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Constellation Field Guide By: Jordan Hutchison


• “Constellation” Cocoa Beach slide 3 • Constellation Dorado

Table of Contents

slide 6

• Constellation Monoceros

slide 12

• Constellation Canis Minor

slide 17

• Constellation Antila

slide 22

• Constellation Musca

slide 27

• Constellation Bootes

slide 32

• Constellation Draco

slide 37

• Constellation Corona Australis • Constellation Cygnus

slide 47

• Constellation Grus slide 52 • Constellation Tucana

slide 57

• Constellation Pavo slide 62

slide 42


Jordan Hutchison Astr 103A Introduction COW Week 1

Constellation “Cocoa Beach”


Official Name: Cocoa Beach

• Myth: The Cocoa Beach is an engagement ring that appears each time someone is proposed to on Cocoa Beach, in Florida. My own husband Gary, proposed to me on this beach, we have been married 6 years and have two children Lillian, and Kyle. • History: I discovered the Cocoa Beach in June 2011, while walking along the beach enjoying the sounds of the waves crashing in, and the way the moon reflected off of the ocean was breathtaking. After Gary proposed we noticed the constellation Cocoa Beach in the sky. We are from the Houston, Texas area and due to pollution we never really had the chance to see how beautiful the stars could be.


Cocoa Beach: Jordan Hutchison

• Location: The cocoa can be best viewed at 28.32 degrees N, -80.61 degrees E., if you gaze up into the sky and search for the Circinus you will find the Cocoa Beach to its left. Best time for viewing are the month of June around 9 p.m. • Special Stars: A handful of the special stars in my life are Gary, Lillian, Kyle and Moose. Gary is in the US Coast Guard and loves hunting, Lillian is 6 she just began Kindergarten in Valdez, Kyle is 4 and enjoys playing with dinosaurs and being outside, and Moose is our 1 ½ year old yellow lab we got shortly after moving to Alaska, his name was chosen by Kyle.


Image of Cocoa Beach •Citations: •Stars Background Image, https://wallpapercave.com/wp/MH1RfEg.gif •Microsoft Paint for drawing the “Cocoa Beach” •Cocoa Beach Coordinates, •https://www.latlong.net/place/cocoa-beach-fl-usa-5 686.html •Circinus, •http://www.topastronomer.com/StarCharts/Constella tions/Circinus.php


Jordan Hutchison Astr. 103A COW 2 January 20, 2018

Constellation: Dorado


Official Name: Dorado

• Myth: There are no myths related to this constellation. • History of Discovery: Dorado was one of many constellations observed by Dutch navigators Pieter Dirkszoom Keyser and Frederick de Houtman. Dorado was created by Dutch astronomer Petrus Plancius in the 16th century.


Location: Dorado is located in the first quadrant of the southern hemisphere and can be seen at latitudes between +20 degrees and -90 degrees and is best visible at 9 p.m. during the month of January. Dorado also contains most of the Large Magellanic Cloud. Some neighboring constellations are Hydrus, Mensa, Reticulum, Horologium, Caelum, and Pictor. Special Stars: Alpha Doradus, which is the brightest star in this constellation. Beta Doradus, the second brightest star in this constellation.

Galaxies: The Large Magellanic Cloud is an irregular galaxy located in Dorado and neighboring constellation Mensa. This galaxy is a satellite galaxy to the Milky Way, and third closest galaxy to ours.

Dorado: Jordan Hutchison


Images of Dorado

Dorado Constellation Map

Large Magellanic Cloud the Dorado can be seen in the left bright area towards the top of the glow from the LMC.


Citations: • Images: http://www.constellation-guide.com/constellation-list/dorado-const ellation/ • Dorado Constellation Map, by IAU and Sky & Telescope magazine. • LMC and Dorado. Taken by European Southern Observatory Photo Ambassador Yuri Beletsky. • http://topastronomer.com/StarCharts/Constellations/Dorado.php • http://www.constellation-guide.com/constellation-list/dorado-const ellation/


Jordan Hutchison Astr. 103A COW 3 January 30, 2018

Constellation: Monoceros


Myth: There are no myths related to this constellation. However, Dutch cartographer/clergyman Pertrus Plancius introduced the Monoceros as a unicorn figure because the mythical animal appears several times in the Old Testament of the Bible. History of Discovery: Monoceros was introduced by Petrus Plancius from the observations of the Dutch in the 17th century.

Official Name: Monoceros


• Location: Monoceros is located in the second quadrant of the northern hemisphere and can be seen at latitudes between +75 degrees and -90 degrees. and is best visible at 9 p.m. during the month of February.

Monoceros: Jordan Hutchison

• Special Stars: Alpha Monocerotis, which is the brightest star in this constellation, and has a mass that is 2.02 times that of our Sun. Gamma Monocerotis, the second brightest star in this constellation, is an orange giant with an apparent magnitude of 3.98. • V838 Monocerotis a red supergiant famous variable star in Monoceros its apparent magnitude is 15.74, and was discovered during an outburst in 2002. Temporarily becoming the brightest star in the Milky Way galaxy.


Images of Monoceros

Top: Monoceros Constellation Map Right: Image of V838 Monocerotis from Hubble Space Telescope


Citations: • Images: http://hubblesite.org/image/1307/news_release/2003-10 from the Hubble Telescope • Monoceros Constellation Map, by IAU and Sky & Telescope magazine • http://topastronomer.com/StarCharts/Constellations/Monoceros.p hp • www.constellation-guide.com/constellation-list/monoceros-constel lation/


Jordan Hutchison Astr. 103A COW 3 February 6, 2018

Constellation: Canis Minor


Official Name: Canis Minor

• Myth: Commonly identified as one of the dogs following Orion, the hunter in Greek mythology. • Name: Canis Minor means “the lesser dog” or “the smaller dog” in Latin • History of Discovery: Canis Minor was first recorded by Greek astronomer Ptolemy in the 2nd century.


Canis Minor: Jordan Hutchison Location: Canis Minor is located in the second quadrant of the northern hemisphere and can be seen at latitudes between -75 degrees and 90 degrees, and is best visible at 9 p.m. during the month of March. Special Stars: Procyon is the brightest star in Canis Minor and seventh brightest str in the sky. This stars apparent magnitude is .34 and not extraordinarily bright but is very close to the Sun. Gomeisa is the second brightest star in Canis Minor and is a hot B-8 type main sequence star. This stars apparent magnitude is 2.89.


Images of Canis Minor

Canis Minor Constellation Map


Citations: • Canis Minor Constellation Map, by IAU and Sky & Telescope magazine • http://www.constellation-guide.com/constellation-list/canis-minorconstellation/ • http://www.astro.wisc.edu/~dolan/constellations/constellations/Ca nis_Minor.html


Jordan Hutchison Astr. 103A COW 3 February 13, 2018

Constellation: Antlia


• Myth: There is no myth surrounding this constellation.

Official Name: Antlia

• Name: Antlia comes from the ancient Greek word for “the pump”. Originally this constellation was named Antlia Pneumatica, to commemorate the invention of the air pump, which it represents. (Constellation Guide) • History of Discovery: Antlia was discovered by French astronomer Abbe Nicolas Louis de Lacaille in the 18th century.


Antlia: Jordan Hutchison

Location: Antlia is located in the second quadrant of the southern hemisphere and can be seen at latitudes between +45 degrees and -90 degrees, and is best during the month of April. Special Stars: Alpha Antliae is the brightest star in this constellation

Antlia has two stars with planets they are HD 93083 and WASP-66

Deep Sky objects: Antlia Dwarf Galaxy, unbarred spiral galaxy NGC 2997, and the Antlia Cluster of galaxies.


Images of Antlia and Antlia Dwarf Galaxy

Map

Left: Constellation Map of the Antlia Above: Image of Antlia Dwarf from NASA


Citations: • Antlia Constellation Map, by IAU and Sky & Telescope magazine • www.constellation-guide.com/constellation-list/antlia-constellation / • https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hubble/science/antlia-galaxy .html • http://topastronomer.com/StarCharts/Constellations/Antlia.php


Jordan Hutchison Astr. 103A COW 3 February 20, 2018

Constellation: Musca


• Myth: There is no myth surrounding this constellation.

Official Name: Musca

• Name: Musca means “the fly” in Latin. First appeared as this name in 1602. • History of Discovery: Musca was created by Dutch Astronomer Petrus Plancius from observations by Dutch navigators Pieter Dirkzoon Keyser and Frederck de Houtman in the late 16th century. • Musca was unamed by Plancius, and when Johann Bayer included this star in his star atlas Uranometria, he called Musca Apis, the Be and this was used for about two centuries.


Musca: Jordan Hutchison

Location: Musca is located in the third quadrant of the southern hemisphere and can be seen at latitudes between +10 degrees and -90 degrees, just south of Crux (The southern cross)and is best during the month of May. Special Stars: Alpha Musace is the brightest star in this constellation with an apparent magnitude of 2.69. This star is 8.8 times the Sun's mass. Musca has one star with known planets.

Deep sky objects: Planetary nebula NGC5189, this nebula has an apparent magnitude of 8.2.


Images of Musca and NGC 5189

Left: Constellation Map of the Musca Above: Image of NCG 5189 nearby planetary nebula images from Hubble/ NASA


Citations: • http://www.constellation-guide.com/constellation-list/musca-constellation/ • https://www.astronomytrek.com/star-constellation-facts-musca/ • https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hubble/science/ngc5189.html


Jordan Hutchison Astr. 103A COW 3 February 27, 2018

Constellation: Bootes


Official Name: Bootes

• Myth: “Traditionally depicted as a herdsman with two hunting dogs on a leash and a club in his other hand. Bootes is said to follow Ursa Major around the pole. In another story, Bootes represents a ploughman driving an oxen in the Ursa Major, followed by his two dogs, Asterion and Chara (Canes Venatici constellation) The oxen are tied to the polar axis and their movement is what keeps the sky in constant rotation.” www.constellation-guide.com/constellation-list/bootes -constellation/ • Name: Bootes means ox driver, herdsman, or plowman in Greek. • History of Discovery: Bootes was first recorded by Greek astronomer Ptolemy in the 2nd century.


Bootes: Jordan Hutchison Location: Bootes is located in the third quadrant of the northern hemisphere and can be seen at latitudes between +90 degrees and -50 degrees. And is best viewed during the month of June. Special Stars: Alpha Bootis/Arcturus is the brightest star in this constellation with an apparent magnitude of 2.69. This star is 8.8 times the Sun's mass. Bootes has five stars with known planets.

Deep sky objects: Bootes void also known as the Supervoid, and Bootes I or the Bootes Dwarf Galaxy. NGC 5466 a globular cluster noted for its blue horizontal branch of stars.


Images of Bootes, Arcturus and NGC 5466

Left: Constellation Map of the Bootes Center: Image of NGC 5466 from NASA Right: Arcturus


Citations: • www.constellation-guide.com/constellation-list/bootes-constellation/ • http://topastronomer.com/StarCharts/Constellations/Bootes.php • http://earthsky.org/brightest-stars/bright-orange-arcturus-use-the-big-dipper-to-find-it


Jordan Hutchison Astr. 103A COW 3 March 6, 2018

Constellation: Draco


Official Name: Draco

• Myth: “Draco is associated with several myths, most frequently with the one about the 12 labours of Heracles, represented by the neighbouring constellation Hercules. In the myth, Draco represents Ladon, the dragon that guarded the golden apples in the gardens of the Hesperides.” • Myth: In Roman mythology Draco was one of the Giant Titans who fought against the Olympian gods for ten years. Eventually killed in battle by Goddess Minvera, and thrown into the sky, freezing around the North Pole. • Name: Draco means “the dragon” in Latin. • History of Discovery: Draco was first recorded by Greek astronomer Ptolemy in the 2nd century.


Bootes: Jordan Hutchison

Location: Draco is located in the third quadrant of the northern hemisphere and can be seen at latitudes between +90 degrees and -15 degrees. And is best viewed during the month of July. Special Stars: Gamma Draconis is the brightest star in this constellation with an apparent magnitude of 2.3617. Gamma Draconis is an evolved giant, that is 471x more luminous the the Sun and 72% more mass than the Sun. Deep sky objects: Draco contains famous objects such as the Cat's Eye Nebula (NGC 6543), the Tadpole Galaxy, and Spindle Galaxy (Messier 102, NGC 5866).


Images of Draco, Cat's Eye Nebula, and the Spindle Galaxy

Cat's Eye Nebula

Spindle Galaxy Draco Constellation Map

from Hubble


Citations: • https://www.space.com/16755-draco-constellation.html • https://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_211.html • http://www.constellation-guide.com/constellation-list/draco-constellation/ • http://www.messier-objects.com/messier-102-spindle-galaxy/


Jordan Hutchison Astr. 103A COW 3 march 20, 2018

Constellation: Corona Australis


Official Name: Corona Australis

• Myth: The Corona Australis is said to represent the crown by the centaur represented by Sagittarius. But, there's no particular myths tied to this constelation. • Name: Corona Australis' name means “the southern crown” in Latin. Corona Australis is also called the Corona Astrina. • History of Discovery: Corona Australis was catalouged by Greek astronomer Ptolemy in the 2nd century.


Location: Corona Australis is located in the third quadrant of the southern hemisphere and can be seen at latitudes between -90 degrees and 40 degrees. And is best viewed during the month of August. Special Stars: Alpha Coronae Australis is the brightest star in this constellation.

The Corona Astralis has two stars with known planets; HD 166724 which was discovered in 2012.

Deep sky objects: Corona Australis Nebula and Coronet Cluster.

Corona Australis


Images of Corona Australis Stars and Dust Near Corona Australis

Corona Australis Constellation Map


Citations: • http://www.constellation-guide.com/constellation-list/corona-australis-constellation/ • https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap060403.html


Jordan Hutchison Astr. 103A COW 3 march 27, 2018

Constellation: Cygnus


Official Name: Cygnus

• Myth: The Cygnus is said to represent many different myths; the most common is one of the Spartan Queen Leda, who gave birth to 2 sets of twins, immortal Pollux and Helen, and mortal Castor and Clytemnestra, after being seduced by the God Zeus, who transformed himself into a Swan. The immortal children were fathered by the god. (Constellation Guide) • Name : Cygnus name means “the swan” in Latin. Cygnus is also known as the Swan constellation. • History of Discovery: Cygnus was catalouged by Greek astronomer Ptolemy in the 2nd century.


Cygnus

Location: Cygnus is located in the fourth quadrant of the northern hemisphere and can be seen at latitudes between 90 degrees and -40 degrees. And is best viewed during the month of September. Special Stars: Alpha Cygni (Deneb) blue white supergiant, approximately 1,400 light years distant. It is the brightest star in Cygnus. And the 19th brightest star in the sky. Gliese 777-yellow subgiant star, and in 2005 two extra solar planets were confirmed in its system.

Deep sky objects: Messier 39 or NGC 7092, Messier 29 or NGC 6913, the Fireworks Galaxy-NGC 6946 and Cygnus X-1 are a few deep sky objects.


Images of Cygnus and the Fireworks Galaxy Fireworks Galaxy-NGC 6946,

taken by Chandra X-ray Telescope.

Cygnus Constellation Map


Citations: • www.constellation-guide.com/constellation-list/cygnus-constellation/ • https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/chandra/multimedia/fireworks-galaxy-ngc6946.html


Jordan Hutchison Astr. 103A COW 11 April 3, 2018

Constellation: Grus


Official Name: Grus

Myth: Grus connection with mythology lis that it was a sacred bird to god Hermes.

Name : Grus means “the crane” in Latin. It briefly went by Phoenicopterus, which means “the flamingo” in Latin. History of Discovery: Grus was created by Petrus Plancius, a dutch astronomer, from the observations of Dutch navigators.


Location: Grus is located in the fourth quadrant of the southern hemisphere and can be seen at latitudes between +34 degrees and -90 degrees. And is best viewed during the month of October. Special Stars: Alnar is the brightest star in Grus, with an apparent magnitude of 1.74. This star has a radius 3.4 times the Sun, and is 263 times more luminous. Deep sky objects: NGC 7424 barred spiral galaxy with an apparent magnitude of 11. It is often called the “grand design� galaxy. It also contains a supernova.

Grus


Images of Grus and NGC 7424 NGC 7424

Grus Constellation Map


References: • www.constellation-guide.com/constellation-list/grus-constellation/ • www.godandscience.org/images/universe/galaxyngc7424.jpg


Jordan Hutchison Astr. 103A COW 11 April 10, 2018

Constellation:Tucana


Official Name: Tucana

Myth: No myths associated with this constellation.

Name : Tucana is “the toucan� in Latin.

History of Discovery: Tucana was created by Petrus Plancius, a dutch astronomer, from the observations of Dutch navigators.


Location: Tucana is located in the fourth quadrant of the southern hemisphere and can be seen at latitudes between +25 degrees and -90 degrees. And is best viewed during the month of November. Special Stars: Alpha Tucanae is the brightest star in Tucana, with an apparent magnitude of 2.86.

Three of Tucana’s stars have known planets. There are no meteor showers associated with Tucana.

Tucana


Tucana Constellation Map

Images of Tucana


References: • www.constellation-guide.com/constellation-list/tucana-constellation/


Jordan Hutchison Astr. 103A April 16, 2018

Constellation: Pavo


Myth: Greeks associated a peacock as Hera’s sacred bird. Name : Pavo means “the peacock” in Latin. History of Discovery: Pavo was first cataloged by the Dutch astronomer Petrus Plancius in the 16th century.

Official Name: Pavo


Location: Pavo is located in the fourth quadrant of the southern hemisphere and can be seen at latitudes between +30 degrees and -90 degrees.

Pavo

Special Stars: Alpha Pavonis is the brightest star in Pavo, with an apparent magnitude of 1.94. Pavo contains five stars with confirmed planets. There’s a meteor shower associated with Pavo. The Delta Pavonids.


Pavo Constellation Map

Images of Pavo


References: • www.constellation-guide.com/constellation-list/Pavo-constellation/

Constellation Field Guide  

Constellation Field Guide for an Astronomy Course

Constellation Field Guide  

Constellation Field Guide for an Astronomy Course

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