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JMNC JOSÉ MANUEL NÚÑEZ CASAL


Table of Contents 001 002 004 016 032 036 058 068 078 082 090 100 102 106 108 112 116 120 130 150 174 192 Office

Retail

CV Publications 1stAveMachine | et al. collaborative | Brooklyn, NY | Lead Designer Alumni I | et al. collaborative | Brooklyn, NY | Lead Designer Hu_Shelving | et al. collaborative | Forest Hills, NY | Lead Designer Casa Galicia | et al. collaborative | Astoria, NY | Lead Designer Innocor Comfort | et al. collaborative | New York, NY | Lead Designer Alumni II | et al. collaborative | Brooklyn, NY | Lead Designer DIEM Pop-Up | et al. collaborative | Miami, FL | Lead Designer Lemanis - Ricard Kitchen | et al. collaborative | Brooklyn, NY | Lead Designer Elliot - Hernandez Residence | et al. collaborative | New York, NY | Lead Designer Saks Fifth Avenue Flagship - L4 | Gensler | New York, NY | Designer Saks Fifth Avenue Flagship - L5 | Gensler | New York, NY | Designer Saks Fifth Avenue Flagship - L2 | Gensler | New York, NY | Designer Saks Fifth Avenue Flagship - L’Avenue Restaurant | Gensler | New York, NY | Project Architect Saks Fifth Avenue Flagship - L1 | Gensler | New York, NY | Designer One Liberty Observation Deck - Grab & Go | Gensler | Philadelphia, PA | Designer Cadillac Experience Center | Gensler | Shanghai, CH | Designer St. Luke Apartments | Warehaus | Richmond, VA | Lead Designer 12th & Macdonald | Warehaus | Richmond, CA | Designer Metro Walk Phase II | Warehaus | Richmond, CA | Designer Foundry | Warehaus | Lititz, PA | Lead Designer Furniture

Cultural

Exhibition

Restaurant

Residential

Urban Planning | Development


Jo s é Manuel Núñez Cas al

917 951 6633 | josemanuelnunez804@gmail.com Education New York Institute of Technology | Old Westbury, NY | B.ARCH | 2007-2012 Honors - Affiliations Presidential Honor List | 2007 - 2012 NYIT Chapter of Phi Eta Sigma National Honor Society | 2008 NYIT Chapter of Tau Sigma Delta Honor Society of Architecture | 2011 Thesis Recognition Award | 2012 Skills AutoCad | Revit | Adobe Creative Suite | Microsoft Office Suite | Sketchup | V-Ray Plug-in | Enscape Professional Warehaus | York, PA | Oct. 2017 - Present | Senior Designer Gensler | New York City | Dec. 2016 - Sep. 2017 | Retail Designer et al. collaborative of new york, LLC. | Brooklyn, NY | Jan. 2012 - Dec. 2015 | Lead Designer Rodriguez Studio PC | New York City | May - June 2013 | Freelance Jeffrey Hutchinson & Associates | New York City | Nov. 2012 - Jan. 2013 | Freelance Languages English | Spanish | Portuguese Agrupación De Lengua y Culturas Españolas | 1994 - 2005 358 Fifth Avenue, Suite 1404, New York, NY 10001 Received a diploma for the completion of studies of the Spanish language and culture under the General Consulate of Spain

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Publications

Dichotomy 19: Ugly Garza, M (2013). Form Follows Ugly. Dichotomy, 19, pgs 72-86. -contributed to all of the graphics in conjunction with the written text

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DNA info Sharp, S. (2013, August 7). Longtime Utica Avenue Shoe Store “Rugged Sole” Gets Sleek Boutique Facelift. -article written on Alumni boutique store

Complex Gordon, D. (2013, August 19). The Best Sneaker Boutiques in NYC. -article written on Alumni boutique store

Dexigner Gokcen, S. (2013, June 12). Alumni Shoes Store in Crown Heights. -article written on Alumni boutique store

Racked Fumo, N. (2013, July 29). Crown Heights Sneaker Shop Changes With the Times. -article written on Alumni boutique store

Dexigner Gokcen, S. (2015, July 21). Alumni Flatbush: A New Playground for the Sneakerhead Culture -article written on Alumni Flatbush boutique store

L’Arreda Negozi (2015, December). Alumni New York: Una Vetrina Per Le Calzature Sportive. L’Arreda Negozi, 130, pgs 58-60 -article written on Alumni Flatbush boutique store

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1stAveMachine 231 Front Street Brooklyn, NY 11201 www.1stavemachine.com Office: et al. collaborative of New York, LLC Status: Completed 2013 Role: Lead Designer led the design and actively participated in every step of the design process, along with interfacing with the client, construction administration, and submitting documents for DOB approvals

1stAveMachine is an award-winning production company based in New York City that prides itself on the success of a collaborative work environment of directors, artists, designers, and scientists. Since their debut in 2004, 1stAveMachine has grown and expanded to both independent and commercial work, representing brands and companies from the likes of Google, IBM, Sony, Audi, Nike, Adidas, Ford, MTV, and Microsoft. In the Fall of 2012, 1stAveMachine approached et al. with the idea of transforming a 10,000 sf loft space in Dumbo into their new head office after having outgrown their space at the time. Taking inspiration from blended live work spaces and an interest in collaborative work environments, the design strives to promote movement and conversation away from the confines of a desk or cubicle, into various zones where exchange and integration take place casually. Having been unused for decades, and once the sight of a Benjamin Moore factory, the aim was to keep the soul of a valuable piece of Brooklyn’s industrial history, and turn it into the creative think tank of this company and a home for the industry of our present time.

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view of the corridor leading into the executive and creative development offices JMNC | 05


view of the site before construction JMNC | 06


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Office Structure pre-award

post-award

live production

*varies

*varies

artists

partners

executive producers

creative development

production

+

directors

= includes interns on their teams JMNC | 08


view of the corridor during an event JMNC | 09


Program

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Employee Circulation | Spacial Use

team

utility IT

photo shoot

edit suites

stairs

kitchen

lounge/recreation

craft center

bicycle storage

elevators

reception

research area

printing/copy

kayak storage

docking station

conference

locker storage

toilets

creative development

production

storage

directors

live production

artists executive producers

partners

circulation

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view of the pantry and plug-in station JMNC | 12


view of the small conference room JMNC | 13


view from the pantry looking into the large conference room across the corridor JMNC | 14


view of the large conference room JMNC | 15


Alumni 1 289 Utica Avenue Brooklyn, NY 11213 www.alumniofny.com Office: et al. collaborative of New York, LLC Status: Completed 2013 Role: Lead Designer led the design and actively participated in every step of the design process, along with interfacing with the client, construction administration, and submitting documents for DOB approvals

et al. collaborative was approached by Alumni to redesign the new concept for the Crown Heights, Brooklyn location for the recent rebranding of the store. Envisioning the Utica location as an anchor in the community, et al. was tasked with designing a flexible, safe, family-centered space that would serve as a positive influence on the surrounding neighborhood. Having been a presence in the community for well over 20 years, the goal for Alumni, recently Rugged Sole, was to not only create a store that lived up to the value of an up and coming gentrified area, but to design it in a manner in which it would be welcoming and approachable among residents in the neighborhood, main factors that had been lacking and causing it to lose business and interest beforehand.

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LE SA anti-theft

sales flexibility

psychological

no clutter

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before, as Rugged Soul JMNC | 18


once completed, as Alumni JMNC | 19


anti-theft both the display system and a series of reflective surfaces allow employees to view merchandise easily from all angles in order to minimize theft

sales flexibility the merchandise on the sales floor can be prioritized, as the floor managers are able to open and close the cabinetry in order to display the products they wabt to sell

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psychological curiosity motivates the customer to open the closed cabinets, as hints of shoes inspire interaction and aid security as approachable, physical barriers

no clutter to avoid the overwhelming display of shoes and sneakers seen in most stores, the entire shoe inventory has been organized within the display system

men’s + boys’

women’s + girls’

700+ shoes

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Sales Floor Program

clothing

fitting room

40% clothing

700 shoes

check out

shoes

60%

sale/clearance

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mis

2% us cellaneo

cks k-pa bac

3%

s ket jac

5%

5%

jea

ns

5%

dres

/p a

nt s

s sh

irts

10% t shirts

60% shoes

% 0 1 ts ha

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source: alumniofny.tumblr.com JMNC | 24


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Floor Plan

7 2

1 5

2

6

3 4

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

cash register shoe display clothing display clothing racks and displays sales floor with modular displays entrance existing building egress JMNC | 26


Seating | Display Typologies a total of 16 modular units provide flexibility, as they are combined and arranged based on the needs of seating and product display on the sales floor

typology 1 (2x) (15”x15”x15”) classic grey

typology 2 (2x) (15”x30”x15”) weathered oak

typology 3 (2x) (15”x15”x24”) golden pecan

typology 4 (2x) (15”x30”x24”) pickled pecan

typology 5 (2x) (15”x15”x36”) classic grey

typology 6 (2x) (15”x30”x36”) weathered oak

typology 7 (2x) (15”x15”x48”) golden pecan

typology 8 (2x) (15”x30”x48”) pickled pecan

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Shoe Display System

men’s shoes men’s in-style shoes men’s boots boys’ shoes women’s shoes women’s in-style shoes women’s boots girls’ shoes JMNC | 28


Clothing Display System

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typical peg-display system inside the cabinetry

view of the shoe display (closed) JMNC | 30


view from the POS towards the entrance JMNC | 31


Hu_Shelving Forest Hills, NY Office: et al. collaborative of New York, LLC Status: Completed 2013 Role: Lead Designer Co-led the design and actively participated in every step of the design process, along with interfacing with the client, shop drawings, and fabrication

et al. collaborative was approached by the client in order to design and fabricate a minimal furniture piece with flexible capabilities that included a desk, storage, and displays. The challenge was to create a small piece that undertook the required program and flexibility, was operable, and was discreet enough to go unoticeable in the apartment, as the client desired to hide appearance and clutter of a functioning work space.

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the piece was fabricated in-studio and assembled on-site JMNC | 33


Components a laser-cut acrylic pattern was assembled and mounted on-to a structural metal frame

x

l

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the piece includes a sliding, pull-out desk

the laser-cut pattern on the acrylic panels JMNC | 35


Cas a Galicia 37-09 31st Ave Astoria, NY 11103 Office: et al. collaborative of New York, LLC Status: Design Development (On Hold) Role: Lead Designer led the design and actively participated in every step of the design process to the current status, interfaced with the client, compiled presentations to present to active club members and the board, reached out to vendors and contractors, created a design development set, and worked on budgets

Established in 1940 by immigrants of the North-West region of Galicia, Spain, the Unity Gallega of the U.S., also known as Casa Galicia, is a private social/ cultural club with over 1,000 members to date. A society rich in history, Casa Galicia provides various services and functions to its community that serve to educate first, second, and third generation children of members about the region and its customs, however, renovating the club came as an initiative from its current board to improve the standards of a dated building in order to meet the demand of an increased membership, maintain the interest of current members, attract a stronger youth base, and improve the felxibility of the building’s spaces in order to meet the demands of its current programs and additional ones to be offered, as the current situation finds many of their functions overlapping due to wasted space. The goal was to present a design to the community that provided the flexibility and timelessness not only needed for the current generation of members, but one that laid out the footprint for generations to come.

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view of the main facade and entrance JMNC | 37


Program Guide

program

storage

bathrooms

library

office

administrative storage

music room

computer room

green room

general storage

chorus room

dance studio

terrace

instrument / uniform storage

conference room

coat check

recreational room

nursery

locker room

bar

elevator

lounge

cinema / sports

stairs

dj

dining

stage

kitchen

liquor storage

circulation

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view of the proposed extension on the second level JMNC | 39


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Longitudinal Section

roof

second floor

first floor

cellar

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roof

mezzanine

second floor

entrance

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First Floor Plan

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view of the proposed bar on the first floor JMNC | 45


view of the proposed dining room on the first floor JMNC | 46


view of the proposed nursery on the first floor JMNC | 47


Second Floor Plan

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view of the proposed extension on the second level JMNC | 49


view of the proposed bar on the second floor JMNC | 50


view of the proposed dining room and stage on the second floor JMNC | 51


Mezzanine Floor Plan

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view of the proposed conference room on the mezzanine level JMNC | 53


Cellar Floor Plan

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view of the proposed dance studio in the cellar JMNC | 55


view of the proposed library in the cellar JMNC | 56


view of the proposed music room in the cellar JMNC | 57


Inno c or Comfor t 1115 Broadway, 3rd Flr., Unit 302 New York, NY 10010 www.innocorinc.com Office: et al. collaborative of New York, LLC Status: Completed 2014 Role: Lead Designer led the design and actively participated in every step of the design process, along with interfacing with the client, construction administration, and submitting documents for DOB approvals

et al. collaborative was approached by Innocor Comfort to revitalize its showroom space to compliment their core product line of bed pillows and mattresses. The design basis itself on versatility, as modular and mobile furniture are used throughout. The floor plan is arranged primarily using a permeable and functional floor-to-ceiling L-shape wall display system containing storage and hidden shelving, as well as two integrated modular wall panels that pivot on caster wheels that can be positioned to extend into the main space, or retract and become invisible depending on the needs of the day. Particular attention was drawn towards the division of public and private spaces. While the wall display system acts as a divider, it creates moments of visibility with its permeability, as meeting spaces and the main showroom are visible, yet physically partitioned.

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view of the main showroom space with an L-shaped wall display looking back towards the conference room JMNC | 59


Floor Plan

7

1

2

3

4

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5

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

reception small conference room pantry storage large conference room main showroom rubber room

L-shape wall display system

large conference display system

building hallway | egress

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Program

25%

25%

- mattresses - toppers - pillows - cushions - covers

- rugs - rubber mats

bedding

flooring

35%

15%

- wedges - bean bags - pillow sacks - rockers - fold out bean bags

- new products - new technology - research

furniture

innovations

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Showroom Components 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 a b c d e f g

reception small conference room pantry storage large conference room main showroom rubber room suspended wood ceiling L-shape wall display system large conference room display ottoman displays mattress displays pillow displays banquette

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view looking towards the entrance of the large conference room

view of the pillow displays JMNC | 64


two integrated modular wall panels pivot on caster wheels and can be positioned to extend into the main space JMNC | 65


moveable, sliding partitions are used to display and store products and innovations in the large conference room JMNC | 66


view of the permeable display at the L-shape display system JMNC | 67


Alumni 2 1924 Church Avenue Brooklyn, NY 11226 www.alumniofny.com Office: et al. collaborative of New York, LLC Status: Completed 2015 Role: Lead Designer led the design and actively participated in every step of the design process, along with interfacing with the client, construction administration, and submitting documents for DOB approvals

et al. collaborative was approached by Alumni to design the new concept for the Flatbush, Brooklyn location for the recent rebranding of the store, formerly known as Wealthy Hostage. Much like the Alumni in Crown Heights, the Flatbush location was envisioned to be an anchor in the community, as et al. was tasked with designing a flexible, safe, and family-centered space that would serve as a positive influence on the surrounding neighborhood. The concept was to showcase the grit and aesthetic of Brooklyn with a raw, industrial palette that enhanced the vibrant colors of the clothes and sneakers against the walls. Keeping an open plan that allows for all items to be organized against the walls, a focal point was created in the form of a light sculpture in order to showcase the latest styles and trends, while also attracting the attention of pedestrians on the street.

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view of the storefront with the light sculpture in sight JMNC | 69


before, as Wealthy Hostage JMNC | 70


once completed, as Alumni 2 JMNC | 71


Floor Plan check-out

accessories

apparel

viewview of Alumni of Alumni once once completed completed

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view looking towards the modular shelving and clothing racks JMNC | 73


Store Components

c

a

b

e

d

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a

metal shelving units

c

light sculpture

b

d

peg wall

metal clothing rack units

e

plywood floor

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exposed walls help create the desired raw palette

the peg wall JMNC | 76


view from the POS towards the entrance JMNC | 77


DIEM | Pop -Up Art Basel Miami, FL www.doesitevenmatter.com Office: et al. collaborative of New York, LLC Status: Completed 2015 Role: Lead Designer led the design and actively participated in every step of the design process, along with interfacing with the client, and construction administration

et al. collaborative was approached by DIEM to design a pop-up shop at the annual Art Basel festival in Miami that could work as both a retail concept and an event. Showcasing their new “1992� line, a grid of 2 types of wooden lacquered painted modules resembling Olympic Podiums were used to display the latest merchandise. The arranged grid invited visitors to meander and experience from multiple view points, as the podiums were designed to offer maximum flexibility and display while also creating unformity in the space.

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the typical display module seen at the pop-up JMNC | 79


Program | Components

a

Olympic Podium Located at the entrance, the step and repeat area set the tone for the pop-up theme, providing an olympic podium for customer | visitor interaction, as well as a photo opportunity.

b

Color Wheel Zone 3 (18”L x 18”W x 18”H) platforms were stacked with bookbags or mannequins to be displayed above, while 2 sides of each platform were open in order to store and display folded colored t-shirts. Each set of platforms had its own color.

c

Stadiem Display Displaying the latest line to be released at Art Basel, (15) 18”L x 18”W x 30”H platforms with an open diplay were organized in a grid. The top of each platform contained one folded t-shirt or hoodie, meanwhile the open area contained folded t shirts or hoodies of the same kind/color.

c

b

a

b c

a

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Lemanis - Ricard Kitchen 449 12th Street Brooklyn, NY 11215 Office: et al. collaborative of New York, LLC Status: Completed 2015 Role: Lead Designer led the design and actively participated in every step of the design process, along with interfacing with the client, and construction administration

et al. collaborative was approached to redesign a kitchen in Park Slope, Brooklyn. Tasked with designing around a rustic, Mediterranean palette, the design challenges the idea with a poured concrete counter, wood elements, white cabinetry, and Marrakech tiles. The goal was not only to design around these elements, but to carefully contrast the new design with the existing palette of the space.

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the poured concrete kitchen features intricate details such as this triangular grid JMNC | 83


before JMNC | 84


once completed JMNC | 85


Floor Plan | Components

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8

9 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22

wood block table with stools concrete block support for table top stools undermount sink integrated sloped dish rack integrated wood chopping block 4 burner stove-top system shelving exhaust hood cabinets backsplash tile 2 inch concrete countertop with bevel concrete base frame drawers pull-out drawer for garbage lazy susan 36 inch counter with drawers 42 inch counter wine bottle inserts existing column with concrete parge marrakech tiles existing partitions

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view looking in from the entry

the bevel detail at the countertop is used throughout JMNC | 88


view from the kitchen interior JMNC | 89


Elliot - Hernandez Re sidenc e 15 Broad St., Unit 1810 New York, NY 10005 Office: et al. collaborative of New York, LLC Status: Completed 2016 Role: Lead Designer led the design and actively participated in every step of the design process, along with interfacing with the client, construction administration, and submitting documents for DOB approvals

Located in Downtown by Philippe Starck, Unit 1810 set a design challenge based on its aesthetic. Faced with hardwood floors that had been painted black by its previous owner, industrial pendants that had no business in a financial district apartment, a lack of storage, and elements such as a large booth by the kitchen that took up valuable space. et al was not only tasked with simplifying a living situation, but also creating a lighter, less dense feel in an extremely dark apartment whose identity had been lost over the years.

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the dining and living room | source: city connections realty JMNC | 91


Common Areas

Master Areas

Children Areas

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Floor Plan

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

Entry Bathroom 1 Bathroom 2 Children’s Bedroom Guest Bedroom | Office Master Bedroom Master Bathroom Master Closet AHU Closet | Storage Washer | Dryer Kitchen Island (seating + storage) Dining Area Storage | Wine Rack Living Room

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before, looking towards the kitchen and dining booth JMNC | 94


after, with sanded and stained floors, an island with seating, renovated kitchen with storage, and a dining area | source: city connections realty JMNC | 95


a look into the renovated kitchen area | source: city connections realty JMNC | 96


new vanities and pendants in each bathroom

the master bedroom | source: city connections realty JMNC | 97


the living room contains a hearth and a sliding barn door that opens up to the master bedroom | source: city connections realty JMNC | 98


a look at the new kitchen island, which is set in poured concrete | source: city connections realty JMNC | 99


Saks Fif th Avenue - L4 611 5th Avenue New York, NY 10022 www.saksfifthavenue.com Office: Gensler Status: Completed 2016 Role: Designer Worked closely with the Design Director and Project Architect to design fixtures and produce fixture booklets, while also assisting the team in producing design development drawings and construction documents.

In 2015, Saks announced a 3 year, $250 million overhaul of its Manhattan flagship. In a world where online shopping has become more convenient for today’s retail shopper, Saks envisions a store that creates a lavish experience that online shopping can’t replicate. Although the plan is ambitious, considering that there are 9 floors to be reprogrammed and overhauled, the competition among other full-price stores is stiff, considering that Nieman Marcus and Nordstrum are opening their first Manhattan locations in the same turf that Saks has reigned for over 90 years. The 4th Floor was the first phase of the Flagship’s revamp. The floor is “lifestyle” focused and geared towards showcasing American designers.

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view of the 30 ft diameter back-lit dome at the center of the fourth floor JMNC | 101


Saks Fif th Avenue - L5 611 5th Avenue New York, NY 10022 www.saksfifthavenue.com Office: Gensler Status: Completed 2017 Role: Designer Worked closely with the Design Director and Project Architect to design fixtures and produce fixture booklets, while also assisting the team in producing construction documents.

The 5th Floor was the second phase of the Flagship’s revamp. The renovated 54,000 sf fifth floor is based on showcasing an assortment of modern designers, including those that have been introduced recently and can only be found exclusively at Saks. The floor is based on an open, minimalistic plan that intertwines both art and fashion, as the retail area is organized by the designers themselves, and various installations can be seen walking through. The floor features 45 fitting rooms, as well as a VIP styling suite and various social areas with seating.

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view of “The Advance�, the 7,000 sq ft gallery-like space that, on occasion, will have art and installations on the floor and partitions JMNC | 103


typical suspended rod displays in the floor’s floating partitions JMNC | 104


entry from the elevator lobby

some of the more transparent display systems JMNC | 105


Saks Fif th Avenue - L2 611 5th Avenue New York, NY 10022 www.saksfifthavenue.com Office: Gensler Status: Completed 2018 Role: Designer worked closely with the Design Director and Project Architect to design fixtures and produce fixture booklets, while also designing concepts for the Apothecary.

The 2nd Floor at Saks was the third phase of the Flagship’s revamp. Breaking away from department store tradition, Saks became the first store to move their beauty department from the main floor to the second floor. At 32,000 sf, the department is not only 40% larger, it also features over 120 cosmetic and wellness brands, and a number of experiences that focus on self care and preservation: 15 spa rooms that offer services such as facials, massages, manicures, brow services, and medi-spa treatments, a flower shop, and a Parfumeur boutique where customers can choose their own scent via digital consultation and ultimately personalize their own bottle. The goal of the second floor was to steer away from the traditional beauty counter design, the idea that counters were placed upon store entry to lure customers into impulse purchases. However, seeing how customers now make impulse purchases online, Saks realizes that customers today need a destination where they can relax, learn, test, and recieve treatments as part of a purchasing experience.

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beauty bar | source: saks

apothecary | source: saks

the face gym area used for services such as facials | source: saks

parfumeur boutique | source: saks JMNC | 107


Saks Fif th Avenue - L’Avenue 611 5th Avenue New York, NY 10022 www.saksfifthavenue.com Office: Gensler Status: Completed 2019 Role: Project Architect With Phillipe Starck as the Designer, Gensler was the AOR for the restaurant on the 8th and 9th floors. Up through design development, my job, along with the Project Manager, was to provide the STARCK team with all the necessary information to design the project (a white-box package, code research, etc.) to then take their proposed vision and develop it into a set of documents for bid and construction, while also coordinating with all of the consultants and the Saks Design Team.

For many years, the 8th Floor at Saks was home to Cafe SFA, a subpar eatery exposed to the retailers’ clothing racks and assemblies without much foot traffic. In Saks’ $250 million store-wide renovation effort, a deal was struck with Costes Group to bring their famed L’Avenue on Avenue Montaigne restaurant to New York City. With L’Avenue at Saks being the first American outpost for the Costes Group empire, Saks aims to position itself above its competitors in New York by introducing a restaurant that is well known in Paris for attracting elite celebrities, athletes, and fashion designers. Designed by Philippe Starck with Gensler as AOR, the 16,000 square foot restaurant has two themes separated along two floors; level 8 being Le Chalet and level 9, The Salon. Those that walk through Le Chalet experience a cozy, cabin-like feel with inspiration from the French Alps. Just up a curved staircase to the 9th floor lies The Salon, a dining area featuring ivory and pink tones that are reminiscent of French haute couture seen in magazines such as Vogue and films such as Breakfast at Tiffany’s. With two completely different and complimentary spaces, Starck strived to create a yin and yang effect, while also introducing what in his mind is old Frech glamour, with a twist.

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The Salon, located on level 9, is the main dining area | source: Pierce Harrison for Architectural Digest JMNC | 109


Le Chalet, located on level 8, is the bar and lounge area | source: saks JMNC | 110


The Salon bar | source: L’Officiel

The Salon | source: Andrew White for NYT

The Salon | source: Philippe Starck JMNC | 111


Saks Fif th Avenue - L1 611 5th Avenue New York, NY 10022 www.saksfifthavenue.com Office: Gensler Status: Completed 2019 Role: Designer Worked closely with the Design Director and Project Architect to design fixtures and produce fixture booklets, while also assisting the team in producing design development drawings.

The 53,000 sf main floor was once home to the beauty department which has since been relocated to the second level, breaking away from the traditional theme seen in most department stores where the consumer is immediately greeted with make-up counters. Today, the main floor at Saks is the centerpiece to the store-wide renovation, as the open dialogue between the second level, first level, and cellar begins to take fruition. An escalator, designed in collaboration with OMA, coated in iridescent dichroic film that changes colors upon different viewing angles, forms a diamond and connects all 3 floors. The escalator has always been a crucial aspect of the department store, and the thought behind the concept was to revive the idea of the escalator as a thrill and an attraction; or in other words, an experience. The main floor itself is dedicated to the largest handbag display in New York City, as the showcase inventory has nearly tripled and features over 50 brands in carefully curated shelving, displays, and interventions.

JMNC | 112


view of the new atrium from a vendor shop on the main floor | source: Bloomberg News JMNC | 113


view of the atrium from the handbag section on the main floor | source: saks JMNC | 114


handbag displays | source: saks

handbag displays | source: saks

escalator going up to the second level | source: saks JMNC | 115


One Lib er t y Obs ervation D e ck | Grab & Go 1650 Market Street Philadelphia, PA 19139 Office: Gensler Status: Design Development Role: Designer worked alongside the Design Director from concept design into design development while interfacing with the client on a weekly basis

Gensler was approached by Montparnasse to make slight improvements on the newly designed One Liberty Observation Deck. In order to better serve customers throughout the day, a grab & go | pop-up food station was added to the program.

JMNC | 116


view of the proposed grab & go station JMNC | 117


Floor Plan

8

3 compartment sink espresso machine drip coffee machine ice machine dishwasher tall refrigerator gelato display point of sale

9

serving station

a

unit 1 • counter height bar • merchandise shelving below unit 2 • gelato station

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

b c

6

unit 3 • cash register • customer serving station • merchandise shelving below

5

4

2

1

3

a

7

b

8

9

c

tra ffic

flo

w

JMNC | 118


view of the proposed grab & go station JMNC | 119


Cadillac Exp erienc e Center Shanghai, CH Office: Gensler Status: Concept Design Role: Designer worked alongside the Design Director to deliver a 100% concept design package while interfacing with the client on a weekly basis. My role was to produce designs for the flexible VIP boardroom, and design options for the precision pattern located along the exterior and core of the building.

Over the last few years, Cadillac has experienced an overhaul in both their branding and image. Having started by uprooting their headquarters from Detroit to New York City, the brand was set to not only appeal to a new crowd, but a new age group. The Cadillac Shanghai Experience Center is one of the many initiatives going forward by Cadillac in their rebranding phase. Its significance could not be more important, as it not only celebrates the brand’s history, it introduces a new way of purchasing vehicles and bringing a community of Cadillac owners together through a range of experiences.

JMNC | 120


view of the proposed building shell JMNC | 121


Core Walls

JMNC | 122


1

2

exterior

1

interior

entry facade design: contains horizontal slatted wood and smoked glass

2

interior core walls: contains the Cadillac precision pattern modules with integrated shelving components

4�

2� led lights in reveals smoked black glass at reveals

JMNC | 123


entry into the experience center with the proposed slatted wood facade JMNC | 124


the proposed cafe | retail with the precision pattern along the core wall JMNC | 125


V.I.P. Board Room Located on the 3rd level, the v.i.p. room is an essential component to the design, as its flexibility not only lends itself to employees, but to clients and the Cadillac community. As well as serving as the board room for company executives, it can serve as an area for seminars and dinners, a virtual reality customization lounge for clients, and an unveiling area for new Cadillac owners.

JMNC | 126


the proposed v.i.p. room in an executive setting JMNC | 127


V.I.P. Board Room

Private Dinner Dinner events are hosted for employees, clients, and the Cadillac community

Virtual Customization Gallery Clients and members of the Cadillac community can view and customize new and future vehicles via virtual reality technology

JMNC | 128


Car Delivery Purchased vehicles are unveiled to each customer and celebrated upon pick-up

Seminar | Event Several times per year, Cadillac news and updates will be unveiled at conferences

JMNC | 129


St . Luke Apar tments 3901 Pilots Lane Richmond, VA 23222 Office: Warehaus Status: Construction Documents Role: Lead Designer worked alongside the Design Director from concept design to design development, and interfaced with the client to deliver the necessary documents to the Virginia HUD.

St. Luke Apartments, once known as Essex Village, is Henrico County’s largest subsidized housing complex. Notoriously known for its deplorable conditions amongst county leaders, it has been riddled with pest infestations, broken railings and balconies, and pipe leaks throughout several years. Under previous management, many of these conditions had been largely ignored and residents were forced to live under unsafe and unsanitary conditions. Under new management and ownership with SAA | EVI, the existing 496 unit affordable housing complex will undergo a complete overhaul with new community facilities, playgrounds, renovations to all units, system updates, landscaping and infrastructural work to existing roadways, sewage, etc.

JMNC | 130


noc

Oro

e o Av

aS

ne La lo ts Pi

Alma

Ave

e pik

n Tur

Delmont Street

co

nri

et

He

tre

nd mo

h Ric

Elb

Oronoco Ave

E Laburnum Ave

N

JMNC | 131


Existing Site Plan

B

A B C

B

C C

C

N

JMNC | 132


A

Building Type A (Housing) Units per Building 4 Total Buildings 20 Total Units 80

B

Building Type B (Housing) Units per Building 16 Total Buildings 26 Total Units 416

C

Building Type C (Community) Units per Building n/a Total Buildings 4 Total Units n/a

JMNC | 133


Existing Site

JMNC | 134


JMNC | 135


Site Improvements

Neighborhood 4: Mature Housing Neighborhood 1: Senior Housing Ric Oronoco

Oronoco Ave

hm

on

Ave

dH

en

ric

oT urn

pik

e

e

sid

gle

En Cir

t

nC

ero

Elb

e

Ct

sid

gle

En

Elb

a

En

gle

St

sid

Dr

ots

e

Ln

Dr

sid

gle

Pil

En

Engleside Dr

alt

o

Dr

ont St

Delm

Pin

e

N

E Laburnum Avenue

Neighborhood 2: Multi-Family Housing

Neighborhood 3: Multi-Family Housing

JMNC | 136


Public Porch The porch is an emblematic symbol of community and gathering. Each entry at single story scale housing, and the areas to the left and /or right of each housing unit will be linked with a circular public porch made up of seating. shaded areas, surfaced treatments, grass, picnic tables, and planting areas.

Central Greenway Designed as a town square, the Central Greenway will be the core to Maggie Walker, as it will connect two multi family communities and become an open, public promenade, giving the flexibility for a variety of activities to take place.

Eat & Play Sitting next to two existing basketball courts, a space where families and friends of all ages can congregate was imagined. A playground anchors the play area while a picnic area sits nestled in-between two courts in order to create a combination of passive and active programs designed to encourage safe spaces for neighborhood children to play.

Link & Loop The loop is a path, scaped much like a trail, that connects each one of the four neighborhoods and links the various outdoor spaces across the village. Tree lined areas provide respite from the sun during the day, benches along the path create areas to take a break, and lamps along the path provide illumination and safety at night.

Culivation Block Three main gardens were imagined using existing outdoor areas in order to help the community cultivate their surroundings with numerous vegetables, herbs, and plants. Families can cooperatively work in all 3 spaces, teaching their children how to plant, while also getting to know their respective neighbors, as these three islands become centers.

Innovation Center Linking Maggie Walker with the surrounding community, the Innovation Center will not only serve as a conduit, but as an activities center for the community.

JMNC | 137


view of the proposed central greenway JMNC | 138


view of the proposed cultivation block JMNC | 139


Building Type A | Existing & Proposed Plans

Existing Plan

Typical Floor Plate | 2,915 GSF (4) 1 Bedroom | 585 SF + 100 SF Patio

Proposed Plan

Typical Floor Plate | Unchanged GSF Typical 1 Bedroom Unit

(4) Outdoor Storage | 9 SF Typical 1 Bedroom Unit JMNC | 140


Typical 1 Bedroom Unit

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Kitchen | 127 SF Linens Closet | 6 SF Bathroom | 37 SF Washer & Dryer + AHU | 20 SF Bedroom 1 | 157 SF Water-Heater Closet | 4 SF Living Room | 181 SF Outdoor Storage | 9 SF Patio | 100 SF Existing Partitions Proposed Partitions

8

3

1

2 9

4

6

5

7

JMNC | 141


Building Type B | Existing Plan

Typical Floor Plate | 8,239 GSF (similar ground floor & second floor plan) (2) Small 3 Bedroom | 831 SF + 61 SF Balcony

(2) Storage | 96 SF

(4) 2 Bedroom | 717 SF + 61 SF Balcony

(2) Electrical Rooms | 27 SF

(2) Large 3 Bedroom | 957 SF + 61 SF

(2) Circulation | 321 SF Balcony JMNC | 142


Building Type B | Proposed Plan

Typical Floor Plate | Unchanged GSF Typical 3 Small Bedroom Unit Typical 2 Bedroom Unit Typical Large 3 Bedroom Unit JMNC | 143


Typical Small 3 Bedroom Unit

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Kitchen | 86 SF Storage + Washer & Dryer & AHU | 47 SF Bathroom | 38 SF Bedroom 1 | 171 SF Bedroom 2 | 112 SF Bedroom 3 | 94 SF Linens Closet | 3 SF Water Heater Closet | 6 SF Living Room | 182 SF Balcony | 61 SF Existing Partitions Proposed Partitions

1

2

3

4

7

8

9 5

6

10

JMNC | 144


view of the proposed kitchen in building type B JMNC | 145


Typical 2 Bedroom Unit

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Kitchen | 86 SF Storage + Washer & Dryer & AHU | 39 SF Bathroom | 38 SF Bedroom 1 | 182 SF Bedroom 2 | 127 SF Water-Heater Closet | 6 SF Living Room | 182 SF Balcony | 61 SF Existing Partitions Proposed Partitions

1

2

3

4

6

7 5

8

JMNC | 146


view of the proposed kitchen in building type B JMNC | 147


Typical Large 3 Bedroom Unit

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

Kitchen | 139 SF AHU Closet | 15 SF Washer & Dryer Closet | 8 SF Bathroom | 38 SF Master Bathroom | 38 SF Master Bedroom | 199 SF Linens Closet | 4 SF Bedroom 1 | 125 SF Bedroom 2 | 109 SF Water Heater Closet | 6 SF Living Room | 178 SF Balcony | 61 SF Existing Partitions Proposed Partitions

2 1

5

4

3

6

7

10

11 9

8

12

JMNC | 148


view of the proposed bathrooms in building type B JMNC | 149


12th & Macdonald Richmond, CA Office: Warehaus Status: Schematic Design Role: Designer worked alongside the Design Director from concept through schematic design, and interfaced with the client in order to deliver the necessary documentation, visualizations, diagrams and presentations for approvals from the City of Richmond.

In the last 20 years, Tech has evolved the Bay area to the point where it accounts for 20% of all payroll jobs in the nine-county region. Even though the population has increased significantly due to the industry’s popularity, it has slowed, and in many cases, counties have been losing residents due to the increased price of housing. With the new connection to Richmond via ferry making it more accessible to and from San Francisco, the City will be more attractive to priced out residents and businesses, leading to a new industry and developmental boom. Since the beginning of the decade, Richmond has become the choice for several of the nation’s top companies. Amazon, Whole Foods, and Restoration Hardware are among some of the few that now call the City its home. Although 12th & Macdonald will be the City of Richmond’s first major development, SAA | EVI, the Developer, aims to create a hub in downtown Richmond that invests in people and connects the community, while also improving social, economic, educational and environmental conditions without displacing residents amidst a time of gentrification. Consuming two blocks of Macdonald Avenue, the mixed-use development will feature over 50,000 sf of retail space and 378 units of housing at affordable rates built along two phases.

JMNC | 150


proposed massing of the first phase of the development JMNC | 151


Context | City of Richmond

GRIZZLY BAY NOVATO SAISUN BAY SAN PABLO BAY

SAN RAFAEL

RICHMOND

BERKELEY

SAN FRANCISCO BAY OAKLAND GULF OF FARALLONES SAN FRANCISCO

N

JMNC | 152


Context | Iron Triangle

Project Site Iron Triangle

N

JMNC | 153


Context | Project Site

tre

S th

et

11

tre

S th

12

et

Ne vin

Av en ue

th

13

M

do

na

N

ac

et re

St

ld

Av en ue

JMNC | 154


Context | Project Site

Project Site Iron Triangle

13th Street

335’-0”

12th Street

11th Street

Nevin Avenue

495’-0”

Macdonald Avenue

N

JMNC | 155


2,15 0

2

6

19 09 19 10 19 6,8 11 0

2

190 7 190 8

1905

190

1903

1904

1900

1901

2018

2019

2016

2017

2014

3

201

19 12 19 13 19 14

08 20

1 201 10 20 09 20

01

05 20

06

15

19

03

16

19

02

20

,21

201

3,7

20

07

04

20

20

99

15 97 2 0

10 20

20

1902

107,5

Growth & Transition | City of Richmond

1

01

6

7 91

18

19

20

00

19 199

8

199

7

199

3

6

192

1995

19011940

Richmond was incorporated as a city i transcontinental railroad and ferry. The c 1940, as large companies such as Stan steady economy. With this growth, neigh construction expanded to accommodate

19401945

Richmond’s population rose dramatically Shoreline. With a population increase of built throughout the South and Southwes

19451960

At the conclusion of the war, the Shipyar production, as well as population. Althou as there was an increase in warehousi increase in warehouse typologies.

19601995

From the 60’s to the late 80’s, Richmond early 90’s in El Sobrante, Hilltop, Brickya cant growth.

19952010

Since the mid 90’s, Richmond saw a con nationally recognized businesses began

1924

1994

1925

1993

1926

1992

1927

1991

1928

87,425 1990

1929

1989

1930

1988

1931

20,093

1932

1987

1933

1986 1985

1934

1935

4

198

193

3

198

6

193

2

198

7

193

1 198

8

19

80

19

39

19

9

7 19

40

19

78

19

41

19

77

19

42

19

76

19

19 75 19 74 3 72

7

1962

1961

1964 1963

6 196

1965

69

19

70 19

8 196

2

5 ,54 99

1

196

19

71

47

19

46

19

19

,64

2

44

45

48 19 49 19

50

195

19

3 195

195

1956

1954 1955

1958

1957

1960

1959

79 ,04 3

23

43

19 19

19 7

6

7 4,6

7

Augustin S. Macdonald conceived the id larger cities and spark early industry. Fe Santa Fe Railroad established its Weste from Chicago in 1900.

3

19 84 16, 0 192 1 192 2 192

19

99

18951901

2010-

In the last 20 years, Tech has evolved th in the nine-county region. Even thoug popularity, it has slowed, and in many ca of housing. With the new connection to R co, the City will be more attractive to p developmental boom. Since the beginnin nation’s top companies. Amazon, Whole now call the City its home.

71,854

JMNC | 156


18951901

Augustin S. Macdonald conceived the idea of a transcontinental rail terminal and ferry service to connect to larger cities and spark early industry. Ferry service was provided from Richmond to San Francisco, and the Santa Fe Railroad established its Western Terminus in Point Richmond, with the first passenger train arriving from Chicago in 1900.

19011940

Richmond was incorporated as a city in 1905 and industrial growth emerged after the introduction of the transcontinental railroad and ferry. The city grew over the following decades from 2,150 in 1905, to 23,642 in 1940, as large companies such as Standard Oil, American Radiator and Ford migrated and established a steady economy. With this growth, neighborhoods within the outskirts of the City Center emerged, and harbor construction expanded to accommodate the increase in production.

19401945

Richmond’s population rose dramatically, as World War 2 ship-building operations sprung up along the South Shoreline. With a population increase of more than 70,000, new housing, both permanent and temporary, was built throughout the South and Southwestern portions of the city.

19451960

At the conclusion of the war, the Shipyards closed in 1945 and Richmond saw a steady decrease in industrial production, as well as population. Although the city suffered negative effects, the industry began to change, as there was an increase in warehousing, distribution, and chemical and research facilities, leading to an increase in warehouse typologies.

19601995

From the 60’s to the late 80’s, Richmond’s population remained the same, however, new development in the early 90’s in El Sobrante, Hilltop, Brickyard Cove, Marina Bay, and City Center/Downtown introduced significant growth.

19952010

Since the mid 90’s, Richmond saw a consistent amount of growth in the residential and economic sector, as nationally recognized businesses began choosing the City for distribution in the early 2000’s.

2010-

In the last 20 years, Tech has evolved the Bay area to the point where it accounts for 20% of all payroll jobs in the nine-county region. Even though the population has increased significantly due to the industry’s popularity, it has slowed, and in many cases, counties have been losing residents due to the increased price of housing. With the new connection to Richmond via ferry making it more accessible to and from San Francisco, the City will be more attractive to priced out residents and businesses, leading to a new industry and developmental boom. JMNC | 157


Problem Statement What problem(s) are we trying to solve?

Design Statement

Design Parameters

1. A lack of urban community as defined by:

Prime the pump: Create an experience that initiates a lively sustainable destination in Richmond, California.

a. activities to promote social engagement

Live

=

Communal viability

b. building density to activate the downtown corridor

Work

=

Economic viability

• Commercial office space that includes an Innovation Center

Play

=

Social viability

• Brew pub

c. commerce to promote investment into the city The scope of this project does not have the critical mass to solve the problem by itself. It is the first step. 2. How do you become the first step toward a solution? Create a destination

• 150 multifamily units (Phase 1) • Retail space that includes Milk & Honey as well as other supporting retailers

• Outdoor entertainment and dining area with media screen • Outdoor leisure and athletic area (e.g., sand volleyball, bocce ball, pétanque etc.)

JMNC | 158


JMNC | 159


LIVE

WORK

PLAY

JMNC | 160


Live | Work | Play In 1943, the American psychologist Abraham Maslow published “A Theory of Human Motivation,” which included what is now known as Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. It puts forth the theory that our basic human needs must be satisfied before we can become the evolved, self-actualized social beings that we are as indicated in the five-level pyramid below. • • • • •

Physiological needs Safety needs Belongingness Esteem Self-Actualization

Our instinctive nature is motivated still today by the desire to achieve or maintain the various conditions upon which the basic needs are satisfied. For new developments to thrive in urban communities, it is imperative to create a sense of place that encompasses a Live I Work I Play paradigm and provides amenities to support Maslow’s theory. LIVE • Multifamily Residential WORK • Commercial office space • Retail PLAY • Outdoor performance space • Outdoor athletic and leisure area

JMNC | 161


Site Connections & Usage Barrett Avenue

Project Site U.S. Social Security Administration =

=

East Bay Center for Performing Arts =

RT & tra Am ine

kL s

Marina Way

=

11th Street

=

Nevin Avenue

9th Street

=

Kaiser Permanente Richmond Medical Center

BA

=

Richmond Train Station | Park and Ride (BART & Amtrak Service)

N

=

Train Tracks (BART & Amtrak Lines)

Macdonald Avenue

Barrett Avenue

RT BA & Am s

Marina Way

9th Street

11th Street

ine

kL

tra

Nevin Avenue

N Macdonald Avenue

JMNC | 162


Program Intent

Project Site Work Community Transit Live Play

Barrett Avenue

RT

BA & s

ine

kL

tra

Am

LIVE WORK

PLAY

Macdonald Avenue

Marina Way

Harbour Way

Bissell Avenue

N

JMNC | 163


LIVE WORK

PLAY

1

2

1

1th

t ee Str

Ne vin

tre

S 2th

Av en ue

et

1 Ma

cd

on

ald

Av en ue

tre

S 3th

et

1

Ma by stre

JMNC | 164


3

flexible space is provided for Eastbay and the community

the grid is respected by keeping 12th Street active

acdonald Avenue is addressed lining up Phase 1 parallel to the eet

the existing parking structure will

JMNC | 165


Ma by stre

4

5

temporary structures are provided until phase 2 is constructed

the base of the building is activated to create a destination

JMNC | 166


acdonald Avenue is addressed lining up Phase 1 parallel to the eet

6

the perimeter is secured with a boundary

the existing parking structure will be updated and 100 reserved spots will be provided for the city

phase 2 will contain 150 units

phase 1 will contain 150 units

JMNC | 167


Site Plan Diagram

4 5 6 7

5

4

1

13th Street

2 3

Nevin Avenue

Outdoor Classroom | Event Covered Dining Outdoor Entertainment Screen Replaceable Structures | Gaming Service Roof Terrace 5 Story Building (150 Units) Existing Parking Garage (228 Spaces) • 100 Public Spaces • 128 Private Spaces Parking Access

1

11th Street

1

6 1

2

7

Macdonald Avenue

N

JMNC | 168


aerial rendering looking north-east JMNC | 169


activating the interior plaza JMNC | 170


Macdonald & 11th Street JMNC | 171


aerial rendering at night looking north-east JMNC | 172


aerial rendering looking south-east JMNC | 173


Metro Walk Phas e II Richmond, CA Office: Warehaus Status: Schematic Design Role: Designer Worked alongside the Design Director to produce the winning RFP for the City of Richmond’s Metro Walk Phase II project. Together, we brainstormed a concept and created a presentation that was later presented to the City amongst 6 other firms.

SAA | EVI, a Developer based out of Baltimore, has had a strong presence in the City of Richmond over the last few years. To date, they have won a few projects in the city: a retail space on the ground floor of the BART garage, and 12th and Macdonald (the largest development to date in Richmond). When Richmond asked SAA | EVI to participate in the RFP competition for Metro Walk Phase II, it was an opportunity to showcase the direct impact that the Developer could have towards the community, as a whole, for the next few decades. Richmond, the last untouched location of the Bay Area, does not have the housing, amenities, and sprawling businesses that other cities across the Bay have. For the most part, during the tech boom, it was a city that had largely been ignored. Carefully phasing SAA | EVI’s projects into 3 parts, we’re able to carefully groom a future for Richmond so that the program lacking in the community slowly comes into play with each phase. Starting with the BART garage, then 12th & Macdonald, and ending with Metro Walk Phase II, we not only build up momentum in size, but we begin to densify this part of the city and connect each of the projects via a corridor due to their close proximity. Considering that there is a lack of program and resources in the area at the moment, the ultimate goal is to begin to shape Richmond’s landscape with these 3 phases. Setting the foundation with these projects will allow the inserted program to intertwine, mesh, and grow organically over the following years.

JMNC | 174


existing TOD site for Metro Walk Phase II, as it sits beside the Richmond BART | Amtrak station JMNC | 175


Existing Site

Transit Work Live

Commerc

Food Out

Commun

Religious

Plazas | P

N

Education

Pedestria

Macdona

General S

Transit Work Live

Commercial & Retail Food Outlets Community & Leisure

Religious Plazas | Parks & Recreation Educational

Pedestrian Flow on Nevin Avenue Macdonald Avenue General Street Flow JMNC | 176


Current State

Building Density

Old + New

JMNC | 177


Phase 1: BART Garage Retail Space

Transit Work Live

Commerc

Food Out

Commun

Religious

Plazas | P

N

Education

Pedestria

Macdona

General S

Transit Work Live

Commercial & Retail Food Outlets Community & Leisure

Religious Plazas | Parks & Recreation Educational

Pedestrian Flow on Nevin Avenue Macdonald Avenue General Street Flow JMNC | 178


the existing site of the BART garage retail space, which has been approved and will be located on the ground floor JMNC | 179


Phase 2: 12th & Macdonald

Transit Work Live

Commerc

Food Out

Commun

Religious

Plazas | P

N

Education

Pedestria

Macdona

General S

Transit Work Live

Commercial & Retail Food Outlets Community & Leisure

Religious Plazas | Parks & Recreation Educational

Pedestrian Flow on Nevin Avenue Macdonald Avenue General Street Flow JMNC | 180


the proposed site and project for 12th & Macdonald, which has received approval from the City to move forward JMNC | 181


Phase 3: Metro Walk Phase II

Transit Work Live

Commerc

Food Out

Commun

Religious

Plazas | P

N

Education

Pedestria

Macdona

General S

Transit Work Live

Commercial & Retail Food Outlets Community & Leisure

Religious Plazas | Parks & Recreation Educational

Pedestrian Flow on Nevin Avenue Macdonald Avenue General Street Flow JMNC | 182


the proposed concept for the Metro Walk Phase II mixed-use development JMNC | 183


1

we take inspiration from Wildcat Canyon JMNC | 184


2

translation | Richmond lacks vegetation JMNC | 185


3

insertion | vegetation is introduced JMNC | 186


4

resulting form JMNC | 187


Phase 3: Metro Walk Phase II | Site Plan Building 1 | Phase 1 Apartment Units Commercial Space

150 Units 15,000 SF

Building 2 | Phase 2 Apartment Units Garden Apartments Commercial Space

150 Units 10 Apts 20,000 SF

Building 3 | Phase 3 Apartment Units Garden Apartments

170 Units 13 Apts

Totals Total Apartment Units Total Garden Apartments Total Commercial SF

470 Units 23 Apts 35,000 SF

Total Residential Parking Total Commercial Parking

125 (.25/Unit) 70 (2/1000 SF)

JMNC | 188


3

2

1

N

JMNC | 189


restaurant row, as seen from the ground floor JMNC | 190


JMNC | 191


Foundry Lititz, PA Office: Warehaus Status: Construction Documents Role: Lead Designer led the design and actively participated in every step of the design process to completion.

Foundry, a restaurant located in Lebanon, PA, prides itself on its culinary craftmanship by cooking each piece of meat and fish over a wood-burning stove. In June of 2019, they will be moving to a new home in Lititz, PA, where the famous Wilbur Chocolate factory operated for roughly 125 years. Although Wilbur will be moving its operations elsewhere, the landmarked factory will stay intact. Moving into the location will be a series of condos and a Hilton Tapestry, however, located on the ground floor will be Foundry. In an area of roughly 6,000 sf, the ultimate goal is to marry the history of the building and its raw elements with the aesthetic and immersive experience of an open kitchen and various zones of seating.

JMNC | 192


the original Wilbur Chocolate Factory storefront where Foundry will be situated JMNC | 193


Kitchen

Restaurant Floor

Functionality | Existing & Proposed

Existing Restaurant Hours Tue - Sat | 4pm - 10pm

+ Floor Manager | G.M.

+ Serving Assistant

4-5 Servers

also expediter when busy

+ Executive Chef

Maitre D’

+ Sous Chef

SautĂŠ Grill

Pizza

Cold Prep

Dishwasher

Pot- Prep washer

Expediter

both work these roles

Bar

*the kitchen serves roughly 150-200 meals per day

+ Bar Manager

Bartender

JMNC | 194


Bar

Kitchen

Restaurant Floor

Proposed Restaurant Hours Mon - Sun | 7am - 10pm Breakfast 7am - 11am | Lunch 11am - 4pm | Dinner 4pm- 10pm

+ General Manager

Assistant Managers

+ Executive Chef

Servers Mon - Thu (±6)

Sauté Mon - Sun Sous Chefs

Cold Prep Mon - Thu

Serving Assistant

Dishwashers Mon - Thu (1)

Grill Mon - Thu

Maitre D’ Mon - Thu (2)

Prep Tue - Wed

Pizza Mon - Thu

Expediter (Executive Chef)

+ Bar Manager

Bartender Mon - Thu (2) Fri - Sat (3) JMNC | 195


banquette and family-style seating in the main dining area in zone 2 of the proposed layout JMNC | 196


Floor Plan

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

Hotel Entry (Hilton Lounge) Maitre’d Station Service Station Private Area Semi-Private Area Janitor’s Closet Women’s Toilets Men’s Toilets Main Dining Area Chef’s Table Kitchen Service Station Service Station Bar + Rail (Storefront) Lounge Entry | Maitre’d Station Vestibule (N. Broad St.)

Hilton Drop-Off Area

17

7

10

4

Total Seating : ± 159 ppl

Hilton Lounge

5

Zone 1: Private | Semi-Private (±32 ppl)

16

11

3

2

1

13

8

6

15

12

N. Broad Street

1

14

9

Zone 2: Busy | Centric (±83 ppl)

Zone 3: Bar | Lounge (±44 ppl)

N

JMNC | 197


the chef’s table and anchored bar-height tables are prime seating areas to the open kitchen JMNC | 198


the semi-private area provides flexible seating for everyday dining and can be closed off for private events JMNC | 199


the proposed bar with main circulation towards the hilton lounge highlighted in tile JMNC | 200


the lounge creates an intimate setting in the storefront and is separated from the entry area by a wall of fluted glass JMNC | 201

Profile for José Manuel Núñez Casal

Work Portfolio 2019  

A few work samples from 2012 - 2019

Work Portfolio 2019  

A few work samples from 2012 - 2019

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