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NEW WHEELS Tundra still has a useable centre-console filing cabinet, charging outlets throughout, a myriad of storage options, spacious cabin, seating for six full adults and, what really makes this truck good, its build quality. Everything is solid and fits together nicely, and what teething problems the Tundra had in its early years have now been ironed out, and these trucks are now seeing proper Toyota reliability. The same can’t be said for the domestics that are jumping into the high-tech dashes with both feet. The Tundra sports auxiliary media jacks and optional navigation, but the dash is a beautifully simplistic design that after only a few hours driving I had memorized, allowing me to make adjustments without taking my eyes off traffic. It just doesn’t have all the bells and whistles of the modern trucks, you still can’t option it out like a domestic and it still sucks a ton of gas, that’s all.

SPECIFICATIONS: MSRP: . ...........................................................................$26,210 Price as tested: ...............................................................$53,800 Layout: ......................................Front Engine, Four-Wheel-Drive Engine:............................................................................ 5.7L V-8 Power: . ..............................................................381 hp, 401 lb-ft Transmission: . ............................................... 6-speed automatic Curb weight: . ................................................................. 2,227 kg Fuel Efficiency (city, hwy, com.): ............................. 15.9L/100km 11.1L/100km, 13.7L/100km

My test drive in this 5.7-litre V8-equipped CrewMax was like meeting an old friend after a few years abroad. The seats are still comfortable, the cabin still spacious, the dash is still simple to use with massive knobs working the essentials… remember those knobs? They seem to work a lot better than flush touch buttons. Despite being the top-of-the-line Platinum Edition, this Tundra prices out cheaper than all three similarly-equipped do-

The Tundra may have 4Low, but even the smallest obstructions were challenging with poor tires and an electronically controlled Limited Slip Differential.

mestics, yet can still hold its own in both the payload and towing departments. Other than the obvious lack of development, my only real quibble was the rather weak 4WD system. All I can say is, if you plan to do any kind of off-roading, opt for the TRD offroad edition that at least gives you good tires and Bilstein shocks to help account for the lack of a real Limited-Slip Differential, as the Tundra uses the laughable electronic unit that will only wear out one of your rear brakes faster than the other. Regardless, the old horse has proven that she still has the metal. It was built so well six years ago that it can still take on the latest and greatest from the Big Three. Sure, it has some backwards old traits, but there is still a lot to love about the Tundra.

20 Trucks Plus

FEB / MAR 2013

Trucks Plus Feb-Mar 2013  

Trucks Plus February-March 2013 Issue