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SUMMER/FALL 2017


SUMMER/FALL 2017

Editors: Komal Mathew and Jenny Sadre-Orafai Josephine Quarterly (ISSN 2334-5888) is an online literary journal accepting only unpublished poetry and art. This online journal was founded in 2012 by poets Komal Mathew and Jenny Sadre-Orafai in Atlanta. Published quarterly online, the editors are interested in work from both established and new voices. Cover Image: “Empty Seat Series� by Katie Kelleher

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SUMMER/FALL 2017

About the Journal

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My Son is No Longer a Novelty | Alexa Doran

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Broken Church | Laurinda Lind

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Word Problems | Mercedes Lucero

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Corporeal | Gabriela Torres

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on paper, this reads like a haunting | Sydney Vance

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Contributors

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SUMMER/FALL 2017 My Son is No Longer a Novelty Alexa Doran and I’ll always be angry / because I love the way the red carpet used to run / beneath my son / And I’ll have you know his bones / are no less tinsel thin at thirteen months than ten / but somehow you keep missing / the delicate shore of his grin / the way it washes over him / instead of scrambling across his chin / the mark of so many men / Buy the sparklers in bulk / I plan on sixty years of babying him / And no it’s not his birthday again / but there’s glitter and hours and God / so every day another baptism / another holy flood glistens / and believe me Mary / that same little sheep sparkles / and bucks inside him / but this one isn’t white / blank / or even all that innocent / take the dustbowl of his curls for instance / I have died / just touching them / wouldn’t you Mary / lay your hands / on the tussle of your son’s hair / let the little ringlets / ring you again / if the sun let you / and the air could

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SUMMER/FALL 2017 Broken Church Laurinda Lind No one is old enough to read this air though we receive it twice the first time for the reflection we can see the next for the hieroglyphic window that closes over like the day of the eclipse when the delivery man said Jeez, it's like 3-D out here. In the same way the light inside is double: Brightly dark. Darkly bright. Broken.

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SUMMER/FALL 2017 Word Problems Mercedes Lucero Solve each problem. Show your work. 1. What is the shape of space between mourning and disremembering?

2. If even 3-dimensional spaces have abbreviations, how many abbreviations can you locate in the day before?

3. Determine the distance between two bodies, where one body breaths slow and the other softens in the darkness.

4. The universe is expanding at an increasing rate. What would you tell the person who says that the sound of the wind is really the sound of the universe falling apart?

5. What is the final weight of reduction?

6. A traveler dwells at the border between winter and a wildflower, inside half-livid skin pressed against a cold window, over holy loving and no one wholly. Calculate a synonym for living.

7. Using a theory of waiting and forgiveness, how long will it take to move from one homesickness to another?

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SUMMER/FALL 2017

8. Pores are often vulnerable, filled with heightened understandings, eager to give a language. Find the pores on your body. Do you notice any condensation? Determine what is really leaving your body.

9. How many different kinds of open can you be? Start with your hands.

10. Imagine erasure. Imagine June. Imagine how long it takes to erase a name. How many ashes can you spread beneath your tongue until you speak again? Until your words are resurrected with fire?

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SUMMER/FALL 2017 Corporeal Gabriella Torres There are many distinctions among bodies: Passive bodies vs. active bodies. Bodies that orbit and bodies that are orbited by another body. Write out the word body enough times and its boundaries begin to dissolve and everything that makes a body starts to seep out and leave a trail on the sidewalk, the highway, the sky. Some bodies have more meaning than others. More significance, more value, more capital. Some bodies go missing and everybody cries. More bodies go missing and people cross off items from their grocery list. Some bodies are violated by a number of other bodies. This happens in every part of the world. One cannot escape the violence certain bodies enact upon other bodies. Bodies are in constant struggle or conflict to be more than corporeal. To be more than bodies. To be bodies running into the woods. To be bodies breaking away. The practice of stealing bodies is not limited to corpses. The distinction between a body and a corpse.

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SUMMER/FALL 2017 on paper, this reads like a haunting Sydney Vance underside—you try to maintain it, but your family likes to remind you you have a knack for slamming doors. baby succulent wants a disruption, but you are too small for that—too thirsty— think of your unmade bed, the mood it sometimes imitates—what will you say to her in the morning? what will the faucet think of her thirst? this is not doubt, not anger—no—this is something more insidious. maybe when you wake into the light, your throat will not be quite as dry as it is on this night—and the thing is, girl, we know you are wise beyond your loss.

you wake at four AM throat tight like losing consciousness or armor—both of the lights in the hallway turned off because no one—nothing—really turns them on these nights—anyway, you’re looking for the kitchen sink. in the darkness, you do not ask for a disruption, though it would be a brave thing for you to do. in the darkness, moon is the opposite of face is the opposite of moon is shag carpet is let’s shag, baby— remember?—is dirt in baby succulent’s pot is dirty dishes: but where is the sink? quiet sounds like stale bath—the echo— smells like roach’s

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SUMMER/FALL 2017

Alexa Doran is a mother, a lyrical gangster, and a PhD student at FSU. She has recently been featured or is forthcoming in CALYX, The Pinch, Connotation Press, The Dr. T.J. Eckleburg Review, Juked and Posit literary magazines. One of her poems about Dada artist Emmy Hennings recently won first place in the Sidney Lanier Poetry competition. Katie Kelleher is an artist and photographer living in Asheville, North Carolina. She spends much of her time searching dumpsters, scrap piles and alleyways for scenes or materials with the potential to become something beautiful. She tends to casually overlook this mention when first meeting people. Her work has been featured in publications and galleries internationally. Laurinda Lind lives and teaches in northern New York State. Some poetry acceptances and publications have been in Comstock Review, The Cortland Review, Main Street Rag, Off the Coast, and Paterson Literary Review. Mercedes Lucero is the author of the chapbook, In the Garden of Broken Things (Flutter Press 2016). Her writing has appeared inThe Pinch, Heavy Feather Review, and Curbside Splendor among others. A Glimmer Train "Short Fiction Award" Finalist and Pushcart Prize nominee, you can find her at www.mercedeslucero.com. Gabriella Torres is the author of two chapbooks, Sister (Lame House Press, 2005) and The Emergence of Brood III (Delere Press, 2014), which features illustrations by Singapore artist, PAYNK. She coedits the tiny with Gina Myers and lives in Iowa. https://gabriella-torres.com/ Sydney Vance is a poet who resides in Edmond, Oklahoma. In the spring of 2017, she received her BA in creative writing from The University of Central Oklahoma where she also served as the Senior Editor of Poetry for New Plains Review. Her work has previously appeared in Jazz Cigarette Magazine, 1890: A Journal of Undergraduate Research, and Words Dance.

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Josephine Quarterly | Summer/Fall 2017  
Josephine Quarterly | Summer/Fall 2017  
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