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The

MeleeZe “Bend your music”

DGH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Bachelor 1.2 Josef Al Abdeli s088108 Project coach Philip Mendels 2009-9-7 - 2010-1-8


Table of Content Abstract Introduction What are Orff instruments? Pressure Cooker Concepts Visiting the experts Requirements Exploration prototyping 1.0 Choosing interaction Choosing sound Exploration prototyping 2.0 Technical details User test Design process Group to individual Melody Choosing interaction Shape/design and the choice of material Technical details Final design and prototype

DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

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Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


Abstract In today’s digital musical age it is extremely difficult to listen to music and sound created from a computer and then interpreting it to a physical action or an object. Starting a project like this without any musical knowledge or experience is both frightening and challenging. Throughout this project I learned what music really is and what its building blocks are. I learned that music is not only made up of different layers of sound but that it requires someone’s emotion, creativity and the ability to express themselves from mind-body-instrument to music. I would like to thank my fellow group members, Freek Ramp and Lynyrd Van Riet for their musical knowledge and help through our individual project. I am also very grateful for all the assistance my coach Philip Mendels and Hans Leeuw provided during the entire process. They stayed until late hours helping us and did more than what was required by them to do. Lastly I would like to thank for all the help, advices and feedback we received from Esmée Olthuis, Marien Hoogerheide and the student from the Berkhof School. Your feedback helped us to create better instruments. Josef Al Abdeli

DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

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Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


Introduction The aim is to design the new Orff Instrument, a new electroacoustic, tangible musical instrument for High School students between the ages of 12-17. Other stakeholders such as the High School teachers and experts at the conservatory had to be taken into consideration. The instruments which are used these days are mostly not expressive and kind of “boring” instruments. All lessons at high schools are getting “up to date”. They work a lot with internet, powerpoint and other modern things but the music lessons are often the same as 20 years ago. In my approach I investigated the values and attributes of the old instruments and brought it to a modern digital form with new sets of values.

DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

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Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


What are Orff instruments? Orff “schulwerk” or “schooling” is one of the major methodologies within musical education. It was developed by the late German composer Carl Orff and his colleague Gunild Keetman during the 1920s. In the Orff approach all concepts are learned by doing. Concepts such as rhythm, tempo and the aesthetical qualities of music are learned through the experience of participating in different musical lessons. In the lessons children are required to sing, clap, dance, pat and chant along the melodies and the rhythms. The instruments that are usually used are xylophones, marimbas, glockenspiels and metallophones. The music that is produces is very simple and beautiful in its musical form. It is done by creating variations of rhythmical patterns in the Major IV, V and I harmonies.

DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

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Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


Pressure cooker During the pressure cooker we explored movements within music. Music was put in the background as we danced and imagined with our hands how to create these sounds. In this idea generation phase we used a method called Interaction Relabeling which is to basically take all kinds of objects and interact differently with them. Fortunately we happened to have a glass jar available. We played around with it by rotating the edges, bending it, tapping it and putting rice in it and shaking it. During the second idea generation phase we used different materials such as balloons, rubbers, cup holders etc. As we played around by squeezing the balloons we immediately felt that this interaction was new, smoothing, fitting and above all fun.

DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

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Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


Concepts After the pressure cooker we developed three more concepts. The concepts where rough developed and emphasized on the social interaction without taking in consideration other vital requirements. They were later abandoned only to continue as inspiration for further development of the initial pressure cooker balloon concept. We choose to continue with the original concept from the pressure cooker. The concept was in many more ways superior then the three other concepts in respect of expressivity, simplicity, interactivity, practicability and achievability. Feedback from experts boosted our decision by adding to say that the concept brought about a new experience through the squeezing of the “balloons�.

DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

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Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


Visiting the experts Cobra workshop with EsmÊe Olthuis The world is sound and music is organizing the sound. What we did during the workshop was to organize an orchestra using acoustic sounds with different instruments. The workshops makes youth learn basic rhythm of music and to express themselves with their creativity, it’s also a fun way to learn or introduce music. The workshop also gives the true form of the different musical styles, when students are for instance challenged to play something in Jazz in various instruments. Through this game, the players are stimulated to use their creativity in the most effective manner possible, to cooperate and to employ a specific form of concentration. The COBRA group consists of fifteen players maximum, who require no experience with improvisation or musical skill at all.

DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

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Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


Xenax drawing Table A good example of an intuitive instrument, where technology is well hidden and interaction is emphasized. A Wacom tablet is integrated into a playful table. The software behind the Wacom emulates a sound matrix, where every X and Y position is mapped to a sound. Drawing on the board grates a gradient of sound.

Omni the Magic Mushroom Round, mushroom like table with colorful ceramic tiles which are pressure sensitive. Tapping the surface started a sample. y x

Children could alternate between both ends of the pen to create different sounds. They also had to work in pairs, both drawing at the same time. Discovering and collaborating in music. As a feedback, the tables light up when touched by a pen.

DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

Kids have to tap on the tiles with their fingertips. They found it both confusing and difficult. It wasn’t always practical as well, because the charms on a bracelet also accidentally hit tiles.

Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


Visiting the experts Klankspeeltuin with Marien Hoogerheide Marien introduces us to three very social interactive products which produce music by different interactions. Xenax: Draw to produce music. Omni: Click the buttons to produce the music. When asked the question “What is music?” the kids can’t phrase an answer. But when one of the coaches stamps on the floor and asks whether that was music, one of the kids answers “No, you need to make a rhythm of it. They also point out that music often needs a tune and some vocals. They understand the concept of making music by improvising, which is of course a key point in the Klankspeeltuin.

DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

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Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


Visiting the experts Steim If you make it more fragile they will treat it fragile. During the Steim workshop we were shown a presentation with a lot of experimental electrical-musical instruments. Afterwards we talked to the software developer and he said something quite interesting; For the beginners he made the instrument more harmonically playable, which made the outcome beautiful and easy to produce. The way he did it with his string instrument was to for the left hand play random notes of Major C and with the right hand different temporaries of that note.

DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

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Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


Requirments Portable At the “klankspeeltuin” someone said it would be easy if it’s portable. They let schools visit the klankspeeltuin but it would be preferable if they can visit the school. It’s also easier if schools would own the instruments. The can move them to store them or to different locations.

Expressive The children should be able to express themselves in the music. That is a point were a lot of improvement can be done compared to the old Orff-instruments. Learning notes and scales is learning music, but learning or exploring how to express in music is also learning music. Maybe that is what music is all about.

Clear Physical and understandable interaction If the children get direct feedback for what they are doing they will easily understand what they were doing. When they don’t have a clue what they are doing, which parameter they are changing, it is very hard to express yourself. But when they got the right feedback they can really go up in the music.

Orchestra The children should be able to play together. It’s more fun, expressive and interactive when they are playing together. In the end of the project the instruments should be able to be combined. With the different instruments different layers of a song should be played.

Location/personal feedback When using sound as feedback it is very difficult to let people know which feedback is directed to who. When all the sound is coming from one spot is too difficult to separate the different feedback. When the feedback is coming from different speakers for example it is already easier to separate the sounds. Also feedback in other ways can be a solution.(vibration, light, etc.)

Easy to learn hard to master This is one of the main requirements. When the children for the first time use this instrument they should be able to create something. To express their selves. But after several times of use the instrument should be still attractive and exiting. This means there should be a learning curve. In the beginning it will be quite easy to play something, but the better they are the more difficult they can make it.(adding more parameters, functions, interactions)

Enable users to make mistakes From an expert meeting with musical teachers we where told that we have to enable the students to make mistakes, meaning they should not create something listenable easy because you learn from making mistakes. DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

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Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


Exploration prototyping 1.0 Our first prototypes where aimed at exploring the design, the experience and the possibilities of interactions. These two simple models made it easier to visualize variations and to explore interaction. Above all it made it easier to decide a sound for a specific interaction.

DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

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Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


Choosing interaction Firstly we explored what kind of interaction related to interactions with musical instruments of today. By doing so we acquired ten different interactions with the product. It ought to be easy to learn and hard to master, meaning simple and understandable but at the same time provide a challenge for the user to developed a certain skill. Due to this as well as the aspect of achievability, we choose three out of the ten interactions. Those being: Bending Squeezing Turning

DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

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Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


Music is made up by layers of sound. In our approach we designed each individual instrument to play one layer of sound.

DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


Choosing sound In this device there is one sound bank meaning one layer of sound for one device. Each and one of the three different interactions have an effect that manipulates the sound. By either turning, bending or squeezing the user changes one of the parameters. By adding only one layer per device we persuade the users to play and create music together. For now we have created four sounds, (layers). Parameters:

Volume Pitch Re-verb Rhythm Tempo Wah Viberato Tremelo

DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

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Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


Exploration prototyping 2.0 The device required three different sensors, one for each interaction. We decided to first build three separate parts one for each sensor and afterwards build one complete prototype. Doing so we could try each sensor separately and explore the sounds while interacting with them. The squeezing

The squeezing part consisted of an air pressure sensor, a balloon, two pieces of wood for stabilizing the sensor and a container to pressurize one of the vents on the sensor.

DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

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Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


Exploration prototyping 2.0 The turning The turning part consisted of generally a pot meter. We added elastics to enhance the feedback experience which also functioned quite well.

DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

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Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


Exploration prototyping 2.0 The bending The beding sensor was built from scratch. From a tutorial online we used Neoprene, Velostat, conductive thread and conductive fabric to construct our bending sensor. If you bend it the conductive sensor the thread and fabric, which are separated by the velostat(resistor), the velostat is pushed together and the resistance drops. This is measured by the Arduino.

DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

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Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


Exploration prototyping 2.0 The final prototype The final prototype turned out to be completely functional. Users can partly interact with it to the extent of its fragile limits. Better materials will be needed for the users to completely interact with the device and for them to fully explore their creativity.

DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

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Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


Technical details The different sensors are all connected the same way to the arduino. The red wire to the 5V, the black one to the Ground and the green to the analog in. Only the bending sensor needs another resistor because it should work like a voltage divider. The file which is uploaded to the arduino is de Arduino_for_input.pde which you can download from the internet. This file takes care for sending the data to Pure Data. As you can see in the patch on the next page I added the ctlout parts. These convert the signal in midi and in the midi settings you can select MIDI Yoke. That’s it for Pure Data. Now in kinetic you to select MIDI Yoke as your midi controller. Now by right clicking different knobs you can add a MIDI channel to it.

DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

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Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


User test With pupils of ‘the Berkhof‘ school in Amsterdam This day we went to do a class with first class highschool students. We showed and let them try out our instruments, gave a little workshop about designing and we did a small design contest. The schedule for that day was: In 4 groups they circulate past the three concepts and hans’ trumpet(try the instrument, ask questions) Then we started the design contest. Divided in the same groups they sit down with one or two of us. We explained a little bit about brainstorming and lead the sessions. We helped them being creative and lead them the right way. In the end the groups presented the ideas to each other and the lesson was finished. It was very important for us to get any feedback from the students. That was very hard because they only said it was cool, or looks cheap. After we explained this was just a prototype for trying things out they said it was a very cool way to make music. That pressing the balloon made a sound was very interesting for them. Actually all the interactions they found very cool because they were different than interaction mostly used with instruments. That our prototype was too fragile also showed this day. The bending sensor stopped working completely, the tube was already broken and also the turning part fell of every 5 minutes. Something that had to be worked on obviously.

DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

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Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


Design process Classifying 3-6 parameters Classifying 3 interactions

Max/MSP

Visualizing Conceptualizing

thinking: analysing abstracting

envisioning transforming society

Week 8

Week 7

Week 6

Week 5

Week 4

Week Week 3 2

Week 1

Analyzing musical learning

Interaction relabeling

Ideating Sketching

exploring validating in context

decisions integrations deliverables

Semester planning

making: synthesising concretising

Scenarios

Patent research

Week 1

Classifying Validating

Week 2

Week 3

Validating Categorizing

Building non-electrical prototypes

Sensors Building 3 electrical prototypes

DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

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Week 5

Week 6

Sketching variations

Finalizing concept

Pressure Cooker

Arduino workshop

Week 4

Software: PureData MIDI Kenitic

Interim exhibition

Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels

Exploring interactions with sounds

Week 7

Week 8


Group to individual After the interim of this project all group members have to work individual on this project. This doesn’t mean they’re not allowed to work together anymore, but more that they have to deliver separately, which means they can and are supposed to work together in this stage of the project. At the second half of this project the concept, worked out in the first eight weeks, is taken as the main concept. From this concept the group members start working. Every member has got his own layer. Because a song consists out of four basic layers (bass, drum, strings/chords, melody) they are divided among the students. So the same concept for a different layer. Because of the layer the concept is placed in a different surrounding and will need different interactions, size, shape and sounds. So at the end the 4 instruments will not look the same. Likely, there are things the same, and they interact in kind of the same way, because it’s all coming from the started prototype. At the end of this semester the four different instruments should be able to be played together so they form an orchestra and play a complete song. Also the instruments should fit each other. So together they are a family of instruments.

DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

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Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


Melody The task was to create an instrument which creates the melodic part of a song. In my approach I investigated what melody really is and how its characteristic features can be interpreted into a design. Through my investigation I found out that a melody consist of two elements; pitches and durations. The pitch is simply going through the notes, A-B-C-D-E-F-G. The duration is basically the volume and the rhythm. From the Steim meeting I heard how a simple, beautiful melody was created. The trick was to only play notes of Major C. That is for instance if you look at a piano, the white keys and not black ones. By playing notes of Major C the sound because more harmonic and listenable. The theory was simple. Create two controllers one for the pitch and one for the duration. Thus by playing any kind of instrument through those controllers you would be able to create a melodic sound.

DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

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Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


Melody “Pitch”

“Volume” “Rhythm”

Notes of Major C.

DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


Choosing interaction To further boost my approach I listened carefully to melodic sound and heard how one instrument created a melody by changing its pitch and durations. I played around with my hands freely trying to create the sound which I heard. I was already fond of the squeezing interaction and so were the users and the experts. I favourite it from the other interaction because it brought an extra dimension to the feeling of creating the music. It had a lot of haptic feeling and force feedback. Above all I considered it appropriate as a controller of the volume. When I investigated which interaction controls the pitch I first had doubts for which interaction would be suitable in order to create a listenable sound. My initial idea was to create a second spherical controller on the left side with buttons on it for each note. This was to be done by with the use of FSR sensors, (Force Sensitive Resistance). Still I was not certain that this way would be the right way to go. I later abandoned the idea with the hope that you should be able to create a melodic sound with the pitch controlled by squeezing. The reason why was because I simply had to try out what worked and what did not work and there was simply no time for doing that. The outcome of this was that users later had trouble mapping which hand was doing what. In my design I had the volume controlled in the right hand and the pitch in the left just as if you were playing a guitar. I later received feedback of an important flaw which was that not all instruments are the same. Indeed to design a digital instrument which should be able to generate a melodc sound with any kind of instrument and doing so with the same type of interaction can be difficult, this aspect did not occur to me beforehand. The instrument that I had designed resembled that of a trombone where you go through the notes (pitch) separetely instead of choosing one or the other or even two notes at a time. DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

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Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


Shape/design and the choice of material The basic design was the same. Two spheres on each edge and a cylinder connecting them. The only problem was to find a material that would be flexible and strong at the same time. Early on we had balloons but they broke often and had to be sealed air tight several times. Later on we tried tennis balls and all type of spherical plastic toys but they were to strong and the hand gets tired easily. After a meeting with an expert in materials, Chet Bangaru I immediately received advice to use silicon and luckily he already had the knowhow’s of how to make a silicon ball using a plastic mould. The silicon added a lot of value to the instrument. It was flexible, strong and cheap, it could be easily produced and easily air sealed. The silicon enabled a lot emotional expression. It had a lot of haptic sensation as well as force feedback. It was fun to play with, sort of a mix of clay and a stress ball. It looked fragile which you could try to break but does not. And above all, combining the features of the silicon with the design of a sphere and the interaction of squeezing, you get a lot of feeling while creating music. The hand feels three dimensions when it is in fact only one dimension of control, the volume.

DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

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Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


Shape/design and the choice of material A problem arose while wondering how much the length of the cylinder would be so that it would not be to short or too long but appropriate. As I tried it out I immediately felt that it was strange, awkward and dissatisfying having it too long or too short. What length should the cylinder have and how can I figure it out? The material I had available to create a silicon ball was 10 centimeters in diameter. An idea came up to using the golden ratio in order to determine the appropriate satisfying length of the cylinder. Since the height was already fixed I simply used a formula to determine the length of the instrument.

DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

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Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


Air tight Hatch Air pressure sensor

“Volume” “Rhythm”

“Pitch”

Pure data

DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


Technical details There are two air pressure sensors which measures the pressure generated in the two spheres. The sensors are connected to the Arduino which in turn is connected to the computer. And just as explained before, the incoming data from the sensors to the Arduino is sent further on to Pure Data. Pure data is a graphical programming environment for audio and video processing. The signal from the Arduino which is analog and between 0-1023 is translated and adjusted to a MIDI signal ranging from 0-127. Through a MIDI Yoke the signal is then transported from Pure Data to Cakewalk Kinetic which is an audio/MIDI, electronic music studio software. In Kinetic instruments can be chosen and effects applied but the most important adjustments have to be written in Pure Data. As for instance the adjustment to make only Major C notes played.

DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

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Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


Air tight Hatch Air pressure sensor

“Pitch”

DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

“Volume” “Rhythm”

Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


Final design and prototype The final prototype was made accurately to the measurements. The original idea was to make an entire prototype out of silicon in two halves from a wooden mould made in Vertigo. The sensors would have been easily placed and glued in the first half then the second half would have come upon it then the two would have been glued together with silicon. In the process the sensors were also connected with a silicon tube to the spheres then the spheres would have been air sealed from the cylinder. A hatch would be cut out from the cylinder to replace any damaged sensor. Nevertheless the prototype made its job. People could play with it as it was intended to do and partly interact with it as if it was a whole silicon made instrument.

DPH31 Orff instruments for the 21st Century Josef Al Abdeli, Freek Ramp, Lynyrd Van Riet, Wadim Seminsky

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Bachelor 1.2 Project Coach: Philip Mendels


Project