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The
Global
Bulldog



 


Issue
1


Winter/Spring
2013



 Peace
Corps
Master’s
 International
Students



 


World
AIDS
Day



Training
in
Mozambique


PCMI
student
Stephanie
 Dempsey
gives
us
a
look
 into
World
AIDS
Day
in
 Malawi.



Find
out
who
Gonzaga’s
 PCMI
students
are
and
 what
they
are
doing
 around
the
world.

 Page
2


Cheyanne
Greer
shares
her
 perspective
of
Peace
Corps
 pre‐service
training
in
 Mozambique.


Page
3



 



Page
5



 



 


Coordinator
Corner




 
 Updates
from
Campus
 In
September,
I
had
the
pleasure
of
attending
the
Peace
Corps
University
Programs
 Coordinators’
Conference
in
Washington,
DC.

The
three‐day
conference
covered
a
 
 variety
of
topics
and
below
I’ve
included
some
highlights.
 
 • Gonzaga
University
is
one
of
84
Master’s
International
Programs
and
one
of
 16
offering
a
degree
related
to
English
Teaching.
 
 
 • Of
the
TESOL
Programs
present
Gonzaga
had
the
most
students.
 
 
 • There
are
currently
over
9,000
Peace
Corps
volunteers
in
76
countries.
The
 Peace
Corps
is
looking
to
bring
the
number
closer
to
8,000.
 
 
 • Peace
Corps
is
narrowing
the
focus
of
primary
projects
to
education,
health
 and
agriculture
related
to
food
security.
 

 
 • Currently
40
percent
of
Peace
Corps
volunteers
are
serving
in
Africa
in
the
 









 education
sector.
 
 • New
Peace
Corps
sites
include
Indonesia,
Nepal,
Colombia
and
Tunisia.
 
 
 • Peace
Corps
is
implementing
a
new
application
process
where
PCMI
 students
are
streamlined
and
nominated
by
sector.

Volunteers
will
receive
 







 Melissa
Heid,
PCMI
Coordinator



Amanda
Walsh
received
her
 placement–Togo


their
region
or
country
placement
earlier
in
the
application
process.



 



 


1


Britt
Harmon
received
her
 placement–Macedonia
 
 Megan
McCann
completed
her
 Peace
Corps
service
in

 Nicaragua–November
2012
 
 We
have
a
new
PC
Regional
 Representative:

 Marya
Nowakowski

 Returned
Peace
Corps
Volunteer
 Agroforestry
Soil
Conservation

 Dominican
Republic
1987–1990
 
 Megan
McCann,
Marya
 Nowakowski
and
Melissa
Heid

 are
presenting
at
the
Spokane
 Regional
ESL
Conference–

 “Peace
Corps
and
Grad
School
 
from
Start
to
Finish”



 



 


Meet
Gonzaga’s
Peace
Corps
Master’s
International
Students
 































































 




























































Placement:
Lilongwe,
Malawi
 




























































Position/Project:
Teacher
Development
Facilitator
(TDF).
I
am
responsible
for
training
 




























































teachers
in
ongoing
professional
development
(I
run
workshops
on
various
teaching
 




























































methods).
I
teach
English
part‐time.
I
am
also
involved
in
Diversity
awareness
and
 




























































Volunteers
Supporting
Volunteers.
 
 






















Favorite
thing
about
your
placement:
I
live
in
the
village,
but
I
am
very
close
to
the
city.
 




























































Also,
people
here
are
very
friendly.
That
is
why
Malawians
are
known
for
living
in
the
Warm
 Stephanie
Dempsey,
PCV












Heart
of
Africa.












 




























































 




























































Placement:
Homoine,
Inhambane,
Mozambique
 
 
 
 
 Position/Project:
I
was
placed
at
an
IFP,
which
is
a
primary
school
teacher‐training













 






























































institute.
I
will
be
teaching
English
and
methods
courses
in
a
small
town
three
hours
from
 the






















































the
town
of
Tofu.
I
am
lucky
enough
to
have
electricity,
Internet
and
possibly
running
water
 at
























































at
my
site,
which
is
not
too
far
into
the
countryside.
It
is
a
beautiful
sandy
town
with
lots
 Cheyanne
Greer,
PCV


















coconuts!
Feel
free
to
come
visit
anytime
and
we
will
go
Humpback
Whale
watching!
 




























































 Placement:
Boaco,
Boaco,
Nicaragua
 




























































Position/Project:
I
was
a
TEFL
Teacher/Trainer.

I
worked
in
a
public
secondary
school
 




























































co‐teaching
English
lessons
with
three
Nicaraguan
counterpart
teachers
and
I
also
worked
at

 




























































a
private
secondary
school
assisting
a
U.S.
Embassy
funded
micro‐scholarship
program
for










 




























































students
to
study
English.
I
taught
adult
English
community
classes
in
the
evenings,
gave
 




























































workshops
for
English
teachers
in
my
town
and
worked
at
summer
camps
as
well.

 
 
















































 




























































Favorite
thing
about
your
placement:
My
favorite
part
about
my
placement
was
the
 




























































beautiful
landscape‐‐Boaco
is
called
"The
City
of
Two
Floors",
meaning
that
part
of
the
city
is
 




























































on
one
“floor”
and
the
other
part
is
on
the
second
"floor"
(hill).
There
are
tons
of
hills
and
 Megan
McCann,
RPCV
















beautiful
greenery
surrounding
the
whole
town.

 
 Placement:
R.I.
3
Corrales,
Caaguazu,
Paraguay
 




























































Position/Project:
Community
Health
Educator‐
I
work
with
local
schools
and
the
local
health
 clinic
to
teach
health
topics
including;
dental
hygiene,
hand
sanitation,
parasite
prevention,
 life
skills
(high
schools
students)
and
many
more
health
related
topics.
As
one
of
my
 secondary
projects,
I
teach
English
to
local
high
school
students.


Frances
Peterson,
PCV



Favorite
thing
about
your
placement:
The
tranquilo
lifestyle
of
Paraguay
and
yerba
máte.



 Placement:
Patamea,
Savai'i,
Samoa
 




























































Position/Project:
My
current
project
is
Primary
Literacy
and
conversation
skills.
I'm









 




























































hoping
to
research
the
intersection
of
gender
identity
and
English
acquisition
in
Samoa.

 




























































I’m
also
interested
in
potentially
using
Small
Talk
in
a
Samoan
context.


Zach
Wegner,
PCV
 
 

















Favorite
thing
about
your
placement:
My
favorite
thing
about
Samoa
is
the
weather.


 


2



 



 


Njewa
Zone
World
 AIDS
Day


make
presentations
that
demonstrated
creativity
and
 a
knowledge
for
this
important
subject.

 
It
was
beautiful
to
hear
the
students
of
the
junior
 section,
grades
3‐4,
use
their
many
gifts
and
talents
 to
express
themselves
through
drama,
singing,
 marching,
and
poetry
recitation.
One
student
from
 each
school’s
senior
section,
grades
5‐8,
was
given
a
 chance
to
practice
composition
writing
by
creating
 written
projects
that
raised
their
concern
about
the
 issue
of
HIV/AIDS.
The
students
who
were
selected
to
 read
their
compositions
were
each
given
a
certificate
 signed
by
the
Deputy
District
Education
Manager
of
 Lilongwe
Rural
West,
the
Primary
Education
Advisor
 of
the
Njewa
Zone
and
Public
Affairs
Officer
from
the




Stephanie
Dempsey,
PCV
Malawi



 
 
 


On
Dec.
1,
2012,
the
Njewa
Zone
in
Lilongwe,
Malawi
 (my
site),
presented
a
World
AIDS
Day
event.

Our
 theme
for
the
day
was
“Making
the
Learners
the
 Teachers
of
their
Community.”




 
 


The
students
from
each
of
the
11
schools
in
the
 Njewa
Zone
created
projects
around
various
themes
 that
taught
about
the
topic
of
HIV/AIDS.
After
 receiving
their
assignments,
each
school
worked
 busily
to
create
compositions
and
oral
presentations
 to
teach
their
communities
about
HIV/AIDS.

The
 topics
covered
how
this
virus
affects
men,
women,
 children,
teenagers,
the
disabled,
their
country
and
 Africa
as
a
whole.
They
also
covered
information
 about
HIV
and
ways
to
prevent
it.
Through
the
 guidance
of
their
teachers,
the
students
were
able
to


Public
Affairs
section
of
the
American
Embassy.

 These
special
guests
made
sure
to
encourage
the
 student’s
efforts
through
their
guiding
words.

They
 were
also
joined
by
the
inspiring
rhythms
of
Music
 Crossroads
and
the
heart
felt,
thought
provoking
 presentations
of
Theatre
for
Change.
Theatre
for
 Change
is
a
drama
group
of
about
10
teachers
from
 the
Njewa
Zone
who
usually
raise
issues
about
 HIV/AIDS.
 
 
 
 
 
 



 



 


3






























(Continues
on
page
4)
 
 
 
 


Along
with
the
on‐stage
presentations,
the
students
 and
teachers
received
more
information
through
 hands
on
and
visual
activities
such
as
Grassroot
 Soccer
facilitated
by
Peace
Corps
volunteer
 Cassandra
Moore
and
Jessica
Libes
and
ANAMED
 facilitated
by
Aisha
Alhassan.

The
children
were
even
 given
a
chance
to
let
their
voices
be
heard
by
drawing
 hope
messages
that
were
posted
on
the
Teacher
 Development
Center
wall.
These
creative
activities
 were
led
by
volunteers,
Mayamiko
Kalawe,
Tiana
 Richmond,
and
Mollie
Mitchell.


Dec.
1st
was
a
proud
day
for
the
Njewa
Zone.
 Teachers
commented
that
the
open
day
was
an
event
 that
they
did
not
think
would
actually
happen
in
their
 zone
because
of
lack
of
funds.
However,
I
made
it
a
 point
to
emphasize
when
the
school
zone
and
the
 community
come
together
for
an
important
purpose
 and
work
together,
anything
can
happen.
As
a
result,
 they
anxiously
wait
to
do
it
again
next
year.
Njewa
 World
AIDS
day
was
sponsored
by
the
Public
Affairs
 Section
(PAS)
of
the
Embassy,
and
the
District
 Education
Manager’s
office.
The
World
AIDS
Day
 committee
would
like
to
thank
all
of
the
volunteers
 who
helped
us
though
out
this
process.
We
also
want
 to
send
a
special
thank
you
to
Limbani
Chimpembere
 of
PAS.
The
day
was���a
huge
success
for
us
all!
 























 



 
 






































Peace
Corps
and
HIV/AIDS
Education
 


“Nearly
40
percent
of
Peace
Corps
volunteers
conduct
HIV‐related
activities
as
 
 part
of
their
primary
or
secondary
project
work
and
more
than
half
of
all
 
 volunteers
work
on
an
HIV/AIDS‐related
project
regardless
of
their
 
 assignment
area.”




 
 
 


‐peacecorps.gov,
November
29,
2012



 



 



 


4



 



 


First
Impressions‐

 Training
Namaacha,
Mozambique
 Group
19
(Sep.
15‐
Dec.
4,
2012)



 Communication
Peace
Corps
Style
 Frances
Peterson,
PCV
Paraguay



 
Cheyanne
Greer,
PCV
Mozambique


Missing
family
and
friends
is
one
of
many
struggles
I
 have
faced
thus
far
serving
as
a
Peace
Corps
 volunteer
in
Paraguay.

Fortunately,
times
have
 changed
as
far
as
communication
is
concerned
for
 Peace
Corps
volunteers
(at
least
in
Paraguay
that
is).
 I
have
Internet.
Not
just
from
a
local
Internet
café,
but
 in
my
home.
Real
live
Internet.
Using
my
computer
as
 a
router,
I
can
even
have
wireless
Internet.
It
is
slow,
 and
often
frustrating,
but
when
I
feel
homesick
and
 want
to
check
my
Facebook,
I
can.
Along
with
the
 privilege
of
having
Internet
comes
all
of
the
great
free
 ways
to
connect
with
people
in
the
U.S.
The
best
to
 contact
home,
in
my
opinion,
is
Skype.
From
my
little
 casita
in
rural
Paraguay
video
Skyping
is
often
 limited,
but
so
far
voice‐call
Skyping
has
been
a
 wonderful
free
way
to
communicate
with
people
 back
home.
During
training,
before
I
was
issued
a
 Peace
Corps
cell
phone,
I
put
money
on
my
Skype
 account
and
made
calls
from
a
local
Internet
café.
The
 charge
was
a
whopping
two
cents
per
minute
to
 make
calls
from
Paraguay
to
the
U.S.

Now,
whenever
 I
get
a
chance
to
head
to
a
big
city,
I
take
advantage
of
 high‐speed,
wireless
Internet
and
video
Skype
with
 anyone
who
has
time.
Another
great
way
to
make
 free
calls
and
text
for
free
is
through
setting
up
a
 Google
Voice
account
and
routing
calls
through
the
 Talkatone
application
for
smartphones.

One
last
 communication
lifesaver
for
me
has
been
iMessage.
I
 brought
my
old
iPhone
and
use
it
to
iMessage
any
 family
member
or
friend
who
has
iMessage.
When
I
 left
the
U.S.
last
February,
I
was
prepared
for
life
 without
Internet
or
regular
communication
with
 anyone
outside
of
Paraguay.
These
modern
 conveniences
have
made
it
possible
for
regular
 contact
with
people
in
the
U.S.
In
August
I
even
 attended
my
niece’s
first
birthday
party
via
Skype.
 Thanks
to
the
World
Wide
Web,
more
and
more
 Peace
Corps
volunteers
are
able
to
access
 inexpensive
ways
in
which
to
communicate
with
 people
far,
far
away.




As
I
sit
listening
to
a
technical
session
on
 management
of
large
classrooms
with
32
other
soon‐ to‐be
English
teachers,
I
hear
the
sound
of
chickens
 cackling
and
roosters
calling
behind
me.
I
watch
a
 gaggle
of
pigs
wandering
about
searching
for
 anything
they
can
find
to
nibble.
I
have
mud
on
my
 Chacos
that
is
over
an
inch
think
and
I
smell
the
 sweet
scent
of
rain
mixed
with
burning
garbage.
The
 “building”
where
our
sessions
take
place
is
neither
 outside
nor
inside.
It
doesn’t
protect
us
from
the
 smoldering
heat
or
the
freezing
rain.
The
wind
blows
 the
makeshift
boards
and
papers
around
as
the
 sketchy
wire‐exposed
extension
cord
attempts
to
 power
the
shaky
projector.
There
is
breathtaking
 view
of
foggy,
lush
mountainsides
and
fruit
trees
that
 are
contrasted
by
muddy
latrines
and
hungry‐looking
 dogs.
Despite
the
many
difficulties
however,
we
 manage
to
discuss
and
learn
about
culture,
education
 and
language.
My
first
impressions
of
Mozambique
all
 come
down
to
one
simple
word–beautiful.
The
 landscape,
the
fog,
the
ocean,
the
people,
the
 languages,
the
food,
etc…
all
have
varying
degrees
of
 beauty.
What
an
amazing
country
to
be
placed
in.
Of
 course
there
are
less
beautiful
things
just
like
any
 other
country–poverty,
gender
roles
and
 expectations,
maltreatment
of
animals,
and
crime
to
 name
a
few,
but
these
are
problems
found
on
 different
levels
throughout
the
world.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



 



 


5



 



 


Upcoming
Events



 



 
 Spokane
Regional
ESL
Conference










Feb.
23,
2013

8
a.m.‐4
p.m.




















Mukogawa
Fort
Wright
Institute‐
Spokane
 
 Peace
Corps
Week

 
 
 

Feb.
24‐March
2,
2013
 
 
 



































peacecorps.gov/pcweek
 
 
 Peace
Corps
Visits
Gonzaga
 
 

Feb.
28,
2013
9:30
a.m.‐4:30
p.m.
 
























Crosby
Hall‐
Gonzaga
Campus
 
 TESOL

Convention

 































March
20‐23,
2013
 
 
 
 
 

















tesol.org/convention2013
 
 
 First
Friday
Forum

 































The
first
Friday
of
every
month

 









Schoenberg
Rm201‐
Gonzaga
Campus
 
 
 
 
 
 


Contact
Information



 








 







 




PCMI
Students






























Gonzaga
Campus






General
Information
 gonzaga.edu/pcmi
 pcmi@gonzaga.edu
 (509)
313‐6560


Stephanie
Dempsey,
PCV
 
 Peace
Corps

 P.O.
Box
208
 Lilongwe,
Malawi,
Africa
 sdemps80@hotmail.com


Melissa
Heid
 (PCMI
and
MA/TESL
Coordinator)

 heid@gonzaga.edu
 (509)
313‐6560


Cheyanne
Greer,
PCV

 C.P.
31
Maxixe
 Inhambane
Province,
Mozambique
 chey82@hotmail.com


Mary
Jeannot
 jeannot@gonzaga.edu
 (509)
313‐6559


Megan
McCann,
RPCV
 Gonzaga
University

 502
E.
Boone
Ave.

 Spokane,
Wash.
99258‐0088
 mmccann@zagmail.gonzaga.edu



 


Frances
Peterson,
PCV
 Cuerpo
de
Paz
 162
Chaco
Boreal
c/Mcal.
López
 Asunción
1580,
Paraguay
 South
America
 fmanring@zagmail.gonzaga.edu


Zach
Wegner,
PCV
 Peace
Corps
Samoa
 Private
mailbag
 Apia,
Western
Samoa,
South
Pacific

 wegner.zach@gmail.com



 
 


Please
share
your
ideas,
events
and
articles

 for
our
next
newsletter.

 Email:
 fmanring@zagmail.gonzaga.edu



 



 



 


6



 



 



The Global Bulldog #1