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[Architecture_Portfolio] 2014–2019: Undergraduate Work

JOSEPH ALLEN PLATT JR.

University of Tennessee, Knoxville College of Architecture + Design


PHILOSOPHY What is next? What haven’t I tried yet? I have always been seduced by the new and the undeveloped ideas involving design and technology. I always push for designs that are not only fun in nature but also have a sense of experimentation to them. I believe design thrives in this realm of thinking as stagnation is a plague that takes form quickly but takes time to leave. As designers I believe it is our job to have a strong passion for something we believe in, but also be adaptable to new ways of thinking and creation. We always seem to project pieces of ourselves into our design work. At the end of the day my philosophy may change, but my passion will never fade.


[Project_01] THE GALE OPERA HOUSE Prof. Maged Guerguis | Fall 2018

pages(01-16)

HBG Design Competition 3rd AIA Middle Tennessee + BIF Award Competition 1st Global Undergraduate Awards Commended (Snøhetta) Craig Dykers Review Commended

[Project_02] WIELOSKALA Prof. Bartłomiej Hominski | Spring 2018

pages(17-28)

[Project_03] M.I.R.A. Prof. James Rose | Fall 2017

pages(29-44)

[Project_04] INTEGRATED MATRIX Prof. Michael Davis | Spring 2017

pages(45-54)

[Project_05] OUTPOST Prof. Michael Davis | Spring 2017

pages(55-64)

[Thesis_Research] THE DJ’s ARCHIVE Prof. Jennifer Akerman, Julie Beckman, Marshall Prado | Fall 2018

pages(65-72)

[Objects] pages(73-82)

[Professional Work] pages(83-86)

[Photography] pages(87-100)


not obstruct one from seeking that escape. Instead it will serve as a tool in times of need or interest. When people look to escape urbanism they immerse themselves into the wilderness. The Integrated Matrix handles that relationship between immersion and escape in a multiplicity of relationships that thrive together as a unit instead of a separation.

CONTEXT

02 12.5”

5”

50”7

5”

125”

Joseph Allen Platt Jr. University of Tennessee Knoxville

250”


P - 01


P-01

The Gale Opera House Boolean Block Studio

Professor

Maged Guerguis

Partner(s)

Shane Principe

[01]

Greg Lyn,, TED TALK, 2014

P - 01 Gale Opera House| Boolean Block Studio

boolean /ˈbo͞olēən/ adjective 1. denoting a system of algebraic notation used to represent logical propositions, especially in computing and electronics. undevelopable surface / un-dəˈveləpəb(ə)l ˈsərfəs/ noun 1. a surface that cannot be flattened permutations / ˌpərmyo͝oˈtāSH(ə)n/ noun 1. a way, especially one of several possible variations, in which a set or number of things can be ordered or arranged. script /skript/ noun 1. a list of commands that are executed by a certain program or scripting engine. descriptive geometry / dəˈskriptiv jēˈämətrē/ noun 1. the branch of geometry which allows the representation of threedimensional objects in two dimensions by using a specific set of procedures.

The Boolean Block Studio sought out to explore the capabilities of the Boolean Operation as a novel effect and its application to design. The studio started out with the physical experimentation of merging undevelopable surfaces together to create a new form. This process involved the Boolean Union of two pears and followed with casting a Boolean Difference of a multitude of pears. This experiment led to a better understanding of the process and aspects that such a command has over space and absence of space. The next step involved that of digital experimentation through scripting permutations. With the surface of a pear defined the script sought out the result of the “best” intersection curve of a union of these surfaces. This was defined as an intersection curve that had the longest length. This script was run a number of times to provide multiple iterations. Once completed, the “best” curve was selected and dissected through means of Descriptive Geometries where one can see all the aspects of the Boolean Operations to complete such a form. With this newfound knowledge the project was then given a site located in Chicago, Illinois. The site is tasked with providing a new Opera House for the city to utilize along the developing riverfront. The Gale Opera House is a design that is created by and for the city. Through wind simulations vectors were created to visualize flow through the site that influenced a form that reflects the aspect of the “Windy City”. This allowed for a lightweight form that took into consideration the surrounding context as it obstructs little to no views of the river. With a sloped roof people can activate its form on every plane and transition between different levels of the site.

“Symmetry is the absence of information”[01]

Fig 1.1 Bird’s Eye View Night rendering of The Gale Opera House

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P - 01 Gale Opera House| Boolean Block Studio


P - 01 Gale Opera House| Boolean Block Studio

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Fig 1.2 Scripted Permutation of the Boolean Union command on undevelopable surfaces, Pears Fig. 1.3 Grasshopper script used to create permutation of pears Fig 1.4 Boolean Union of multiple permutations to create a mold Fig 1.5 Boolean Difference cast resultant from the Boolean Union Fig 1.6 Piped intersection curves Fig 1.7 Section Cut into a model consisting of each previous aspect from the experiment

P - 01 Gale Opera House| Boolean Block Studio

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P - 01 Gale Opera House| Boolean Block Studio

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P - 01 Gale Opera House| Boolean Block Studio


P - 01 Gale Opera House| Boolean Block Studio

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P - 01 Gale Opera House| Boolean Block Studio Fig 1.8 Descriptive Geometry of the “Best” Boolean Union of the undevelopable surface

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P - 01 Gale Opera House| Boolean Block Studio

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Fig 1.9 Site Boundary Fig 1.10 Wind Flow Simulation that extends the site boundary Fig 1.11 Extrusion of selected vectors that reflect a peeling motion to allow for flow between levels Fig 1.12 Boolean Difference of North-East facades Fig 1.13 Site Axon of program within the scope of Chicago and the river system

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P - 01 Gale Opera House| Boolean Block Studio


P - 01 Gale Opera House| Boolean Block Studio

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Fig 1.14 Concept Model showing peeling motion of roof form Fig 1.15 Concept Model in Plan View Fig 1.16 River level plan view Fig 1.17 Concept Model showing Illuminating Capabilties Fig 1.18 Concept Model showing connection of multiple levels Fig 1.19 Axonometric Section from South-East cutting through multiple layers in the design

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1.17

P - 01 Gale Opera House| Boolean Block Studio

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00:01:00

00:02:00

00:04:00

00:00:50

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00:03:50

00:04:00

00:02:00

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Fig 1.20 Time stamps of sound simulation in the theater Fig 1.21 Time stamp of wind simulation Fig 1.22 Riverfront elevation facing towards the south facade of the opera house

P - 01 Gale Opera House| Boolean Block Studio


14

1.22

P - 01 Gale Opera House| Boolean Block Studio


Fig 1.23 Perspective Section of design Fig 1.24 Presentation layout of the final review

1.23

BACKSTAGE/ TO DRESSING ROOM

400 SEAT AUDITORIUM

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICESS

PUBLIC CAFE

GROUND LEVEL

B1

CITY GROUND

P - 01 Gale Opera House| Boolean Block Studio

15 PARKING

GROUND LEVEL

PARKING ACCESS

RETAIL/GIFT SHOP

CITY GROUND

PUBLIC ART GALLERY

GRAND OPERA HALL


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1.24

P - 01 Gale Opera House| Boolean Block Studio


P - 02

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18


Wieloskala | Polyscale _Study Abroad

Professor

Bartłomiej Hominski

P - 02 Wieloskala| Skin For The Szkieletor

buffer /ˈbəfər/ noun 1. a person or thing that prevents incompatible or antagonistic people or things from coming into contact with or harming each other. filter /ˈfiltər/ noun 1. a porous device for removing impurities or solid particles from a liquid or gas passed through it. mote / ˌpərmyo͝oˈtāSH(ə)n/ noun 1. a way, especially one of several possible variations, in which a set or number of things can be ordered or arranged.

Krakow, Poland is a city that prides itself in its history. With new architecture always being made, a challenge presents itself to find a balance between innovation and historic preservation. Throughout Krakow you will rarely find a structure such that of the Szkieletor or Skeletor. The Skeletor, or Unity Tower, is a 102.5 m tall building that has been under construction since 1975. Due to economic and political stress the tower has yet to be fully constructed. This bare beam structure thus adapted the name of Skeletor over the years. This project seeks to not only finish the Skeletor but to also design the urban context around the tower. The site design is that of a micro city with the use of the Golden Ratio. It takes aspects of Krakow and applies it to its area. With the edge of the site being lined with a tree buffer, people filter into the city and through the outer wall of pavilions. These pavilions would each be assigned to a different architectural firms from Krakow. This site is going to become too important and iconic for the city to be designed by one designer. Thus, if each pavilion was tasked to a different firm there would be a combination of not only designs but also ideals. Once through the outer wall of pavilions people are greeted with a moat; one not of water but grass. Here people can lounge and sun bath or go for a picnic. After the moat and passage through the inner wall people are greeted with the city square. The square is framed by multistory multi-use buildings centered around the Skeletor. Having the tower stand alone in the square sets it up to be this magnificent and dominant piece in the site. With 102.5 meters of structure the Skeletor stands atop all of Krakow. To enhance this importance an extension was needed for the tower, but not a physical extension rather an illusion. To connect outer walls to inner walls and for people to cross moats in cities, there is always a bridge that connects them. For this site, the narrative is inversed. The bridge is a long reflecting pool that starts at the outer tree buffer and passes the outer wall, the moat, and connects to the inner city’s square. When standing at the beginning edge of the reflecting pool the length of the Skeletor is doubled. Visually this makes the Skeletor a grander piece of architecture.

Fig 2.1 Rendering of site entrance to Wieloskala

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3rd

Skin For The Szkieletor

HBG Design Competition

P-02


2.1

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P - 02 Wieloskala| Skin For The Szkieletor


P - 02 Wieloskala| Skin For The Szkieletor

2.2

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Fig 2.2 Highlighted Site within the cities context Fig 2.3 Connections between similar typologies Fig 2.4 Similar Site Typologies Fig 2.5 Connection to contemporary tower, K1 Fig 2.6 Site Axon of Wieloskala

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P - 02 Wieloskala| Skin For The Szkieletor


P - 02 Wieloskala| Skin For The Szkieletor

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P - 02 Wieloskala| Skin For The Szkieletor

Fig 2.7 Site Plan of Wieloskala Fig 2.8 Elevation Render of facade Fig 2.9 Skyline Study of Krakow

2.8 St. Mary's Basilica 80 m Early 13th Century

Town Hall Tower 70 m Late 13th Century

Saints Peter and Paul Church 50 m 1619

Corpus Christi Basilica 60 m 1335 Wawel Cathedral _65 m 14th Century

Basilica of the Sacred Heart of Jesus 50 mz 1921

Skeletor 92 m 2009

K1 90 m 1972

Parish of St. Joseph 80 m 1909

2.9

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P - 02 Wieloskala| Skin For The Szkieletor

Fig 2.10 Grasshopper Script of Solar Analysis Fig 2.11 Axon View of Diamond Modular System for the facade Fig 2.12 Simplified Skyline of Krakow with Wieloskala Fig 2.13 Plan View of Diamond Modular System for the facade Fig 2.14 Plan View of the five panels for Diamond Modular System and their solar analysis Fig 2.15 Process of the facades design Fig 2.16 Visualization of the filter amphitheater Fig 2.17 Visualization of the ground floor interaction with the plaza

2.10

2.12

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2.11


00_Base

2.14

01_Diamond

02_Program

03_Solar

03_City

P - 02 Wieloskala| Skin For The Szkieletor

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P - 02 Wieloskala| Skin For The Szkieletor

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P - 02 Wieloskala| Skin For The Szkieletor


P - 03

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M.I.R.A. _Modular Inclusive Research Architecture

Professor James Rose

Partner(s)

Katie Lamb, Dylan Palmer

P - 03 M.I.R.A.| Integration Design Studio

module /ˈmäjo͞ol/ noun 1. each of a set of standardized parts or independent units that can be used to construct a more complex structure. integration /ˌin(t)əˈɡrāSH(ə)n/ noun 1. an act or instance of combining into an integral whole. research / ˈrēˌsərCH/ noun 1. the systematic investigation into and study of materials and sources in order to establish facts and reach new conclusions.

M.I.R.A., Modular inclusive research architecture, located in Cherokee Farms, Knoxville Tennessee, is geared toward the company of Ernst and Young. With a focus on using local products and lower construction footprint, wood is utilized on a module of 20’ by 20’, with other materials like glass, concrete, and steel wrapping around the structure acting as a protective shell, promoting transparency between the workers and visitors of the research campus, and allowing views and natural daylight to penetrate into the two major zones of research and office program. This piece of architecture also showcases LEED characteristics like : water collection, green roof system, raised planters, PV panels, and a geothermal pump all utilizing an under floor distribution system. This design promotes Cherokee farms as a lead research campus promoting values that could influence the future of design in Knoxville. When thinking of the best way to represent this creation of a modular system I created an animation. It displays the process of starting from a grid originating from the site and applying layers of design on top of it. When someone is occupying this space, they are immersed in a connected module that they may not even realize they are apart of. This modular system allows for free flowing spaces and for them to be rearranged with each new tenant occupying the space. The integration of these spaces allow deep connections with the people and allow for unique experiences in the research labs. The form follows this modular system as it subtracts at ground level allowing for a relationship of invitation to be established with the communal plane. Egress towers were established to serve not only as shear support but visual holders to the timber lab spaces. A moment of relief was desired in our project, so a semi-private courtyard was established with a orientation away from the public realm while also crating a public view with the architecture.

To see an animation of how the floor plan was established, open up a camera on any smartphone and point it at this QR code. This will take you to a youtube video at the url : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EDniwv96AV8 ------------------------------------------------------------------------->

Fig 3.1 Street Rendering of M.I.R.A.

31

1st

Integration Design Studio

AIA Middle Tennessee + BIF Award Competition

P-03


3.1

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P - 03 M.I.R.A.| Integration Design Studio


P - 03 M.I.R.A.| Integration Design Studio

3.2

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Fig 3.2 Interior Rendering of Research Space Fig 3.3 Arial View of Research Campus Proposal w/ Project Highlighted Fig 3.4 Plan View of 2nd Level Research and Plaza Fig 3.5 Massing Strategy for Structure and Form

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0’

10’

Atrium 01 Waiting Area 02 Open Office 03 Mechanical Space 04 Storage Space 05 Woman’s Bathroom 06 Men’s Bathroom 07 Breakroom 08 Private Office 09 Conference Space 10 Admin Space 11 Research Space 12 Raised Courtyard 13

3.4 [MODULE]

5’

[STRUCTURE]

[STRUCTURE]

P - 03 M.I.R.A.| Integration Design Studio

LEVEL ONE

[SKIN]

[FORM_FINDING]

[FORM_FINDING]

[FORM_FINDING]

3.5

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Fig 3.6 Axonometric Section Cut of Multiple Details Fig 3.7 East / Plaza Elevation View

1.1

P - 03 M.I.R.A.| Integration Design Studio

1.2 1.3 3.1

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ROOFSYSTEM TO EXTERIOR

[1.1]

PV panel system

[1.2]

CLT decking 6”

[1.3]

sheathing 1/2”

[1.4]

rigid insulation

[1.5]

sheathing 5/8“

[1.6]

CLT decking

[2.0]

FLOOR SYSTEM COMPONENTS

[2.1]

carpet tile 1/4”

[2.2]

pedestals, galvanized steel

[2.3]

junction box, telecommunications

[2.4]

sprinkler pipe system

[2.5]

electrical box

[2.6]

underfloor air return duct

[2.7]

CLT decking

[2.8]

rigid insulation

[2.9]

paralam support beam

[2.10]

aluminum insulated panel

[2.11]

diffuser

[2.12]

return air duct

[3.0]

EXTERIOR SYSTEMS

[3.1]

rigid insulation

[3.2]

facade support rail

[3.3]

aluminum insulated panel

[3.4]

double pane glass

[3.5]

aluminum mullions

[3.6]

perforated metal facade system

P - 03 M.I.R.A.| Integration Design Studio

[1.0]

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Fig 3.8 North Elevation View Fig 3.9 Exploded Axon of Building Systems

PV PANEL SYSTEM [1.0] ROOF SYSTEM [2.0] STRUCTURAL SUPPORT SYSTEM [3.0] GLAZING SYSTEM [4.0] SUSPENDED LED LIGHTING [5.0] CARPET TILE MODULE [6.0] PEDESTALS [7.0] SPRINKLER SYSTEM [8.0]

P - 03 M.I.R.A.| Integration Design Studio

SATCHEL RETURN DUCTS [9.0] CROSS LAMINATED TIMBER [10.0] CORES [11.0]

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[1.0]

[2.0]

[4.0]

[5.0]

[6.0]

[7.0]

P - 03 M.I.R.A.| Integration Design Studio

[3.0]

[8.0] [9.0]

[10.0]

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Fig 3.10 Model of Axonometric Section Detail Fig 3.11 Facade Pattern “1” Fig 3.12 Facade Pattern “2” Fig 3.13 Facade Pattern “3” Fig 3.14 North Elevation Facade Study

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1 | Public 2 | Semi - Private

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3 | Private 4 | Restricted

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P - 03 M.I.R.A.| Integration Design Studio

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Fig 3.15 Image showing the utilization of Virtual Reality as a means of representation (Joseph Platt) Fig 3.16 Image showing the utilization of Virtual Reality as a means of representation (Dylan Palmer) Fig 3.17 12 -2d Images used to create VR Experience Fig 3.18 Specifications of Renewable and Reusable Energy Systems Fig 3.19 Rendering of Courtyard from Garage Level

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renewable energy

rainwater reusage

rainwater storage

Annual

January Feburary March April May June July August September October November December

| | | | | | | | | | | |

4.66

3.18 3.93 4.82 5.36 5.32 5.61 5.60 5.34 4.97 4.90 3.63 3.20

(kWh/m2/day)

Solar Radiation | | | | | | | | | | | |

113,993

7,230 7,844 10,305 10,820 10,856 10,817 11,127 10,607 9,683 10,198 7,443 7,063

(kWh)

AC Energy

113,993 kWh/Year*

AVG RAINFALL OF KNOXVILLE, TN: 48”

January | 4.57 inches Feburary | 4.01 inches March | 5.17 inches April | 3.99 inches May | 4.68 inches June | 4.04 inches July | 4.71 inches August | 2.89 inches September | 3.04 inches October | 2.65 inches November | 3.98 inches December | 4.49 inches

CISTERN CAPACITY CALCULATIONS:

**14% OF ROOF AREA WILL BE DEDICATED TO CATCHING WATER,4,994 GALLONS PER MONTH WILL BE USED FOR IRRIGATION OF LANDSCAPE**

YEARLY NEED:

737 800 1,051 1,104 1,107 1,103 1,135 1,082 988 1,040 759 720

$11,626

| | | | | | | | | | | |

($)

Energy Value

= 73,000 gallons

cistern will be 12’ by 12’ by 9’

=2406 ft^3

18,000 gallons/ 7.48 (gal/ft^3)

=18,000 gallons

200(90)

200(dry period)

CISTERN SIZING:

Average Cost of Elecricity Purchased from Utility | 0.10 $/kWh

Economics

Requested Location | 2450 E J. Chapman Dr #216, Knoxville, TN 37996 Weather Data Source | (TMY2) KNOXVILLE, TN 9.4 mi Latitude | 35.82 N Longitude | 83.98 W

LOCATION AND STATION IDENTIFICATION

= 14%

= 32”

200 gpd x 365

1040/7200 roof area

(2/3)(48”)

RAIN CATCHMENT AREA: 2(520)= 1040 ft

DESIGN RAINFALL: (2/3)(AVERAGE RAINFALL)

P - 03 M.I.R.A.| Integration Design Studio

catchment area

Capacity factor | 15.2%

Performance Metrics

DC System Size | 85.8 kW Module Type | Standard Array Type | Fixed (open rack) Array Tilt | 35 Array Azimuth | 180 System Losses | 14% Inverter Efficiency | 96% DC to AC Size Ratio | 1.1

PV SYSTEM SPECIFICATIONS(Commercial)


P - 03 M.I.R.A.| Integration Design Studio

3.19

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P - 03 M.I.R.A.| Integration Design Studio


P - 04

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Basecamp

Professor Michael Davis

[01]

Balkrishna Doshi, B.V. Doshi Pritzker Laureate, 2018

P - 04 Integrated Matrix| Basecamp

urban wilderness /ˈərbən ˈwildərnəs/ noun 1. the inclusion of biodiversity in urban regions matrix /ˈmātriks/ noun 1. an environment or material in which something develops; a surrounding medium or structure overlay /ˌōvərˈlā/ noun 1. something laid as a covering over something else. satellite /ˈsadlˌīt/ noun 1. an artificial body placed in orbit around the earth or moon or another planet in order to collect information or for communication. integrated /ˈin(t)əˌɡrādəd/ adjective 1. with various parts or aspects linked or coordinated.

I seek to question the preconceived norm that nature has in relationship with new technologies. I question what it means to have an urban wilderness. I create an opportunity where urban design can enhance the wilderness experience. This experiment takes place in Knoxville, TN at Meads Quarry. The project involves creating a design that educates the public and can serve as an amenity for those hiking the South Loop trails just south of the quarry. Whenever architectural design meets nature, the finished project will typically be modest to ensure that design never overbears nature itself. However, I wanted to explore the possibility to make a design that announces itself amongst the context. However, I wanted the project to also seem like it always belonged— to appear like it grew alongside all the trees and has seen the history of the site just as the vegetation has. By analyzing existing site ecosystems and matrices, I integrated an urban matrix of technology that enhances the experience one has when walking the trails of the South Loop. I created an overlay of the existing system that connects all of the South Loop trails to how the roots of the trees spread across the landscape. There are info kiosks across the 42 miles of trail systems to inform hikers about the surrounding context, such as the wildlife present and historic information of the area. I propose to use these kiosks as satellites for the basecamp of my project. These satellites would be able to communicate with each other as well as the proposed tower at Meads Quarry. The beauty of this proposed integrated matrix, is that if one desires to immerse themselves deeply into nature and escape civilization, they can. All the matrix does is allow for enhancement of information that nature has to offer. One could happily hike these trails without giving a second thought to the technology they have at their disposal as the matrix does not interfere with any traveler. One could still pass through the site and by the design as if it was just another tree in the forest.

“Design is nothing but a humble understanding of materials, a natural instinct for solutions and respect for nature.”[01] Fig 4.1 Rendering of the Basecamp to the Integrated Matrix

47

Global Undergraduate Awards

Integrated Matrix

Commended

P-04


4.1

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P - 04 Integrated Matrix| Basecamp


P - 04 Integrated Matrix| Basecamp

4.2

4.3 Fig 4.2 Locating Diagram of Site in Relation to Knoxville Fig 4.3 Form Making Diagram of the Basecamp Fig 4.4 Floor Plans of the Basecamp at Meads Quarry

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6

5th FLOOR

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4th FLOOR

7 9

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P - 04 Integrated Matrix| Basecamp

3rd FLOOR

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Fig 4.5 The Matrix of Information Between Satellites / Kiosks Fig 4.6 Visualization of the Interaction Between a Satellite and the Basecamp Fig 4.7 Arial Curved Section Perspective Fig 4.8 Arial Perspective Fig 4.9 Visualization of the Interaction Between a Satellite and the Basecamp

?

?

?

? ? ?

?

? ?

?

?

?

?

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LEGEND Bodies Of Water Rails

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Roads Hiking Trails

? Info Kiosks

P - 04 Integrated Matrix| Basecamp

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P - 04 Integrated Matrix| Basecamp

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Fig 4.10 Rendering of the North Side of the Basecamp Fig 4.11 Presentation Layout of the Final Review

P - 04 Integrated Matrix| Basecamp


P - 05

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P-05

Outpost Good Neighbor _Framed Canvas

Professor Michael Davis

Partner(s)

Sydney Flannery

[01]

Greg Lyn,, TED TALK, 2014

P - 05 Outpost | Good Neighbor

ecosystem /ˈēkōˌsistəm/ noun 1. a biological community of interacting organisms and their physical environment frame /frām/ verb 1. surround so as to create a sharp or attractive image network /ˈnetˌwərk/ noun 1. a group or system of interconnected people or things.

A connection is a moment when one or more individual items work well together to create a new entity. While our site choice has very obvious connections, one example being the trails surrounding it, we tried to make the connections between ecosystems the most prominent. Using multiple design strategies we attempted to bring together the three surrounding ecosystems; the wetlands, fields, and the forest. The large garage like windows frame the views just outside the outpost beautifully displaying the various ecosystems through the gallery like space inside. The central point of the connection is located within the outpost, giving the occupants the ability to clearly view all three ecosystems while inside. With there being a plethora of trails surrounding the site, it was desired to create a connection between multiple terrains and across what was once thought unreachable. A boardwalk was implemented the wetlands to allow for trekkers to have access to other trails. This allows for an opportunity for the design to have engagement with people on the trails that are not directly using the Outpost. The entirety of IJAMS Hiking Trails is a large area, 1,000 acres to approximate it. This design is created with the mind-set that it can be implemented at any trail / ecosystem in the larger network of hiking trails. This is what led up to the idea of the Integrated Matrix and how multiple pieces can connect over a larger network of systems.

Fig 5.1 Night Rendering of the Outpost 1/2

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P - 05 Outpost | Good Neighbor


5.3

5.4

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P - 05 Outpost | Good Neighbor

5.2

Fig 5.2 Initial Concept of Framing the Forest Fig 5.3 Initial Concept of Framing the Fields Fig 5.4 Initial Concept of Framing the Wetland Fig 5.5 Initial Concept of Bridging the Ecosystems Fig 5.6 Diagram Representing the Layering of Different Ecosystems

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P - 05 Outpost | Good Neighbor


P - 05 Outpost | Good Neighbor 5.7 Fig 5.7 Rendering of the Wetland Ecosystem of the Outpost Fig 5.8 Night Rendering of the Outpost

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P - 05 Outpost | Good Neighbor


P - 05 Outpost | Good Neighbor

5.8

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P - 05 Outpost | Good Neighbor


Thesis Research

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Thesis Research

The DJ’s Archive Self Diploma Studio _Hook

Professor(s)

Jennifer Akerman, Julie Beckman, Marshall Prado

[01]

Elon Musk, Code Conference, Interview, [Spring 2016]

Thesis Research | The DJ’s Archive| Self Diploma Studio

interface /ˈin(t)ərˌfās/ noun 1. a device or program enabling a user to communicate with a computer. splinter /ˈsplin(t)ər/ verb 1.break or cause to break into small sharp fragments. identity /ˌīˈden(t)ədē/ noun 1. the fact of being who or what a person or thing is. archive /ˈärˌkīv/ noun 1. a collection of historical documents or records providing information about a place, institution, or group of people. surveillance /sərˈvāləns/ noun 1. close observation, especially of a suspected spy or criminal. artificial intelligence /ˌärdəˈfiSHəl inˈteləjəns/ noun 1. the theory and development of computer systems able to perform tasks that normally require human intelligence

Every day more and more interfaces present themselves for us to imprint a splintered version of our identities on. We continually find ourselves seduced by sleek and efficient ways of connecting and archiving ourselves in an attempt to preserve ourselves into the memory of existence, for we continue to exist up until the moment the last person forgets us. It is because of these traits that we continue to allow ourselves to be tracked and monitored by technology under surveillance. On the surface they range from lighthearted texts to social medial posts to gaming( avatars, usernames, handles, profiles, etc...). However, none of these interfaces are correct representations of who we are as it is impossible to log every word, every thought, and every emotion of ourselves…currently. These incomplete profiles are not completely false in the end. They are just splintered pieces of a puzzle that if pieced together can create a whole, perhaps a new whole from what they came from. The tool I am looking to use to piece these identities together is that of Artificial Intelligence and the way it occupies space and will be used in society. The sheer quantity of uploads and tracked locations calls for concern as it is argued now that our technology knows more about us than we do. It picks up habits about our daily lives and gives us “recommended” choices in our feeds. If we continue to upload more and more about ourselves these recommendations will become so accurate that they are being generated by our virtual selves. It goes without saying that every piece of data needs somewhere to store itself. The amount of data storage it would take to store the human populous would be larger than the Earth could allocate. This is determined from the reference of the fastest super computer in the world, The Summit, located in Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This prompts a different approach to the norm of data storage and data compression inside of CPU fridges. This data and use of false profiles are already being manipulated in today’s culture. From bots on social media to selling our profile preferences to 3rd party companies we are approaching an era of making a decision between privacy and integration.

“The odds that we’re in ‘base reality’ is one in billions”[01]

Fig TR.1 Initial Graphic for The DJ’s Archive

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TR.1

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Thesis Research | The DJ’s Archive| Self Diploma Studio


Moving into this semester have been exploring ways of giving my DJ tools to design a space. Current iterations involve coding walkers in 2d and 3d space to see what exactly can be created without my input. This created multiple iterations where I told the DJ to walk 100,000 steps. This is then to be super imposed onto existing maps of cities and spaces to see how the DJ’s choices would have impacted the context.

Thesis Research | The DJ’s Archive| Self Diploma Studio TR.2

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Fig TR.2 Visualization of the DJ’s Space in 3d Form Fig TR.3 Map of the DJ’s Capabilities of Walking


TR.3

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--------------------------------------------------------> To see the full research behind The DJ’s Archive, open up a camera on any smartphone and point it at this QR code. This will take you to the book uploaded to issuu at the url : https://issuu.com/josephplatt/docs/the_dj_s_archive


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Thesis Research | The DJ’s Archive| Self Diploma Studio


OBJE

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ECTS

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--------------------------------------------------------> To see the footage of Ferrofluid experimentation, open up a camera on any smartphone and point it at this QR code. This will take you to the video uploaded to youtube at the url : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T65d1IDz3mc

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During my time at Fleming Architects I participated in concept design and representation / visualization. Here are some examples of the work I participated in producing.

*All images are property of Fleming Architects.

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PHOTOGRAPH

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https://www.instagram.com/plattform.zip/

https://www.instagram.com/joetheginga/

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SPECIAL THANKS Hansjoerg Goeritz Ashley Pace Tracy Moir-McClean Katherine Ambroziak Tricia Stuth Michael Davis James Rose Bartłomiej Hominski Maged Guerguis Jennifer Akerman Julie Beckman Marshall Prado Diane Fox David Fox Mark Stanley John McRae Jason Young

I can’t thank these professors enough for all of their help and contribution to my academic career.


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Profile for Joseph Platt

Undergraduate Portfolio - Selected Works  

Undergraduate Portfolio - Selected Works  

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