Page 1

JOSEPH D. SCHAEFER-GLICK

University of Kansas Selected Works and Projects


ABOUT ME / OBJECTIVE A graduate student in the Master of Architecture Program at the University of Kansas participating in a rigorous and complex graduate program, Studio 804. My background is in architectural design, metal / woodworking, and the understanding of many architectural programs, have helped me have a mindful but competitive approach to different obstacles in the architectural field. I am looking for new challenges in the architectural field to learn the ins and outs of the industry, in order to further myself in the field and in design.

2731 Harrison Pl. Lawrence, KS 66047

Joseph Schaefer-Glick

(303) 957-6224 JSchaeferGlick@gmail.com

WORK EXPERIENCE University of Kansas 2015 - Present Lickel Architecture 2017 2016

Jay’s Valet, LLC 2011 - 2017

Digital Fabrication Assistant Helping students learn how to operate fabrication machines, laser cutters, 3D printers, and wood / metal working tools. Summer Architectural Intern Worked on various jobs for the firm, from red lining and detailing to rendering and other final product production Valet Parking Engineer / Manager Job included maintaining staff and clients, establishing strategic goals, maintaining high customer satisfaction, and contributing to team effort.

FOLLOW ME

EDUCATION

LinkedIn:

University of Kansas 2018

Studio 804 Rigorous and complex graduate program offered to students in their 5th year. Students collaborate to design, detail, and construct an ADA Accessible / smart home. This home will then be sold at the end of the school year.

University of Kansas 2013 - 2018

5-Year Master of Architecture Program Degree expected May 2018

linkedin.com/in/JoeSchaefer-Glick

Issuu:

https://issuu.com/josephschaefer-glick

REFERENCES

INVOLVEMENT, AWARDS, HONORS

Dan Rockhill, Professor Studio 804 T: (785) 393-0747 E: Dan@rockhillandassociates.com

American Institute of Architecture Students 2014 - Present Michael C. Lasseter Graduate Scholarship 2017 Rosenfield Scholarship 2016 - 2017

Dan Lickel, CEO Lickel Architecture T: (816) 421-0707 E: Dan@lickelarchitecture.com Jay Mills, Owner/CEO Jay’s Valet T: (303) 777-5297 E: Jay@jaysvalet.com

TECHNICAL SKILLS Revit AutoCAD Lumion Keyshot ARCHICAD SketchUp Rhino

SADP Scholarship Scholarship 2016 - 2017 Donald P. Ewart Memorial Traveling Scholarship 2015 KU Distinction Scholarship 2013 - 2014 / 2015 - 2016

PERSONAL SKILLS Creativity Team player Responsible Communicative Self-motivated Ability to learn quickly

KNOWLEDGE OF Laser Cutting CNC Wood Working Metal Working 3D Fabrication


Table of Contents Studio 804 Connected Wellness Rising Tides Splitlog Garden Shed Donald Judd Museum Lamborghini Museum Study Abroad

01

-

02 22 32 38 44 52 58


Studio 804 1220 E. 12th St. Lawrence, KS 66044 Design-Build and Materiality I and II, Fall 2017 & Spring 2018 Professor: Dan Rockhill

02


Studio 804 Studio 804 educates students through experience in all aspects of construction. Embodied by a holistic approach that includes both design and fabrication, the program is comprised entirely of graduate students that are engaged in every step of the process, resulting in the production of one building annually. We have consistently designed our buildings to integrate the most cutting-edge building products available and this provides an opportunity for domestic and international companies to showcase products in the U.S. market. Our studio strives to achieve building innovations through the creation of sustainable architecture with a high level of craft, exceed traditional design models, and promote the creative use of materials.

03


Studio 804 This year’s home is configured to be modern, open, and flexible. An additional flex space was also included in the plans to be used according to the owner’s preference, such as the inclusion of an additional bedroom or a home office. Along the East side of the house, a main corridor that is clad in glass connects the shared and private spaces, while providing an expansive view of the natural landscape of the East lot, which we have also acquired. In addition to designing, hiring consultants, establishing budgets, producing construction documents, applying for permits, and doing the physical act of building, Studio 804 students solicit most donations. This helps us understand and appreciate the vital role that building product manufacturers and suppliers play in bringing new technologies to market, as well as the real costs of the components we will use in construction.

04


05


PDU FLOOR PLAN

FLOOR FRAMING PLAN

06


ROOF FRAMING PLAN

RCP LIGHTING PLAN PDU 07


ADU FLOOR PLAN

ROOF FRAMING PLAN

FLOOR FRAMING PLAN

RCP LIGHTING PLAN PDU

08


09


10


11


12


13


14


15


16


17


18


19


20


21


Connected Wellness 346 Maine St. Lawrence, KS 66044 Integrated Design, Spring 2017 Professor: Kent Spreckelmeyer

22


Connected Wellness For my 4th years Integrated Design Studio, I was to partner with someone in the class to work on a Medical Clinic combined with a Community Center near Lawrence Memorial Hospital. The site of the project has many different practices located together but they are all in seperate buildings. These practices include an adult clinic, a pediatric clinic, an Ob/Gyn/WIC clinic, and a dental clinic. The new clinic would take these practices and combine them all into one building, allowing for greater flexibility and communication between practices. Combining these clincs also allows the new Medical Clinic to be larger, which would allow the clinics to grow within the larger form than they currently have. The new clinic would also include a small treatment and diagnostics center that could handle minor surgeries and diagnostic services. One of our main goals in this project was to bridge the gap between the large and monolithic hospital and the small residential homes around the area. In order to do this we placed our Medical Clinics near the hospital and the Community Center functions near the community. This allowed residents and clients to transition between the medical functions and the community functions with ease, starting to diffuse the boundaries associated with both functions. Amoung everything though, this also allowed greater security between the two areas. The building took form from the functions inside the building. The clinics are angled from the road in order to specify where the entrance is for the building. This was also necessary as we would want to have farmer markets and other community activities to set-up around the parking lots and on the terraced steps. The angle of the building also allowed more space to be utilized for these functions to happen. This project introduced and reinforced some design aspects, such as designing around real problems and designing with actual clients. 07 23


08 24


PRE-DESIGN GOALS FOR PROJECT AREA

Oral Surgery

Dentistry

MAINTAIN POINT OF CARE SERVICES AND PROVIDERS

CONNECT CLINIC AND COMMUNITY

SUSTAINABILITY TECHNIQUES Low Energy Use Intensity Innovative Source Energy Systems Innovative Energy Distribution Water Use Reduction Rainwater Harvesting Reclaimed Water Reuse On-site Wastewater Treatment

Health Care Access REJUVENATE THE COMMUNITY

CONTINUE DEVELOPMENT OF MEDICAL CAMPUS

Climate/Bioregional Design Narrow Floor Plate Energy Responsive Facade Green Roof Connection to Nature Innovative Stormwater Management Transit Access Innovative Parking

Medical Arts Building and Pharmacy

Ford Alumni Center Portland, Oregon Atrium + Circulation

Cultural Center Stjordal, Norway Community Space 25

Lawrence Farmer’s Market Lawrence, Kansas Exterior Engagement


PROGRAM ANALYSIS Pharmacy 1,500SF

Reception & Waiting Pharmacy Public Toilets

Treatment Center 4,400SF

Reception Waiting (Combined with Diagnostics Services) Public Toilets Clinic Toilets Medical Preparation Pre-Op Preparation Post-Op Recovery Treatment Rooms Small Treatment Nurses Stations Offices Staff Break/Lockers Soiled & Clean Linen

1 @ 250SF = 250SF 1 @ 500SF = 500SF

1 @ 400SF = 400SF 1 @ 980SF = 980SF 2 @ 60SF = 120SF

2 @ 200SF = 400SF 2 @ 100SF = 200SF 1 @ 100SF = 100SF 4 @ 140SF = 560SF 4 @ 140SF = 560SF 2 @ 360SF = 720SF 1 @ 200SF = 200SF 1 @ 150SF = 150SF 3 @ 120SF = 360SF 1 @ 200SF = 200SF 1 @ 200SF = 200SF

Medical Clinics (Adult/Dental/Pediatrics/ 3.680SF Womens)

Reception 2,830SF Waiting (Combined with Treatment Center) 1 @ 250SF = 250SF Standard Radiographic/Mammography 1 @ 500SF = 500SF CT Scan Viewing/Diagnostics 2 @ 240SF = 480SF Offices Soiled & Clean Linen 1 @ 500SF = 500SF 1 @ 300SF = 300SF Lab & Blood Draw 5 @ 120SF = 600SF Reception 1 @ 200SF = 200SF

Healthy Eating Establishments 5,000SF

Reception & Waiting 1 @ 600SF = 600SF Public Toilets 2 @ 150SF = 300SF Clinic Toilets 2 @ 100SF = 200SF Exam Rooms 12 @ 120SF = 1,440SF Consulting Rooms 1 @ 130SF = 130SF Nurses Stations 1 @ 250SF = 250SF Offices 2 @ 180SF = 360SF Staff Break/Lockers 1 @ 200SF = 200SF Soiled & Clean Linen 1 @ 200SF = 200SF

Diagnostic Services

Waiting Lab Toilets 1,900SF Blood Draw 1 @ 100SF = 100SF Laboratory 1 @ 300SF = 300SF Office 3 @ 60SF = 180SF Soiled & Clean Linen 1 @ 800SF = 800SF 1 @ 300SF = 300SF 1 @ 120SF = 120SF 1 @ 100SF = 100SF

Open Dining Area Kitchen Demo Kitchen Cafe Market

1 @ 1,100SF = 1,100SF 1 @ 800SF = 800SF 1 @ 800SF = 800SF 1 @ 1,300SF = 1,300SF 1 @ 1,000SF = 1,000SF

Fitness & Physical Therapy 9,100SF

Gymnasium Weight Room Multi Purpose Space (Yoga, Dancing Lessons, Spin Class) Locker Rooms

1 @ 5,000SF = 5,000SF 1 @ 1,100SF = 1,100SF 1 @ 1,500SF = 1,500SF 1 @ 1,500SF = 1,500SF

Education 8,800SF

Classrooms Community Rooms/Lecture Room Large Conference Room Greenhouse

26

2 @ 1,000SF = 2,000SF 1 @ 1,300SF = 1,300SF 1 @ 1,000SF = 1,000SF 1 @ 4,500SF = 4,500SF


1

DIVISION OF PROGRAM

2

CORRELATION OF SITE

3

CONNECTING CONTEXT + PROGRAM

NORTH

27

4

ADAPTION TO SITE

5

UTILIZATION OF OUTDOOR SPACE


Floor 1 Plan

Floor 2 Plan

Floor 3 Plan

10

10 24' 9"

10

9

9 28' 0"

9

8

8

29' 6"

8

7 7

7

16

16

47' - 0"

29' 6"

16

6

6

26' 0"

6

15

5

15

26' 0"

4

4

38' - 8 13/32"

29' 6"

3

UP

29' 6"

13

1

UP

UP

DN

11

A

B F

C

G

H

I

J

25' 0"

32' - 3 25/32"

C 1

28' - 2 13/32"

23' - 5 13/16"

12' - 0"

19' 3"

B

D E

DN

16' 6"

A

13 2 12

12 23' - 0"

1

3

29' - 8 13/16"

DN

28' 0"

12

14

13

2

2

4

14

14

3

15

5

33' - 6 25/32"

5

Level 2 1/16" = 1'-0"

F

34' 0"

G

H

I

J

1

11

11 A

B C

D

F

G

H

I

J

D E

E

1

Level 3 1/16" = 1'-0"

gymnasium/wellness

market

breakroom

linens

radiology

support/storage

mep

shared office

procedure

ct scan

locker room

restaurant/kitchen

reception

nurse station

consulting

radiology

exam room

greenhouse

imaging

lab/pharmacy

ct scan

cafe

education

vitals

restroom

consulting

prep area

demo kitchen

reception

28


29


30


31


Rising Tides 400 Bayshore Dr. Fort Lauderdale, FL 33304 Architectural Design V, Fall 2016 Professor: Keith Vanderiet

32


2 feet 2030

Rising Tides

6 feet 2070

Sea Level Rise - Fort Lauderdale

In a collaborative studio with two other schools, FAU and USC, we looked into the rising sea levels and how architecture can adapt to them. These issues were to be examined and the driving factors in planning and designing of a masterplan. The studio was split into teams and asked to come up with different solutions. My partners and I decided to go with a cut and fill operation to raise the land, as this would create more canals throughout the area of interest causing more diverse travel and recreation. After working on this master plan of the area the studio begin designing a building to accommodate shops, restaurants, and other community functions, along with 1, 2, and 3 bedroom apartments. Our main focus in design was to create a node or destination. The building began to take on two different shapes so we decided to split and separate them. This separation began to create a central shared community space which made the two buildings feel connected yet also gave them their own identities. The different views and gathering places further increased the main idea of making this site a destination for people to visit and see.

4 feet 2050

Begin with full residential building

split functions into two separate buildings

This project introduced me to designing around real problems that we face today.

33

began tweaking each building depending on its functions


Master Plan Central beach in Fort Lauderdale, fl

Site plan

34


2 Bedroom Apartments 1 Bedroom Apartments Residential Gym Business Center Expansion Space / Utilitarian

35


3 Bedroom Apartments Restaurant Retail stores Expansion Space / Utilitarian

36


37


Splitlog Farm Garden Shed 1053 Splitlog Ave Kansas City, KS Architectural Design-Build, Spring 2016 Professor: Nils Gore

38


Splitlog Farm Garden Shed Third year, our Design-Build Studio project was to design and build a shed that could be used for an Elementary School and community run garden. The requirements for this shed were to hold tools and other equipment for the garden. In order to achieve this the studio decided on a 100 square foot shed. Throughout the many different iterations of designs, the studio agreed on a shed that was able to be accessed from in and outside the garden fence. This design feature invites the public to see the garden shed while it is opened, also allowing a flex space in front of the shed for kids and community members to gather. In order to make this flex space more useful, we added a shelf that is accessible on the inside and outside. The facade and roof of the shed were made to incorporate a sustainable aspect. The metal mesh strip that wraps around the shed is to make sure the shed can breathe, while the shape of the roof was designed to collect rain water. While this project was a studio collaborated project, I participated in the design work and helped build the shed in the warehouse, then continued with the on-site instillation.

39


40


41


Site Plan Rendered By S. Elstein

42


43


Donald Judd Museum Cellar 222 Parking Lot, Central St. Kansas City, MO 64108 Architectural III, Fall 2015 Professor: Nilou Vakil

44


Donald Judd Museum The Donald Judd Museum is a simple design with not much detail in stonework since the concepts of Judd’s simplistic artwork run throughout the building design and detail. The design process started with a connection between the surrounding area, specifically the Kauffman Center, and the community of the Crossroads Arts District. The modern look of the museum came from the proposed master plan of Crossroads. The plan will have light rail and other transit going through it, creating a hub for much more modern development throughout the Crossroads District. This developing area is the main art district in Kansas City. The Donald Judd Museum helps the community by creating a friendly outdoor relaxation spot, as well as including a local cafÊ that is open to the public.

45


46


47


48


49


50


51


Lamborghini Museum 1 Rue du Colisee, 75008 Paris, France Architectural II, Spring 2015 Professor: Dennis Sander

52


Lamborghini Museum The fictional client for this partner project was the Lamborghini Company. Our task was to create a show room on the main road of Av. des Champs-ÉlysÊes in Paris, France. The design of the Lamborghini Show Room incorporates different floors at similar heights in order to offer visitors a different view of the show cars on every level. The design also incorporates three platforms that were originally intended to pop out of the facade and connect the street site lines with the building, but not enough time was provided in the semester to complete this complex facade design. In order to still highlight the three platforms, we installed lights into the project to highlight the Lamborghini logo in the glass of the floor. The built model was the main point of the semester and for that reason, the final model was about 2 1/2 feet tall and around 6 feet in length. Teamwork was a large part of this project as we both contributed to its design and production. Although our ideas sometimes differed, my partner and I focused on discussing our opinions and coming to a consensus for each part of our design. In building a large model like this we also found that it is essential to keep a timeline and to keep on schedule.

53


54


55


56


57


Study Abroad United Arab Emirates (UAE) January 1, 2016

58


The University of Kansas Architecture Program encourages and requires its 5 year Master students to study abroad. I took my study abroad trip to the United Arab Emirates. This trip was a very intriguing experience as I was able to study architecture, learn about Middle Eastern culture, and explore various destinations throughout the UAE. Being able to see all the possibilities that the modern age of architecture has to offer in this environment was an eye-opening experience. During the trip, I traveled to Dubai, Sharjah, Abu Dhabi, Fujairah, and Ajman. All of these locations offered something special and new. These locations are all currently in development and I would enjoy going back to see their progress. These are some but not all of the architectural marvels that we had visited. The Al Aziz Mosque is perhaps most notable, as it incorporates “see through concrete� and exhibits a more modernized approach to aesthetics and program than traditional mosques. An aspect of the UAE that I appreciated is its balance between modern appearances and traditional atmosphere.

59


Sheikh Zayed Mosque

60


Al Aziz Mosque

61


Burj Al Arab

American University of Sharjah

62


Massdar City

63


Burj Khalifa 64


Thank You Joseph D. Scahefer-Glick JSchaefer-Glick@gmail.com (303) 957-6224

Portfolio  

Selected Works and Projects

Portfolio  

Selected Works and Projects

Advertisement