowledge. The main areas of study are indicated below. Potential topics for study include; the ethics of research, memory, visual perception, attachment, cognitive development, schizophrenia, abnormal behaviour, social influence, sleep, dreams, intelligence, and many others. Exam Board: AQA (A) New AS specifications (Assessment reduced from 3x1 hour examinations to 2 x 1.5 hour examinations.) Course Content and Assessment AS outline At AS, candidates will develop a broad knowledge and understanding of the core areas of psychology (social, cognitive, developmental, biological and individual differences) through a range of topics, chosen for their accessibility and popularity. Unit 1: Cognitive Psychology, Developmental Psychology and Research Methods Topic list • • •

Cognitive psychology, including memory and eyewitness testimony Developmental psychology, including early social development, attachment and the effects of day care Research methods, in the context of the topic areas.

Assessment Written Paper: Weighting:

1 hour 30 minutes 50% of total AS 25% of total A Level marks

Structured compulsory questions based on Cognitive Psychology, Developmental Psychology and Research Methods. Questions include short answer, stimulus material and one 12 mark question requiring extended writing in which QWC will be assessed. NB: QWC = Quality of Written Communication. Unit 2: Biological Psychology, Social Psychology and Individual Differences Topic list • • •

Biological psychology, including stress, factors affecting stress, coping with stress and managing stress Social psychology, including conformity, obedience and independent behaviour Individual differences, including definitions of abnormality, approaches and therapies.

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Assessment Written Paper: Weighting:

1 hour 30 minutes 50% of total AS

Three compulsory structured questions; one based on Biological Psychology content, one based on Social Psychology content and one based on the Individual Differences content. Questions include short answer, stimulus material and one 12 or more mark question requiring extended writing in which QWC will be assessed. Teaching and Learning Methods Because the syllabus requires a wide range of material to be covered in two and a half terms, all students can expect the pace to be fast and furious. However, although this subject and its presentation is demanding, it is endlessly fascinating and potentially deeply rewarding whatever future direction you take. Entry Requirements Since Psychology requires both literacy and numeracy and is an experimental science-based subject, candidates ideally should have English and at least one Science subject GCSE at grade B and Mathematics at grade C. Links with other subjects Since Psychology covers a wide field of involvement, students enter with a wide range of interests. An ability to generate ideas, combined with a willingness to be open-minded and flexible in evaluating them is essential. Some students have greater strength in logical analysis and some on the philosophical side. For this reason, it has been found that Psychology makes a good combination with both Arts and Science subjects and the mixture of people from both disciplines creates an interesting class. Prospects and Applications Whilst Psychology is self-evidently of interest to people thinking of a career in the "caring" professions, e.g., Clinical Psychology, it is increasingly recognised as being important to anyone who works with other people. The choice of Psychology careers covers aspects in the working world such as Forensic Psychology, Educational Psychology, Occupational Psychology, Sports Psychology, Counselling, and various forms of psychotherapy. It often forms part of management courses and many degree courses in vocational subjects such as Marketing, Advertising, Business Studies and Sports Studies include psychological elements. It is also the case that Psychology is now available in a variety of combined degree courses. This course aims to show how Psychology can contribute to a wide range of issues confronting society as well as illuminating the student's own experience. Head of Department: Mr A McCarthy

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Philosophy of Religion and Religious Ethics Exam Board: OCR. Outline The word ‘philosophy’ means literally ‘love of wisdom’. It is not a subject in its own right – it is always the philosophy of something, such as religion. In particular, the philosophy of religion examines the general philosophical problems about religion and God, while religious ethics evaluates how we decide what is ‘right’ and ‘wrong’. The OCR GCE and Advanced GCE Philosophy of Religion and Religious Ethics specifications are designed to support a course of study suitable for students from any religious background (or none). These specifications build on the knowledge, understanding and skills that students may have developed through the study of GCSE Religious Studies; they do not, however, assume or require any previous study of the subject. It is important though, to have an interest in life and the questions it poses. Philosophy of Religion and Religious Ethics is designed to enable students to: •

develop an interest in and enthusiasm for a rigorous study of Philosophy and Ethics within a religious context;

treat the subject as an academic discipline by developing knowledge and understanding appropriate to a specialist study of Philosophy and Ethics;

1. use an enquiring, critical and empathetic approach to the study of Religious Philosophy and Ethics. Module Titles AS Philosophy of Religion Ancient Greek influences on religious philosophy 2. A study of some key elements in the thought of Plato and Aristotle. Judaeo-Christian influences on philosophy of religion. 3. Students explore the concept of God as creator and the concept of the goodness of God. Traditional arguments for the existence of God 4. A study of the philosophical arguments for and against the existence of God. Challenges to Religious Belief 5. Students explore the challenges of the problem of evil and science to religious

belief.

AS Religious Ethics A study of ethical theories which are the basis of human decisions about what is ‘right’ and ‘wrong’. 6. Natural Law 7. Kantian Ethics 8. Utilitarianism 9. Religious Ethics Applied Ethics • These theories are then applied to contemporary issues such as abortion, euthanasia, genetic

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engineering and war and peace. A2 Philosophy of Religion Religious Language • A study of the uses of symbol, analogy and myth to express human understanding of God. Religious Experience • Students explore the following different forms of religious experience: visions, voices, ‘numinous’ experience, conversion experience, corporate religious experience. A study of how God might interact with humanity, by looking at the concept of miracle. Nature of God • A study of the attributes of God, including the views of Boethius in his discussion of eternity and God’s foreknowledge in book 5 of The Consolation of Philosophy. Life and Death • A study of the distinctions between body and soul, as expressed in the thinking of Plato, Aristotle, John Hick and Richard Dawkins. Students also explore the relationship between the afterlife and the problem of evil. A2 Religious Ethics Meta-Ethics • The study of different approaches: cognitive and non- cognitive; ethical naturalism, intuitionism; emotivism and prescriptivism and how these apply to ethical statements. Free will and determinism • A study of the views of the hard and soft determinists and the implications of these for moral philosophy. The nature and role of the conscience • The study of different views of the conscience as God-given, innate or the voice of reason or instilled by society, parents, authority figures. Virtue Ethics • Students explore the importance of practising the virtues and the example of virtuous people. Applied Ethics • Kantian Ethics • Natural Law • Utilitarianism • Virtue Ethics Environmental and business ethics • Students explore the issue of how humans should relate to the environment, its resources and species. The relationship between business and globalisation. Sexual Ethics • Students explore the issues surrounding sexual ethics – premarital and extramarital sex, contraception and homosexuality. Trips Students will have the opportunity to go on conferences to London, which offer a stimulating and informative look at major topics outside of the classroom environment. The chief examiner provides invaluable advice

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about how marks are gained in the examination. There is also an opportunity to enter a philosophical essay competition. Also this year two students have a chance to visit Poland. What could I go on to do at the end of this course? The course will enable you to develop a range of skills that are transferable to many areas of life. These include the skills of collecting, synthesising and interpreting information from a range of sources. The findings of your research will need to be effectively communicated. You will need to identify and develop the links between different parts of the subject you have studied. These skills are in great demand and are recognised by employers, universities and colleges as being of great value. Philosophy and Religious Ethics combines well with almost all other humanities subjects such as History, Geography, English, Art and Music. Also, if taken with sciences it will give you a broad-based curriculum which universities and employees value greatly. It sharpens your mind to grapple with such things as the definitions of concepts. It will force you to examine your own ideas and presuppositions. As Socrates concluded: ‘Life that is not examined is life that is not worth living.’ The skills in Philosophy of Religion and Religious Ethics are easily transferable to so many other areas of thought and practice, it offers a wide range of opportunities for further education and employment. Head of Department Ms E Jameson

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2013 Sixth Form Courses  

2013 Sixth Form Courses

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