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Creatively expressed forms of communication and their engagement with each other. “The out-of-field refers to what is neither seen nor understood, but is nevertheless 1 p e r f e c t l y p r e s e n t . ”

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1. TITLE PAGE 2. ESSAY 11. APPENDIX: DESCRIPTIVE TRANSCRIPT: TRIAD, 30/12/12 13. BIBLIOGRAPHY 15. IMAGE REFERENCING http://www.blurb.co.uk/bookstore/detail/3898212 http://georgiarosewings.wordpress.com/

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Gilles Deleuze. http://www.stankievech.net/dwn/Stankievech_Cinema-substraction.pdf

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The desire to express emotion in reaction to subjective experience drives my practice. My creative starting point reflects the value I attribute to the experiences as a source of artistic expression. I am motivated by a constant desire to articulate my inner contemplations and a concern to portray honestly and succinctly the comparisons I draw between all that I am experiencing. Expanding my knowledge of the core medium I employ, which is paint, is also a constant endeavour. The way I then use paint to create a narrative, an alluring composition, and a touching array of colours is all important to the production of a successful painting and ultimately the use of a language which I strive to continue learning to express as coherently as possible. Within my whole practice a current concern is how to bridge the gap between painted language and written and verbal languages, used as vessels to explain, promote and contextualise the work. Written and painted messages in relation to each other, are employed as forms of expression for subjective experience in relation to a desired awareness of universal positioning. Appropriate translations between the forms of communication which are active in my practice are paramount in whether the interactions are successful and manage to elevate each other. Within the art school society, online and sometimes in galleries, my work is contributing to contemporary visual culture. Accessing images of other artists’ work, in books, magazines, on line, on posters/ billboards within artistic institutions such as galleries. and all public spaces where visual elements become part of society’s whole constantly evolving persona’s, is a core part of life. Combinations of alphabet letters are chosen to appear in painted imagery if they communicate a message in the utmost way. They add a layer of depth to the other painted elements which are beyond description via words. Text is to do with straightforward defined speaking which can be quickly read, it articulates a level of what I am trying to present to the world, it is to do with providing quick accessible understanding and letting it lead the viewer onto deciphering the painted imagery, which will speak just as strongly or hopefully with even greater potency. The various forms of languages used in my work, can be interpreted, unpicked and understood at different paces, and they hopefully amalgamate to make one concise tongue. “Your paintings are like riddles that we need to solve.” 2 I do not attempt to cause confusion or create riddles in my work but hope to embody my own experiences in images as part of broader representations, such as landscape, the free flight of birds and more abstract colour plains concerned with identifying specific atmospheres, with the desired result of making my works accessible from multiple angles. An aim is to capture viewers with an appealing exterior visage and then let them find a way into the space; to engage through time and allow the transcendental power within the works to touch them. A circling motion exists in my routines, as elements of my processes revolve and filter in and out of finished works, appearing on various levels throughout the whole practice. Symbols, colours, brush marks and text are used, re-used and re-appropriated to speak similarly or 2

Patricia Martin. In Triad Crit with Georgia Murray and Kenny Hunter. C9, C19, E.C.A, 30/11/12


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differently betwixt works and portray alternative messages or similar atmospheres. Nancy Spero worked with a huge bank of symbols which she played with in relation to each other. “Overtime, the images…have evolved, transformed and proliferated and in doing so, have brought about new births from old deaths. That is both the form and content of her work.” 3 Undertaking the process of painting is hugely significant in my feeling free and able to move forward through life with understanding and acceptance; painting raises my awareness of being. Spero’s specific works often stem from, and can be viewed in relation to a range of catalysts. “It’s dose of ambiguity is an homage to the complexity of the world.” 4 Integrated narratives and layers of cryptic text which point to things as opposed to spelling them out are elements of the compilations I form when creating paintings. Striking experiences harmonized with the processing of everyday occurrences, (intake via the senses- mainly sight and touch; what I see and feel,) expressed though a painterly execution, which relays out a running narrative, constantly evolving from the initial idea, (which morphs in response to momentary decisions, for example to do with colour choice or brush size and stroke,) to the finished work, fuse into complete creations. Making art as a form of discovery is instinctual and generally if the subject is the artist themselves and the work is self-portraiture or a reflection upon something which has personally affected them emotionally, physically or otherwise, the discovery seems essential and is the only way to resolve confusion. The creation of something physical has the ability to make things apparent which have previously been concealed and to highlight issues from innovative perspectives. An artist has the ability, through their chosen medium, to physically assault their creation through the unleashing of emotion. Expressive brush strokes could potentially equalise central turmoil, creating inner balance. Almost like counselling, in which concerns are spoken out loud to relieve inward difficulties or tensions, artists translate their subjective experiences, releasing them into a tangible dimension, as a form of communication. The processes and techniques employed in the journey of expression, from conception to realisation, are paramount in fathoming how influential the nature of subjective experience is, as a source of creative inspiration. Having a range of materials and workspaces ready and available is important, as varied processes and forms of media are satisfactory at different times, depending on how quick the output needs or desires to be. Mono-printing is suitable as an immediate and refined process, due to usually working monochromatically with this process the images produced are subtler than the vibrant paintings I make. The subject of the imagery is usually explicit, as I am drawn to making prints as a way of gaining insight into something troubling, the content is often straightforwardly related to the disturbance. Frequently the imagery I use is energetically translated and the content is alluringly lively. Small text in the prints often converts the work from uplifting to unsettling. “Multiple 3

Pg 407 M/E/A/N/I/N/G An Anthology of Artists' Writings, Theory, and Criticism. Edited by Susan Bee and Mira Schor. Duke University Press 2000 4 Pg 408. M/E/A/N/I/N/G An Anthology of Artists' Writings, Theory, and Criticism. Edited by Susan Bee and Mira Schor. Duke University Press 2000


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embedded elements are fused into a swirling, magnetic whole whose stormy, messy layering includes a strangely pop ‘smiley face’ over the whole work.” 5 The painted narratives I create have layered atmospheres involving pulsating, uplifting colours with mysterious characters interacting with distant transcendental landscapes. Tracey Emin choses various mediums to reveal personal experiences in what seems an essential way, at times her practice has been fuelled by a manifestation of first hand pain. One needs to be a direct counterpart of a situation in order to feel justified in the creation of such personal and indulgent art. The degree to which one dips in to working autobiographically must also be to do with how great the need for self-expression is. “Communicating is nice, but Tracey’s work is made for herself… She does not need people to view it.” 6 Emin uses her skills of creativity to physically release some of the mental anguish she has suffered as the result of traumatic experiences and while the reaction from viewers has become linked to her garish celebrity persona, the work is about her, expressing shocking events and letting them go from her core in to an external realm. Expressive poetic description is an important component within my work and the writing style is unconventional. Space within the structure of the writing is vital in guiding the time taken for a reader to interpret and perceive the connections between words. Each letter can be recognised like a symbol, each of which should be read in relation to the other symbols and the space around it. It is not algorithmic art, there are no reading rules to be followed, the pattern of words need to be felt like a painting. The way I form words and use syntax reflects the atmosphere of what I am writing. A current contemplation is whether words should be placed beside works to enlighten the viewer as to the content of paintings. The kind of words and the style in which they are presented is crucial to whether they provide positive insight. Honest descriptions seem an obvious option to de-mythicize a complicated narrative, however, frank words may actually confuse the message in the work, distorting a viewer’s freedom to perceive the painting. This is due to levels of communication between descriptive words and paintings often not equalising. Poetic writing as a method of further description to the narrative of the paintings functions harmoniously for my work. It is not placed directly beside the paintings but it is made available on Wordpress.com. Paintings should stand alone… “the painting needs to be the thing that…communicates in its own way on its own.” 7 Words should communicate as pars pro toto and as counterparts to painted imagery, they can seem like a useful inlet to the brush worked narrative but they can also be a total interference. “It’s the battle between art and the algorithm. Between emotion and rationality. Between indescribable magic and perfect information.” 8 R.B. Kitaj’s Preface for ‘The Street (A Life)’, 1975 describes how experiences in life filter through the artist, into his work in such a way that “one’s own changeful poetics, mind-sets, 5

http://www.saatchigallery.co.uk/artists/jutta_koether.htm?section_name=artists_germany Patrick Elliot. In conversation with Georgia Murray. P.E’s office, Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh. 20/10/08 7 Kenny Hunter. In Triad Crit with Georgia Murray and Patricia Martin. C9, C19, E.C.A. 30/11/12 8 http://bbh-labs.com/the-battle-between-art-the-algorithm 6


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nerve systems, fired by the ups and downs and dreadful secrets of one’s modern lives, seize up and become pictures.” 9 Kitaj’s description of modern art can be interpreted as his own desire for each of his new creations to move onwards with innovative knowledge and experience. This relates to my description about artists making work in reaction to their subjective experiences, which in turn highlights an engagement with visual culture. A description of Jutta Koether’s work functions ideally as an example of an artist working in relation to visual culture. Her “abstract paintings…are like a portrait of the artist in our times. She is a painter… interweaving soft, sinuous brushwork and delicate colouring with bold cartoon-style figuration… an interdisciplinary artistic practice…reflecting her strong… engagement with contemporary theory and culture.” 10 Responding to visual culture and reflecting on the world and experiences of it is a separate undertaking to presenting those translations to audiences. In 1893 Paul Gaugin had an exhibition of new works which he’d made whilst on Tahiti. The vivacious, bright, lively works showed his enthusiasm for the unusual tropical island, with the “result: ironical comments and few buyer.” 11Realising that he needed to bridge the gap between his far off tropical adventures and his European audience, Gaugin planned to make a book, “to make his paintings understood.” 12He forged an unsuccessful collaboration with the symbolist poet and art critic Charles Morice and as a result his original manuscript was not fully published until 1926. The collaboration was set up to hoist the story and involve an appreciated literary style as the plan was for Gaugin and Morice to contribute alternative sections: “the painter would describe his journey, and the poet would intercalate lyrical chapters: the wild man and the civilized, side by side.” 13 The partnership was futile due to Morice’s style being far too refined to elevate Gaugin’s story. What he wrote was “at the opposite pole from what Gaugin loved, felt and wished to communicate.” 14 Conflict between an artist’s visual creations and the background information they offer to an audience can occur due to an impulse to provide explanations for artworks, which signifies a lack of confidence in the original. The problem is that painted language and written text are not exactly translatable. “A writer continually struggles for clarity against the language he's using or, more accurately, against the common usage of that language.” 15 Words, paint, voices and hands are tools of communication with limitations, which can prevent succinct transferences of information between each language. Over the past months I have questioned whether the narratives within the paintings I make need to be expanded upon via written texts to go with the works. The enquiry occurred due to feeling that the content of the paintings was more cryptic than the expressive story I wanted to tell, however telling stories is not the only reason I make paintings. The works are 9

Pg 131. KITAJ PICTURES AND CONVERSATIONS JULIAN RIOS. Hamish Hamilton Ltd 1994 http://www.saatchi-gallery.co.uk/artists/jutta_koether.htm 11 Pg 57. Paul Gauguin NOA NOA Voyage to Tahiti. Printed for Bruno Cassirer Oxford by Spottiswoode, Ballantyne & Co. Ltd., London 12 Same as above. 13 Same as previous. 14 Pg 69. Paul Gauguin NOA NOA Voyage to Tahiti. Printed for Bruno Cassirer Oxford by Spottiswoode, Ballantyne & Co. Ltd., London 15 John Berger. http://www.cytwombly.info/twombly_writings8. 10


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comprised of narrative, composition, use of colour, type and quantity of paint and brush strokes. Wordpress.com provides a suitable platform for me to write about my work, yet I was concerned that the poetic style I employ would again be too cryptic to explain the paintings’ backgrounds. Writing blogs can sometimes be to do with providing information but it is often an outlet for expression. “Your blog about the snake adds a positive layer to the painted work, it has made the hugely used symbol part of your existence in the 21st century” 16 Whilst creating a painting called ‘Abandoned with Snake’, which was instigated in reaction to a dream, I spent some horrifying time researching the reptiles and anchored my investigation into the symbols which have huge cultural baggage, by describing personal experiences of them in reality and in subconscious terror. An awareness of how a highly used global symbol has been used in artworks in the past and a desired attempt to liberate it in to the present, as a fresh sign, seems paramount when appropriating such a strong emblem. The diverse methods of interaction which humans utilise are essentially intertwined with expression. As competitive beings people need to express themselves to gauge their place within the world and the society with which they are connected, so innovative methods of doing so are formed. “All true poetry consists of words written in a foreign language. Every one of us is born with a mother tongue. Yet poetry is motherless.” 17 The poetic style which I employ in my blog is useful in confirming the atmosphere in my paintings, separated by real and virtual space, the outputs can be perceived distinctly but, through the choice of the viewer, can also function in relation to each other. They do not hold each other up but are different forms of expression which speak diversely and congruently. Mono-printing provides an additional place to express supplementary points, as I use a delicately sized font to scribe intimate details of events alongside emotional illustrations.

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Kenny Hunter. In Triad Crit with Georgia Murray and Patricia Martin. C9, C19, E.C.A. 30/11/12 John Berger. http://www.cytwombly.info/twombly_writings8.htm


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Despite the fact that Gaugin created Noa Noa to “make his paintings understood” 18 I actually perceive the images in the book separately to the text that intersperses them. Often “information is the difference that makes a difference” 19 however reading Gaugin’s story and deciphering the content of the pictorial language, are separate tasks for me. Once the languages have been entirely perceived individually, connections may be drawn between them. ‘Georgia Rose Painting Onwards Now 2012’ is a book I have recently published with Blurb. Similarly to Gaugin the reason for the production of the book was foremost about providing information. The body of work that I wanted to expand on was all that I have created whilst on the MFA course. Differently to Gaugin I was not compelled to provide further information due to awareness of a lack of understanding about my work. The extra material given in the book acts a as a record of my artistic processes, it highlights methods of working and the stages paintings evolve through, as well as acting as a catalogue of images displaying litho and mono printing processes, casting, workshops, collaborations, exhibitions and the range of painting methods I have explored recently, it also displays printed versions of the poetic style of writing that I engage with as an extra form of expression. The painted language can describe sensations in ways that other forms of communication cannot. Deleuze illustrates his notions about sensations via his analysis of Francis Bacon’s

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Pg 57. Paul Gauguin NOA NOA Voyage to Tahiti. Printed for Bruno Cassirer Oxford by Spottiswoode, Ballantyne & Co. Ltd., London 19 Gregory Bateson. http://www.stankievech.net/dwn/Stankievech_Cinema-Subtraction.pdf


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paintings. “We represent what we think we can touch, but we narrate what we see, what seems to be happening in the light or what we presume to be happening in the shadows” 20

My feeling that various forms of communication are necessary to provide a rounded amount of information about my work may be to do with the fact that often the narrative in my work 20

Pg 93. Deleuze FRANCIS BACON: THE LOGIC OF SENSATION. Continuum 2003


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implies an event, situation, ambiance or string of emotions, as opposed to depicting the specific occurrence. My paintings present imperceptible atmospheres and circumstances which I feel inclined to elaborate on or to express in other forms, such as poetic text or monoprints. The additional forms of representation anchor the subtle notions, clarifying them from multiple angles. Through the narrative of works I suggest emotions which are never tangible but representational via expressive figurative depictions. Recently, wide staring eyes have been symbols used to suggest shocked and possessed states. Bacon’s use of the scream in his paintings generates a beautiful sense of horror and describes a chilling force to which we can easily relate. A scream cannot be touched but it can be sensed and heard and a painting signifies the gap for our imaginations to fill.

“The task of art, in all its forms, is to capture forces…the "summoning" and making visible of otherwise imperceptible forces. In this sense art might be said to produce or suggest worlds hitherto unseen but always produced from within the seen.” 21 Figures have reappeared in my work after three years of the human form only being suggested as opposed to represented, a departure which felt natural but peculiar, due to my outstanding desire to contemplate the whole human form as an expressive vessel within the universe. The departure is now understood as a portrayal of a lack of self-assuredness, as those three years were heavily steeped in searching for an identity for me. As a high sense of anxiety subsided and I felt continuously more grounded, figures came back, as details to be explored again, due to a more peaceful understanding of the whole. Expression is constantly caught up in arbitrary algorithmic circles; if this painting is with me, it needs to have what I have in it. Painting for me is an all-encompassing process, like forward rolling along the branch of a tree, the moss in my hair, the green bark scratched on my skin. The circling motion echoes the spinning earth, the sun and moon, new leaves, blossom, constant growth; my practice and the branch of the tree. It is a constant aim to have 21

http://spacecollective.org/Wildcat/6067/Gilles-Deleuze-Francis-Bacon-the-Logic-of-Sensation-pt-4


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an awareness of my place within the universe and how to function as part of it. Attentiveness to visual culture is part of this, more than ever I desire an appreciation of the paths contemporary painters are walking. The painted imagery I make, adds up to create a story which is an amalgamation of representational elements alongside techniques which describe emotions. The challenge is the construction of things beyond the physical realm as I strive to communicate with the soul and “not to reproduce what we can already see, but to make visible what we cannot.� 22 Creating paintings which communicate successfully is my chief concern and finding ways to develop my use of poetic writing to further promote the content of the paintings is vital. Acquiring an ability to succinctly translate betwixt all of the creatively expressed communicative forms I engage with is crucial in allowing my holistic practice, with many individual fragments, to function as one whole entity.

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Paul Klee. http://www.stankievech.net/dwn/Stankievech_Cinema-Subtraction.pdf


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APPENDIX: DESCRIPTIVE TRANSCRIPT. Taken from Blog posted after Triad Crit, C9, C19, Edinburgh College of Art. 30/ 11/ 12. Georgia Murray, Patrica Martin, Kenny Hunter. http://georgiarosewings.wordpress.com/2012/12/04/triad-30th-11th-2012-c9-georgia-patrica-kenny-c19/ WE BEGAN IN C9 I SPOKE FOR TEN MINUTES I PINPOINTED THESE THREE MOST CURRENT QUESTIONS ABOUT MY WORK: 1. TRADITIONAL HANG? OR A JIGSAW, HIGH AND LOW? 2. OK/ APPEALING TO SEE CANVAS AND BOARD PAINTINGS HUNG ALL TOGETHER, BESIDE EACH OTHER? 3. AS AN AUDIENCE WOULD YOU LIKE MORE OF A VERBAL OR WRITTEN EXPLANATION AS TO THE NARRATIVE IN THE WORKS? SOMETHING IN A DEFINED LANGUAGE? As I began talking I spoke of my basic concerns but in terms of a presentation it might have been better to give some background into myself as an artist and the history of the works I make, put what I am talking about into context. Dreams, consciousness. Identity: about where I am in relation to and as part of the universe Paint has the power a power to communicate How much does a viewer expect from the text within the works? (Painted text..) The texts in the works has graphic power, it works as a symbol rather than as text. TEXT MUST BE A KEY RATHER THAN A WHOLE PANDORA'S ROOM! Text articulates something about the world that you are trying to present. C.Y. Twombly; enigmatic words. It is part of my identity to use text... It is up to me to take responsibility for describing work, each context may need a varied description- be it vast or very minimal/ non existent- (private/ big/ small galleries). I could think about writing some questions that the works i am showing address, a opposed to trying to describe the content with a language which is not satisfactory- the paintings speak their own language and that is what i am working to develop as stronger and more succinct. BARE CANVAS: IT SAYS 'MY WORLD IS NOT STABLE, COMPLETE, OSTEER, IT IS HUMANE.' Need space around each works? hmm, yes more please. 1 MARK: A STAIN. THE PAINTED WORK HAS MORE OF AN ANCHOR ON CANVAS, IT IS EMBEDDED IT WANTS TO GOT OUTSIDE OF THE FRAME ON BOARD- IT IS SHOOTING OFF, SLIPPERY, NOT HAVING BEEN ABSORBED‌ FORWARD TEXT/ REVERSE TEXT


12 CONSCIOUS/ SUBCONSCIOUS Text is about representation, this is what something is/ text is more graphic, abstract, like pattern work, a gesture to get away from representation. ABSTRACT. SNAKE, CANVAS MY BLOG ABOUT THE SNAKE GIVES POSITIVE LAYERS TO THE PAINTED WORK, IT HAS MADE THE HUGELY USED SYMBOL PART OF MY EXISTENCE IN THE 21ST CENTURY, MY EXPERIENCE BENEATH THE SEA, CHINESE STRIPES. BE AWARE OF CULTURAL BAGGAGE ASSOCIATED WITH SNAKES AND MAKE SNAKES ABLE TO STAND UP AS FRESH NEW SYMBOLS NOW TOO. I COULD WRITE A BACK-STORY, THE HISTORY OF A SNAKE/ NARRATIVE WITHIN RESEARCH, ADD THE WORDS TO THE PAINTING OR NOT? NOT. THE PAINTING NEEDS TO BE THE THING THAT STANDS UP AND COMMUNICATES IN ITS OWN WAY ON ITS OWN. POETIC TEXT ON MY WORDPRESS SITE WORKS AS A METHOD OF EXPRESSIVE COMMUNICATION FOR ME, IT IS SEPARATE TO THE LANGUAGE I AM USING TO COMMUNICATE WITH PAINT. THEY ARE CONNECTED AND ARE DIFFERENT THINGS. PAINTINGS ARE LIKE RIDDLES THAT WE NEED TO SOLVE ABANDONED WITH SNAKE- TH VIEWER IS NOT BEHIND A WINDOW BUT BEHIND A PAINTINGLOOKING INTO A PAINTING, THE BARE TEXT REINFORCES THIS. AND WE MIGRATED TO C19 TO TALK ABOUT PATRICIA'S WORK AND WHAT IT MEANS TO BE CONTEMPLATING MAKING A STAR? HOW COULD A STAR BE BROUGHT ONTO THE SURFACE OF AN IMAGE? STARS EVOLVED BEYOND AND BEFORE HUMANS SO THE USE OF SPOKEN/ WRITTEN/ HUMANLY DEVELOPED LANGUAGE SEEMS AN INAPPROPRIATE METHOD WITH WHICH TO COMMUNICATE WHAT THE ARTIST HERE IS DEALING WITH EMPIRICAL. BOB MCGUILLVRY- EXPANDING PAINTING INTO 3D SPACE- CANVAS SEASCAPES WITH SLITS CUT FOR HORIZONS REPRESENTING THE SPACE THAT IS INFINITE IN OUR UNIVERSE AS THE WORLD CONSTANTLY TURNS AND WE KEEP MOVING ROUND AND ROUND ON AND ON. IT IS ABOUT TRYING TO UNDERSTAND WHERE WE ARE AS HUMANS, AS PART OF THIS UNIVERSE WHICH HAS SUCH DEPTHS SPINNING TOGETHER. KENNY, GEORGIA, PATRICIA, TWO HOURS OF GREAT CONVERSATIONS IN RELATION TO OUR EXPERIENCES AS HUMANS WITHIN THIS UNIVERSE. PAINTING, PHOTOGRAPHY, SCIENCE, SOUL


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BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Books: NARRATIVE PAINTINGS Figurative Art of two generations selected by Timothy Hyman Paul Gauguin NOA NOA Voyage to Tahiti. Printed for Bruno Cassirer Oxford by Spottiswoode, Ballantyne & Co. Ltd., London KITAJ PICTURES AND CONVERSATIONS JULIAN RIOS. Hamish Hamilton Ltd 1994 Deleuze FRANCIS BACON: THE LOGIC OF SENSATION. Continuum 2003 Malcolm Morley in Full Colour. Hayward Gallery 2001 ALTER EGO SELF PORTRAIT. Glasgow Print Studio 1992 CLEMENTE/ CRONE/ MARSH. A Vintage Contemporary Artists Original, November 1987 THE AVEBURY CYCLE. MICHAEL DAMES. 1977 Thames and Hudson Ltd, London Paul Nash MODERN ARTIST, ANCIENT LANDSCAPE. Tate 2003 M/E/A/N/I/N/G An Anthology of Artists' Writings, Theory, and Criticism. Edited by Susan Bee and Mira Schor. Duke University Press 2000 MIRA SCHOR. WET. ON PAINTING, FEMINISM, AND ART CULTURE. Duke University Press 1996 NATURAL LIGHT Portraits of Scottish writers. Angela Catlin. 1985 Paul Harris Publishing/ Waterfront, Leith, Edinburgh

Webites: http://www.jmberlin.de/kitaj/en/ueberblick.php

Accessed on 9/12/12

http://sydney.edu.au/news/84.html?newsstoryid=10312 Accessed on 10/12/12 http://www.culturewars.org.uk/2004-02/hayesemin.htm Accessed on 9/12/12 http://db-artmag.com/en/53/feature/real-bodys-interview-with-maria-lassnig/ Accessed on 12/11/12 http://www.saatchi-gallery.co.uk/artists/jutta_koether.htm Accessed on 12/11/12 http://artforum.com/words/id=21064 Accessed on 11/12/12 http://www.culture24.org.uk/art/painting%20%26%20drawing/art390396 Accessed 16/11/12


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http://www.saatchi-gallery.co.uk/artists/jutta_koether.htm?section_name=artists_germany Accessed on 11/12/12 http://www.stankievech.net/dwn/Stankievech_Cinema-Subtraction.pdf Accessed on 11/12/12

Films: True Stories: Painting the mind. Off-air recording, More4, 26th May, 2009, 70 mins. ECA Library Service.

Magazines: TURPS Banana. Issue Eleven Art Review: Issue 63 November 2012 MODERN PAINTERS. Jim Shaw/ Laura Owens/ Richard Artschwager. Blouinartinfo.com November 2012


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Image Referencing: Page 1: ‘One Door God’. Georgia Rose Murray. Oil, Gloss, Pigment. October 2012 Page 7: ‘Fermenting Cement’. Georgia Rose Murray. Mono-print, December 2012. Page 7: ‘Up with Me’. Georgia Rose Murray. Mono-print. December 2012. Page 8: ‘I aam going to Pineapple Island’. Georgia Rose Murray. Oil, Gloss, Pigment. November 2012. Page 9: Study after Velazquez's Portrait of Pope Innocent. Francis Bacon. http://www.artquotes.net/masters/bacon/paint_study.htm Accessed 12/12/12.

Creatively expressed forms of communication and their engagement with each other.  

SEMESTER 1, MFA 2 FINAL ESSAY

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