Page 1

Joseph Di Bella

Architecture Portfolio


Professional Work 1-4 The Four Seasons Hotel and Private Residences, Boston 5-6 Swar tz Residence, Boston 7 The Four Seasons Hotel, Bristol Lounge, Boston 8 Fargo Civic Plaza, North Dakota 9 Disney Wilderness Preserve, Florida 10 Leschley Residence master suite renovation, Boston 11 University of Virginia, Ivy Corridor, Virginia 12-13 The Mar thas Vineyard Museum, Massachusetts 13 Childrens Playschool, Amsterdam, NE

Udergraduate + Graduate Work 14-15 Thesis: South Station Connect, Master Degree Project 16-19 Interactive Research Hub, Comprehensive Design Studio 19-20 Live/Work Housing, Housing Studio


The Four Seasons Hotel, OneDalton

Boston, MA

Designed in partnership with Pei Cobb Freed & Partners for developer, Carpenter & Company, the new Four Seasons Hotel and Private Residences stands sixty one stories high in the Boston skyline and is New England’s tallest residential building. The three-sided parcel informed the building’s curved triangular form and complements its surroundings with a modern aesthetic.

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et tre

Cle ar w ay S

nS lto

Da

tre et

Belvidere Street

Park

St. Germain Street

Christian Science Center

Public Alley

Site plan

OneDalton, Site The building’s unique form allows separate and private access for residents and hotel guests. The lobby, cafÊ and restaurant enliven the adjacent streetscape.

3D model

Residential entry from OneDalton street

Exterior site section study

Exterior site section study 2


Site Plan

Typical king guestroom

Typical king guestroom

Typical king bathroom

The Four Seasons Hotel, Guestrooms

View from Belvidere Street

Typical guestroom floor plan

Enlarged guestroom floor plan 3


TV

Master Bath

Master Bedroom

02

14'6" x 14'5"

18'8" x 17'10"

TV

Floors 55–58 Penthouse Flats

Bedroom No. 2

Lin.

FP

17'11" x 14'10"

Quick Facts

Views

W.I.C

4,151Sq Ft / 385.6 Sq M 3 Bedrooms 3.5 Bathrooms Balcony 50 Sq Ft / 4.6 Sq M

N

Bath No. 2

W.I.C

W.I.C

Lin.

Living Room W

E

25'0" x 25'0"

Gallery

CL

Rotunda Balcony

Bar S

Service Entrance

Floor Plate

01

Private Entry Foyer

02 Powder Room

AV

03 Unit Locator W D

Utility Room

Se Entrarvice nce

Dining Room

CL

18'0" x 17'11"

DW Pkg.

CL

Cof. CL

Wine

Kitchen

North-East

18'0" x 14'2"

DW CL

Oven

CL Ref.

Bath No. 3

Bedroom No. 3

TV

CL

18'0" x 11'11"

The Four Seasons Hotel, Private Residences

Boston, MA

Typical residential unit floor plan

These are preliminary unit plans for informational purposes only. All configurations, dimensions, views, materials, and features shown are approximate and are subject to change without notice or obligation. Variations may occur depending, for example, on construction variances, location of unit and/or mechanical or structural requirements. Certain plans may show furniture layouts for illustrative purposes, but no furniture is included with the purchase of any unit. Depictions of household appliances are for illustrative purposes only. The final unit depictions in the condominium floor plans incorporated in the condominium documents may not be as shown in these preliminary plans.

ONEDALTON.COM 617-502-3700 or info@onedalton.com

Four Seasons Private Residences One Dalton Street, Boston will be managed by Four Seasons Hotels Limited and/or its affiliates (Four Seasons), but they will not be Four Seasons. The developer, One Dalton Owner LLC, uses the Four Seasons trademarks and tradenames under a license from Four Seasons Hotels Limited. The marks SEASONS HOTELS AND RESORTS,� any combination thereof, and the Tree Design are registered trademarks of Four Seasons Hotels Limited in Canada and U.S.A

Typical residential living room

Typical residential kitchen

Residential bathroom elevations

Residential bathroom floor plan 4


The Four Seasons Hotel, Swartz Residence, Force of nature

Boston, MA Located on the fifty ninth floor of The Four Seasons Hotel, this 5,000 sf penthouse unit was designed to mimic natures “wind swept�patterns. The curved feature wall was designed to display the clients art-work and also provides seating around the built-in curved fireplace.

Rendering - view of feature wall

Rendering - View of feature wall

Rendering - view of bar wall and living room

Feature wall sketches

Floor Plan 5


Rendering - view of kitchen

3D model - kitchen island

Rendering - view of family room

Interior elevation - kitchen

Interior elevation - family room

Interior elevation - kitchen and family room

Floor plan - master bathroom

Interior elevation - kitchen island

Interior elevation - family room

Rendering - master bedroom entry

3D model - bookcase

Rendering - view of soaking tub

Rendering - view of master bedroom and bathroom 6


The Four Seasons Hotel, The Bristol Restaurant and Lounge

Boston, MA

Rendering - view of bar and lounge

Located in the heart of BackBay, The Bristol restaurant and Lounge is Boston’s best restaurant for fine dining. The acclaimed space overlooks the Boston Common and reflects New England style elegance.

Rendering - view of restaurant

Floor plan

Rendering - view of bar and lounge

Section - view of restaurant in relation to streetscape 7


CONCEPTUAL STUDIES

CONCEPTUAL STUDIES

PLAZA SCALIBILITY

GATHERING SPACES

CONCEPTUAL STUDIES

CONCEPTUAL STUDIES

PEDESTRIAN+BIKE CIRCULATION

MOVEMENT HEAT MAP

FARGO CIVIC PLAZA CONCEPTUAL DESIGN

Fargo Civic Plaza CONCEPTUAL STUDIES SOFTSCAPE x HARDSCAPE

CONCEPTUAL STUDIES HYDROLOGY

Fargo, MN

The project celebrates the Civic Plaza as an invaluable resource for the City of Fargo by creating a space where the city can come together, which will contribute to a vibrant and engaging downtown environment and foster the City’s connectivity to ORGANIZATIONAL SYSTEM the river.

CRACKLES

CONCEPTUAL STUDIES HISTORICAL ECOLOGY > LANDSCAPE CHARACTER

CONCEPTUAL STUDIES PROGRAMS x AMENITIES

Concept studies

Organizational system

FARGO CIVIC PLAZA CONCEPTUAL DESIGN

FARGO CIVIC PLAZA CONCEPTUAL DESIGN

THE ADVENTURE RAVINE AND THE WETLAND PAVILION

WETLAND PAVILION FOUNTAIN

FARGO CIVIC PLAZA CONCEPTUAL DESIGN

FARGO CIVIC PLAZA CONCEPTUAL DESIGN

FARGO CIVIC PLAZA CONCEPTUAL DESIGN

FARGO CIVIC PLAZA CONCEPTUAL DESIGN

PAC SMALL APHITHEATER SPRING JAM

Pavilion cross section

THE FOREST PAVILION ON BOW BRIDGE | INTERIOR

THE BOW BRIDGE x THE RED RIVER CONNECTION 8


Executive Summary

Executive Summary

The Conservation Center for Innovation

Disney Wilderness Campus Preserve (DWCP)

The Conservation Center for Innovation

Vision of the Conservation Center for Innovation

Introduction At a time when increasing numbers of the population live in urban or suburban environments, the value of nature is not always appreciated and understood. Through its research and programs, the Conservation Center for Innovation will inform and inuence the next generation of conservationists, environmental leaders, citizens, and communities. It will also support the TNC’s Shared Conservation Agenda to create a world where people and nature thrive together. The Center will provide access to on-the-ground conservation educational experiences, energize youth to take volunteer action on behalf of the environment, and promote TNC’s vision of a world where people act to conserve nature for its own sake and its ability to fulll our needs and enrich our lives.

Guiding Objectives The Center will focus on four types of audiences and programs:

A Center that’s mission is to help

Youth Education Professional Training Initiatives

conserve unique ecosystems through

Public Outreach Engagement

Inclusive and engaging learning environments will foster and expand youth education and professional resource management training initiatives to inspire the next generation of conservationists. The Center will provide learning experiences through hands-on stewardship and eld science opportunities with classroom instruction. Groups, such as LEAF, 4-H, Gulf Corps, and AmeriCorps would stay onsite at preserve campuses for immersive internships. These groups would work with TNC’s dedicated staff to open their eyes to career possibilities, as they build self-condence, work skills, and conservation literacy.

Outreach programs will inform the public on important conservation topics that are signicant to the relationship between people and nature. The variety of engaging opportunities include passive recreation, such as hiking biking, birding, interpretive hikes, volunteer opportunities, and citizen science and stewardship projects. A docent program will assist with public and youth group tours, conservation and science speaker series, and interactive display areas. Staff will give presentations to community groups and lead regional conferences. The Center’s campuses would also serve as hubs to facilitate citizen voluntary conservation programs with surrounding communities.

education, outreach, scientic research, and stewardship, and bring

Center

people and nature together to learn about and address critical issues

Strategy & Research Platform: TNC, Academia, Agencies, and NGO’s

facing conservation across Florida’s (southeast) landscape.

Conservation Demonstration Platform

Focal Areas for the Center

The Center’s campuses will be managed to support demonstration and investigation of the Shared Conservation Agenda strategies as well as the Florida Chapter’s Transformational Initiatives. In addition to the SCA priority of connecting people with nature, the campus preserves will support tackling climate change/ natural climate solutions. For example, public and private forest land managers will be engaged through education, training, and demonstrations that can be applied to managing forest resources. The Center campuses will also provide opportunities to further test and demonstrate the ways biodiversity translates into resilience, and how that resilience is strongly tied to the sustainability of Florida’s ecosystems.

Connected Lands and Water The Disney Wilderness Campus Preserve (DWCP) was established in 1992 through an agreement with the Walt Disney Company and several public agencies to serve as a large-scale offsite wetland mitigation project that simultaneously addressed innovative techniques applied towards the restoration of hydrological systems and upland habitats. Due to its established infrastructure and long-term use for teaching/training outreach and scientic use, this 11,500-acre campus preserve is an ideal campus site for the Center. Located south of Orlando, at the headwaters of the Everglades in Osceola and Polk counties, the DWCP can serve as a platform for studying and educating issues in natural systems as well as engaging in urban-interface conservation issues in the expanding Orlando-Kissimmee metropolitan area.

Three campus preserves, each with a unique conservation focus, have been identied to serve as demonstration platforms for addressing the ve conservation pillars of climate change, lands, water, healthy coasts, and cities that TNC has identied as strategic priorities in Florida. Disney Wilderness Campus Preserve (DWCP), Tiger Creek Campus Preserve (TCCP), and Blowing Rocks Campus Preserve (BRCP) are three diverse sites that represent abundant opportunities to investigate and research pertinent questions to issues facing conservation. They can be utilized individually and collectively to facilitate opportunities and experiences as they provide a variety of learning and outreach engagements.

Campus Preserve Improvements The Concept Plan includes a variety of tools to create Center campuses with improved visitor amenities, better infrastructure and building to accomplish the objectives outlined above. These range from new interpretive galleries, improved roads, expanded learning classrooms, new learning labs, expanded office space, improved communication services, and onsite lodging for interns and visiting scientists. The three campus preserves are described on the following pages, each with its unique focal theme and resources.

Before becoming a Nature Conservancy campus preserve, the land was a cattle ranch where timbering and ditching to increase drainage and create pasture areas dramatically changed the landscape and reduced the amount of natural wetlands present within the site. By the late 1980s the land had been substantially altered and was being considered for urban development. Discussions of how to protect this piece of Florida wilderness led to a new approach to conservation. The Walt Disney Company, and later the Greater Orlando Aviation Authority, joined with the environmental community and state agencies to create the rst large-scale, offsite restoration project of its kind.

The Center campuses will serve as conservation demonstration platforms to foster collaborations with academia, agencies, community leaders, and NGOs from around the world. Each campus preserve will establish long-term development demonstration plots with clear objectives and treatments that are scientically designed with academic and agency partners. These long-term reference sites will serve as educational resources to support academic teaching and research.

Credit: Eric Blackmore

Credit: Ian Adams

Executive Summary

Executive Summary

Disney Wilderness Campus Preserve: Connected Land and Water

Disney Wilderness Preserve: connected land and water

Disney Wilderness Campus Preserve (DWCP)

The Florida Chapter of TNC offers training in prescribed burning as a management tool

The Nature Conservancy

Florida

November 26, 2018

November 26, 2018

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The focus of the conservation center is to maximize education, outreach and research opportunities to expand knowledge of our natural resources to connect nature and people. This concept plan examines three campus preserves where the Nature Conservancy will partner with education programs, schools, and communiExecutive Summary ties Rocks to provide a (BRCP) hands on learning environment. Blowing Campus Preserve

The Conservancy has teamed up with scientists from the University of Central Florida and the National Ecological Observatory Network to better understand issues such as climate change by measuring the amount of carbon stored in different habitats at the campus preserve. Sensitive instruments collect data on weather, water, energy and carbon storage. Scientic studies help document the value of natural habitats in providing ecosystem services.

November 26, 2018

New Covered Pavilion Maintenance Building

Renovated Office Building

Expanded Learning Classroom

New Learning Lab

New Exhibit Gallery

Blowing Rocks is an ideal location to engage a variety of audiences and partners. The preserve is located at the northern edge of the South Florida urban corridor and the southern edge of the more rural Treasure Coast region. More than 55,000 visitors come to Blowing Rocks each year, primarily to enjoy the rock formations and the beach, where swimming, snorkeling, and scuba diving are allowed.

Credit: Rachel Hancock Davis/TNC

Visitor education currently occurs through interpretive signage along three hiking trails as well as guided nature walks and programs facilitated by BRCP’s staff and interns. Given the preserve’s unique access to diverse terrestrial, marine, and estuarine ecosystems, visitors may spot a number of shorebirds such as the brown pelican, osprey, and least tern, as well as ldler crabs and a wide variety of small marine creatures. Healthy seagrass along the lagoon harbors urchin, blue claw crab, and the endangered Florida manatee.

Extended Covered Walkway

Expanded Bathrooms

Aerial view of Disney Wilderness Campus Preserve

Executive Summary

Disney Wilderness Campus Preserve (DWCP)

Please note that all renderings are conceptual and may change during later phases of design. November 26, 2018

Gateway Center

Renovated Office Building Landscaped Courtyard

Expanded Learning Classroom

Blowing Rocks Campus Preserve (BRCP) Sea grape tunnel at Blowing Rocks Campus Preserve

Porch

4 Room Bunkhouse + 1 Apt.

New Dock and Covered Observation Platform Changing Building Hawley Center

Beach Overlook

Indian River Lagoon

Renovated Entry Kiosk

Atlantic Ocean

Shade Structure at Observation Platform Learning Lab

Nursery

ATV Path to Beach

North Maintenance Building

Porch

Lab

Extended Covered Walkway

Exhibit Gallery

Photovoltaic panels on rooftops at DWCP

To better accommodate visitors with mobility issues, an ADA-compliant path and boardwalk will link the southern end of the east parking lot with the existing Beach Overlook so all visitors can enjoy a view of the beach. This boardwalk will also bring visitors to an additional interpretive opportunity at a new overlook at the “Dead Zone,” which illustrates how climate change can affect habitats.

South Beach Road

Expanded Bathrooms

Visitors who arrive for a specic program will be directed to the newly expanded Learning Classroom, which will be almost doubled in size to accommodate larger groups and functions. The central space can be subdivided and utilized in a variety of ways, for classes, banquets, and lectures. The kitchen and storage closets will also be expanded. The exterior covered porches will be expanded along the length of the building, and they will open to the newly landscaped courtyard and to the expansive views of the preserve.

Executive Summary

Site plan

Disney Wilderness Campus Preserve (DWCP)

November 26, 2018

Blowing Rocks Campus Preserve Aerial view of Blowing Rocks Campus Preserve, looking southward (BRCP)

Aerial view of Blowing Rocks Campus Preserve Visitor Experience The property west of South Beach Road will be greatly improved by the expansion of the Hawley Center classroom and offices, a new Learning Lab, improved Covered Vehicle Storage, and lodging in the form of a four-room bunkhouse with one apartment.

Beach Overlook

November 26, 2018

ADA Boardwalk

North ATV Path

Changing Building Renovated Entry Kiosk

Overlook to “Dead Zone” ADA Path

South Beach Road Nursery and Ext. Event Space 4 Room Bunkhouse + 1 Apt.

West Parking Covered Vehicle Storage

8

As they approach the Gateway Center, visitors will see the exhibit gallery standing proud of the walkway. Exhibits in this welcoming structure will include compelling large-scale graphics, interactive media, and artifacts that orient visitors to The Nature Conservancy and the Conservation Center for Innovation. In addition to describing the opportunities at DWCP that are available for day visitors, the exhibits will describe the history and the important research taking place at the Disney Wildlife Campus Preserve, describe DWCP’s role as an important partner for the Everglades Headwater National Wildlife Refuge and Conservation Area, and provide information about public programs.

Executive Summary

Expanded East Parking

Interpretive graphics throughout the Gateway Center will explain the green design features of the buildings and interiors, including those elements not easily visible, such as heating and cooling strategies.

Classroom

As they begin their trek to the beach, visitors will rst stop at the newly renovated entry kiosk, where interpretive exhibits will describe the unique habitats of BRCP, the long history of the preserve’s coastal habitat restoration, BRCP’s role as part of the Conservation Center for Innovation, and The Nature Conservancy’s mission. Additional interpretive graphics will be installed along the paths and beach boardwalks.

Upon leaving the beach, visitors can change into their street clothes at the newly constructed Changing Building; this amenity will reduce the number of people crossing South Beach Road in search of the facilities at the Hawley Center.

Expanded East Parking

ATV Path to Beach

6 Designs for new buildings and renovations at the Center will be designed to meet LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Standards. Design strategies to deliver a high performance building will include best practices for sustainable design: the use of alternative energy such as photovoltaic panels, energy efficient lighting and lighting controls, the specication of recycled materials, water conservation, minimizing solar heat gain (through orientation, siting, and envelope design), sustainable landscapes, high efficiency systems, and the commissioning of those systems to insure they are operating as specied.

New Learning Lab

Improved Beach-Goer Experience To increase awareness of the larger work of The Nature 11 Conservancy and the Center, the entry to the east parking lot will be moved north so that the Hawley Center will be more easily seen from South Beach Road. Visitors will be able to pull into the west parking lot near the Hawley Center, or they can pull into the east parking lot, which will be expanded to accommodate the increasing numbers of beach-goers.

November 26, 2018

ADA Path

The road will bring visitors and groups to the expanded Gateway Center, which will be improved with two new structures, enhancements to visitor amenities, such as expanded restrooms, and building renovations. The covered walkway will extend from the new Learning Lab to the Expanded Learning Classroom, thus creating a cohesive front façade to the Center.

Improvements at the Gateway Center at the DWP campus will include a new Learning Lab, an exhibit gallery, an expanded Learning Classroom, expanded bathrooms, and a renovated office building, all connected by a covered walkway.

Programs developed for the general public, volunteers, citizen scientists, academics, and others will further the Center’s strategy to connect people and nature, provide opportunities to learn about Blowing Rocks’ dynamic landscape, and address key issues of concern to the region—specically sea level rise and nature-based coastal defense solutions.

Sea grape tunnel at Blowing Rocks Campus Preserve

5

Visitor Experience New signage at the Old Pleasant Hill Road entrance to the Disney Wilderness Campus Preserve will welcome visitors. As they drive the 1.5-mile, winding Scrub Jay Trail, visitors will have the opportunity to stop and park at two interpretive pavilions, where interpretive exhibits will orient them to the Gateway Center and introduce them to the Center, the campus preserve, and The Nature Conservancy’s mission.

Landscaped Courtyard

Marine and Coastal Environments The Blowing Rocks Campus Preserve (BRCP) is a unique private barrier island preserve with shorelines on the Atlantic Ocean and Indian River Lagoon. Established in 1969, BRCP was named for its unique beach, which is home to the largest outcropping of rocky Anastasia limestone on the U.S. Atlantic coast. This 73-acre preserve was the site of a large-scale, 20-year coastal habitat restoration where non-native species were cleared to make way for native habitats, including beach dune, coastal strand, mangrove swamp, and tropical hardwood hammock. The preserve, which sits at the northern edge of the Florida Coral Reef Tract, is a very heavily used nesting beach for loggerhead, green, and leatherback sea turtles.

Executive Summary

Through extensive restoration work over two decades, the campus preserve has returned to a more natural state, supplying food and shelter for a variety of native plants and animals. DWCP is part of the Reedy Creek watershed, with two large swamp systems and two lakes framing the campus preserve. Rivers, atwoods, scrubby areas and approximately 4,000 acres of wetlands lie within its boundaries. Acting as nature’s “sponge”, these wetlands capture water, lter nutrients, replenish Florida’s aquifer, and provide essential habitat for plants and wildlife. DWCP has become an important partner site for the Everglades Headwaters National Wildlife Refuge and Conservation Area. The collaborative approach that produced The Disney Wilderness Campus Preserve is being applied to the Refuge project by bringing together state and federal agencies to envision a conservation area that includes both public and private land, the kind of wetland restoration pioneered by TNC at DWCP, and a combination of working and protected lands.

As day visitors leave the Gateway Center to explore DWCP’s trails, they will have opportunities to explore cypress swamp, freshwater marsh, scrub, atwood, and oak hammock habitats, as well as a rejuvenated longleaf pine forest, replete with a lush understory of native grasses, saw palmetto, and other shrubs. Birdwatchers may be rewarded with sightings of bald eagles, red-cockaded woodpeckers, a wood stork rookery, sandhill cranes, and Northern harriers.

The Hawley Center 12 Visitors who wish to explore the lagoon side of BRCP will enter the parking lot on the west side of South Beach Road and proceed to the Hawley Center, where its renovated central gallery will display new exhibits that reect BRCP’s role as part of the Center. Groups will proceed to the Hawley Center’s expanded classroom space, a large, exible space for classes, professional training, and outreach presentations. The classroom will be connected to an outdoor covered deck via double doors and a glass wall. A kitchen, with outside access, will be added to the building to facilitate catered events. In addition, the restrooms, will be updated and expanded, again with outside access. Learning Lab Towards the northwest corner of the site, a new Learning Lab, has been sized to match the current maintenance building footprint in order to minimize its development footprint on the site. The Lab will attach to the existing open porch, which will be renovated with bathrooms and a storage room. It will open onto the Nursery area, which will also function as an events space. This Lab will provide space for visiting researchers and scientists. Its stations will incorporate water and compressed air connections and moveable lab benches that can be rearranged to support program needs.

Executive Summary

View of the new Exhibits Gallery, looking towards the courtyard off the expanded Learning Classroom (right) at Disney Wilderness Preserve Campus

View of Exhibits Gallery at Disney Wilderness Preserve

Disney Wilderness Campus Preserve (DWCP) Maintenance Building

Learning Lab

Shade Structure at Observation Platform

Executive Summary

Hawley Center Expanded

November 26, 2018

New Dock and Covered Observation Platform

Blowing Rocks Campus Preserve (BRCP)

View of the north lodging site

November 26, 2018

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Lodging 7 The Disney Wilderness Preserve Campus, as well as the other Center campuses, is open to scientists and students from throughout the world. Academic research partnerships support the use of interns, students, and visiting researchers who will partner directly with TNC staff. Visiting researchers will have the ability to reside on site at DWCP in modern dorms that will be built in a disturbed eld to the north of the Gateway Center. Enough space is available in this area for parking, two central courtyards, up to eight bunkhouses, a multi-purpose building, and up to four sites for RV campers.

Phase 2

4 - RV Sites Phase 1

Multi-Purpose Building

View of the classroom and extended deck at the north end of the expanded Hawley Center

View of The Hawley Center

A new boardwalk leads visitors from the central gallery of the Hawley Center directly to the new dock and observation platform on the Indian River Lagoon

Lodging is planned to be implemented in two phases: Phase 1, at the southern end of the site, includes four bunkhouses (three 8-room bunkhouses and one 6-room bunkhouse, which also includes an apartment), a multipurpose building, and four RV sites. Phase 2, located further north on the site, duplicates the four bunkhouses of the Phase 1 construction.

View of north lodging site, with courtyard and re pit

View of the north lodging site November 26, 2018

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9


Leschley Residence, Master Suite Renovation

Boston, MA

The clients for this master bedroom suite renovation requested a peaceful oasis, with a graceful transition to the adjacent traditional home. Increased privacy and creating an open feeling space were primary concerns. The clients were interested in creating a “spa-like” experience.

Rendering - view of bathroom

Floor plan

1

1

1

1

2

1/2" = 1'-0" 1/2" = 1'-0" 1/2" = 1'-0"

Interior elevations BATHROOM bathroom ELEVATION 1 BATHROOM ELEVATION ELEVATION 1 1/2" =11'-0"BATHROOM 1 1/2" = 1'-0" 1/2" = 1'-0"

1

BATHROOM BATHROOM BATHROOM ELEVATION ELEVATION ELEVATION 2 2 2 2 2

3

1/2" = 1'-0" 1/2" = 1'-0" 1/2" = 1'-0"

BATHROOM ELEVATION 2 BATHROOM ELEVATION 2 ELEVATION 2 1/2" =21'-0"BATHROOM 2

3

1/2" = 1'-0" 1/2" = 1'-0"

ENLARGED VANITY PLAN 1 1/2" = 1'-0"

ENLARGED VANITY PLAN 1 1/2" = 1'-0"

1/2" = 1'-0" 1/2" = 1'-0" 1/2" = 1'-0"

Plan detail - bathroom vanity 2

2

1 1/2" = 1'-0"

BATHROOM BATHROOM BATHROOM ELEVATION ELEVATION ELEVATION 3 3 3 3 3

ENLARGED VANITY PLAN 2 1 1/2" = 1'-0"

2

BATHROOM ELEVATION 3 BATHROOM ELEVATION 3 ELEVATION 3 1/2" =31'-0"BATHROOM 3

2

ENLARGED VANITY PLAN 2 1 1/2" = 1'-0"

ENLARGED VANITY PLAN 2 1 1/2" = 1'-0"

1/2" = 1'-0" 1/2" = 1'-0"

1/10/2020 1:28:57 1/10/2020 PM 1:28:57 PM

1

BATHROOM BATHROOM BATHROOM ELEVATION ELEVATION ELEVATION 1 1 1 1 1

ENLARGED VANITY PLAN

4

4

VANITY SECTION AT SINK 1 1/2" = 1'-0"

VANITY SECTION AT SINK

5

1/10/2020 1:28:57 PM

5

Interior bathroom elevations 5

ATHROOM BATHROOM BATHROOM ELEVATION ELEVATION ELEVATION 4 4 4 4 4

SHOWER SHOWER ELEVATION SHOWER ELEVATION ELEVATION 2 2 2 5 5 1/2" = 1'-0" 1/2" = 1'-0" 1/2" = 1'-0"

3" = 1'-0"

ENLARGED LAVATORY PLAN 3" = 1'-0"

Section - bathroom vanity

4

SHOWER SHOWER ELEVATION SHOWER ELEVATION ELEVATION 3 3 3 6 6

6

ENLARGED LAVATORY PLAN

1 1/2" = 1'-0"

1/2" = 1'-0" 1/2" = 1'-0" 1/2" = 1'-0"

VANITY SECTION AT SINK 1 1/2" = 1'-0"

5

ENLARGED 3" = 1'-0"

2" = 1'-0" 1/2" = 1'-0" 1/2" = 1'-0"

OOM ELEVATION 4

BATHROOM ELEVATION ELEVATION 4 0"BATHROOM 4 1/2" = 1'-0" 1/2" = 1'-0"

5 4

SHOWER ELEVATION 2 SHOWER ELEVATION 2 ELEVATION 2 1/2" =51'-0"SHOWER 5 1/2" = 1'-0" 1/2" = 1'-0"

6

SHOWER ELEVATION 3 SHOWER ELEVATION 3 ELEVATION 3 1/2" =61'-0"SHOWER 6 1/2" = 1'-0" 1/2" = 1'-0"

3D model - Closet SHOWER SHOWER ELEVATION SHOWER ELEVATION ELEVATION 4 4 4 7 7 1/2" = 1'-0" 1/2" = 1'-0" 1/2" = 1'-0"

Rendering - view of closet 8

TOILET TOILET ROOM TOILET ROOM - INTERIOR ROOM - INTERIOR -ELEVATION INTERIOR ELEVATION ELEVATION TOILET 1 TOILET 1 ROOM TOILET 1ROOM - INTERIOR ROOM - INTERIOR -ELEVATION INTERIOR ELEVATION ELEVATION 2 TOILET 2 TOILET ROOM 2 TOILET ROOM - INTERIOR ROOM - INTERIOR -ELEVATION INTERIOR ELEVATION ELEVATION TOILET 3 TOILET 3 ROOM TOILET 3ROOM - INTERIOR ROOM - INTERIOR -ELEVATION INTERIOR ELEVATION ELEVATION 4 4 4 8 8 9 9 9 10 10 10 11 11 11 1/2" = 1'-0" 1/2" = 1'-0" 1/2" = 1'-0"

1/2" = 1'-0" 1/2" = 1'-0" 1/2" = 1'-0"

1/2" = 1'-0" 1/2" = 1'-0" 1/2" = 1'-0"

1/2" = 1'-0" 1/2" = 1'-0" 1/2" = 1'-0"

10


Charlottesville, VA University of Virginia, Ivy Corridor Massing and Scale The Ivy Corridor site lies at the center of campus and acts as a significant entry to the University grounds as well as a critical link between the north grounds, arts Access grounds and central grounds. ThisSite feasibility study tests multiple factors such as program, building massing, functional requirements, site access and circulation. In addition, it complements the overall site redevelopment Public Engagementand academic adjacencies. Hospitality Task Force Recommendation

Visibility

Support for up to a 300 room hotel and up to 35,000 square feet of conference space/meeting rooms; should serve UVA audiences and meeting space needs and complement Boar’s Head and Darden Inns.

Guest Room Count Conference Facility SF/Key Food Service Opportunities

Parcel Diagram Parcel 7: Site plan

Fitness Facility/Pool

+527.00

+530.00

Ivy Corridor Framework Plan - Hospitality feasibility studies Program – 225 Guest rooms (264 bays) Conference space – 25,000 sf +/- 220,000 GSF Parcels – 4/5 & 7

+503.00

+503.00

+ 530.00

Parcel 5 Parcel 7 Parcel 4

Parcel 7: Circulation - Drop-off

Site Plan

Parcel 7: Circulation - Service access

Massing study

80’-0”

ROOMS BALLROOM

LOBBY

MEETING ROOMS

RESTAURANT VISITOR FITNESS CAFE CENTER

+610 +600 +590 +580 +570 +560 +550 +530

67’-0”

Parcel 7: Site section

+503

Site Section

11


Marthas Vineyard, MA The Martha’s Vineyard Museum Vineyard Museum TheMartha’s Martha’s Vineyard Museum, formerly The Marthas Vineyard Vineyard Haven, MA

historical society, has been an important island institution since 1922. The Martha’s Vineyard Museum, formerly the Martha’s Vineyard Historical Society, has been an important island institution since 1922. strategized Current facilities are about inadequateits for the display and storIn 2010 as the museum future, Oudens Ello age of the Museum’s permanent collection, for fulfilling the Museum’s core mission of education and community outreach. In 2010, as the to Museum strategized its future, OEA was retained Architecture was retained develop aabout feasibility study that led to the to develop a feasibility study that led to the Museum’s purchase of a land parcel in Vineyard purchase of created a land parcel in Vineyard OEA has created a design Haven OEA has a design that balances the needs of Haven. respecting the preeminence of the 1895 wood-framed Marine Hospital building, while meeting the Museum’s program needs. The that balances the needs of respecting preeminence of the 1895 design places all new construction “behind” the 1895 building, the out of the primary view-shed from the harbor and the town, respecting the 1895 building’s historic relationship with its north lawn wood-framed and terraced hillsideMarine overlooking Hospital Lagoon Pond. building, while meeting the museum’s program needs.

Rendering - exterior view

Site plan

Site Plan

Aerial view of the Martha’s Vineyard Museum

Floor Plans

Rendering - view of the fresnel lense pavilion

Exterior Elevations

Exterior Elevations

Building Sections

Building Sections

Construction drawings of the fresnel lense pavilion 12


Ca

Interior Elevation

Rendering - interior view of the fresnel lense pavilion

Rendering - interior view of the fresnel lense pavilion

Wall Section Casework Details

Sta

Rendering - interior view of the library

Rendering - interior view of the classroom

Amsterdam Children’s Playschool Children’s Play School ACP Competition ACP Competition

Amsterdam, DE

TheTheDesign of the Amsterdam Children’s Playschool uses the dynamic waters edge design for the Amsterdam Children’s Play school uses the dynamic water’s edge to create iconic public space. Aspace school building cantilevers over the wa- The school cantilevers over the to create ananiconic public on the waterfront. ter, creating a gateway to a public square, set against a backdrop of the river bank. Dynamic playarafts transform theto water a floating, kinetic playscape. water, creating gateway a into public square, set against the backdrop of the river The project is a celebration of Amsterdam’s history of appropriating waterways. bank. Dynamic rafts transform the water into a floating, kinetic playscape. The design is a celebration of Amsterdam’s history of appropriating waterways. Stair Details

1

existing site

2

site adjustment

3

required massing

4

volume adjustment

5

introduce void

6

program : playschool + cultural center

7

private and public recreation

13


Boston, MA South Station Connect South Station Connect As the population of Boston is drastically increasing due to the growth Boston, MA

of the adjacent district, South Station As the population ofinnovation Boston is drastically increasing due to the growth of has become a “bottlethe adjacent innovation district, south station has become a “bottlneck” neck” for commuters. The largest transport hub for commuters everyday. The largest transport hub in New England canin New England can no no longer support the pressures of increased transit flows to and from longer support the pressures of increased transit flows. Boston every day.

National Trends

Global Trends

83.1

70%

While all Americans are driving less than they did a decade ago, younger adults are driving much less. In 2009, Americans between the ages of 18 and 34 drove 21 percent fewer miles than those in that age group did in 2001.The total number of licensed drivers under the age of 34 actually declined between 2001 and 2012, despite an increasing population. Many are choosing to live in cities where they can bike, walk, and take public transit to work or school. Today there are 83.1 million millennials in the United States. Millennials, also considered as generation Y, were born between 1980 and the mid 2000’s. They were the first to grow up with new technology and are considrered to be the largest and most diverse and educated generation. The millennial generation chooses the most practical transportation mode (driving, public transit, biking or walking) for each trip, and this flexible concept of mobility is spreading. According to the study Millennials and Mobility, nearly 70 percent of millennials, people 18 to 34, use multiple travel options several times or more per week. The APTA conducted a recent survey of 1,000 people in six cities that millennials find attractive Boston, Chicago, San Francisco, Seattle, Portland, Oregon, and Washington, D.C. According to the American Public Transportation Association (APTA), public transportation is ranked highest as the best mode to connect to all other modes, according to 54 percent of millennials polled. APTA officials note that the recent trend of smartphone applications allow public transit users to be increasingly spontaneous and flexible with their travel decisions.

A 2014 study by the Rockefeller Foundation and Transportation for America reported that four in five millennials in 10 major U.S. cities say they want to live in places where they have a variety of options to get to jobs, school or daily needs. Acording to the APTA report, Public transportation options are considered the best for digital socializing and among the most likely to connect the user with their communities. Public Transit also allows millennials to work as they travel, a trend noted by 40 percent of those polled.

2.5

of millennials are multi-modal.

million millennials in the United States

Senegal

Cities over 10 million people

Mali

Algeria 22.0 65%

Sao Paulo 20.4

80

50

19

20

10

20

40 20

00

20

20

80

90

19

19

20

60

70

19

19

2.8%

0.6%

Bosnia

Albania

Lebanon

Palestine

Egypt 33.1 43%

Libya Niger

Chad

Sudan 16.1 41%

Armenia Azerbaijan

Turkey 51.1 68%

Greece

Cairo 15.9

Tehran 12.1

Georgia

Bulgaria Macedonia

Jordan

Saudi Arabia

20.9 81%

Eritrea

Ethiopia 11.0 16%

Uganda

UAE

Karachi 14.8

Angola 9.3 Namibia

Mozambique Botswana Zimbabwe

Madagascar

Bangladesh 38.2 26.2%

India 329.3 29%

Somalia

Kenya

Malawi

S. Africa 28.6 60%

Burma 16.5 32%

Nepal

9.9 25%

Dacca 13.8

Bombay 21.3 Delhi 21.1

39.0

81%

Hong kong

Sri Lanka

Calcutta 15.5

Seoul 23.2

Vietnam 23.2 27% Laos

Cambodia

Thailand 21.5 33% Malaysia 18.1 69%

Osaka 16.6

Phillipines 55.0 64%

Tokyo 33.4

Manila 15.4

Bus Service

South Station: “Work” Station

At present, South Station operates above its design capacity for efficient train operations and orderly passenger queuing. When it opened to the public in 1899, South Station had 28 tracks; that number is now 13, significantly constraining current and future rail mobility not only within Massachusetts but throughout New England and the NEC.

7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Bus

01

0

Japan 84.7 66%

S. Korea

42%

Oman

Yemen

7.6 DR Congo Rwanda 20.2 Burundi Tanzania 33% Zambia

559.2

Urban percentage

Pakistan 59.3 36%

Kuwait

N. Korea 14.1 62%

Urban population in millions

Tajikistan

Afghanistan

Iraq 20.3 67%

Syria 10.2 51%

Israel

Iran 48.4 68%

Uzbekistan 10.1 Kyrgyzstan Turkmenistan 13%

Commuter Rail

20

Bosnia & Herzegovina

T Subway Service

Boston South Station is the largest passenger rail hub in New England. It serves passengers from the Northeast Corridor and beyond, connecting them to local and intercity destinations. It is one of the most significant architectural structures in the City of Boston, and one of its most important transportation assets.

8

01

China

Kazakhstan

115.6 million

5.2%

20

Istanbul 11.7

36.1 million

76.4%

Car

Public Transport

91

Romania 11.6 54%

Beijing 12.7

174.8 million

Percentage of workers (16 years +)

9

19

Croatia

Gabon

Canton 14.5

Macedonia

Hungary

CAR

Shanghai 17.3

Ukraine 30.9 68%

Total trips on the MBTA: 2014

How do people travel to work?

11

Heavy rail

All other

Daily Ridership

Transit ridership growth

22,632

18% 16% 14% 12%

41,720

10%

Jakarta 14.9

Australia 18.1 89%

7,290

8%

Indonesia 114.1 505

6% 4% 2% 0%

16,000

-2% New Zealand

-4%

3,966

Transit passenger miles Highway vehicle miles of travel

12 20

10

11

20

20

09 20

3,307,930,000

The worlds urban population

20

Buenos Aires 11.5

08

Uruguay

07

Argentina 35.6 90%

Bus ridership: 1.1 %

10

81

Austria

Nigeria 68.6 50%

Ghana 11.3 43%

Slovakia

7.4

Cameroon Congo 9.3

Rio de Janeiro 13.3

Commuter rail: 2.9 %

Walk

19

Czech Republic

Moscow 13.4

Unlinked Passenger trips (billions)

Belarus

Italy 39.6 68%

Lagos 10

Burkina Faso

Benin

Mexico 84.4 77%

1000

06

Chile 14.6 88%

Morocco 19.4 60%

Togo

Paraguay

2000

20

Predominantly rural 0-25% urban

Bolivia

3000

05

Predominantly rural 25-45% urban

Latvia

Poland 23.9 62%

Slovenia

Denmark

Mauritania

Cote d’lvoire

Venezuela 26.0 94%

Peru 21.0 73%

4000

20

Predominantly urban 50-74%

5000

50 91%

Guinea

Columbia 34.3 73%

6000

20

Predominantly urban 77% or over

Estonia

Finland

Germany 62.0 75%

10.2

Western Sahara

El Salvador

Russia 103.6 73%

Lithuania

Liberia

Ecuador 8.3

Key

Sweden 7.4

Denmark

13.3 81%

Guinea- Bissau

Honduras

Panama

4.34

19 Norway

Netherlands

Belgium

Spain 33.6 77%

Belize

Costa Rica

4.34

Heavy rail: 3.3 %

Transit ridership

Cuba

Nicaragua

4.09

7000

Boston’s Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority (MBTA) operates as the fourth busiest subway system in the U.S. after New York, Washington, and Chicago. In 2014, ridesrhip grew on every mode of MBTA transit except for the green line. Due to increased rides on the subway, buses and the commuter rail, the MBTA had a record of 400.8 million trips last year. The MBTA transit system in now in line with a nationwide trend in which more and more people are using public transportation.

Light rail: 3.6 %

Bike

Frace 46.9 77%

Rico

Bike

The American Public Transportation Association (APTA) reported that public transportation use in the United States in rose to 10.7 billion trips. This is a long-term trend that shows that more and more Americans are using public transportation. More recent shifts in trends point to the growing demand for public transportation. The 2005 gas price shock, when prices first went to three dollars per gallon of gasoline, combined with demographic shifts including the Millennials’ desire for travel options and the Baby Boomers’ return to urban areas, have established consistent travel behaviors that led to the highest public transportation ridership since 1956.

http://www.census.gov

UK 54 90%

Puerto

Bus

Urban Rural

New York 21.8

Dominican Republic

Subway, light- rail

2.73

Tunisia

Haiti

Natural Increase Rural to urban migrations International migration

0

Portugal

Jamaica

Why are urban populations increasing?

Population in millions

2.24

Sierra Leone

Mexico City 22.1

Walking

Mean preference rank (1 is most preffered)

Urban percentage

Mexico 84.4 77%

2050

Over the past 50 years we have depended more and more on cars. But our travel patterns are shifting. Americans are driving less. Per capita vehicle miles traveled, a measure of how much people drive, began declining in 2006 and has not increased, even as the economy has recovered from the Great Recession. Despite this trend, traffic congestion remains high, particularly in large urban areas. As a result of high levels of congestion, many Americans are making different choices about where they live and how they get around. Throughout the 1980s and 1990s, Americans spent more and more of their time in cars as commute lengths increased and traffic grew. Personal vehicle travel increased as carpooling, transit, and walking all declined. Driving became more affordable as the cost of cars and gas fell relative to other costs and fuel economies improved. More Americans entered the workforce, especially women, and the boundaries of metropolitan areas expanded. The population of the suburbs increased and rural areas on the fringe of metropolitan areas became exurbs. Meanwhile, the population of cities stagnated. Commutes grew in distance and commuters spent more time in traffic. By the mid-2000s, these trends began to change as Americans srarting driving less. The rate of women entering the workforce slowed and baby boomers began to pass their peak driving years. Gas prices increased to historic highs and entered a period of volatility.

04

LA 17.9

1950 2015 *Percentage of population living in urban areas

Urban Population Growth Dring a car

London 12.0

Urban population in millions

70%

billion trips on public transit in 2014.

20

U.S. 246.2 81%

54%

30%

Local Trends: Boston

10.7

71

Ireland

Top 5 most preffered modes of transportation.

of the U.S. population lives in urban areas.

19

Canada 26.3 80%

80.7%

billion people will live in urban areas in 2050.

commuter rail amtrak inter-city bus silver line red line

14


Urban Strategy Urban Strategy

Site plan

Proposal: A new Urban “Thread”

The site is located along the Fort Point Channel right across from Boston’s growing Seaport District. The main urban strategy is to create a connection from South Station to the waterfront which connects to a new hotel and office building.

Transportation

Commercial - Retail - Restaurants

Rowes Wharf

Fort Point Channel Parks

Hotel

Residential - Flexible housing units

Site: Post Office Education - Tech Museum

FINANCIAL DISTRICT

Recreation

Fan Pier Park

InterContinental Hotel & Residence

Federal Reserve Bank

Office - Flexible office Spaces - Labs

South Station | Site Contingencies

Site: South Station

Destination Transit + Innovation Campus

Boston Tea Party Museum

Children’s Warf Park

Institute of Contemporary Art

Boston Children’s Museum

SEAPORT DISTRICT

Binford Park

Rolling Bridge Park

Boston Harbor Walk

Seaport District

Strategy: Develop waterfront

Strategy: Connect to Seaport

Connection: Harvard and MIT

Design Strategy: Direct Connection to The Boston Harbour Walk

Design Strategy: Introduce various program to activate “bridge”

Site Plan

Floor Plans

Floor Plans

Rendering - interior view of bridge Site Section

Site section

Rendering - exterior view 15


Interactive Research Hub

Interactive Research Hub

Boston, MA

TheBoston, mingling of public and private program proposes a transparent, MA The mingling of public environment. and private program proposes a transparent, reserpublic research Located in thepublic developing area of South ach environment. Located in the developing area South Boston, the project aims to bring together the residents of Boston, Tourists, and Boston’s top research Boston, the project aims to bring together the residents of Boston, tourtemas. Public spaces are paired with “magnet” program such as cafes and istsrestaurants, and top research areplanned paired with “magnet” media libraries and teams. an interactivePublic museum. spaces This strategiaclly program allows for the public to become engaged and learn about the research program such the ascultural cafes and restaurants andhubabecomes interactive museum. This all while enhancing spirit of South Boston. The reaserch part of Boston’s research park, acting as a link between the top academic strategically planned program allows for the public to become engaged environment of Boston and the community. and learn about the research all while enhancing the cultural spirit of South Boston.

Site Model

Site Plan

Urban Strategy

The site is located in an re-development zone, anchored to one of the busiest intersections in South Boston. Through the massing strategy, the south corner becomes an “anchor” to the site. By connecting the reserach center and interactive community center to the proposed Boston Harbor walk, it will create a link between other cultural institutions along the proposed path, such as the Boston’s Children’s museum and the Institute of Contemporary Art.

The Boston Harbor Walk

Street Identity: Dorchester Ave & W Broadway Street

Industrial

Mixed-Use

Residential

Site Plan

T

Figure Ground

Maximize North- South orientation + Connection to Boston Harbor Walk

Public Transportation

Redefine Massing

Traffic Pattern

Variety of Open Spaces

Pedestrian Flow

Public Connector

Private Connector

Rendering - exterior view 16


Performative Exo-Skeleton

Program Diagram

The innovative exo-skeleton creates a shell for an extremely adaptable interior, while enhancing thermal comfort through complete shading in the summer monthis while allowing for full heat gain during the winter months. The adaptability challenge is adressed by using the concrete exokeleton to maximize interior flexibility. In order to maximize adaptability, the massing responds to a framework of “soft” and hard” program, which impels the level of mechanical systems used. The “soft” and “hard” program is further divided into sizes of small, medium and large in order to easily fit various future program types.

Structure: Cast in place concrete diagrid

Energy Production

Summer

All Year

22% efficiency PV panel 1,100 -1,300 kWh/day

22,400 kWh/year

OPEN OFFICE

PRIVATE OFFICE

CONNECTOR

SOFT PROGRAM

HARD PROGRAM

Urban Green Energy - UGE 9M

0 kWh/year

Boston Average Wind Speed 5 m/s UGE 9M Annual Power Output 14,500 kWh x 7 = 101,500 kwh/year

40,000 kWh/year

All Year

70,500 kWh/year

Summer 10,000 kWh/year

06:00

Hydronic Cooling

08:00

10:00

12:00

14:00

16:00

18:00

STOREFRONT WINDOW

22% Efficiency PV Panel

er int W er Summ

All Year

Equipment

Wind

FLOOR 4 OUTDOOR OBSERVATION

14,000 kWh/year

Daylight

AHU

Thermal Mass

PUBLIC INDOOR/OUTDOOR

SOFT PROGRAM

Energy Production

Power Demand (kWh/year)

Winter Lighting Fixtures

41°

Winter Heat Gain

OPEN OFFICE

STRUCTURE + SKIN

Energy Consumption

Solar

Daylight

COMMON SPACE

CONNECTOR

Modification: The form of the diagrid is manipulated to obtain a performing role. Summer sun rays are blocked while winter sun rays provide full heat gain

Energy Saving Maximime Glazing on South and North facade

LABS

HARD PROGRAM

Boston Solar Insulation 4.35 - 4.77 kWh/sqm/day Roof Area: 14,000 sf 170,000 kWh/year

20:00

Usage (t) Summer 0 kWh/year

Cross Ventilation

Winter

100,000 kWh/year

Winter

0 kWh/year

Hydronic Heating

Average Wind Speed 5 m/s UGE 9M Annual Power Output 14,500 kWh per unit

FLOOR 3

Heat Gain

Summer Cooling

Cross Ventilation

E+ 14,000 kWh/year

Total: 271,500 kWh/year

Total: 257,000 kWh/year

Prototype Testing FLOOR 2

Shade

FLOOR 1 Indirect

Hydronic Cooling

Heat Gain

Radiant Heating

PRIVATE RECREATION PUBLIC PLAZA

Cross Ventilation

PUBLIC RECREATION

Program Diagram Floor Plans

Floor Plans

Loading Dock

Up

Up

Office

Up

Office

Office Flex Space/ Exposition

MEP Up

Up

Cafe

Up

Open Office

Office

Off

ice

Up

Off

ice

Off

e Offic

e Offic

e Offic

Lobby

ice

e Offic

Lobby Cafe

Off

e Offic

ice

Up

Open Office

Research Exhibition

Up

Labs

Up

Labs

Office

Open Office Up

Up

Office Up

First Floor

Second Floor

Third Floor

Dn

Up

Up

Up

Dn

Up

Game Room

Game Room

Lobby

Lobby

Library/ Media Center

Library/ Media Center

MEP

Lounge

Lounge

Lounge

Up

Up

Media Room

Labs

Dn

Media Room

Labs

Labs

Media Room

Media Room

Up

Up

Fourth Floor

Dn

Fifth Floor

Sixth Floor + Roof

17


Assembly Systems Integration

Systems

Interior View Rendering - inerior view

Floor Connection

Assembly Process

Site: Digging

Site

Structure: Remove Formwork

Structure: Re-bar + Formwork

Site: Foundation Piles

Structure: Remove Formwork

Site: Cap Placement

Site: Foundation Walls

Structure: Upper Floors

Structure: Upper Floors

Structure: Re-bar + Formwork

Structure: Upper Floors

Structure: Remove Formwork

Structure: Upper Floors

Structure: Re-bar + Formwork

Enclosure: Glazing + Finsihes

Site Section

Program Concept

Rendering - exterior view

Public Recreation

Private Recreation

Public Recreation

Rendering - exterior view

Private Recreation

Public Recreation Hard Program

Soft Program

Connector Soft Program

Hard Program

Private Recreation

Site Section 18


Rendering - exterior view

Live /WorkHousing Housing Live/Work Boston, MA

Boston, MA

Boston’s demand for housing has increased drstically over the last decade. 924 Boston’s demand forefficient, housing dramatically over the last Harrison Avenue proposes an yet socialhas drivenincreased Live/Work community where Boston residents are given the spatial opportunity to work from home. The decade. 924 Harrison Avenue proposes an efficient, yet social driven aggretation of public and private unit types creates poen balcones and private pocket spaces within the interior which maximies social interaction and views, live/work community where Boston residents are given the opportunity while still maintating privacy. Social interaction between residents is also encouraged by the various outdoor common spaces. to work from home. The aggregation of public unit types created open balconies and private pocket spaces within the interior. This maximizes social interaction and views while still maintaining privacy.

19


Urban Strategy The site is located in an re-development zone, anchored to one of the busiest streets in Boston. Through the massing strategy, the south corner becomes an “anchor� to the site. By introducing a pulbic plaza with retail spaces along Harrison Avenue, the site bomces a destination point.

Surrounding Context T

D

T

ATE EV

EL

T

ge ra ga

T Possible Future Development

ge

ra

ga

Street Identity Street Identity

Site Plan

Typical floor plan Typical Floor Plan

Site Plan Present

Washington Street

1870

T

T

T

T

T

T

Harrison Street

Historical Fragmentation

Lenox Street

Re-development

Variation

Massing Strategy

Green Spaces Proposed Developments

Building Heights

Site

Modularity: Single Pre- Fab Structure

Stacking: Solid and void spaces create public and private zones

12-30 ft

30-50 ft

50-100ft

Social Realm: Repeat modules along perimter to create enclosed courtyard

Rendering - exterior view Interior view

Unit Floor Plans

Floor Plans

Unit A 1 Bedroom

Unit B 2 Bedroom

Unit C 3 Bedroom

Unit D 1 Bedroom

Unit E 2 Bedroom

Rendering - interior pocket space

Unit F 2 Bedroom

Elevation

Rendering - exterior view

Exterior elevation 20

Profile for Joseph Di Bella

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