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JOSEFGUTIERREZ landscape architecture portfolio


JOSEF GUTIERREZ josefegutierrez@gmail.com 619.948.7170 1969 Meeks Bay Drive Chula Vista, CA 91913


projects

manhattan mennonite church campus 01 Campus Design + Site Design

arapahoe square 05 Urban Design + Site Design

city of neighborhoods 09 Urban Design + Community Planning

internship 13

Neri Landscape Architecture

restorative campus landscapes 17 Campus Design + Therapeutic Site Design + Research

hand rendering 25


manhattan mennonite church campus location: Manhattan, Kansas course: Planting Design Studio medium: Autocad Civil 3d, Adobe Indesign & Photoshop design partner: Liwei Han

The Manhattan Mennonite Congregation’s strong following in Manhattan, Kansas had prompted a need for a new facility. This project emphasizes the Mennonites’ spiritual journey through the land they greatly appreciate, using curvilinear forms to create intimate and contemplative spaces. The planting design proposes vegetation that would stimulate the senses and

appeal to the rich history of the church. Accent plants, such as prairie rose and sedum, were used as specimen planting within the smaller subspaces. Buffer planting was provided to mitigate noise from the adjacent main street. Opportunities for intimate experiences were thought to be instrumental to their spiritual contemplation.

Reflecting Pool Retaining Seat Wall

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Contemplative Garden Section

Buffer Planting


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Site section depicting the walk to the main entrance as well as the neighboring landscape areas.

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Photoshop rendering depicting the proposed outdoor dining area that immediately serves the church.


The blue and red designations represent areas of cut and fill in order to carry out the site design, specifically the area surrounding the contemplative garden.

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATI 1

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Isolux lighting plan showing the lighting that primarily guides site circulation.

Irrigation plan showing the designed head alignment to water the recreation lawn and the buffer planting.

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arapahoe square revitalization

location: Denver, Colorado course: Site Planning + Design medium: Autocad Civil 3d, Adobe Indesign & Photoshop design partners: Kylie Harper & Valerie Thomas

In recent years, poverty stricken Arapahoe Square, situated just outside the central business district of Denver, Colorado, has become out of place. The site’s diagonal arterial road creates awkward intersections and discourages pedestrian travel. During this project, multidisciplinary teams were formed to create design strategies to solve this dilemma. Our group design implements curving forms within the street grid to remove a troublesome intersection and improve existing street conditions. Such a change was meant to support pedestrian, bicycle, and vehicular traffic. Bending these streets, particularly Champa Street, will limit the amount of five-way intersections and provide a more comfortable pedestrian experience. The organic forms, which were variously implemented throughout our site, will help redefine place and create a new, inviting identity for Arapahoe Square.

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The diagram below shows the proposed street traffic that intersect with Broadway Avenue (Red)

Photoshop rendering (by teammate Kylie Harper) depicting the proposed pedestrian bridge that would help connect a troublesome intersection

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arapahoe square park

Sketchup and Photoshop rendering depicting the large open space for gathering and recreation

location: Denver, Colorado course: Site Planning + Design medium: Autocad Civil 3d, Adobe Indesign & Photoshop

Following the group work, a specific site was chosen to design in detail. The selected site is an urban park for the neighboring area. The design utilizes a series of raised berms and green spaces to create a “forest” and “meadow” identity for the park. The contrast between the “forest” and the “meadow” will create a variety of intimate and public spaces. Such variety will potentially attract more users to the park and Arapahoe Square.

Berm detail that highlights how the berms are constructed

4.0’ 1.5’ Pre-Cast Concrete Stone Cap Unit Crushed Rock for Drainage Low Permeable Soil Backfill and Drainage

Fountain Picnic Shelter

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Park “Forest”

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city of neighborhoods location: Kansas City, Missouri course: City Ecologies Studio medium: ArcGIS, Adobe Indesign, Photoshop, & Illustrator design partners: Adam Ragoschke & Peiwen Wang

As one of the largest cities in the nation, Kansas City, Missouri has yet to become the major urban city that it strives to be. In collaboration with the Downtown Council of Kansas City and the Kansas City Parks and Recreation, fourth year landscape architecture students began a year long research and design study investigating a vision for green space in downtown Kansas City. In an effort to revitalize the urban core, critical mapping evaluating issues and dilemmas of the area were made. This particular portion of the project practices diagramming our analysis of this urban core.

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For “City of Neighborhoods,� the project analyzed the current status of the downtown neighborhoods and residential communities. The declining quality of life was pushing people to the suburban regions of the city. Our goal was to identify the issues that contributed to this decline in order to help inform potential solutions.

SUBURBAN

URBAN CORE

Migration Patterns

Diagram illustrating the suburbanization patterns that are occuring within Kansas City, Missouri and therefore hurting downtown development


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N 2011. “Education.” Greater Downtown Area Plan: 80, 83-84. The COR Team. The COR Team. 2011. “Land Use Plan.” Greater Downtown Area Plan: 27-29. 60 0 15 30 The COR Team. 2011. “Economic Development.” Greater Downtown Area Plan: 75-80.

Areas of Concern

Residential Area

School Location N 0

GDAP Planned Neighborhood Development Development Renovating the local school system, as well as developing their surrounding area, can have a lasting Legend Legend impact in accomplishing the GDAP’s goals towards doubling the population density, improving Opportunity

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rs in attracting and gathering together the neighboring community. parks are or are not frequently used; therefore showing how School Location walkability, building safe neighborhoods. This map highlights the city’s currently planned Park and - Limited Usage nity surrounding them. Highlighted in red are the areas of concern Neighborhood Devel development in red). AreasUsage in blue show immediate walking areas around the public and Park - (shown Moderate to Heavy es of these concerns range from: high elevations, which affect Opportunity private schools, as well as representing potential zones, not recognized by the GDAP , around the Areas of Concern Downtown Kansas possesses many local The city’s current plan for development (shown inPlanned Deve on enclosing the site, which is perceptively less safe;City degradation of GDAP schoolsNeighborhood that can be revitalized for the community. Development in the immediate area close to the Area areleave seldom used. This diagram red) should be revised to include improvements n adjacent to the freeway.parks These that problems room for potential Residential Neighbor school and its location nearby the downtown core can help attract more people to the area. ch can lead to better community engagement recreation. usage in relationship documents theirandobserved to neighborhood amenities surrounding

to the downtown residential areas

local5 schools. The blue represents immediate residential areas within walking distance

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Low Density Residential Medium Density Residential High Density Residential Mixed Use Downtown Mixed Use Commercial / Shopping / Business Industrial Transportation Public / Civic / Institutional Parks / Open Space

Proposed land use plan focusing on improving residential quality of life to attract more people to downtown Kansas City area

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Also discovered through the critical mapping portion of the project was the desire by residents for higher quality education and subsequent facilities to support it. With “City of Neighborhoods,� we proposed to revitalize downtown neighborhoods through the improvement of schools and civic space in order to establish Kansas City as a major urban city. Our team proposed a phasing plan for school revitalization in five major neighborhoods of downtown. Each neighborhood required different phasing according to their respective exisiting conditions. To do so, we proposed repurposing each school also as a community center for their respective neighborhood. This would provide a safe hub for children at more hours of the day.


Photoshop rendering (by teammate, Adam Ragoshcke) depicting the proposed performing arts school within the arts district of downtown Kansas City Photoshop rendering depicting potential quality of life for the Westside neighborhood as well as other residential communities within the downtown area

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neri landscape architecture internship location: San Diego, California course: Landscape-Planning Studio duration: Seven Months

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For the spring semester of 2012, I had the pleasure to intern with Neri Landscape Architecture in the Pacific Beach area of San Diego. This professional experience allowed us students to understand the design process through real application. Beyond theory and design issues, there are real-world circumstances to take account for. The several months spent with NLA allowed me to learn how those

Site plan rendering completed for the condominiums on 939 Coast Boulevard (design by NLA)

issues are dealt with and how they affect the design process. Through the experience, I was able to learn more about office protocol, interdisciplinary communication, and construction documentation as well as apply many of the skills I have learned through my education.

Sketchup Podium rendering for an interior courtyard at the Celgene facilities in San Diego, California


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NLA proposed planting plan for the Australian Outback koala exhibit at the San Diego Zoo (planting design proposed by Jim Neri; planting plan completed in coordination with Ieszic Formeller)


Proposed irrigation plan for a residence in La Jolla, California showing conceptual head arrangment

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Restorative Campus Landscapes location: Lawrence, Kansas course: Master’s Report medium: Autocad Civil 3d, Adobe Indesign, Illustrator, Photoshop, Google Sketchup, SU Podium V2 Restorative landscapes are a growing trend within health care environments and can have a lasting impact on people if applied within other settings, particularly higher education campuses. Their design captures the many healing qualities of nature that humans are instinctively attracted to. Within them, people have been historically found to experience relief of stress, improved morale, and improved overall well-being. While campus planning standards do consider the outdoor environment as an extension of the classroom, higher education campuses can do more to utilize the cognitive benefits of nature for students, faculty and staff. My master’s project explores principles and theories of restorative landscape design, empirical psychological research, and campus design to develop a framework that facilitates the creation of restorative spaces on higher education campuses.

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placemaking

Daniel Kenney Clare Cooper Marcus Stefanos Polyzoides fluid figures “park-once” principle interconnectivity of open pedestrian network space

campus design

campus sprawl student engagement education campus use interaction

typological architecture unity open space

cognitive benefits

exposure Stephen Kaplan to nature

restorative campus landscapes

human perception

restorative design

experience place identity of place sensory appeal Martha Tyson

stress relief illness recovery horticultural therapy Marni Barnes Clare Cooper Marcus

healing

symbolic language information exchange

psychological theory

Roger Ulrich “view from restoration the window” healthcare

Stephen Kaplan attention direct attention restoration involuntary attention theory mental fatigue

compatibility the extent restorative fascination experience escape William Sullivan Frances Kuo

Sketchup Podium and Photoshop rendering depicting a proposed healing garden for the graduate design studios at the University of Kansas in Lawrence, Kansas

Literature map diagramming the three major categories of research that were determined to be central to implementing restorative landscapes on higher education campuses

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Using the principles and theories from campus design, restorative design, and psychological research, a series of typologies (shown below) were derived. Common relationships were found through Clare Cooper Marcus’ concept that the campus resembles a “home” for students. Within this

concept, each campus building is recognized as a house while its landscape spaces are its respective home space, such as the front yard. Based on this concept, each typology was therefore applied to a “home” space. This yielded spatial typologies for a campus.

To develop a framework for design, common design elements were determined. After careful consideration of each of their qualities, a framework matrix (shown bottom right) was created to guide design decisions. Through the framework, design elements crucial to making each spatial

Restorative Landscapes Landscaped Grounds Landscaped Setback Patio / Front Porch Entry Garden Cour tyard Plaza Roof Garden

Campus Outdoor Spaces

Roof Terrace Healing Garden Meditation Garden

Common Turf Home Base

Viewing Garden A “Tucked Away” Garden

Higher Education Campuses Patio Quadrangle Green / Lawn Mall Field

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The Front Yard The Front Porch The Back Yard


typology restorative are identified. The purpose of this framework is to provide a strategy to applying restorative landscapes to any higher education campus. Such application was tested with a design project (next page).

Restorative Landscape Typologies

(below) Framework matrix identifying key relationships between the identified spatial typologies and design elements deduced to be important to both campus design and restorative design (bottom left) Diagram illustrating the determined classifications for the design framework

Design Elements Landmarks

Balconies / Terraces

Natural / Familiar Materials

Shade Structures

Quadrangle

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Green

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Field

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Plaza

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Mall

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The Front Yard Landscaped Grounds

Vegetative Buffer

Vegetative Planter

Native Vegetation

Water Features

Paths / Pathways

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Landscaped Setback

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Plaza

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Patio

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Entry Garden

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Roof Terrace

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Courtyard

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Healing Garden

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Meditation Garden

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Sensory Engaging Plant Palette

Common turf

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Home Base

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The Front Porch 2

Backyard

Viewing Garden

High Importance

Tucked Away Garden Roof Garden

Moderate Importance

Low Importance

No Importance

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Back Yard

In partnership with the Office of Design and Construction Management (DCM) at the University of Kansas, the developed framework was applied through the design of the landscape for the Center for Design Research (CDR), a research facility intended for campus use. The recently renovated CDR lies on the East Campus of KU, and the DCM desired an expansion to include more graduate studios and other academic buildings.

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Given the needs of the DCM, I was able to apply the newly developed framework on the campus expansion. Using the framework, a system of “Common Turf,” “Front Yard,” and “Back Yard” spaces were created. Such spaces allowed for healing opportunities, private space typically desired by graduate students, and large public areas for gathering. The site possessed a steep grade change, so maintaining attractive views of the outdoors was important. This, as well as increased exposure to nature, will benefit the quality of life on campus.

Front Yard

CDR Master Plan Render

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Center for Design Research

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Existing Studios

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Graduate Studios

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DCM Building

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Proposed Research Facility

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Permeable Paving

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Bioretention Pond

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Infiltration Basins

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Rain Garden

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Amphitheater

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Entry Sign

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Entry Plaza

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Shade Structure

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Sound Wall


Common Turf

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entryway

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natural / familiar materials

Sketchup Podium and Photoshop rendering showing the main entrance (or “Front Porch�) to the Research and Design District campus

views

tree places

seating variety


seating variety

interior / exterior connections

balconies / terraces

water feature

native vegetation

Sketchup Podium and Photoshop rendering showing the amphitheater and bioretention pond within the “front yard�

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Hand Rendering

(Far Right) Graphite (Right) Pen & Ink (Below) Pen & Ink, Markers

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JOSEF GUTIERREZ josefegutierrez@gmail.com 619.948.7170 1969 Meeks Bay Drive Chula Vista, CA 91913



Josef Gutierrez - Landscape Architecture Portfolio 2013