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“The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is possibly the least fascinating area imaginable: it does not boast a metropolis, lacks exotic appeal, sensational phenomena, a great past and explosive developments. The Euregion Meuse-Rhine counts 301 inhabitants per square kilometre (whereas the Randstad, the Dutch capital conurbation, has 1,250 inhabitants per square kilometre and the Brussels area counts 6,272 inhabitants per square kilometre). The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is set within a (rather light) legal framework and its outer borders are clearly defined. However, Euregional inhabitants have no particular bond with the Euregion; their identity is not or hardly determined by it and they do not consider themselves ‘Euregioners’ – what’s more, many of them are not even familiar with the term Euregion. The Euregion is far more determined by its inner borders – making up some 220 kilometres between the various countries – than by its outer borders. The research project Traces of autism intends to draw up an inventory of public space in the Euregion Meuse-Rhine, based on journeys made through the area and following a number of strict parameters. Public space can be defined as non-privatised space, the space that escapes control, the space that is not well-kept, the space of transgression, the space of the needy. For the researchers the inner borders of the Euregion function as a reference line and a kind of reading axis. Gypsies, refugees, migrants and drug addicts can function as indicators, although other indi-cators may become manifest. The emphasis will be on maps: existing maps will be collected and new maps will be drawn. During the entire research period, the French pedagogue Fernand Deligny (1913-1996) will be considered a supporter; he will accompany the researchers at every step. For thirty years Deligny followed autistic patients and merely registered their acts, without intervening; he only registered, without the desire to ‘learn’ anything. ‘The pedagogue following the footsteps of autistic patients’: it is an allegory that expresses the current position of the artist or intellectual. Deligny did not provide a method, merely a position: “Je ne voudrais pas qu’on s’y trompe. J’ai bien écrit en 1944, un petit livre qui parle de ce métier-là (educateur). Ce n’est pas le mien.””


“Discussing the current and future form of the European Union cannot happen in abstract space. According to Etienne Balibar the crucial issue vis-à-vis the EU is to decide what kind of status and rights the inhabitants of this new political entity would individually and collectively enjoy. Let us thus for a moment not consider the poor outsiders knocking at Europe’s gates, nor Europe’s illegal inhabitants subjected to the abstract (and inconsistent) rule of law. Instead, we should focus on the legitimate, common citizens that populate the EU – those for example that are neither outspokenly pro nor contra the union, neither living in the core-cities of the EU nor in the Eastern hinterland, etc. – and use them as critical yardstick in the discussion on the future of Europe. The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is not a case in splendid isolation. One merely has to check the website of the EU to convince oneself of the fact that there are hardly any borders of the EU that are not part of a particular Euregion. With the Euregion Meuse-Rhine, we thus get a genuine picture of the future of Europe: a union suffering of a collective borderline syndrome, a union for which the internal borders are both the condition of possibility and impossibility, a union constantly fluctuating between a progressive and reactionary ideology, a union that opportunistically solves the dilemma of the local and the global and, moreover, a union in which all the differences (real or imagined) between the old nation states are exploited for cultural, social and economical profit. We thus have a union of 494 million people all happily living in an eternal in-between state, elastically crossing borders in order to benefit from a tax system here and enjoy a local dish there. In short, the future of the EU is not only that of an empire in continuous expansion eastwards but also that of an ‘inland empire’ that exploits its own internal borders. No wonder that the EU, from its very start, is constantly balancing at the verge of a nervous breakdown.” "Inland Emripe," BAVO


“Discussing the current and future form of the European Union cannot happen in abstract space. According to Etienne Balibar the crucial issue vis-à-vis the EU is to decide what kind of status and rights the inhabitants of this new political entity would individually and collectively enjoy. Let us thus for a moment not consider the poor outsiders knocking at Europe’s gates, nor Europe’s illegal inhabitants subjected to the abstract (and inconsistent) rule of law. Instead, we should focus on the legitimate, common citizens that populate the EU – those for example that are neither outspokenly pro nor contra the union, neither living in the core-cities of the EU nor in the Eastern hinterland, etc. – and use them as critical yardstick in the discussion on the future of Europe. The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is not a case in splendid isolation. One merely has to check the website of the EU to convince oneself of the fact that there are hardly any borders of the EU that are not part of a particular Euregion. With the Euregion Meuse-Rhine, we thus get a genuine picture of the future of Europe: a union suffering of a collective borderline syndrome, a union for which the internal borders are both the condition of possibility and impossibility, a union constantly fluctuating between a progressive and reactionary ideology, a union that opportunistically solves the dilemma of the local and the global and, moreover, a union in which all the differences (real or imagined) between the old nation states are exploited for cultural, social and economical profit. We thus have a union of 494 million people all happily living in an eternal in-between state, elastically crossing borders in order to benefit from a tax system here and enjoy a local dish there. In short, the future of the EU is not only that of an empire in continuous expansion eastwards but also that of an ‘inland empire’ that exploits its own internal borders. No wonder that the EU, from its very start, is constantly balancing at the verge of a nervous breakdown.”

"Inland Emripe," BAVO


Canarias (ES)

Guadeloupe Martinique

Réunion

Guyane (FR)

Açores (PT)

Madeira

R e g io GI S

INTERREG IIIA (2004-2006)

INTERREG IIIA regions other regions

0

100

500 km

© EuroGeographics Association for the administrative boundaries


In the Heart of the “New Europe” The CENTROPE region, strategically located in the heart of the “New Europe”, has posted the strongest economic growth of any region in the world, surpassed only by South Asia. Membership in the European Union has emerged as a magnificent success story. In their first two years of EU membership, the New Member States of the EU (NMS) recorded higher GDP growth (4 % – 5 % on average) than in the previous year. In 2005, GDP growth in the EU-15 remained close to 3 percentage points below that of the NMS. The economic outlook for the years 2006 and 2007 continue to be outstanding, with forecasts predicting an annual growth rate of up to 6.5 % (Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies). The CENTROPE region, bringing together neighbouring areas in Austria, the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary, has been characterised by experts as an optimal gateway and springboard in the centre of Europe. As a diverse and highly advanced economic area, CENTROPE offers strategically favourable access to Western markets with their high level of purchasing power, as well as to the dynamic growth markets in Central and Eastern Europe (Austrian Institute of Economic Research). The fourcountry border region – a prosperous and dynamic economic area – attracts international investors with an impressive range of bottom-line competitive advantages (all of which can be found within a radius of 200 km): • Extremely low corporate income tax rates, ranging from 16 % to 25 % \ • Highly-qualified employees • Extremely low labour costs and unit labour costs in some areas • An excellent infrastructure combined with traditional Central and Eastern European know-how • An optimal business location for headquarters and production based on a division of labour Multinational companies such as Philips, Siemens, Daikin, Symbol Technologies, Honeywell, Lufthansa, IBM, Audi and PSA Peugeot Citroën have already seized upon these opportunities to expand their business operations in the CENTROPE region. Research follows in the footsteps of production. The Fraunhofer Gesellschaft plans to set up a competence centre in Austria, in order to have a foothold in the heart of CENTROPE, and thus exploit the opportunities arising from the booming automobile industry. Other related service providers are doing the same. “The business expansion to the Eastern European region will continue”; according to MCE, an industrial engineering and building technology group. “We have to be present in precisely those areas where our customers are investing”. Representatives of the CENTROPE region provide ongoing professional support and assistance to foreign investors, in order to enable them to establish or expand their business operations (e.g. in searching for industrial sites), and take advantage of business initiatives (e.g. automotive cluster).

"Invest in Central Europe," Centrope


The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is possibly the least fascinating area imaginable: it does not boast a metropolis, lacks exotic appeal, sensational phenomena, a great past and explosive developments. The Euregion Meuse-Rhine counts 301 inhabitants per square kilometre (whereas the Randstad, the Dutch capital conurbation, has 1,250 inhabitants per square kilometre and the Brussels area counts 6,272 inhabitants per square kilometre). The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is set within a (rather light) legal framework and its outer borders are clearly defined. However, Euregional inhabitants have no particular bond with the Euregion; their identity is not or hardly determined by it and they do not consider themselves ‘Euregioners’ – what’s more, many of them are not even familiar with the term Euregion. The Euregion is far more determined by its inner borders – making up some 220 kilometres between the various countries – than by its outer borders. The research project Traces of autism intends to draw up an inventory of public space in the Euregion Meuse-Rhine, based on journeys made through the area and following a number of strict parameters. Public space can be defined as non-privatised space, the space that escapes control, the space that is not well-kept, the space of transgression, the space of the needy. For the researchers the inner borders of the Euregion function as a reference line and a kind of reading axis. Gypsies, refugees, migrants and drug addicts can function as indicators, although other indi-cators may become manifest. The emphasis will be on maps: existing maps will be collected and new maps will be drawn. During the entire research period, the French pedagogue Fernand Deligny (1913-1996) will be considered a supporter; he will accompany the researchers at every step. For thirty years Deligny followed autistic patients and merely registered their acts, without intervening; he only registered, without the desire to ‘learn’ anything. ‘The pedagogue following the footsteps of autistic patients’: it is an allegory that expresses the current position of the artist or intellectual. Deligny did not provide a method, merely a position: “Je ne voudrais pas qu’on s’y trompe. J’ai bien écrit en 1944, un petit livre qui parle de ce métier-là (educateur). Ce n’est pas le Traces of Autism, Wim Cuyvers + Jan van Eyck Academy


“The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is possibly the least fascinating area imaginable: it does not boast a metropolis, lacks exotic appeal, sensational phenomena, a great past and explosive developments. The Euregion Meuse-Rhine counts 301 inhabitants per square kilometre (whereas the Randstad, the Dutch capital conurbation, has 1,250 inhabitants per square kilometre and the Brussels area counts 6,272 inhabitants per square kilometre). The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is set within a (rather light) legal framework and its outer borders are clearly defined. However, Euregional inhabitants have no particular bond with the Euregion; their identity is not or hardly determined by it and they do not consider themselves ‘Euregioners’ – what’s more, many of them are not even familiar with the term Euregion. The Euregion is far more determined by its inner borders – making up some 220 kilometres between the various countries – than by its outer borders. The research project Traces of autism intends to draw up an inventory of public space in the Euregion Meuse-Rhine, based on journeys made through the area and following a number of strict parameters. Public space can be defined as non-privatised space, the space that escapes control, the space that is not well-kept, the space of transgression, the space of the needy. For the researchers the inner borders of the Euregion function as a reference line and a kind of reading axis. Gypsies, refugees, migrants and drug addicts can function as indicators, although other indi-cators may become manifest. The emphasis will be on maps: existing maps will be collected and new maps will be drawn. During the entire research period, the French pedagogue Fernand Deligny (1913-1996) will be considered a supporter; he will accompany the researchers at every step. For thirty years Deligny followed autistic patients and merely registered their acts, without intervening; he only registered, without the desire to ‘learn’ anything. ‘The pedagogue following the footsteps of autistic patients’: it is an allegory that expresses the current position of the artist or intellectual. Deligny did not provide a method, merely a position: “Je ne voudrais pas qu’on s’y trompe. J’ai bien écrit en 1944, un petit livre qui parle de ce métier-là (educateur). Ce n’est pas le mien.””

Traces of Autism, Wim Cuyvers + Jan van Eyck Academy


“The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is possibly the least fascinating area imaginable: it does not boast a metropolis, lacks exotic appeal, sensational phenomena, a great past and explosive developments. The Euregion Meuse-Rhine counts 301 inhabitants per square kilometre (whereas the Randstad, the Dutch capital conurbation, has 1,250 inhabitants per square kilometre and the Brussels area counts 6,272 inhabitants per square kilometre). The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is set within a (rather light) legal framework and its outer borders are clearly defined. However, Euregional inhabitants have no particular bond with the Euregion; their identity is not or hardly determined by it and they do not consider themselves ‘Euregioners’ – what’s more, many of them are not even familiar with the term Euregion. The Euregion is far more determined by its inner borders – making up some 220 kilometres between the various countries – than by its outer borders. The research project Traces of autism intends to draw up an inventory of public space in the Euregion Meuse-Rhine, based on journeys made through the area and following a number of strict parameters. Public space can be defined as non-privatised space, the space that escapes control, the space that is not well-kept, the space of transgression, the space of the needy. For the researchers the inner borders of the Euregion function as a reference line and a kind of reading axis. Gypsies, refugees, migrants and drug addicts can function as indicators, although other indi-cators may become manifest. The emphasis will be on maps: existing maps will be collected and new maps will be drawn. During the entire research period, the French pedagogue Fernand Deligny (1913-1996) will be considered a supporter; he will accompany the researchers at every step. For thirty years Deligny followed autistic patients and merely registered their acts, without intervening; he only registered, without the desire to ‘learn’ anything. ‘The pedagogue following the footsteps of autistic patients’: it is an allegory that expresses the current position of the artist or intellectual. Deligny did not provide a method, merely a position: “Je ne voudrais pas qu’on s’y trompe. J’ai bien écrit en 1944, un petit livre qui parle de ce métier-là (educateur). Ce n’est pas le mien.””

Traces of Autism, Wim Cuyvers + Jan van Eyck Academy


“The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is possibly the least fascinating area imaginable: it does not boast a metropolis, lacks exotic appeal, sensational phenomena, a great past and explosive developments. The Euregion Meuse-Rhine counts 301 inhabitants per square kilometre (whereas the Randstad, the Dutch capital conurbation, has 1,250 inhabitants per square kilometre and the Brussels area counts 6,272 inhabitants per square kilometre). The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is set within a (rather light) legal framework and its outer borders are clearly defined. However, Euregional inhabitants have no particular bond with the Euregion; their identity is not or hardly determined by it and they do not consider themselves ‘Euregioners’ – what’s more, many of them are not even familiar with the term Euregion. The Euregion is far more determined by its inner borders – making up some 220 kilometres between the various countries – than by its outer borders. The research project Traces of autism intends to draw up an inventory of public space in the Euregion Meuse-Rhine, based on journeys made through the area and following a number of strict parameters. Public space can be defined as non-privatised space, the space that escapes control, the space that is not well-kept, the space of transgression, the space of the needy. For the researchers the inner borders of the Euregion function as a reference line and a kind of reading axis. Gypsies, refugees, migrants and drug addicts can function as indicators, although other indi-cators may become manifest. The emphasis will be on maps: existing maps will be collected and new maps will be drawn. During the entire research period, the French pedagogue Fernand Deligny (1913-1996) will be considered a supporter; he will accompany the researchers at every step. For thirty years Deligny followed autistic patients and merely registered their acts, without intervening; he only registered, without the desire to ‘learn’ anything. ‘The pedagogue following the footsteps of autistic patients’: it is an allegory that expresses the current position of the artist or intellectual. Deligny did not provide a method, merely a position: “Je ne voudrais pas qu’on s’y trompe. J’ai bien écrit en 1944, un petit livre qui parle de ce métier-là (educateur). Ce n’est pas le mien.””

Traces of Autism, Wim Cuyvers + Jan van Eyck Academy


“The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is possibly the least fascinating area imaginable: it does not boast a metropolis, lacks exotic appeal, sensational phenomena, a great past and explosive developments. The Euregion Meuse-Rhine counts 301 inhabitants per square kilometre (whereas the Randstad, the Dutch capital conurbation, has 1,250 inhabitants per square kilometre and the Brussels area counts 6,272 inhabitants per square kilometre). The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is set within a (rather light) legal framework and its outer borders are clearly defined. However, Euregional inhabitants have no particular bond with the Euregion; their identity is not or hardly determined by it and they do not consider themselves ‘Euregioners’ – what’s more, many of them are not even familiar with the term Euregion. The Euregion is far more determined by its inner borders – making up some 220 kilometres between the various countries – than by its outer borders. The research project Traces of autism intends to draw up an inventory of public space in the Euregion Meuse-Rhine, based on journeys made through the area and following a number of strict parameters.

Public space can be defined as nonprivatised space, the space that escapes control, the space that is not well-kept, the space of transgression, the space of the needy. For the researchers the inner borders of the Euregion function as a reference line and a kind of reading axis. Gypsies, refugees, migrants and drug addicts can function as indicators, although other indicators may become manifest. The emphasis will be on maps: existing maps will be collected and new maps will be drawn. During the entire research period, the French pedagogue Fernand Deligny (1913-1996) will be considered a supporter; he will accompany the researchers at every step. For thirty years Deligny followed autistic patients and merely registered their acts, without intervening; he only registered, without the desire to ‘learn’ anything. ‘The pedagogue following the footsteps of autistic patients’: it is an allegory that expresses the current position of the artist or intellectual. Deligny did not provide a method, merely a position: “Je ne voudrais pas qu’on s’y trompe. J’ai bien écrit en 1944, un petit livre qui parle de ce métier-là (educateur). Ce n’est pas le mien.””


Traces of Autism, Wim Cuyvers + Jan van Eyck Academy

“The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is possibly the least fascinating area imaginable: it does not boast a metropolis, lacks exotic appeal, sensational phenomena, a great past and explosive developments. The Euregion Meuse-Rhine counts 301 inhabitants per square

kilometre (whereas the Randstad, the Dutch capital conurbation, has 1,250 inhabitants per square kilometre and the Brussels area counts 6,272 inhabitants per square kilometre). The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is set within a (rather light) legal framework and its outer borders are clearly defined. However, Euregional inhabitants have no particular bond with the Euregion; their identity is not or hardly determined by it and they do not consider themselves ‘Euregioners’ – what’s more, many of them are not even familiar with the term Euregion. The Euregion is far more determined by its inner borders – making up some 220 kilometres between the various countries – than by its outer borders. The research project Traces of autism intends to draw up an inventory of public space


Traces of Autism, Wim Cuyvers + Jan van Eyck Academy

in the Euregion Meuse-Rhine, based on journeys made through the area and following a number of strict parameters. Public space can be defined as non-privatised space, the space that escapes control, the space that is not well-kept, the space of transgression, the space of the needy. For the researchers the inner borders of the Euregion function as a reference line and a kind of reading axis. Gypsies, refugees, migrants and drug addicts can function as indicators, although other indi-cators may become manifest. The emphasis will be on maps: existing maps will be collected and new maps will be drawn.

During the entire research period, the French pedagogue Fernand Deligny (19131996) will be considered a supporter; he will accompany the researchers at every step. For thirty years Deligny followed autistic patients and merely registered their acts, without intervening; he only registered, without the desire to ‘learn’ anything. ‘The pedagogue following the footsteps of autistic patients’: it is an allegory that expresses the current position of the artist or intellectual. Deligny did not provide a method, merely a position: “Je ne voudrais pas qu’on s’y trompe. J’ai bien écrit en 1944, un petit livre qui parle de ce métier-là (educateur). Ce n’est pas le mien.””


TracesofAutism,WimCuyvers+JanvanEyckAcademy “The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is possibly the least fascinating area imaginable: it does not boast a metropolis, lacks exotic appeal, sensational phenomena, a great past and explosive developments. The Euregion Meuse-Rhine counts 301 inhabitants per square kilometre (whereas the Randstad, the Dutch capital con-

urbation, has 1,250 inhabitants per square kilometre and the Brussels area counts 6,272 inhabitants per square kilometre). The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is set within a (rather light) legal framework and its outer borders are clearly defined. However, Euregional inhabitants have no particular bond with the Euregion; their identity is not or hardly determined by it and they do not consider themselves ‘Euregioners’ – what’s more, many of them are not even familiar with the term Euregion.The Euregion is far more determined by its inner borders – making up some 220 kilometres between the various countries – than by its outer borders. The research project Traces of autism intends to draw up an inventory of public space in the Euregion Meuse-Rhine, based on journeys made through the area and following a number of strict parameters. Public space can be defined as non-privatised space, the space that escapes control, the


TracesofAutism,WimCuyvers+JanvanEyckAcademy

space that is not well-kept, the space of transgression, the space of the needy. For the researchers the inner borders of the Euregion function as a reference line and a kind of reading axis. Gypsies, refugees, migrants and drug addicts can function as indicators, although other indi-cators may become manifest. The emphasis will be on maps: existing maps will be collected and new maps will be drawn. During the entire research period, the French pedagogue Fernand Deligny (1913-1996) will be considered a supporter; he will accompany the researchers at every step. For thirty years De-

ligny followed autistic patients and merely registered their acts, without intervening; he only registered, without the desire to ‘learn’ anything. ‘The pedagogue following the footsteps of autistic patients’: it is an allegory that expresses the current position of the artist or intellectual. Deligny did not provide a method, merely a position: “Je ne voudrais pas qu’on s’y trompe. J’ai bien écrit en 1944, un petit livre qui parle de ce métier-là (educateur). Ce n’est pas le mien.””


“The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is possibly the least fascinating area imaginable: it does not boast a metropolis, lacks exotic appeal, sensational phenomena, a great past and explosive developments. The Euregion Meuse-Rhine counts 301 inhabitants per square kilometre (whereas the Randstad, the Dutch capital conurbation, has 1,250 inhabitants per square kilometre and the Brussels area counts 6,272 inhabitants per square kilometre). The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is set within a (rather light) legal framework and its outer borders are clearly defined. However, Euregional inhabitants have no particular bond with the Euregion; their identity is not or hardly determined by it and they do not consider themselves ‘Euregioners’ – what’s more, many of them are not even familiar with the term Euregion. The Euregion is far more determined by its inner borders – making up some 220 kilometres between the various countries – than by its outer borders. The research project Traces of autism intends to draw up an inventory of public space in the Euregion Meuse-Rhine, based on journeys made through the area and following a number of strict parameters. Public space can be defined as non-privatised space, the space that escapes control, the space that is not well-kept, the space of transgression, the space of the needy. For the researchers the inner borders


of the Euregion function as a reference line and a kind of reading axis. Gypsies, refugees, migrants and drug addicts can function as indicators, although other indi-cators may become manifest. The emphasis will be on maps: existing maps will be collected and new maps will be drawn. During the entire research period, the French pedagogue Fernand Deligny (1913-1996) will be considered a supporter; he will accompany the researchers at every step. For thirty years Deligny followed autistic patients and merely registered their acts, without intervening; he only registered, without the desire to ‘learn’ anything. ‘The pedagogue following the footsteps of autistic patients’: it is an allegory that expresses the current position of the artist or intellectual. Deligny did not provide a method, merely a position: “Je ne voudrais pas qu’on s’y trompe. J’ai bien écrit en 1944, un petit livre qui parle de ce métier-là (educateur). Ce n’est pas le mien.””


Traces of Autism, Wim Cuyvers + Jan van Eyck Academy

“The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is possibly the least fascinating area imaginable: it does not boast a metropolis, lacks exotic appeal, sensational phenomena, a great past and explosive developments. The Euregion Meuse-Rhine counts 301 inhabitants per square kilometre (whereas the Randstad, the Dutch capital conurbation, has 1,250 inhabitants per square kilometre and the Brussels area counts 6,272 inhabitants per square kilometre). The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is set within a (rather light) legal framework and its outer borders are clearly defined. However, Euregional inhabitants have no particular bond with the Euregion; their identity is not or hardly determined by it and they do not consider themselves ‘Euregioners’ – what’s more, many of them are not even familiar with the term Euregion. The Euregion is far more determined by its inner borders – making up some 220 kilometres between the various countries – than by its outer borders. The research project Traces of autism intends to draw up an inventory of public space in the Euregion Meuse-Rhine, based on journeys made through the area and following a number of strict parameters. Public space can be defined as non-privatised space, the space that escapes control, the space that is not well-kept, the space of transgression, the space of the needy. For the researchers the inner borders of the Euregion function as a reference line and a kind of reading axis. Gypsies, refugees, migrants and drug addicts can function as indicators, although other indi-cators may become manifest. The emphasis will be on maps: existing maps will be collected and new maps will be drawn. During the entire research period, the French pedagogue Fernand Deligny (1913-1996) will be considered a supporter; he will accompany the researchers at every step. For thirty years Deligny followed autistic patients and merely registered their acts, without intervening; he only registered, without the desire to ‘learn’ anything. ‘The pedagogue following the footsteps of autistic patients’: it is an allegory that expresses the current position of the artist or intellectual. Deligny did not provide a method, merely a position: “Je ne voudrais pas qu’on s’y trompe. J’ai bien écrit en 1944, un petit livre qui parle de ce métier-là (educateur). Ce n’est pas le mien.””


Traces of Autism, Wim Cuyvers + Jan van Eyck Academy

“The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is possibly the least fascinating area imaginable: it does not boast a metropolis, lacks exotic appeal, sensational phenomena, a great past and explosive developments. The Euregion Meuse-Rhine counts 301 inhabitants per square kilometre (whereas the Randstad, the Dutch capital conurbation, has 1,250 inhabitants per square kilometre and the Brussels area counts 6,272 inhabitants per square kilometre). The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is set within a (rather light) legal framework and its outer borders are clearly defined. However, Euregional inhabitants have no particular bond with the Euregion; their identity is not or hardly determined by it and they do not consider themselves ‘Euregioners’ – what’s more, many of them are not even familiar with the term Euregion. The Euregion is far more determined by its inner borders – making up some 220 kilometres between the various countries – than by its outer borders. The research project Traces of autism intends to draw up an inventory of public space in the Euregion Meuse-Rhine, based on journeys made through the area and following a number of strict parameters. Public space can be defined as non-privatised space, the space that escapes control, the space that is not well-kept, the space of transgression, the space of the needy. For the researchers the inner borders of the Euregion function as a reference line and a kind of reading axis. Gypsies, refugees, migrants and drug addicts can function as indicators, although other indi-cators may become manifest. The emphasis will be on maps: existing maps will be collected and new maps will be drawn. During the entire research period, the French pedagogue Fernand Deligny (1913-1996) will be considered a supporter; he will accompany the researchers at every step. For thirty years Deligny followed autistic patients and merely registered their acts, without intervening; he only registered, without the desire to ‘learn’ anything. ‘The pedagogue following the footsteps of autistic patients’: it is an allegory that expresses the current position of the artist or intellectual. Deligny did not provide a method, merely a position: “Je ne voudrais pas qu’on s’y trompe. J’ai bien écrit en 1944, un petit livre qui parle de ce métier-là (educateur). Ce n’est pas le mien.””


Canarias (ES)

Guadeloupe Martinique

Réunion

Guyane (FR)

Açores (PT)

Madeira

R e g io GI S

INTERREG IIIA (2004-2006)

INTERREG IIIA regions other regions

0

100

500 km

© EuroGeographics Association for the administrative boundaries


“The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is possibly the least fascinating area imaginable: it does not boast a metropolis, lacks exotic appeal, sensational phenomena, a great past and explosive developments. The Euregion Meuse-Rhine counts 301 inhabitants per square kilometre (whereas the Randstad, the Dutch capital conurbation, has 1,250 inhabitants per square kilometre and the Brussels area counts 6,272 inhabitants per square kilometre). The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is set within a (rather light) legal framework and its outer borders are clearly defined. However, Euregional inhabitants have no particular bond with the Euregion; their identity is not or hardly determined by it and they do not consider themselves ‘Euregioners’ – what’s more, many of them are not even familiar with the term Euregion. The Euregion is far more determined by its inner borders – making up some 220 kilometres between the various countries – than by its outer borders. The research project Traces of autism intends to draw up an inventory of public space in the Euregion Meuse-Rhine, based on journeys made through the area and following a number of strict parameters. Public space can be defined as non-privatised space, the space that escapes control, the space that is not well-kept, the space of transgression, the space of the needy. For the researchers the inner borders of the Euregion function as a reference line and a kind of reading axis. Gypsies, refugees, migrants and drug addicts can function as indicators, although other indi-cators may become manifest. The emphasis will be on maps: existing maps will be collected and new maps will be drawn. During the entire research period, the French pedagogue Fernand Deligny (1913-1996) will be considered a supporter; he will accompany the researchers at every step. For thirty years Deligny followed autistic patients and merely registered their acts, without intervening; he only registered, without the desire to ‘learn’ anything. ‘The pedagogue following the footsteps of autistic patients’: it is an allegory that expresses the current position of the artist or intellectual. Deligny did not provide a method, merely a position: “Je ne voudrais pas qu’on s’y trompe. J’ai bien écrit en 1944, un petit livre qui parle de ce métier-là (educateur). Ce n’est pas le mien.””


“The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is possibly the least fascinating area imaginable: it does not boast a metropolis, lacks exotic appeal, sensational phenomena, a great past and explosive developments. The Euregion

Meuse-Rhine counts 301 inhabitants per square kilometre (whereas the Randstad, the Dutch capital conurbation, has 1,250 inhabitants per square kilometre and the Brussels area counts 6,272 inhabitants per square kilometre). The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is set within a (rather light) legal framework and its outer borders are clearly defined. However, Euregional inhabitants have no particular bond with the Euregion; their identity is not or hardly determined by it and they do not consider themselves ‘Euregioners’ – what’s more, many of them are not even familiar with the term Euregion. The Euregion is far more determined by its inner borders – making up some 220 kilometres between the various countries – than by its outer borders. The research project Traces of autism intends to draw up an inventory of public space in the Euregion Meuse-Rhine, based on journeys made through the area and following a number of strict parameters. Public space can be defined as non-privatised space, the space that escapes control, the space that is not well-kept, the space of transgression, the space of the needy. For the researchers the inner borders of the Euregion function as a reference line and a kind of reading axis. Gypsies, refugees, migrants and drug addicts can function as indicators, although other indi-cators may become manifest. The emphasis will be on maps: existing maps will be collected and new maps will be drawn. During the entire research period, the French pedagogue Fernand Deligny (1913-1996) will be considered a supporter; he will accompany the researchers at every step. For thirty years Deligny followed autistic patients and merely registered their acts, without intervening; he only registered, without the desire to ‘learn’ anything. ‘The pedagogue following the footsteps of autistic patients’: it is an allegory that expresses the current position of the artist or intellectual. Deligny did not provide a method, merely a position: “Je ne voudrais pas qu’on s’y trompe. J’ai bien écrit en 1944, un petit livre qui parle de ce métier-là (educateur). Ce n’est pas le mien.””


“The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is possibly the least fascinating area imaginable: it does not boast a metropolis, lacks exotic appeal, sensational phenomena, a great past and explosive developments. The Euregion Meuse-Rhine counts 301 inhabitants per square kilometre (whereas the Randstad, the Dutch capital conurbation, has 1,250 inhabitants per square kilometre and the Brussels area counts 6,272 inhabitants per square kilometre). The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is set within a (rather light) legal framework and its outer borders are clearly defined. However, Euregional inhabitants have no particular bond with the Euregion; their identity is not or hardly determined by it and they do not consider themselves ‘Euregioners’ – what’s more, many of them are not even familiar with the term Euregion. The Euregion is far more determined by its inner borders – making up some 220 kilometres between the various countries – than by its outer borders. The research project Traces of autism intends to draw up an inventory of public space in the Euregion Meuse-Rhine, based on journeys made through the area and following a number of strict parameters. Public space can be defined as non-privatised space, the space that escapes control, the space that is not well-kept, the space of transgression, the space of the needy. For the researchers the inner borders of the Euregion function as a reference line and a kind of reading axis. Gypsies, refugees, migrants and drug addicts can function as indicators, although other indi-cators may become manifest. The emphasis will be on maps: existing maps will be collected and new maps will be drawn. During the entire research period, the French pedagogue Fernand Deligny (1913-1996) will be considered a supporter; he will accompany the researchers at every step. For thirty years Deligny followed autistic patients and merely registered their acts, without intervening; he only registered, without the desire to ‘learn’ anything. ‘The pedagogue following the footsteps of autistic patients’: it is an allegory that expresses the current position of the artist or intellectual. Deligny did not provide a method, merely a position: “Je ne voudrais pas qu’on s’y trompe. J’ai bien écrit en 1944, un petit livre qui parle de ce métier-là (educateur). Ce n’est pas le mien.””


REGIONS

EMERGING IDENTITIES


“The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is possibly the least fascinating area imaginable: it does not boast a metropolis, lacks exotic appeal, sensational phenomena, a great past and explosive developments. The Euregion Meuse-Rhine counts 301 inhabitants per square kilometre (whereas the Randstad, the Dutch capital conurbation, has 1,250 inhabitants per square kilometre and the Brussels area counts 6,272 inhabitants per square kilometre). The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is set within a (rather light) legal framework and its outer borders are clearly defined. However, Euregional inhabitants have no particular bond with the Euregion; their identity is not or hardly determined by it and they do not consider themselves ‘Euregioners’ – what’s more, many of them are not even familiar with the term Euregion. The Euregion is far more determined by its inner borders – making up some 220 kilometres between the various countries – than by its outer borders. The research project Traces of autism intends to draw up an inventory of public space in the Euregion Meuse-Rhine, based on journeys made through the area and following a number of strict parameters. Public space can be defined as non-privatised space, the space that escapes control, the space that is not well-kept, the space of transgression, the space of the needy. For the researchers the inner borders of the Euregion function as a reference line and a kind of reading axis. Gypsies, refugees, migrants and drug addicts can function as indicators, although other indi-cators may become manifest. The emphasis will be on maps: existing maps will be collected and new maps will be drawn. During the entire research period, the French pedagogue Fernand Deligny (1913-1996) will be considered a supporter; he will accompany the researchers at every step. For thirty years Deligny followed autistic patients and merely registered their acts, without intervening; he only registered, without the desire to ‘learn’ anything. ‘The pedagogue following the footsteps of autistic patients’: it is an allegory that expresses the current position of the artist or intellectual. Deligny did not provide a method, merely a position: “Je ne voudrais pas qu’on s’y trompe. J’ai bien écrit en 1944, un petit livre qui parle de ce métier-là (educateur). Ce n’est pas le mien.””


REGIONS // EMERGING IDENTITIES // TRACES OF AUTISM

The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is possibly the least fascinating area imaginable: it does not boast a metropolis, lacks exotic appeal, sensational phenomena, a great past and explosive developments. The Euregion Meuse-Rhine counts 301 inhabitants per square kilometre (whereas the Randstad, the Dutch capital conurbation, has 1,250 inhabitants per square kilometre and the Brussels area counts 6,272 inhabitants per square kilometre). The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is set within a (rather light) legal framework and its outer borders are clearly defined. However, Euregional inhabitants have no particular bond with the Euregion; their identity is not or hardly determined by it and they do not consider themselves ‘Euregioners’ – what’s more, many of them are not even familiar with the term Euregion. The Euregion is far more determined by its inner borders – making up some 220 kilometres between the various countries – than by its outer borders. The research project Traces of autism intends to draw up an inventory of public space in the Euregion Meuse-Rhine, based on journeys made through the area and following a number of strict parameters. Public space can be defined as non-privatised space, the space that escapes control, the space that is not well-kept, the space of transgression, the space of the needy. For the researchers the inner borders of the Euregion function as a reference line and a kind of reading axis. Gypsies, refugees, migrants and drug addicts can function as indicators, although other indi-cators may become manifest. The emphasis will be on maps: existing maps will be collected and new maps will be drawn. During the entire research period, the French pedagogue Fernand Deligny (1913-1996) will be considered a supporter; he will accompany the researchers at every step. For thirty years Deligny followed autistic patients and merely registered their acts, without intervening; he only registered, without the desire to ‘learn’ anything. ‘The pedagogue following the footsteps of autistic patients’: it is an allegory that expresses the current position of the artist or intellectual. Deligny did not provide a method, merely a position: “Je ne voudrais pas qu’on s’y trompe. J’ai bien écrit en 1944, un petit livre qui parle de ce métier-là (educateur). Ce n’est pas le mien.”


REGIONS // EMERGING IDENTITIES // TRACES OF AUTISM The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is possibly the least fascinating area imaginable: it does not boast a metropolis, lacks exotic appeal, sensational phenomena, a great past and explosive developments. The Euregion Meuse-Rhine counts 301 inhabitants per square kilometre (whereas the Randstad, the Dutch capital conurbation, has 1,250 inhabitants per square kilometre and the Brussels area counts 6,272 inhabitants per square kilometre). The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is set within a (rather light) legal framework and its outer borders are clearly defined. However, Euregional inhabitants have no particular bond with the Euregion; their identity is not or hardly determined by it and they do not consider themselves ‘Euregioners’ – what’s more, many of them are not even familiar with the term Euregion. The Euregion is far more determined by its inner borders – making up some 220 kilometres between the various countries – than by its outer borders. The research project Traces of autism intends to draw up an inventory of public space in the Euregion Meuse-Rhine, based on journeys made through the area and following a number of strict parameters. Public space can be defined as non-privatised space, the space that escapes control, the space that is not wellkept, the space of transgression, the space of the needy. For the researchers the inner borders of the Euregion function as a reference line and a kind of reading axis. Gypsies, refugees, migrants and drug addicts can function as indicators, although other indi-cators may become manifest. The emphasis will be on maps: existing maps will be collected and new maps will be drawn. During the entire research period, the French pedagogue Fernand Deligny (1913-1996) will be considered a supporter; he will accompany the researchers at every step. For thirty years Deligny followed autistic patients and merely registered their acts, without intervening; he only registered, without the desire to ‘learn’ anything. ‘The pedagogue following the footsteps of autistic patients’: it is an allegory that expresses the current position of the artist or intellectual. Deligny did not provide a method, merely a position: “Je ne voudrais pas qu’on s’y trompe. J’ai bien écrit en 1944, un petit livre qui parle de ce métier-là (educateur). Ce n’est pas le mien.”


“The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is possibly the least fascinating area imaginable: it does not boast a metropolis, lacks exotic appeal, sensational phenomena, a great past and explosive developments. The Euregion Meuse-Rhine counts 301 inhabitants per square kilometre (whereas the Randstad, the Dutch capital conurbation, has 1,250 inhabitants per square kilometre and the Brussels area counts 6,272 inhabitants per square kilometre). The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is set within a (rather light) legal framework and its outer borders are clearly defined. However, Euregional inhabitants have no particular bond with the Euregion; their identity is not or hardly determined by it and they do not consider themselves ‘Euregioners’ – what’s more, many of them are not even familiar with the term Euregion. The Euregion is far more determined by its inner borders – making up some 220 kilometres between the various countries – than by its outer borders. The research project Traces of autism intends to draw up an inventory of public space in the Euregion Meuse-Rhine, based on journeys made through the area and following a number of strict parameters. Public space can be defined as non-privatised space, the space that escapes control, the space that is not well-kept, the space of transgression, the space of the needy. For the researchers the inner borders of the Euregion function as a reference line and a kind of reading axis. Gypsies, refugees, migrants and drug addicts can function as indicators, although other indi-cators may become manifest. The emphasis will be on maps: existing maps will be collected and new maps will be drawn. During the entire research period, the French pedagogue Fernand Deligny (1913-1996) will be considered a supporter; he will accompany the researchers at every step. For thirty years Deligny followed autistic patients and merely registered their acts, without intervening; he only registered, without the desire to ‘learn’ anything. ‘The pedagogue following the footsteps of autistic patients’: it is an allegory that expresses the current position of the artist or intellectual. Deligny did not provide a method, merely a position: “Je ne voudrais pas qu’on s’y trompe. J’ai bien écrit en 1944, un petit livre qui parle de ce métier-là (educateur). Ce n’est pas le mien.””


“The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is possibly the least fascinating area imaginable: it does not boast a metropolis, lacks exotic appeal, sensational phenomena, a great past and explosive developments. The Euregion Meuse-Rhine counts 301 inhabitants per square kilometre (whereas the Randstad, the Dutch capital conurbation, has 1,250 inhabitants per square kilometre and the Brussels area counts 6,272 inhabitants per square kilometre). The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is set within a (rather light) legal framework and its outer borders are clearly defined. However, Euregional inhabitants have no particular bond with the Euregion; their identity is not or hardly determined by it and they do not consider themselves ‘Euregioners’ – what’s more, many of them are not even familiar with the term Euregion. The Euregion is far more determined by its inner borders – making up some 220 kilometres between the various countries – than by its outer borders. The research project Traces of autism intends to draw up an inventory of public space in the Euregion Meuse-Rhine, based on journeys made through the area and following a number of strict parameters. Public space can be defined as nonprivatised space, the space that escapes control, the space that is not well-kept, the space of transgression, the space of the needy. For the researchers the inner borders of the Euregion function as a reference line and a kind of reading axis. Gypsies, refugees, migrants and drug addicts can function as indicators, although other indi-cators may become manifest. The emphasis will be on maps: existing maps will be collected and new maps will be drawn. During the entire research period, the French pedagogue Fernand Deligny (1913-1996) will be considered a supporter; he will accompany the researchers at every step. For thirty years Deligny followed autistic patients and merely registered their acts, without intervening; he only registered, without the desire to ‘learn’ anything. ‘The pedagogue following the footsteps of autistic patients’: it is an allegory that expresses the current position of the artist or intellectual. Deligny did not provide a method, merely a position: “Je ne voudrais pas qu’on s’y trompe. J’ai bien écrit en 1944, un petit livre qui parle de ce métier-là (educateur). Ce n’est pas le mien.””


“The Euregion MeuseRhine is possibly the least fascinating area imaginable: it does not boast a metropo-

Regions // Emerging identities // Traces of autism


“The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is possibly the least fascinating area imaginable: it does not boast a metropolis, lacks exotic appeal, sensational phenomena, a great past and explosive developments.

The Euregion Meuse-Rhine counts 301 inhabitants per square kilometre (whereas the Randstad, the Dutch capital conurbation, has 1,250 inhabitants per square kilometre and the Brussels area counts 6,272 inhabitants per square kilometre). The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is set within a (rather light) legal framework and its outer borders are clearly defined. However, Euregional inhabitants have no particular bond with the Euregion; their identity is not or hardly determined by it and they do not consider themselves ‘Euregioners’ – what’s more, many of them are not even familiar with the term Euregion. The Euregion is far more determined by its inner borders – making up some 220 kilometres between the various countries – than by its outer borders. The research project Traces of autism intends to draw up an inventory of public space in the Euregion Meuse-Rhine, based on journeys made through the area and following a number of strict parameters. Public space can be defined as non-privatised space, the space that escapes control, the space that is not well-kept, the space of transgression, the space of the needy. For the researchers the inner borders of the Euregion function as a reference line and a kind of reading axis. Gypsies, refugees, migrants and drug addicts can function as indicators, although other indi-cators may become manifest. The emphasis will be on maps: existing maps will be collected and new maps will be drawn. During the entire research period, the French pedagogue Fernand Deligny (1913-1996) will be considered a supporter; he will accompany the researchers at every step. For thirty years Deligny followed autistic patients and merely registered their acts, without intervening; he only registered, without the desire to ‘learn’ anything. ‘The pedagogue following the footsteps of autistic patients’: it is an allegory that expresses the current position of the artist or intellectual. Deligny did not provide a method, merely a position: “Je ne voudrais pas qu’on s’y trompe. J’ai bien écrit en 1944, un petit livre qui parle de ce métier-là (educateur). Ce n’est pas le mien.””


REGIONS // EMERGING IDENTITIES // TRACES OF AUTISM

“The Euregion MeuseRhine is possibly the least fascinating area imaginable: it does not boast a


“The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is possibly the least fascinating area imaginable: it does not boast a metropolis, lacks exotic appeal, sensational phenomena, a great past and explosive developments.

The Euregion Meuse-Rhine counts 301 inhabitants per square kilometre (whereas the Randstad, the Dutch capital conurbation, has 1,250 inhabitants per square kilometre and the Brussels area counts 6,272 inhabitants per square kilometre). The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is set within a (rather light) legal framework and its outer borders are clearly defined. However, Euregional inhabitants have no particular bond with the Euregion; their identity is not or hardly determined by it and they do not consider themselves ‘Euregioners’ – what’s more, many of them are not even familiar with the term Euregion. The Euregion is far more determined by its inner borders – making up some 220 kilometres between the various countries – than by its outer borders. The research project Traces of autism intends to draw up an inventory of public space in the Euregion Meuse-Rhine, based on journeys made through the area and following a number of strict parameters. Public space can be defined as non-privatised space, the space that escapes control, the space that is not well-kept, the space of transgression, the space of the needy. For the researchers the inner borders of the Euregion function as a reference line and a kind of reading axis. Gypsies, refugees, migrants and drug addicts can function as indicators, although other indi-cators may become manifest. The emphasis will be on maps: existing maps will be collected and new maps will be drawn. During the entire research period, the French pedagogue Fernand Deligny (1913-1996) will be considered a supporter; he will accompany the researchers at every step. For thirty years Deligny followed autistic patients and merely registered their acts, without intervening; he only registered, without the desire to ‘learn’ anything. ‘The pedagogue following the footsteps of autistic patients’: it is an allegory that expresses the current position of the artist or intellectual. Deligny did not provide a method, merely a position: “Je ne voudrais pas qu’on s’y trompe. J’ai bien écrit en 1944, un petit livre qui parle de ce métier-là (educateur). Ce n’est pas le mien.””


REGIONS // EMERGING IDENTITIES // TRACES OF AUTISM

“The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is possibly the least fascinating area imaginable: it does not boast a metropolis, lacks exotic appeal, sensational phenomena, a great past and explosive developments


“The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is possibly the least fascinating area imaginable: it does not boast a metropolis, lacks exotic appeal, sensational phenomena, a great past and explosive developments. The Euregion Meuse-Rhine counts 301 inhabitants per square kilometre (whereas the Randstad, the Dutch capital conurbation, has 1,250 inhabitants per square kilometre and the Brussels area counts 6,272 inhabitants per square kilometre). The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is set within a (rather light) legal framework and its outer borders are clearly defined. However, Euregional inhabitants have no particular bond with the Euregion; their identity is not or hardly determined by it and they do not consider themselves ‘Euregioners’ – what’s more, many of them are not even familiar with the term Euregion. The Euregion is far more determined by its inner borders – making up some 220 kilometres between the various countries – than by its outer borders. The research project Traces of autism intends to draw up an inventory of public space in the Euregion Meuse-Rhine, based on journeys made through the area and following a number of strict parameters. Public space can be defined as non-privatised space, the space that escapes control, the space that is not well-kept, the space of transgression, the space of the needy. For the researchers the inner borders of the Euregion function as a reference line and a kind of reading axis. Gypsies, refugees, migrants and drug addicts can function as indicators, although other indi-cators may become manifest. The emphasis will be on maps: existing maps will be collected and new maps will be drawn. During the entire research period, the French pedagogue Fernand Deligny (1913-1996) will be considered a supporter; he will accompany the researchers at every step. For thirty years Deligny followed autistic patients and merely registered their acts, without intervening; he only registered, without the desire to ‘learn’ anything. ‘The pedagogue following the footsteps of autistic patients’: it is an allegory that expresses the current position of the artist or intellectual. Deligny did not provide a method, merely a position: “Je ne voudrais pas qu’on s’y trompe. J’ai bien écrit en 1944, un petit livre qui parle de ce métier-là (educateur). Ce n’est pas le mien.””


“The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is possibly the least fascinating area imaginable: it does not boast a metropolis, lacks exotic appeal, sensational phenomena, a great past and explosive developments. The Euregion Meuse-Rhine counts 301 inhabitants per square kilometre (whereas the Randstad, the Dutch capital conurbation, has 1,250 inhabitants per

square kilometre and the Brussels area counts 6,272 inhabitants per square kilometre). The Euregion Meuse-Rhine is set within a (rather light) legal framework and its outer borders are clearly defined. However, Euregional inhabitants have no particular bond with the Euregion; their identity is not or hardly determined by it and they do not consider themselves ‘Euregioners’ – what’s more, many of them are not even familiar with the term Euregion. The Euregion is far more determined by its inner borders – making up some 220 kilometres between the various countries – than by its outer borders. The research project Traces of autism intends to draw up an inventory of public space in the Euregion Meuse-Rhine, based on journeys made through the area and following a number of strict parameters. Public space can be defined as non-privatised space, the space that escapes control, the space that is not well-kept, the space of transgression, the space of the needy. For the researchers the inner borders of the Euregion function as a reference line and a kind of reading axis. Gypsies, refugees, migrants and drug addicts can function as indicators, although other indi-cators may become manifest. The emphasis will be on maps: existing maps will be collected and new maps will be drawn. During the entire research period, the French pedagogue Fernand Deligny (1913-1996) will be considered a supporter; he will accompany the researchers at every step. For thirty years Deligny followed autistic patients and merely registered their acts, without intervening; he only registered, without the desire to ‘learn’ anything. ‘The pedagogue following the footsteps of autistic patients’: it is an allegory that expresses the current position of the artist or intellectual. Deligny did not provide a method, merely a position: “Je ne voudrais pas qu’on s’y trompe. J’ai bien écrit en 1944, un petit livre qui parle de ce métier-là (educateur). Ce n’est pas le mien.””


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