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CO?. I NNE .EDWARDS

Corinne hails from Idaho, Her specialty is acting, . From spinster or matron to sweet young路 miss, She's e~ually enchanting.

Quiet, but not In school or lanes; Attractive and matic Especially witl James.

FLAVO McMULLIN

A leader in word and deed, She 'flavo'ed every thought A modest matronly maid, A girl who couldn't be bought.

preacher honest, With a twinkle A lion in his vo And a toe tn hi

"Ole, Olee, Olivia, Olivia What's in a name to be sure?" says Bill, Call her Carnation, Rose or Lobelia, As sure as she's a Gardner, She's my girl still.

Isabelle was 1 Crescent, And she rang and day, Most she chimec hard, Whom people s:

OLIVIA GARDNER

IDA BROWN

She thought no voice had such a thing, As his'n in the choir My! When Will made "Old Hundred" ring She knew the lord was nigher.

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He pushed the skill, He pounded ivm 路 thought, But oft he wot "Oh, Bili! I thi1


e hails from Idaho, specialty is acting, spinster or matron to sweet young 路miss, s equally enchanting.

Quiet, but not phlegmatic, In school or in lover's lanes; Attractive and quite dramatic Especially with one called James ..

ader in word and deed, 'fiavo'ed every thought odest matronly maid, {irl who couldn't be ught.

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preacher sedate and honest, With a twinkle in his eye, A lion in his voice, And a toe 1n his boot.

, Olee, Olivia, Olivia t's in a name to be re ?" says Bill, her Carnation, l or Lobelia, ure as she's a Gardner, s my girl still.

Isabelle was the bell of Crescent, And she rang both night and day, Most she chimed to a castle hard, Whom people say was Ray.

LILLIE SJOBLC f.l

HARRY JONEC

ISABELLE 'OLSEN

Wll..:L1AM CUSHING

thought no voice had ch a th~ng, -.is'n in the choir. When Will made "Old Indred" ring knew the lord was

He pushed the quill ivith skill, .He pounded ivory too; thought, But oft he \vot that Erma "Oh, Bilt! I think of you."

~her.

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Jionor and justice : on his brow. lie might be a st: or a soldier, or ju Tom.

PETER MICKLESON

Who says a Webster might not develope From ·such a speechifer as he?

Quiet talk she liketh best, In a bower of gentle looks "' "' o! Clarence, whether Watering flowers or reading books.

i!ope and love and union, ·Song themes thet Nelson sings; "Marry .Marjorie 11· Milne," ·Such a lark SOD brings.

was that smile that whipped seniors into line, Robert btuce could have done no oetter.

Modest, reserved, c in thought and in action.

VERA WOODRUFF

~OBERT

PIXTON

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..· ROSETTA SMITH

Maids there are of course Whose h!lll flirtationst beat her, But a "dog-rose" blushin' to a brook, Ain't modester ner sweeter."

2he liked to· sing liked to dance, Jlut most she like<i ··~orge..J>)'",.i:han<"


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TOM DEWEY

rho says a Webster might not develope rom ·such a· speechifer as he?

}Ionor and justice sat well on his brow. }Ie might be a statesman or a soldier, or just plain Tom.

MARJORIE NELSON

luiet talk she liketh best, u a bower of gentle looks • o-f Clarence, whether vatering flowers or reading books.

}!ope and love and joy and union, ·Song themes these Miss Nelson sings; "Marry -Marjorie M a·r ion Milne," Such a lark song echo brings.

was that smile that whipped seniors into line, tobert · btuce could have don~ no oetter.

Modest, reserved, clear cut in thought and decisive in action.

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Waids there are of course Whose hall flirtationst beat her·, But a "dog-rose" blushin' to a brook, A.in't modester ner sweeter."

ELGIN MORRIS

EDITH CUNDICK

She liked to· sing and she liked to dance, )3ut most she liked 'to meet ···«eorge_..br>!i!hance,

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B. TOLBERT

A senior .vith sophomorelonging That teachers nor chums could not alter, The only thing Born (Ei) that could break the charm Was a sweet little boy named Walter.

lie thought he thought. I. e. he thought he thO\ :But few learned wha1 .thought.

ELBERT DESPAIN

Queenly and graceful, With mischeivious eye, She'd wink at the men 'Then retreat with a Sif

Sweet tempered with Ups: made for business. The girls called him handsome.

Why should those stray so far from hon When: Stevenson's liv• near?

FAY WAl..I(ER

"Full of a nature nothing: can tatne, "Changed every moment, "Ever the same."

HEBI::R EGBERT

Briton in stature, Anglo~ Saxon in speech, 'reuton in expression, Lath~ in sympathy, And human in love.

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'Tender as an Alpine flo With mien so loving ra An occasional flash· of per You surely recognize Cl

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A senior .vith sophomorelonging That teachers nor chum& could not alter, The only thing Born(e) that could break the charm Was a sweet little boy named Walter.

DONALD YOUNGDELL

lie thought he thought, I. e. he thought he thought, :But few learned what he .thought.

MAE Wl•'lDQUIST

Sweet tempered with Ups: · made for business. T-he girls called him hand· some.

Queenly and graceful, With mischeivious eye, She'd wink at the menlets, 'Then retreat with a sigh.

HERBERT BARRETT

"Full of a nature nothing: can tame, "Changed every moment, "Ever the same."

Briton in stature, AngloSaxon in speech, •.reuton in expression, Latin in sympathy, And human in love.·

VVhy should those eyes stray so far from home, VVhen Stevenson's live so near?

CLAIRE BROV/11

'Tender as an Alpine flower, With mien so loving rare; An occasional 1lash· of temper You surely recognize Claire.

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. could Maurm e I ween charm a queen, No king has ever charmed Maurine; She'd blush, he'd hush, as you have seen, And that is why we've still Maurine.

MAURINE PETERSON

LOUIS NELSON

He appears so very serious here, He even may seem slowBut whete there's mischief he'll be near, "Still water run deep," you know.

Always at his post of dll Though you would rar know it Unless you called on 1路 specially.

Mary, Mary, not contrar~ Whenever wanted to "pi: But courting work she'd ten shirk, At least ao Idurray b say.

JENNIE NIELSON

A most attractive manner, A really charming smile, To see her is to love her, And to linger near a while,

FLAVIUS ERICKSON

His only faultHe likes the girls too wen,

He knew his place anr kept it, 'Vhen Ida was around.

She wore a smile upon lip, Her fair cheek showe< dimple, 'Her apron spread wit a speck, Her air was frank simple."


EDWIN SWENSON

tSON

Maurine I ween could charm a queen, No Iring has ever charmed Maurine; She'd blush, he'd hush, as you have seen, And that is why we've still Maurine.

Always at his post of duty, Though you would rarely know it Unless you called on him specially.

MARY JOHNSON

He appears so very serioue here, He even may seem slowBut whe1路e there's mischief he'll be near, "Still water run deep," you know.

A most attractive manner, A really charming smile To see her is to love her ' And to linger near a ~vhile.

Mary, Mary, not contrary W'henever wanted to "play," But courting work she'd often shirk, At least ao Murray boys say.

WILLIAM NELSON

He knew his place and he kept it, When Ida was around.

BEATRICE LINDELL 路ON

His only faultHe likes the girls too wen.

She wore a smile upon her lip, Her fair cheek showed its dimple, 'Her apron spread withouf路 a speck, Her air was frank and simple."

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RELLA McMULLEN

Full many a gem of purest ray serene, The deep unfathomed caves of ocean see; Full many a flower is born to blush unseen, And waste its sweetness on a boy n3;med Lee.

GLt::N BECKSTEAD

Fair haired and fair minded, He made every defeat a stepping stone to success.

VERA JOHNSON

Face and figure of a child Though too calm, You think, and tender For the childhood you would lend her.

"And her voice it murnw lowly As a silver stream may ru And her smile it seems h: holy." This, of course, is Bert路 Sun (d).

Bashful the first year, sm the second, in love third. A student the fourth.

Shaky of pen but glib .tongue, You'd always find Gen, Good friends among.

LEONARD ltHIELDS

Love and duty reveal Leon- [ 1 ard, the man, But why does he make West Jordan his mecca?

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Lincoln like he tow above his fellows, And they were charme< his drollery.


BERTHA SUND

LEN

Full many a gem of purest;· ray serene, ; The deep unfathomed caves : . of ocean see; Full many a flower is born to blush unseen, , And waste its sweetness on i a boy named Lee.

"And her voice it murmurs lowly As a silver stream may run. And her smile it seems half holy." This, of course, is Bertha Sun (d).

HARVEY GLOVER AD

Fair haired and fair minded, He made every defeat a stepping stone to success.

Bashful the first year, smart the second, in love the third. A student the fourth.

GENEVIEVE ORGILL

Face and figure of ·a child Though too calm, · You think, and tender For the childhood you would lend her .

Shaky of pen but glib of tongue, You'd always find Gen, Good friends among.

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Love and duty reveal Leonard, the man, But why does he make West · Jordan his mecca?

WILLARD OLIVER

Lincoln like he towered above his fellows, And they were charmed by his drollery.

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RUTH PETERSON

"In to the sunshine, Full of the light, Leaping and flashing from morn till night."

MARY WINWARD

Youth and beauty and maidenly charms, Attracted the lads to Win· · ward, . Let them dance and wink, •t could do no harm, For she kept her heart to Leeward.

J'Her voice was ever sol gentle, and low-" .Especially low.

A bright little English nu -with looks and manners . tractive.

CARRIE JENSEN

"Expert in motion, Blithesome ana: cheery, Still climbing heavenward, Never a'weary.··

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'The telephone rang .Quite often they say She'd call at 124W :But he'd call a Day.


BESSIE FACEY 30N

"In to the sunshine, Full of the light, Leaping and flashing from · morn till night."

''Her voice was ever sort, gentle, and low-" .Especially low.

ELSIE BRADBURY

RD

Youth and beauty and maidenly charms, Attracted the lads to Winward, Let them dance and wink, •t could do no harm, For she· kept her heart to Leeward.

"Expert in motion, Blithesome anu cheery, Still climbing heavenward, Never a'weary.--

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A bright little English maid ·with looks and manners attractive.

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'The telephone rang .Quite often they say She'd call at 124W :But he'd call ·a Day.

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MARIE DAY


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ii ~ EALIZING ihat om day of dep"'tuce fcom th;, Hfe ;n the J. H. 'I S. is near at hand, we, the Senior Class, leave to the following our. most treasured possessions : My gym shoes and tan sox to the J. H. S. Museum-Willard Oliver. My checkered skirt to Mr. Jorgenson for a desk cover-Flavo . McMullin. My light blue tie with orange and green dots to the Freshies for a pennant-Harry Jones. My history note book to be used as a text for vVestern History next year-Naomi Pixton. My laugh to be taken on a blank record for the Victrola-Glen Beckstead. My sister Hazel to some bright, capable young man-Edith Cunili~.

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My art of speech路 making to Burton Oliver- Heber Egbert. My wardrobe of waists to the fashion show of next year-Mae Winquist. My fatherly attitude to tame Hel'bert-Elgin 'Morris. My school spirit to Gunhild Larson-Leona Heaps. My dreams of blonde girls to Lamont-Vv'illiam Nelson. My art路of making things stir to the Senior Class of next yearGen Orgill. My spunk to the athletes of next year-Ruth Peterson. My dramatic ability to the high school dramatists of next yearRobert Pixton. 路 路 My suggestive ability to the next year home problem class-Maurine Peterson. My love to Roland Smoot-Beatrice Tolbert. My attentive attention to small boys-Vera \iVoodruff. My suggestive hints about neckties to the Freshies-Elbert Despain.

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e in the J. H. the following ·urn-Willard cover-Flavo Freshies for •tern History ictrola-Glen -Edith Cun:gbert. :t year-Mae 5.

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i next yearson. f next yearclass-Mauff.

-Elbert Des-

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fxtrarta 1J1rnm"tqr mtartr.a ofJrnmturut lfi1E1!1& From Leonard Millerberg's Diary. April 2nd. ODAY I got April Fool on a Freshie and he was so dumbfounded I felt sorry for him. I also showed some Freshies how to pull nails, apply glue, act big, and court girls. ICalw!ays seems a great pleasure to me to assist the Freshies with tasks th~t come before them daily. I spent some time in generating noxious gases in the laboratory. From Personal Notes of Hattie Fitzgerald. March 21st. 1 have spent most of today talking with Le Grand Smith. He is such a charming person, and his conversation is entrancing. I sometimes wonder what his intentions are. He acts as though he had some deep purpose in paying so much attention to me. Well, it will be out some day, and if he ever asks me I feel that I can give him an answer that will suit both of us. · From the Daily Journal of Northrop Garfield. April 18th. . ; My work has not been in vain! After my intense striving, con-:~ stant self-denial, burning· of· the niidnight oil, and well-directed .... energy, I firmly believe that J am a great benefit to humanity. r~ am not striving for niy own good, but for the welfare of my fellowbeings . From the Daily History of My Life by Ed. Larsen. April 6th. .I have certainly been busy today. I cannot remember fo"r certain, but I believe I have been to at least two classes today. I have been criticized on my irregular attendance, but what of that? \Vhy not let the others do the work? Ind-eed, w~y have work? It soon gets tiresome. I am coming more and more to believe that there is great pleasure to be derived from doing what people don't want yutt to. For instance, the Juniors voted to have a· ball in Draper. All arrangements were being ·made wh~n I, without any authority from the classmen, cancelled everything. Oh, you!! ! From Flora Bowen's Diary. Monday, April25. Same as all last ;week. Nothing to write about since Frank has joined th~ army.

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SOPHOMORE

CLASS


FRESHMEN CLASS


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Hail to thee, Utah! Thy dear mountain valleys; · Hail to the toilers, that made thee so fair; Hail to thine emblem, the pure sego-lily, Token of innocence, spotless and rare. Grand are thy mountains, and wild are thy torre11ts, Limpid thy streamlets; thy skies, oh, how fair; Making thy clime a delight and a wonder; Thrilling the soul with a rapture most rare. Let thy vales ring with the songs of thy people; Cheery and blithesome, yet loving and kind; May the· refrain echo down through the ages; All thy son's hearts. in true brotherhood bind.' Utah, we crown thee the Queen of the ·Mountains, Land of the foothill and desert· sage-clad, . Long may thy children, a: bo.unteous harvest, Heap from thy water-kissed valleys made glad.

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0, may thy sons and thy daughters be ever · True to the flag with its red and white bars, Making thy light, from the deep field of azure, Brightest of all in the cluster of st~rs.

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O!nuutry'n O!all

UR great country is in a state of war.

In an age when we hoped for universal and perpetual peace the earth is deluged with blood and our own great nation is involved in the struggle. vVe are called upon to rally to her standards. But war is not an unmixed evil. By thai: bloody process the human race has broken its chains, overthrown despotism and struggled upward to liberty and democracy. That goal that has been realized now by our own and many other people must be reached by all. It is in the overthrow of despotism and the establishing of democracy and freedom that our nation has enlisted. Our country now call~ upon all her children to give her strength. In this crisis she needs us all. Some are required to bear arins and carry our standards, the standards of liberty, to the front; some to produce munitions of war and we~pOI}S' for armies-and navies; some to produce and. conserve food and clothing. for ourselves and allies; and some to bind up the wounds and minister to the needs of those injured in battle. In these activities we can all enlist and each should find the place where he can serve the best. In this crisis the call has come to the school-to our school. vVe have responded promptly wjth a dozen 'or a score in the army and navy, with a hundred enli~tt!d in farming activities to produce路 the needed food, with a hundrf!rl Red Cross auxiliaries to aid in the cause of relief of suffering, anq. with fifty as a body of minute men responding to the calls of our labor bureau for quick and urgent help. Honor comes to the soldier "vho路 risks his life or sacrifices it for freedom, honor to the mother and sister who anxiously wait and pray for the soldier, honor also to the industrial worker who supplies the needs, and to the nurse who l)inds up the wounds. Honor comes to all in these varied lines who put their life and energy into this cause of human freedom. The thrill of the feeling of patriotism is the reward for right action in this time of needed help. The cause. of humanity invites us all to enlist in some phase of this activity and get the reward.

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Boys from Jordan High School who have enlisted in the United States army:

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THIS YEAR STUDENTS.

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Oscar Olson, Frank Ellis, Clyde Brady, William Park, George Oliver, Norman Obvrn WilliRm· Bogge8s, Dewey Canning, Clemen Green. Flavius Erickson . Griffith Dowans. Rufus Ray. Ivan Born. Ray Vincent. Gerald Butler. Charles Van.

LAST YEAR STUDENTS. Verlan Bateman. Elgin Erickson. Elmer Charter. Dewey Monteer. Marion Milne. Hyrum Stag. Carlos Hanson.

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P aOBABLY WILL ENLIST ON JUNE I. Thomas Dewey. John Oldham. Herbert Morris. Wilford Thornblad. William Egbert. Merlin Butler.

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CHOOL days-hO\v much reflection these words contain. This is the springtime of life when the buds of thought are just ready for opening. It is then that we are so earnestly mounting the great ladder of learning, that ladder which has no end but leads ever on and upward. It is true that we must always be ascending or descending; we cannot remain still, we must either fall back or advance. But _our school days, the time when the mind is developing and forming, is the time of the greatest ascension. It is then that the brain is most ready to receive; it is then that the character is formed for future life. Each act or thought, be it ever so small, will some time make itself known. Our school days are the days of happy hours. In them we form true friendships that ~vill last throughout the coming years, and though we are scattered far apart, time or distance can never blot out the memory of our happy school days. They will come back to -us in dark hours of sorrow. In our dreams we will live again the . time we spent in forming the golden chains of friendship, whose links can never be broken or rusted apart. And when we are tottering down the hill of life, we will look 路back and long for just once more our "Happy School Days.'; ~

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United States, my home, 0 sacred ~att~.i ~£ worth; Thy vales and streams, thy plains ·.'afidKwoods; Thy rock-ribbed hills and rushing floods;. Fit home art thou for freedom's birth. My native land, my heartstrings swell With Orpbean music as I dwell On all that thou hast given me; On all that's kept in store by thee. Thy sacred soil we tread with joyous step and free; No conqu'ring foot shall press thy sod; While strength remains, with help of God · All foes before our might shall flee. To all the world we give a hand of greeting kind; May no false step be ours to break The peace we pray mankind to make; One mighty brotherhood to bind.

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PHYSICAL,

EDUCATION


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HE gymnasium classes of this year consist mainly of girlS' taking first year physical education, there being only eleven enrolled for second-year work. Because Jordan sees the 路benefit of this work for girls, all freshmen are required to enroll for it. The work taken up consists of Swedish exercises, games and dancing. These varieties add grace to the body as well as developing the different muscles and organs. Even those organs which are inclined to be sluggish and inexercised are reached in one way 路or other. The gymnasium is one of the best in the state, roomy and comfortable, with equipment suitable for this work. During the warmer months the students are allowed to be out~of-doors for class wor'J<:. This is very beneficial because of their being shut up in the school.,. rooms practically all day. '?;路We believe that through gymnasium work a better standard will. be set in Jordan for girls. They will be more efficient mentally' and physically.

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·DOMESTIC ART

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ID you notice the picture ~f the Do,mestic Ar_t ~ir_ls? If ~10t you had better look at 1t now: Fess up, 1sn t It the mcest looking group of girls you ever saw? They include some excellent sewers, too, as you would be ready to say if you had seen some of the tasteful dresses, pretty underwear, art needlework, and other useful things made by the girls in the different depa1'tri1ents. You k! ow the Domestic Art Department is helping the girls by allowing them to make wl:h'lt they want and need, instead of having hide-bound rules as to what must be made in each year of sewing.

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UlnNG the. school year of 1916-17 the band has made very rapid progress. It started at the beginning of the year with a strong 路路determination to make good, and it has indeed succeeded. The band has been present and has played at many football games this year. It has put spirit and determination into the p1ayers and has enthused the onlookers. The object of the band has been to give spirit to tile school, to spread the fame of "Old Jordan," and also to J路?repare students fer ~. musical career ni .\ftc;- life.

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Members of the Band. Peyton Johnson William Nelson Flavius Erickson Samuel Egbert Lamont Nelson Willie Park Clyde Raddon Rex Miller Louis Neison Wesley Sadler Charles Van George Whetman Egert Larson William Anderson ' 44

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Violins. Wilford Pierson Clvde R:tddon - Nephi Andei·son Newell Kuhre Herman Bjork Marcus Cushing Corinne Edwards Eva Anderson Levi Freeman . Cello. Leo Freeman Trombone. Edwin Larson Lamon Nelson Cornets. Clarence N eison vVeslev Sadler vViEiam Fox Egert Larson Samuel Egbert Clarinets. William Anderson ·'. Charles Van Drums. G_eorge Whetman · Piano. Etta \Vootten .· Valora Cushing ___ ..... ___ .. ___ ~- _\'Y.illiam Cushing 45

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STUDENT BODY OFFICERS


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J7T' HE student body is conducted under the constituted name W . "Students' Organ!zation of the Jordan High School."

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In the year past our newly devised government (student self government) has· been launched upon that untried sea, and we champion the a"{ th"is first admin-istration. and say that it has been a success, morally, financially, and i)ractically. Never before in the history of the school has_ the student body been effective until the year we now regret-to leave. The students' or-ganization has been guided by the officers forming the executive co1mi1iftee. i3y our own practical experience in this new regime we ha.ve. come to realize that the foundation of a school, as of society, is law and order; that the student by wisely governing himself certainly gains the supreme end of his education and \vhatever ha~ caused him to put forth efforts of improvement and selfcontrol has trained hin1 toward this .end. High school students have come to regard this system of selfgovernment as an active, willing participation in the responsibilities of school government and have· a"ttended to their duties faithfully as m~mbers and officers in the organization, enJorcing the rules, notwithstanding the possible opposition and jll-will of the offenders. Thi.ts by doing and observing such,, we have without question received a most excellent training for citizenship .. Our government has been expressed in the will of the students to enthusiastically support · the best interests of the school. and disapprove of anything harmful to its welfare. Such has been the experience of the student body officers in heiping to make this first administration of student self-government a success and a boost to the .Jordan High School. lVIay this organization continue to endure and its praises be heard when it~ friends and foes, those who support it and those who assail ·it, those who bare their bosom in its defense and those who aim daggers .at its heart, shall all sleep in the dust together.

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. President .............................................................c•.••••••••....•••••••••• : •••••••••••.• Wid. D. Oliver · Vice President ·············-~---····-·····················································Harold Brindley Secretary ······························-···········-········-·················································Bessie ·Facey Treasurer ............ ·-··············-·····-~---··-····················-········································Marie Day Historian .................................,....................................................:.............. Naomi Pixton Yell Master ............................................,.................................................*Heber Egbert Marsha[· ................................................- .................:............ ~ ...................Herbert Morris· Editor of Student Publications.............................. **Corinne E;dwards l.VIanager ..................................................... - ....,............................... Lee A. Beckstead

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·Executive Committee ················.···-···-·-···········································Elgin Morris " " ................. ·-·-···-········-···························Newell Kuhre " " .........................................:........................... Olivia Gardner Improvement Conimittee ···········--······-.. ··········-················Genevieve Orgill " " .............................................................Claire Brown " ·" ................................................. Millard Henderson Debating Manager ········--·····-·····--·····:.:.............................. Leonard Shields Dramatic Manager ·;·······--·····-······-······-........................... Le Grande Smith Athletic. Manager :..:....................,...:.:.....................................:..... William Dewey ·Senior Representative ............................................................ Flavo McMullen Junior· .\ · .. ·················: ......:.............:......:..................William Dewey

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**Rella: McMullin resigned.


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Editor-in-chief ...............................................................................Ccrr;ne Edwards Assistant Editor ..........................................................................Harold Brindley Business Mam.ger ··--··············-·····-·:............................................... Lee Becks'::e'ld Subscription Manager' ......... :...............:......................................... Heber Egbert Advertising Mam;ger ...:.:........................................................... Robert Pixton . Assistant Advertising Manager......................................Le Grand Smith

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ASSISTANTS. Artists. Loomis Richardson Maurine Peterson· -.~

Jokes. Vern Hardy· Olivia G_ardner Society. Mildred Dunyon Mary Tr hnson

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Sports. Peter Mickleson Photographer. Thomas Dewey English Critics. Miss Horst Miss Johnson

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HE Jordan High School is in line with other schools in placing football first on the list of high school athletics. No activity should involve a larger number of students. The training necessary for football is the kind that puts "red blood" into the veins of men. Playing football means the spending of leisure time profitably. We are in need of men who do things, men whose time is given to the school in some form of activity in preference to displaying finery in the halls; and where will you find a sport more worthy of a person's best efforts than football? It tends to eliminate the unmanly quality of petty cowardice and places the virtues-bravery, courage, and determination at the head of the list.

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The following men represented Jordan in football this year: Oldham, H. Morris, E. Morris, T. Dewey, Richardson, vVhitmore, R. Brown, Glover, Vann, Mickelson, Pixton, Canning, Lambert, Lind, Ellis, Terry, R. Gardiner, C. Brady, Boberg. Many of the abovenamed men will be in Jordan next year. Let us get together and boost Jordan by boosting football next fall.

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OACH HAMILTON worked wonders toward the development of a winning team this year. He had only three men who had · had some experience at the game. First was Clyde (Elder) Brady, who has played a good game of basket-ball for several years, but went on a mission for two years, making it quite impossible for him to play as well as was otherwise expected. Nevertheless, he was a tower of strength and his loss will be felt keenly next year. Then there was Capt. McKinley (Fitz) Fitzgerald; whom Coach Norm developed when the Fitz boy was a freshie, and who has been the mainstay of the team for three years. The students expect great things .of him when he returns as captain in the fall. Oscar (Ocie) Olson is a. beautiful blonde athlete who has played a whirlwind game at forward at Jordan for two seasons and who !ms two more years in which to do great things for his Alma Mater. Now for the green ones. E. \<Villian1 (Bill) Dewey has suffered a vast improvement in his playing during the past season. He started out to make the team as a guard, but the watchful coach, seeing that he had more ability at forward, developed him into a shark at baskets and an exceilent co-worker for the Cyclone Olson. Herbert (Sea Pirate) Morris is another blonde who got his start in some metropolis called Crescent, but was really made into a star guard last season. James (Funny)· Anderson is considered as a comer for next year and Brat Berritt and Blue-Eyed Holt have been perfectly capable substitutes. The regular team is as follows : Olson ............._...... Right Forward Dewey..................... Left Forward Brady..................Center Fitzgerald ..................Right Guard Morris ..................Left Guard The team played rather consistently all season, but they did not think of their own ability and thus failed to train as well as they should have done. However, they have a fond ambition .to play in the state tourney this coming year, so support them next season and watch for victory .

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. The second team, consisting of K. Brady and W. Parks as forwards, A. Boberg at center, G. Holt and M. Henderson as guards, made a good showing as a team. They won most of their games and were a credit to the school. The J. H. S. group athletic teams won the championship of this division, so on the whole we feel that basket-ball has been a splendid success, mor.e so than in other years, because everyone who wanted to enter has had a chance to receive physical development from the game.

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Some things the team members are professionals at: Funny Anders·on at dancing and fussing. Ocie Olson at say "Da! Da !" and. wearing bow ties. Fitz Fitzgerald at saying "Sweet Florence" and "Oratory." Bill Dewey at singing and adoring Swedes. . Sea Pirate Morris at roving the seas and leaving for Texas. Elder Brady at keeping quiet in assemblies and being called Petramus. ·


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'I i7T'HE first real event that took place in the history of the Jordan High. School during 1916-17 was the Freshman-Sophomore flag rush on September 15. The Sophomores defended the pole. for ten minutes, keeping the struggling, determined Freshies from mounting to any height. The battle raged and exci'tement from the side lines grew "tense. After a vigorous fight, the whistle sounded and the wn~stling ceased. Then the volunteer "Red Cross nurses of the Senior Class" played an important part. Many victims were revived by a s'wallow of water. Several who were thought deJ.d suddenly came 'to life when the ambulance drew near. The rest period over, the battle was resumed by a football rush to de'termine the victor. The Freshmen secured the ball, and proudly bore it across the field. Sept. 16_:._A p:.-.rty of twenty-three made the annual expedition to Mount Jordan. However only eight reached the top. The High School was represented by Principal Henry Peterson, Christina B. Clayton, and Genevieve Johnson, all three of whom clin1bed to the top. SeJ)t. 22-The Student Body enjoyed its first matinee dance m the J. H. S. gym. Oct. 2--The Jordan High School had its annual excursiOn to the Utah State Fair. Oct. 5-The Student Body gave a matinee dance in honor of \iVilliam Dewey, one of the football men, who met with an accident while practising . .:· O:::t~· · l3~ J oFdan football_ .. tea·m met Ogden on Jordan's campus; Ogden won with a score of 48 to 7. The defeat was taken in a good-hearted m_anner, _\vit!1 hepes that the future would prove as superior.

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On the ~vening of October 13, the Janitors and Stage Drivers entertained the Student Body, Faculty and invited friends from the outside; at a very enjoyable program, dance and banquet. 20-The Student Body gave their opening ball in the High School ballroom. 24-A Thanksgiving concert, under the direction of the music department, was given in .the a,uditorium; the proceeds of which were used to purchase a Victrola. 4-The American Quartette, the first feature of the Lyceum course, rendered a very enjoyable and educative program. 11-A mass meeting was held the sixth and seventh peripds, at which sevenil questions· of vital interest to the Student Body Republic ,regarding our honor and _general welfare were discussed and resolutions passed. · 19-Jordan's first feam in basket-ball. met,the L. D. S. Quintet in the· Deseret- gym. The latter were victorious by a score of 46 to 39. 24-Jordan's first team played Granite's first team. Jordan victorious ; score 28 to 25. 26-Senior Dramatic Club presented "Snowball" in the }. H. S. auditorium. 31--Jordan first team played Murray first team at Murray;· Jordan won; score 36 to 20. On February 7 same teams played at Jordan, Jordan again victorious; score 63 to 18. 23-The Bingham basket-ball team met the Jordan "hoopers" in the Jordan gym. at 8 :30. Bingham, though strongly represented by "rooters," was miserably beaten by the superior J ordanites by a score of 40 to 19. The game was followed ·by a grand ball. 26--At 2 p. m. Bingham's funeral was held in the auditorium. 9-Payson basket-pickers met Jordan's "All Stars" in Jordan gym. Payson.carried off the laurels with a score of 43 to 39. 30-The Bingham: debating teams (~ffirmative)- met Jordan (negative) iil'J. H. S. auditorium .. Biil.gham, who was represented by E;a Burke aiiai·:·Mark'>Jarries·, put forth th~ stronger _arj.~ more substanti-a_! arg\i.ment.- Jordan was' represeri.te~C'by -Peter M-iCkef~on: Ciyi:k Brady,··'"-28-Girls' Club gave their annual "sack-apron-overall" ~ance.

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The following are some answers to examination questions given in the various departments of the J. H. S.: History Department. There were no Christians among the early Gauls. They were mostly lawyers. George Washington married Martha Curtis and in. due time became the fathe_r of his·"l::G..~;tntry. The government of"·:Englarid is a limited mockery. Georgia was founded by people who had been executed. The qualifications of a .voter at a school meeting are that he must be the father of a child for eight weeks. Pompeii was destroyed by an eruption of saliva from the Vatican. Weapons of the Indian-bow, arrow, tomahawk, and war-hoop. Physical Education Department. Typhoid fever is prevented by fascination. A permanent set of teeth consists of eight canines, eight cuspids, two molars, and eight cuspidors. The function of the stomach. is to hold up the petticoat. The purpose of the skeleton-something to hitch meat to. The alimentary canal is located in the northern part of Indiana. The stomach is just south of the ribs. The skeleton is what is left after the insides have·been taken out and the· outsides have been taken off. English Departm~nt. The feminine gender of friar is toastress. Achilles was dipped in the River Styx to make him immoral. Gender sho\vs whether a man is masculine, feminine, or neuter. A phenomenon is something that looks like your face. The Slough of Despond is the Atlantic Ocean. Procrastination is the mother of invention. Scienc~ Department. · A dinosaur is an officer in the Russian gover:Oment. A freezing water pipe bursts because it has no other way to get out. · Gravitati9n is that if there were none we should fly away. A mountain r~nge is a large cookstove. A blizzard is the inside of a hen. Climate is caused by emotion of the earth around the sun. A vacuum is the place where the Pope lives.

,lVI.!i~ema~i~:s, Department. Sixfy gallons make' one hedgt!hog. .· . . A circl~ is a round -straight line with a hole in the middle. Geometry teaches us how to dissect angels.

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.11;riu!ly 1hftgq 搂rqnnl iirtinnury Agg.-The means of saving the expense of a gardener. Applause-A means of prolonging assemblies. Bluff-'J:'he pr.ocess of making a little knowledge go a long way. Broken stage-An excuse for tardiness-good indefinitely. Chorus-A modern means of torture. Debate-Fifteen weeks' work condensed in fifteen minutes. "D"-An unoffending letter of the alphabet but possessing much sinister meaning. Faculty-A medley of unpronounceable names. Freshie-An excuse for the Joke Editor to jump into the air and cry, "Good josh material." Girls' meeting-An argument against equal suffrage. Gym-A process of keeping路 Freshies quiet a limited length of time. Hill-An unscalable demon at 8:45. Library-A pleasant room where sociability is encouraged. ' Oral expression-A production of weird noises that haunf~the school. Stud_ent Body President-"'-An expert press agent. Self Gov.__:.A means of governing the teacher. Seniors-Beautiful statues that adorn our halls. Tardy bell-The finish of a race against time . . Track team-An aggregation of masculine gender a,nd si.ngular n~mber; invincible in the hundred and two::twenty-'yard dashes. Cafeteria line-A means of developing sprinters for the track team. . Football-A legal method of doin2' away with undesirable citzens.

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The Dramatic Club has made ten different .appearances this y~ar in their· various plays. They have appeared at Draper, Union, Sandy,· South Jordan and Midvale .. The club is now at work ·on three oneact plays, "The Teeth of the Gift Horse," "The Burglar" and "Between the soup and the· S:1 voury." .. James_ And_erson ...,............................- ............... .The Romancers· and Mr. Bob J~rvin Anderson .................... ~ ..............................The Romancers and Niobe :. ·c!yde Brady .,.............................. ,.:.............:.. :........The Neighbors ·and Niobe· Marie Day ....~ .. :~.......................................................~.Mr. Bob F~y Dooley ..................................... ~-~- ..,................... Niobe · _ Corinn,e Edwards ..... :................:..: ...................... .The Neighbors and Mr. Bob Frank .Ellis ..:................,..............................:............. Mr. Bob Hattie ·. Fitzgeraid ........:....................,:...............1'he Neighbors a'nd Mr. Bob William Par·k .........................................................The :Romancers and Niobe . Bertha Peterson ........... :.................................... My Wife's Bonnet and Niobe . Lu.eiie Peterson .................................................... Niobe . Una~ Peterson ............. :.......:................................... Niobe Wesley Sadler .............:......~ ......:_.-~- .. :................... Niobe Claudia Shields ......... :........:.: ............·:.................... My Wife's Bonnet and Niobe Le Grand. Smith ...............................:................... Mr. Bob Marie Smith ....................................... ·------- The Romancers and Niobe Le Grand Terry......................................... Niobe Vera Woodruff ..............................__ .... M_" \Vife's Bonnet and Mr. Eob Etta Wootton ............................................ The Neighbors and Niobe


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The test of a man is the fight he makes, The grit that he daily shows; -The way he stands on his feet and takes Fate's numerous bumps and blowsA coward can smile when the're's naught to fear, When nothing his progress bars; But it takes a man to standup and cheer While some other fellow stars. It isn't the victory after all, But the fight that a bro.ther makes; The man who, driven against the wall, Still stands up erect, and takes The blows of fate, with his .head held high'; Bleeding, and bruised, and pale, Is the man who'll win in the bye and bye, For he isn't afraid to fail. It's the bumps you get, and the jolts you get, Arid the shocks that your courage stands, The. hours of sorrow and vain regret, The prize that escapes your hands, , That test y.our mettle and prove your worth; It isn't the blows you deal, But the blows you take on the good old earth That show that your stuff is real.

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Full in the flash of the golden day, 路 The sunflower raises his lordly crest, Flaunting a scentless life away, \Vith its diadem, bright afi a monarch's dress; _As who should say, 'Come worship me, The lady and c1ueen of the garden bed." But soon as the twilight dims the lea, Its petals are folded; it droops its. head. 路 The violet's home .is down In the vale, \Vhere none intrude on the moss'd retreat Save a curious beam, or a wandering gale, Who leave it laden with odours sweet, But when daylight melts to purple pale, When the songs of the birds stream far aud wide, In richest perfume路 its flowers exhale \Velcoming the .restfulness of eventide.

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Is laughter an aid,to digestion? Some people talk of it so lightly.-Herbert Morris. . Yes, ,the condition of the mind has much to do with digestion. "A sour disposition makes a sour stomach." Do not talk of food values or Germany during meal time but let your conversation be plea~ant and agreeable.

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Dear Editor: 'Vhere can I have hair combings made into a gentleman's watch chain ?-Fay Dooley. At the Sasse Hair Factory, 218 So~tth Main St., Salt Lake City.

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Dear Editor: Is it proper to hum the tune when you are dancing ?-George Whitman. No; it is decidedly bad taste and very discourteous to one's partner.

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Dear Editor : Should a girl accept a proposal the first time ?--Miss Thurman. Certainly. Perhaps you have missed your chance because most men would never dream of asking the second time.

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Dear Editor: How can I remove ink stains from a lady's handkerchief ?-Heber Egbert. Place the stain over steam and apply salt and lemon juice. The stain will disappear.

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Dear Editor: As yet I have been unable to get pictures from the. girls m our graduation class. Can you help me ?-Robert Pixton. . · Send one of your photos to each of the girls. Ask them kindly for an exchange and offer to pay the difference. ~

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Dear Editor : · Please inform me when wedding announcements should be sent out.-Olivia Gardner. Do not·send your announcements out until the day of, or the day following your wedding. You might whisper of it to your friends if you ··tell them not to tell.

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Dear Editor: Since I have taken up farming I have found a very bad looking bug on my potato vines. It is two inches long and has glass eyes. 1 am in great distress. because I fear for my crop.-Bres. Wiilard . Oliver. Take a smooth board six inches by two inch.es. Lay the bug on the board and hit it in the head with a hammer. If one blow is not sufficient use two. When the eyes are injured it can no longer see your vines. Editor's Note: It w;ill be necessary to send· private answers to the other questions, as trey are too personal for publi<; discussion. 71


Wqr ifikr tn §lltt. llorllan ·77!: HE iiiket; 'Mt. Jordan-Mt. }ord~~1?

Where is it? What .is Some· Freshman, and perhaps. a few Sophomores mur. ·I.nur, as they 'read the title.· . · ··Ni:n\·,Junicrs and Seniors, isn't it a shame that we have so sadly neglected the education of these children? Let's make amends, as : best \ve can, by telling them all about M t. Jordan and tile famous hikes that teachers and students have made to that moumam peak. For a long time the highest and m.ost rugged peak in the mountains east of Salt Lake valley was called by a half dozen. different · names: "Lone Peak," ·"Farmers' Peak," etc.·; but when the Jordan High School was placed almost under the very shadow of this peak, could there any longer be doubt about the true name for it? M t. Jordan, like all other rugged mountain peaks, persistently challenges every nature lover; it stands winter a11d summer and s.eems to say to admirers below; "The view is wonderful, why don't you climb?" and much as all .love a challenge, very few seem to have heard the. call of .M t. Jordan. In September of last year, Superintendent Ryan, and a few other enthusiastic mountain climbers planned a hike to Mt. Jordan, and in-· vited student and teacher to join them. \Vhen mountaineers, familiar with this section of the country heard of the expedition, most of them laughed and said, "You'll never climb that mountain; I've tried. it . four or five times and I know :it can't be done. Insects can walk up - ·those cliffs perhaps, bitt men can't." In spite of such discom;'ag<!ment, the date for the trip was set and much enthusiasm was shown by _ teachers and .students throughout the district. However, whe11 the day arrived, the weather was cold and stormy and only .'about ten clin1bers appeared at the appointed meeting place, on the morning of the hike. When they got well up into the mountains they encountered a severe snow storm and one or two turned back almost at the beginning of the trip. Several climbed thirty or forty yards of the top of the peak and then gave .up. They would very likely have succeeded had it not been for the cold, which so numbed their hands, as to make climbing over the rocks excei~ingly dangerous. ·Four or five of the party reached the summit. ~nd M t. Jordan was officially ·· · ... n:1med. · · Xn spite of the difficulties and hardships of .the climb; everyone who went last year wanted to repeat the trip and great preparations were made for the "Mt. Jordan" hike in September, rn6. It was decided that the trip could be made more enjoyable by taking inore time .for it, so the crowd planned to leave the high school shortly after school closed Friday afternoon, to spend the night in the foothilkand to begin the climb at daylight Saturday morning: It seems that fortune smiled on the "hikers" this year, for the weather was glorious and about twenty-two students and teachers met at the high school on the afternoon of September fifteenth: Tf words but had the power of the camera we might give you a picture .that would' set you to' guessing for the crowd might easily have been taken for .a troop ·of gypsi-es or .-a}Qad of homeless ..rB.elgian refugees. Several· of the girls wore bloomers, one or tw_o w_ore overalls and high top boots, and a number wore skirts, shockingly slrort. Perhaps the most noticeable figure in the group was a ge11tlerrian whp ap-

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peared in a white <;ollar, a gay silk tie, and a suit so neatly pressed that the creases fairly crackled. .. The· patty reached the mouth of Big Willow Canyon, about seven in the evening and proceeded to eat. Then, after the last hot dog had been roasted and the. last marshmallow had been toasted, and every popular song ever heard in Ameri~a, had been '.'killed;" "blankets were unrolled and the crowd enjoyed the 'solid comfort" of the Granite Rock. At five thirty a. m., the hikers had the pleasure of greeting the rising stin, and fifteen minutes later\vere on tniil to Mt. jordan. You may wonder how they-especially the girls-dressed themselves, cooked and ate breakfast all in fifteen brief minutes. That's easily answered; no one needed to dress for no one had undressed; and as for breakfast, when some famished soul started a fire tor coffee, he was so severely up-braided by Mr.. Ballard, official hike leader, that even the hungriest simply seized a lunch basket and foiiowed the crowd. · Once on the trail, however, even the most resentful of the breakfastless climbers forgot his hunger and became completely lost in the glorious autumn colorings of the mountains. Mrs. Clayton became so wrapped up in admiring a particular tree, that she intruded upon a hornet's ne5t and was stung before she came back to earth at all. The well-dressed gentleman previously mentioned did not even notice that a certain small hole in the heel of his sock, grew and grew until there was more hole than hosiery. About nine o'clock, the party reached the last mountain spring on the trail, so the signal for a halt was given and tile climbers ate breakfast and rested for an hour. Near this same spring, about ten of the party forgot their· former ambitions and loitered till evenmg. One o'clock found but seven determined men and women within a mile or so of the trail. "A mile?" you may say, "how easy!" Yes, a mil.e over a paved street in.a "Hudson Six," or even a "Ford," is easy, but let those who climbed that mile tell something how 5,280 feet can stretch themselves. Every step of the way was impeded by rocks or brush, yet ever/: inch of ground gained meant inexpressible delight to the climbers. It .was nearly three when four men-all pretending ~o be fresh as a May'morning-and three women-frankly admitting exha,ustion -reached the coveted goal. M t. Jordan itself rises two or three hundred feet as a pinnacle of almost solid rock. Onlv from the northeast is it .at all accessible and here a· heap of boulders: ·seemingly hurled against the pinnacie, serves as a difficult yet interesting and moderately safe approach to the "tip-top" which is perfectly flat and about the size of a large dining table. · The rest of this story is briefly told. The climbers viewed the world-or at least a big part of it, from the delectable mountain; they found the names of climbers who had visited the peak fifteen years ago; they organized a club, naming as charter members all those who . had ever· reached the top of M t. Jordan ; they then wrote epitaphs for those who had "fallen by the way side," and returned to camp.

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Class of 1911. '

Clare· McH~le ·······'·························-······-······················-~·-·········································-.Idaho Silas Brady................c........................... ~......... ~.........:...........,......................~ .... Sandy, Utah Abbie Ballard Richardson ............................................................Garfield, Utah H. Alva Fitzgerald...................._____...................................._____ Draper, Utah Mary Goff.........................................................................................................Union, Utah Arthur Peterson...................................- ................................................._Sandy, Utah Elsie Farrer Smith.........................._ ........,.............................. ______ Draper, Utah Effie Smith Beckstrand........._ .....- ........................... Salt Lake City, Utah Peyton J ohnson...........,.............................................................................. Sandy, Utah Genevieve J ohnson...........................- ..... _ ............................................. Sandy, Utah Orson Smith, Jr ...........................- ....."............................................... Draper, Utah

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Class of 1912. .

Albert Brockmeyer...............:.:::.::........:...:.....:....................................... Sandy, Uta:h Nora Tangwall Peterson ..................c............................................_Butler, Utah E. Berg. J orgensen .......................- ..........................:.....:·.................. _.Milford, Utah Martin Kuhre ..............................................................................~ ...~.Chic·ago, Illinois Basil Walker................................................................................................... Union, Utah Gertrude Anderberg................................................................................... Sandy, Utah Darrel Gardner..................,.......................,................................ W est Jordan, Utah Elgin Walker................................................................................................_Union, Utah Ebba Lindell Finlayson ..................,...................................... Pocatello, Idaho Esther Lindell White ...,...................................................................... Hyrum, Utah

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Portia Rawlins ................................................,.....................................:... Draper, John Simenson................................................................................................ Sandy, .Martin Peterson ....................................................................._South Jordan, Leda. Sadler....................................................................................- .......... .Draper, Oralie Smith................................................................................................... Draper, Mabel Smith Hadfield..............................................................._Riverside, Class of 1913.

Utah Utah Utah Utah Utah Utah

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Wilburn Goff.................................................................................................. Rigby, Idah<., .. Anna: Anderson Buxton.........................................................- ......... Union, Utah Joseph Millerberg.......................................................................................Union, Utah Agnes Fitzgerald Rasmussen ........................ ,.......................... Draper, Utah Oscar Peterson.......................................................................................... M urray, Utah Otto I vins .......................................,..............................................._......_......... Sandy, Utah Benjamin Nokes ...............................................................American Falls, Idaho Thomas Richards ..................................................................................~Magna, Utah Olive Despain............................................................................................ Granite, Utah William Richards ................................._................................._Raft River, Idaho Edison Denny ................~....................... _.............................:-.......- ......... Union, Utah Ada farrer ..........................................,.................,................................,........... Sandy, Utah Mamie Malstrom Tholen................:.............................................. Garfield, Utah Haz.el ..Malstrom ..:........ :........................,..c.......................... Pleasan:f:Green, Utah Harold.M.oore ..-........................................_....................................... _............... Lark, Utah Mark Gardner......................................,..,......,...............:............\Vest Jordan,. Utah Margaret Bowen Peterson....,...................,............................._Magna, Utah J. Milton Peterson........................- ................... :..................................Magna, Utah Printess Fitzgerald.......................- ................................. _............... _Draper, Utah 75


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i\lumut Moll Class of 1914.

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Earl· Gr.eene.................. ---·································-···························'···············Sandy, Utah Gwendolyn Dewey................................................................................... Sandy, Utah Florence Larson Parmley"....................................... Salt Lake_ City, Utah .Nathaniel Jones .............................:...................... .A. C. College, Logan, Utah Harold Nelson ......................................................................................... ~.Welby, Utah Alice Kuhre ..................................................................................................... Sandy, Utah Ruth Parry...................................................................................................Granite, Utah Horrace_ \Vheeler... ................:........................................ Salt Lake City, Utah .·Raymond BerreL.......................................................................................Union, Utah Marian Nelson................................................................................. _......Midvale, Utah Esther Swenson......................................................................................... Sandy, Utah Charles Lords ........................................................................ Salt Lake City, Utah Wayne EgberL ................................................................................... Midvale, Utah Rosa Johnson Smith ......................-----------'·············'···············-··········Draper, Utah Grace Sharp .........................................:....................................................Midvale, Utah Hyrum Glover........................................................................... West Jordan, Utah Alva Despain.........................................................,..................:________________ Granite, Utah Ebba Nordberg.......................................................................................... Geneve, Idaho Stella Greenwood .................................:.......,.............................................Union, Utah .Earl Ferguson ............................................................................................. Sandy, Utah Harvey Driggs ............................................................................................ Sandy, Utah Iva Peterson............................................................................................. Bingham, Utah Ann Gardner..........................................................................................:.....Kamas, Utah Irene Allen.,.........................................................................................Chicago, Illinois Ervin Milne ......................................................................................................... Union, Utah Albert Anderberg ....................................................................................... Sandy, Utah Earl White .......................................................................................................................................... Class of 1915. Lionel Hartvigsen .................................................................................. Sandy, Utah Edward Beck................................................................................................ Sandy, Utah Eva Butler .........:..............................................A. C. College, Logan, Utah Lois Walbeck Brindley..................................................................... Coyote, Utah Thomas Parmley ...................................................................................... Sandy, Utah Alma Crane............................................................... A. C. College, Logan, Utah -John Anderson................................................................................................ Sandy, Utah James 1\'Ionson............................................................................................... Sandy, Utah Olivia Nelson ..... :....................................... Cleveland, Emery County, Utah Eva Elvin............................................................................................................ Sandy, Utah Vvilliam Thon1pson ................................................................................ Magna, Utah Washington Boberg................................................................................. Sandy, Utah Lenard Larson ................................................................................................ Sandy, Utah Carol Smith ................................................................................................... Midvale, Utah Blanche Nelson Coe ........................................................................... Garfield, Utah Leon Morgan.........................................................~---········Los Angeles, California Alvin Thornblade: ...................................................................................... Sandy, .Utah Herman Nelson ........................................................................................:.... Union,. Utah George Bateman ................................................A. C.;Con~·ge,. Logan, Utah Mary Hansen ........................--------······································--···:..:......:...Rtveiton;· Utah Margaret Lehman·· McMuUen........................................:.-::Bingham, Utah. · . Author Morris ..... _.: ...:..::...:...........~---··················.A. C. College; Logan, Utah Carlos Hansen................... ----------···························-················-·········-Midvale, Utah Ella Brown .............................. ---········--·'·································-~---···········-'-'-··-~Draper, Utah Maida Crosgrove ..................----'-································-·······-,-·-·HOtirieyville, Utah

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Lillian Oleen Preece ........................................................................Altonah, Utah Belle Burgon ......................................................:........................West Jordan, Utah Lavern Day ............... :.................................:................................................. Draper, Utah De. Los Jenkins ........................................................,.............................. Victor, Idaho Floyd Anderson .................................................:.......................................Union, Utah Carl J ensen ...................................................... :..................................... Sunnyside, Utah Elizabeth Anderson ................................................................................ Sandy, Utah Zina Peterson................................................................................................Tropic, Utah Robert Bateman...................................................A. C. College, Logan, Utah Edith Sjoblom .............................................................................................Draper; Utah

Class of 1916. . Jennie Garfield ..............................................:..............................................Draper, Utah Merle Brown ........................................................................_..................... Garfield, Utah Arvid Anderson ....................................................................................... Midvale, Utah Bernice Nelson ......................................................................................... ~ ... Welby, Utah Orrel Greenwood......................................................................................... Union, Utah Maxine Presler... .................................................................................... Midvale, Utah Brigham Hardy ..................................................................... Salt Lake City, Utah Josephine Peterson...............................................................W est Jordan, Utah Erma Despain ............................................................................................. Granite, Utah_ Perry Gardner... ........................................................................... W est Jordan, Utah Elgin Erickson ............................................................................................. Sandy, Utah Kathlyn 路yland Terry .....................................................................Draper, Utah Leona Leak ................................................................................................ Midvale, Utah .Rosena Dansie ....................................................................................... Riverton, Utah James \iVhitmore .................................................................................... Midvale, Utah .Venice Deming ......................................................................................Coalville, Utah Violet Swenson ............................................................................................. Sandy, Utah Ortence Fitzgerald ................................................................................. Draper, Utah Alva Butler .....................................................................:................................... Sandy, Utah Hazel N elson ................................................................................. Vvest Jordan, Utah Genevieve Fitzgerald ........................................................................... Draper, Utah Leland J orgenson........................................................................................ Sandy, Utah Varro J ones ...................................................................................................... Heber, Utah Golda Brown.................................................................................................. Draper, Utah Ida Gardner......................................................................................................Kamas, Utah Horace Burgon ....................................................................................... Midvale, Utah Lamont Crosgrove ................................................................................. Draper, Utah Dora Boyce ................................................................................................ Morgan, Utah Verna Fitzgerald.................................................................................... Draper, Utah Lawrence Despain .............................................A. C. College, Logan, Utah Pearl Cowley............................................................................................. Granite, Utah Fedelia Nelson ...................................................................................Cres cent, Utah Hattie Parry ............................................................................................. Granite, Utah Leland Wardle ..........................................................................W est Jordan, Utah Oscar Sjoblom .............................................................................................Draper, Utah Irvin Greer.. ..............................,................................................ Salt Lake City, Utah Ethelyn Oliver ........... :.................................................................................. Union, Utah . Walt~r- Atwp.od.....................................:....................Jndependence, Missouri Mervin Des'pain,.. :.: .....................................:......"A;. C. College, Logan, Utah Fay StewarL......................................................................................:........... Sandy, Utah

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~nnn-iyr (Senior Class.) OOD-BYE is always the saddest thing to say, especially when it is forever .. It is for this reason that we, the class -of '17, regret to say good-bye to one of the dearest and most influential factors of our lives. Such we hold dear 路old Jordan to be, for its kind and willing faculty, for its enthusiastic student body, for its pleasures, lessons and even its troubles are dear to us, who have for four years shared these things that we are now. leaving. Whether it be for better or for worse we do not know, but our lives have been so enriched that we may hope for the better. It may be that war. will sweep over our nation and carry us, unexperienced as we are, into its dreadful pit of destruction, and it may be that peace will be restored and leave us to follow the path of industry to build up this great' natioiL after tli'e ide~~!搂 set before us day after day, but whatever-路 our: destination, whether it be the grave of a patriot or a seat of fam'e or even the modest and humble fate of the American citizen, we :vill hold the memory of Jordan and her ideals dear to our hearts.

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:hen · say our facand hese orse wpe unmay . In-

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ATAN: Now minions, gather round your mighty king, For here is News, 'twill pleas~ you all to hear. My messe!lgers that swarm 'oer all the earth, And that do press the very gates of heaven, Have come post haste a riding on the wind To bring these gladsome tidings to thine lord. You know I am a free and royal host, I turn no knocking stranger from my gates, Doctor nor priest, nor rude mechanical, Forever inward swing my ponderous doors, But I have always had a special love For that same breed of men who while they're living, Do wield the rod with autocratic hand O'er helpless urchins, and boisterous youths, And make of childhood's days a hell on earth. . These school teachers are mine especial joy. But to the message that I told you of,· · The Jordan High School faculty have turned To ripe old ages, now they all must die, Their spirits all will leave the earthly vale · And drift through rows of eternityOf course, they'll knock first at the Golden Gate, But there's no doubt they'll join us here at last. So now prepare your most ingenious arts, A thousand tortures new and weird devise . To punish these o'erbearing pedagogues . . In life they torture. ·Hark, the telephc;me . .. 1st Imp (Answers telephone; then bows before Satan) Ycmr majesty, prepare your face to smile, Your eyes to gloat; for o'er the telephone Saint Peter tells me he has just sent down A m~rvelously talkative old man Who tried to• talk his way right into heaven; And when at last to' stop the dreadful noise •St. Peter thought to let the fellow in, And offered him a mellow golden harp And bid him take his seat among the choir And placed a halo on his wise old head, This pedagogue's remonstrance filled the air . ..-_ .....,• .., ::~1

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He said that he had never learned to play : A bloomin' harp, but if they.· wished to sing And had a grand piano he could play Accompaniments most loud and sometimes but the. As for the halo, he had kept his hair Through all his life and he'd be hanged if he vVould rub it off now with a golden wire; Besides he didn't think he'd like the wing~-· He'd rather ride round m a Zeppelin And keep his impressive figure as it was, And so they sent him down; ev'n now I think He's answenng the call of gravity . (Bell rings) Satan: The beli. He come$.. Prepare. We'll meet him here. (Thunder Imps throw powder on the fire. Thunder and lightning and Mr. J or gens en shoots dowri the chute. Imps. rush around him with pitch forks. They poke him.) Mr. Jorgensen (Sitting up, rubbing his shins) Why all this hubbub? Pray, don't be so rough. I never thought to end in such a place Or mingle with such blackguard company, I always planne•l to have a seat in heavenIn fact, I thought I'd be the best one there, ContinuPd on page 82

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Farm machinery, wagons, fencing, hardware, harnesa, cement, stoves, paints, wall paper, auto oils and tires, cream 6eparators, trunks ,and suitcases, granite, tin and aluminum ware electrical appliances, bicyclea, baseball good:s, fishing tackle, machine extras, twine etc. Our newest articles are electric sewing machines and white enamel ranges. If we do :not have what you want, we will do our best to get it. - . . Give us a call

RIVERTON, UTAH nigh The one who thin~s our jokes are poor vV ould straightway change his views, Could he compare the jokes we print With those that we refuse.

Teach your dollar to] have more cents.

that petit

a po

it be

fAR\URS IMPLtMtNT COMPANY he d

Farm Implements· Buggies Wagons, Harne.ss, Extra repair parts for all kinds of machinery Stoves and Hardware Phone Midvale 203

P. 0. Box 162

note his t acre deal

Sandy,. Utah We have it---Can-get it--:or it can' · beinade. .

.~------------------------~--8~0----------------------------~

self.


co. ner

ae People fencing, . stoves, and tires, ;nd auitumware ~•. basemachine

JOk s

electric enamel re what 3t to get

~H ·e poor views, print

>] have

·Mr. Peterson: What did you think of the dinner party last night? ·Mr. Jorgenson: It was the most daring bareback performance that I ever attended. As for your niece, she outstripped all her com-· petitors. Marie: Wilford told me a long story last night. Fla vo: Is he an interesting story- teller? Marie: I should say so: he held his. audience from start to finish l Bill and his sweetheart drove into town .and happened to 'stop ne~-~ a popcorn stand · Presently Erma said: "My, don't that popcorn smell good:?" : _·•.: ; _; · "Yes," said the gallant Bill c.,. "I'll drive closer so we can smell,. -:· ,. it better." ·

4P.ANY ~uggies

repair :hinery

. Box 162

r it can'

Hattie: And so you quarreled with Frank? _ _Flora: Yes, and I returned all his presents and what do you think he did? . Hattie: Something horrid, I am sure. Flora: He sent me half a dozen boxes of face powder with a note explaining that he thought he had taken as inuch as that home on his coat since he met me, -Tourist traveling through Draper: You have an unusually large acreage of corn under cultivation. Don't the crows annoy you a great deal? · Pete M.: Oh no, nqt to .. any extent.. Tourist: That's peculiar, considering you have no scarecro\vs. Pete: Oh well, you see, I'm out here a good part of the time myself .. 81


Continued from Page 80

MULLET-.KELLY

But sin~e I knew I might, I came prepared, Asbestos B. V. D.'s protect my skin, I always did believe in preparation. 2nd Imp: And so do we. fellow, answer me.

HOME OF

VIe\-

I heard

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Are you prepared to treat him royally, Imp one? 1st Imp: Prepared. 2nd Imp: Prepnred. 3rd Imp: Prepared. 4th Imp : Prepared. 3rd Imp: The pit, the fire, the

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boiling oil's prepared. We learned your rule of daily preparation, And art thou now prepared to welcome these ? All Imps (Poking him vigorously): Answer!

156-tSB SO. MAIN STREET

Mr.

].

(Writhing; shrieks):

ffiO>

For on.

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P;e~ared; prepared, prepared, pre-

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The sca1 sce1 And ye1

hell Mr.}.: gestSatan:

My

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And so, whi: A faint

Anto-mena-mina-maul, Catch the menlet~ in the hall, When you've caught them let him bawl, Anto-mena-mina-maul.

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pared. Satan: Hands off. He hath not yet approached my throne. Mr. J. (Approaching): Well, Satan, I don't care much for your looks. Your pictures that I've seen must flatter you, A little redder color, rd suggest Would ma.ke· you look more diabolical, As for this pl~ce, I would suggest a change, It doesn:t suit my preconceived . idea of hell. Satan: You see we had to make it fit . ~ . ·,· ·.·.

L. L. RADDON "?i~

SERVES ICE CREAM AND ALL KINDS OF LIGHT LUNCHES

ALSO

CONFECTIONERY

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boili Of fire,<. skin The sco· his I Sir, 'twi that you, When h( Awaywi here Lest otl reac (Imps d chain him . Mr.}.: Satan:- Her (2nd ImJ hastens to 2nd Imp: Iows~:irard,,-.

MAIN STREET

SANDY

OPPOSITE· JORDAN ·HIGH

The kee) won· Has sta


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him bawl,

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JDY ·.GH

The scanty Jordan High School scenery. And yet me thinks it must be most correct. For once when Mr. Walker ·viewed the stage, I heard him say alpud, "It's a · hell of a scene." Mr. J.: gest-

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But still I would sug-

Satan: Nay, it's my turn .. My privilege; as host, to m"ai<:e '>,. suggestions, And so,- my-~·-rmps, draw near while I suggest A faint suggestion, now of boiling oil, Of fire, mild suggestion to his skin,· The scourge lay heavily upon his back Sir, 'twill suggest the burden that he hea\)ed on helpless you, When he did wield the rodAway with him. Nay chain him here -awhile. Lest other bright suggestions reach my mind . (Imps drag him, U. R., and chain him up.) Mr. J.: I would suggest. (Bell rings.) Satan:- Here imp the telephone, (2nd Imp answers phone and hastens to Satan.) 2nd Imp: My lord, _another follows·trard"'up~m:; .. The .keeper of' the gate sends

Our OPTICAL Dept. Will give you Careful Attention. : : Successor to C• ·M• DIEHL . ·,. J~.J. Devine ..

68 So. MAIN ST.

a

Has

word that he started Master · 'Dutton

There are meters of accent, And meters of tone, But the best of all meters, Is to meet her alone.

R- WHITE Dealers in

HARN~SS, GlOVfS, ~IC. AUTO CURTAINS RfPAIRfD

MAIN St. 83-

SANDY, Utah


down the chute! hear him coming. (Dutton slloots i11.) Satan: Ah; so this is he? . Dutton (Brushing off dust and shaking his fist at Satan.) Now what tnean you by this? I tell you, sir,. No one can treat me so.and get away with't. (Slowly and ponderously, with wrinkled brow.) I wonder if you fully realize The dignity and prestige of my station; I am no common clay. I'll have you knovY. · But lately was proud owner of a Buick. Satan: That will not save you here for it is true, That autos ever lead to deepest sin. (To Imp): My slave, step forth; of what is he accused? (2nd Imp) : My lord, of many things but worst of all . He loved his swine more than his fellow men, For oft as he sat teaching in a class. His brow perplexed as if with,.thoughts of science, He really wcind·e~ed if he'd fed his hogs, And ponderec!,_on~a diet to make them fat. Satan: His punisl;u:pent shall be to feed my swine, Ten thousand tho~s~nd; that a.-t.e never full, . And hark ye, he shali t~ach th~fu sde.nce too. butt~~ : . A~ easier task than I ha Ye had to do. · . S~tan: Av:iay with him. and chain him with the rest. Dutton: I wonder if you realize, old man, that I have lately ·.:·owned a car. Mr. Jorgensen: May I suggestSatan: Nay, not' a word, away. (Great clatter outside. Imps crowd around throne as if afraid. Walker bounds in.· Imps rush at him but are stopped by his speech.) Walker: Oh; can the rough stuff, beat it now, old tops, I'll have to show you where to head in at. You get my goat with this big bluff you pull, But don't think you can put it over me. Satan: What says he? Not a word, I understand? 1st Imp: Well, think of that; he beats the very devil. Satan: Who is this man? What language does he speak? Walker: Now get me, good, I'm Walker-the rag time manAnd you'll'find no last year's bird nests in my.'hair, Keep open, and I'll tip you who I am .. (Sin~s.) .. You. will n~ver find any ~i~::ori ll1e, . I'm always huzzin' round just like a bumble bee, 1

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WE ··ARE THE ·oNES - • Who took. the Photographs for the "J'' Courier Look through it and see The HIGH GRADE Work Displayed there. We want to make your

PHOTOGRA·PH. COME . IN AND SEE US We Guarantee to Satisfy

·THOMAS STUDIO PHONE WASATCH 3491

44 MAIN STREET

Roiand: What a marvelous. animal the grasshopper is·: he can jump one hundred times his length. Walter: That's nothing; I saw a bee raise a two hundred pound man three feet in the air. lately

Keep .£raid. ch.)

nan-

Your Moriey 1n the

Bank

.. Are you tr<;>ubled by -havin·g._.your mqney ''burn a hole" in your pocket? That· is a common fault of money. If you ·have yoo.r money in the bank, whether it be much or little, it will not burn any holes and it will be there when you need it. · Money carried on the person is a temptation to spending. Money in the bank does not offer this temptation. You may hesitate before writing a check where you w(-uld not hesitate to spend if you had the money with yo'l. - · :'·

We offer you the advantage of our banking facilitl.es and invite you to open a .check ing~acc01,1:1t with us. ·. . - . :: . . . .. . :· ... - .. .,

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MIDVALE' STATE BANK Capital and Surplus,. 40,000

MIDVALE, UTAH

Resources over 350,000

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If anything is happening, you will find me there, I'm always present everywhere, I am very clever when it comes t9 wit, Every body round the school is fond of it, You ought to hear me crack a joke, My face is my only fortune. Everybody: Then, Walker, you're broke.· Satan: But what's the crime wherewith we have him charged? 3rd 'Imp: Murder, my lord, a foul, unnatural crime. All (Moaning) : Murder? Alas! A most unnatural criine. Satan: Who was his victim; pray what did he slay? 3rd Imp: He murdered oft the English languageses. Satan: Away! and let him taste a murderer's doom. . (They chain him up also.) Mr. Jorgensen: ·Now, Satan, if you'll only listen here-: Sa tan: What? .You again. (To Imp) : Thy hand upon his mouth. (Miss. Bowen's voice he1J-.rd off stage.) Miss B.: Oh this iS<;s,well. Watch out, I'm coming down. 1st Imp: Miss ·Bowen, I can tell her by a word. Miss B.: That 'was a_ swell ride; do you want me here? ·Satan: Who woul.ci not want you any place, my love? But tell me, dear, wha(have you eve~"done To justify my liberating you? Miss B.: I taught the girls. to sew a good straight seam; and mend and patch and darn a husband) clothes. Satan: Stop! that's enough, I'll send you straight to heaven. Miss B.: My lord, I do not want to go to heaven. Satan: Then where, young lady, do you want to go? Miss B.: To Brigham where my loving Cy is; he longs to gaze into my lustrous eyes. Satan: Alas, that cannot be, but never fear; He'll f9llow lustrous eyes e'en though to hell; Just make yourself at home, my pretty on.e. (Bell rings.) Satan: The bell! Who's here? (Heard off) Tis I, Alma Smith. (Smith enters looking as if he had been al'guing with his Ford.) Satan: My Imps suggest a punishment most dear. Mr. J org.: I mi-ght suggestSa tan : I'll use 'another word. 1st Imp: Consider. well, my lord, bef9re you act,·· In like. the culprit owned and·f<t.~ a:·l,;:{)ra~· . , Satan:_ .He .own~Q. ~-E.'9~d?. _Dra:w .. nc;!arer, my good man. F.o:r you have suffered more than man should bear, You had yqur hell on earth ; fear nothing here. C~me sit th~e here upon my right most hand. 86

how he could typewriter an, his office, ancl your mother veniences in t

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Utah P Eft

Ed lv; Ed lv;

fOR G

Diamond Watc)


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MIDVALE, MAGNA AND LARK

Ask Your father how he could get along without a 'phone, typewriter and other modern ·convenience• in his office, and then ask him how he expects your mother to · do without modern conveniences in the kitchen - - An

?

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Then tell your mother to call at our store and _let us demonstrate an electric range t-o her. We will show her how she can save her health, as well as time and money and at the same time get better results by cooking electrically

Meats and Groceries

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PHONE MID. 252

Efficient Public Service

,Edwin: Who is your favorite author? Ivan: My father. Edwin: What did he ever write? IVan: Checks.

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Diamond Engagement Rings our Specialty \Vatch and Jewelry Repairing 87


(Mrs. Clayton's voice, oqtside.) Mrs. C.: l\'lay I come in? Satan: vVhose voice is that I hear? 1st Imp: 'Tis Mrs. Clayton, mother of good cheer. Mrs. Clayton: You see I did not have to come down here; But then I thought that you might lonely be, And I might cheer you up a little bit, For listen; this i.s my philosophy. (Sings.) Oh I'm always merry; I'm never gloomy, No matter what the weather, And I have to laugh at this good old world, Why I can't keep my lips together.

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Third Verse. Oh I'm going out in this good old world And I'm ·going to win my feather~ When I'll get me a house and a little man And we'll settle down together. Satan: You're welCome, but your cheer .ri1ttst fall, For cheer is not for Hades gen'rally? . (Bell rings twice: in rapid succession and. Mr. Hamilton slides in followe,d.>by Mr. Thatcher.) Satan: What's this? Be~10ld, it's raining teac!H~rs now, Don't crovvd, kind sirs, there's room enough for all. (Hamilton looks around) Hamilton: How lovely 'tis in heaven, 'peaceful,· calm, I now am really happy that I died. What 'sweet rep()se, existence more than bliss To spend my days among this blessed host; I dared not hope that I would come to heaven. Satan: vVhy what is that? This is not heaven, you dunce. Hamilton: Not heaven? The~ what? I pray you, where am I? ls.timp (\iVhispering): He was in life the coach at'Jordan High. 2nd Imp: He also was, my sire, a married man . Satan: Then that explains his humorous mistake; As coach he must have lived a checkered life, When his team won they caUed him prince of men But when it lost they called him king o(boobs . .tle :had n9ttf1e support that he deserved, Then let him have a place of honor too .

~--------------~~~------------~--~

NO may sessu• to all

CAL tion.

HE 49 So.

my!

In

w F Greatelt Value•

In America

'


NOW

is a good time to enroll for our

Summer course. New students may enter at any time Our school is in session all the year. Positiosn guaranteed to all graduates.

CALL, WRITE or PHONE for full information.

HENAGER'S BUSINESS COLLEGE 49 So. Main St.

Salt Lake City

Elg. Morris: How can I disguise myself so I won't have to pay my student body fees? Coach: That's easy; get a shave. ies in

I

-n.-lJ-t-:h-0-;-;~-cs-i!-li~-in_g____W_m___L_.-8-a-te_m__a_n-&-So-.-IJ

l - -.•

on

I

WOOL SUITS FOR MEN

Hay, Grain, Flour and Feed Of All Kinda DEALERS IN

at

I? High.

tm

Greatelt Value•

In · America

$11

No

COAL

More

No

.. ,

L~a•

WOND.ER, CLOTHfS

PHONE MIDVALE 232

SANDY, UTAH

SHOP SERVICE F.IRST

I I I South Main s~· . 89.

I J

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(To Mr. Thatcher): Now, sir, what do you want? And who are you? Thatcher: I, .sir, taught wood work at Jordan High. 1st Imp: He ever was a loyal, helpful guy; To student dances' and to High School shows He always lent a willing ready hand To build and mend, get ready and prepare, He really was the High School classes' friend. Satan: \iVe'll keep him here to build and fix and mend.

I \

(Thatcher retires to back ground.) (Miss Christensen is heard outside.) Miss C.: Sisters, defend your rights; surround the flag. 1st Imp: Have we a woman's suffrage meeting here? Miss C.: My sisters all, emancipation's near. Will you downtrodden be and bend your heads To man's dominion, in servility? Sa tan : Now, woman, fie for shame. Why all this now? Why thou should'st ~ide thy face in humbleness, To waste thy talents thus is thy disgrace. With all thy art of cooking thou could'st make Some happy man a more than useful wife; And make his life- i perfect round of bliss. Man's joy upon his stomach e'er depends. Miss C.: Your majesty, I tried niy'humble best, I tried with will and art to bag my game Each day in cafeteria be it known, I freely handed spoons to all the boys, And did I not, sir, drive a Kissel car? At last I grew disgusted with the men. -They sometimes left the napkins on the trays, And on the tables oft they spilled the salt. Satan: Then thou must run our cafeteria here, We always leave our napkins on the trays, And always on the tables spill the salt. Miss C.: Oh, wee is me, alas such misery! (She is led away.) (Mr. Brammer s!ides in unannounced.) Mr. B.: My wife said if you do not treat me right To go straight way and tell the principal. Satan: What, Brammer, lnst still that upon thy tongue? Here, lock him up in furnace number- five. Mr. B.: My wife would never let me in-the-heat. You'd better see if 'tis all right with her. (They drag him back stage.) (Mr. Hansen, off stage yells): My, this is hot.

Fir Athleti<

WESl SPOf

Wear

Lt

Clothi:

hay era

We bt sequer

Casl Fai:r at grow f Wear Our st and se

Tl


are

Fine Athletic Goods

~J.i. CHy.,

•;' -S aU

WESTERN ARMS

and

SPORTING GOODS GO. We announce the opening of a Ladies Outing Clothing Depart~ent .. -. Clothing fo't every outing or . Athletic need

Lake

,.

ICE CREAM SHERBET PUNCH AND CANDY· BEST BY TEST .

VISIT oUR RETAIL SToRES 260 STATE ST. 55 M/\IN. ST

115 Si>;Main St.

PHoNE WAS._

J22~-4-5

The Sandy City Star advertises a cow for sale as follows: "For sale-A full-blooded cow, giving milk, also three tons of hay, a wheelbarrow, a grindstone, two stoves, a scythe, and a Democrat wagon. Call Midvale 126R2."

MONEY TALKS We buy for Cash; we sell for Cash. segu~ntly we can sell for less.

Cash Prices · Low Prices

We buy for 175 st'Jres, con-

One Price To All

F arr and S1u ue Treatment to Everyone has c 1used the Go I::len Rule to grow from one store-established fifteen years ago-to 175 stores tod'ly. We are always the Ia 'it to advance th: prices and a\way3 sell for less. Our string of buyers are in the market aU the time buyin5 for splt c:~.sh and see the goods they buy. We carry a complete Line of

DRY GOODS

Ladies' and Gent's Ready-to-Wear NOTIONS

And

'm'ike a .SpeCialtY ··of Good Shoe~. for Less Money

The Golden Rule Store U~!l::siJ;:h


r--------------------

Satan: Ha! Ha! Who have we there? (Hansen shooting in). Hansen: Yes, you can laugh for you have lots of hair, But listen, sir, w-hen I remove ti1y hat, I'm half undressed, and bared unto the heat. Satan: 1 need not ask thy name, I know it well. Hanson, we've waited long to greet you here, Thy sins are great; thy punishment shall be. Mr. Hansen: \Vhate'er my sins I penance did in life, Enough to wipe the blackest sins away; I was a busy man, yet every day At morn and night I had a weary task, A greater task than that of ther men. For when at breakfast and at supper time I washed my face, I had to wash my head. There was no way to tell where one began Or t'other ended, so I paid the price. Satan: That will not help you here, you cast your hair, In counting money, tainted ~nd ill got, Wrenched in pennies from poor students路'. hands. (To Imp) : But say, speak for.th, what is his chief offense? 1st Imp: I have him _booked, sir, as a bootlegger. Accused, my lord, of runn~ng a blind pig. Mr. Hansen: . It is not true; I swear it is not true! Satan: How's this? Step forth, my Imp, and give thy proof. lst Imp: 'Tis as I said, he ever broke the law, In prohibition district he sold gum And therefore tempted students pure, to sin. Satan: Away with him! He hangs his head in shame. (The Imps take him back stage.) _ (Mr. Johnson hammers on the gates outside and shouts m an-

-I

Ell

,_ UTAt II I

guish.) Mr. Johnson: Pray, open thy gates, have pity, let me in, From worse than Hades, prithee, rescue me. (More hammering.) They closer co~e, alas in wild pursuit, Please open quiCk these great protecting gates. Satan: Well, this is strange; I never heard before, Of spirit seeking for protection here. (Shouting off stage) Quick, open the gates, thou slave, and send him in. (Mr. Johnson slides in.

I

!I

Where

Wf

He has a hunted look. and glances over

his shoulder.) Satan: 'Now why-th1s"foad路 Explain thyself, yot':mg man, Let's hear; who is it that pursues you so? Mr. Johnson: Miss Thurman and Mi1>s Hor:st, Noble s~r, -'Twas so in life; where 'er I chanced to be, .;路 路 .

135


illo.

§ALT ffiAKE fENGRAVING 145 MAIN ST, MAIN 590

t SALT LAK-E CITY,. UTAH

i

i

I

Mr. Brammer, upon arriving in America, was asked his name at Ellis Island. He gave it. · "Speak louder," said the officer. . ., He repeated it: "Why man, your voice is as soft as a'woman's." "Well," said Brammer, "that might be, my mother was a woman."

!l---------------------------------------.----------------------~---------1

i

1-

I

I

I I

I·!

UTAH IMPUMENT & VfHICl~ CO. J€ -~

Styles are

To BeHad In

.

Where the- Goods are Good Goods We Want Your Business

:!r

All the High-P~i~ed

.1.

135 80. STATE .Sr•. ·

REGENT SUITS for MEN AND

YOUNG MEN

I SCO Snappy

I

$15 ·

F'om Factocy · To You No Mid_dle.man's Prof1t

New Styles , AIIOne Price . The ~eararound

..

.137 Main·St. ,.. ·. Opposite Kearns Bldg.

)

'113

·········-.

··r~-

'

..

.


I was not safe; they always followed me. They quarrelled. about me, tagged me everywhere, At last, I longed for death to set me free. I died; but not in peace for each was there To claim the kiss I had derived in life. f'reely my soul ascended through the air, Alone at last, and. bathed in heavenly calm, I had not gone ten leagues above the earth And still could see Mt. Jordan's snowy top, When looking down,-my blood with horror froze I saw two spirits rising on the breeze. It was- Miss Thurman and Sweet Gretchen, They gained on me and when I came to heaven, They were· so close behi~1d I dared not stop, So down I swooped; they saw and followed me. (Some one hammers on the gate.) Mr: Johnson: Oh save me, sir, they hammer on your gate. Satan: ~Te'll let them in; we'll listen to their plea. (They come in, Johnson retreats to other side of stage. They see him.) Miss Thurman: I tell you he is· mine; I love him most. Miss H.: How will you prove it; he i? mine, I say. (To Johnson) : Come thou ";ith me, i iOve you most of all. Miss Thurman: ·Nay come with me, and be my husband, king. Mr. Johnson: Lock me up, burn me, throw me in the fire-( to Satan)-Hell hath no horrors like a woman's love. Miss H.: He's mine. Miss Thurman:. Nay mine. Miss H.: He's not. Miss Thurman: He is, I say. (They fight pulling hair; Imps separate them.) Satan: Here, separate them; take them both awayYour punishment shall be to stay down here And gaze for aye on him you ~annat have. (From the top of the stage are heard the strains of a song. Some one is singing "There is s"·eet rest in heaven." Then Mr. Madsen's voice is heard shouting.) I say, it must be deuced hot down there; at least it looks so from the golden stairs. Satan: VVho are you, sir; that dare intrude this way? Mr. M.: \iVhy can't you see, I'm wise old Madsen? Right now I'm s'itting on the golden. stairs, A crown upon my head and in my hand· My Baton; for I'm to .lead the he~v~nlyb~nd. I mean to put the harp quite out of use, I like it here, a little change or two

M want:

I

++++++~ A,O. W

I~all ALMA

I*

THE ·L +

i

SE ++++++++·


TRY .OUR LOCAL DUTCH SOMETHING NEW

40c, 75c, $1.00, 1he Box

IN CHORUS. Mr. Johnson: When Mr. Madsen comes in here this period I want you all to help him out.

+++++++++++++++++~++*++++++++++I I I I I+++++++++++++++~ A. 0. McMULLIN, PRES.

RAYMOND SPENCER. SECY.

~

ALMA HOGENSEN, V·PRES.

E. L. BURGON,

..-

;f:

BUSINESS MGR.

+

1J1artut rif 1£quittr illntupatty t .1Jur.

:I:

+

f

+ + + + +

i~

I t !

i

THE ONLY BUSINESS HOUSE IN SALT • LAKE COUNTY OPERATED FOR THE FARMERS BENEFIT t

f

SEE

us

FOR FENCE MATERIAL

I

+++++++++++++++++I I I oJ +++I !<I I 11 ++I-I i I I I++++++·:-+++++++++++ 95


I plan to make in heaven before I'm through, The golden streets are broad; they hurt my ieet I'm going to get a Ford to save my solesAnd elevator I shall soon install I'm growing much too fat to climb the stairs.

UTAH A

(Imp who has slipped off stage enters hastily.) 1st Imp: My lord,· there doth approach a mighty man

Offers to (

\Vith frosted locks and face of iron strength-

A~ricultuJ

Liberal T

I would not face him, not fer treasures rare 1\'"ay nor defy him, for a cake of ice. I think, sir. we had better shut the gates.

Agric l\ (

Satan: Nay. let him come; I fear not any one. 1st Imp: But this, oh sire, is Principal Peterson. Dutton: This will he good, I oft have longed to see A scrap between these two; I'm glad I came. 1.Valker: A ringside seat at what will prove to be The great sensation of eternity. Mr. Johnson: I am not a better man but on the level l'll bet on Peterson against the devil. Mr. Jorgensen (to Satan): J.Iay T suggest, you'd better move

Satan: Ah, pity sir, I prithee pity me. You always claimed to love democracy. Mr. Peterson: No pity do I show to such as youI'll roast you, sir, upon your hottest fire. (Satan resists sjightly but Mr. P. grabs him by the collar.and drags him off.)

who

me

Write

t:

Ge

M1

tan menacingly. Satan, entirelY: frightened, falls on his knees.)

Imps,

tional

wreck.

Mr. Peterson: Take care, .Your power is ended quite. You've done the last harm :you will ever do. (He approaches Sa-

to

yo1

to do a

your throne. You might hit a sharp corner when you fall.. Principal: Here stand aRid•· I Rrt~' ••no let me in: He Flides in but lights on his feet and immediately assumes a heroic position.) Satan: Now, si1~! beware! Mr. Peterson: Aha! so this is he. I've alw·ays longed to get a chance at you. And now, I warn you, you had best beware; There won't be any devil when I'm through. Satan: You, sir! (Loudly and defiantly.)

Mr. Dutton: Well, .this is good. \Valker : Oh, well, T told you so. (Mr. Peterson enters again and speaks

Here is

your~elf w

have


THf UTAH · AGRICULTURAL (OlU6f LOGAN, UTAH

THf- • fCONOMY

Offers to Graduates of High Schools Liberal Training in all Branches of

Airiculture Home Economics Agricultural Engineering and Mechanic Arts General Science Commerce Here is your opportunity to affiliate yourself with the big ·live educational movement of the century Write the Ptesident for Further Information.

~STORf Dry Goods Groceries Boots

ShoeF. Prices Always

Never

Right

Undersold

George Whitman: Mr. Madsen, do you think I will ever be able to do anything with my voice? Mr. Madsen: Well, it might come in handy in case of fire or shipwreck ..

I I


crowded behind throne.) Mr. Peterson:_ You Imps, come here. I guess you're free, With such a leader what else could you be? I will not punish but I'll educate. Right here \ve'll start a school. Now let me see. I think we have a good full faculty. (Mr. Jorgensen comes forward and takes out roll book. line up in row.) Mr. J.: Imp otie? 1st Imp: Prepared. Mr. J.: Imp two? 2nd Imp: Prepared. 3rd Imp: Prepared.

Imps


~----------

~~""""~~'

~

;

~You Are Judged by ~

l t:: :::re~::.:~ l @)

:.?

If your stationery is up to the minute, with type the p;oper size and neatly dis-

C :

~ ~

c

~

I

~

S

( <

!! :::~~~:~;:~:~路路路:: ! ~

Stationery That Our ~ Jub Office Turns Out S

~~...l .

I

EAGLE PUBLISHING CO. MURRAY, UTAH PHONE. MURRAY 35

J.

5. BARLOW, MGR.


,---------------------~

---

WHY. Questions hard ones, Flunks galore. Pencils bitten, Smiles laid by, Vacation coming....,That is why.

Pupils sleep, Teachers blue, Answers minus, Scholars, too. Frowning facesScowls are more ;

PRETIY GREEN. A little green Freshie in a green way Some chemicals mixed, just for fun one day, And the little green grasses, tenderly wave O'er the little green Freshie's little green grave. While Miss Bowen was in New York City last winter she decided to learn some of the new dances so she went to one of the leading dancing academies. The instructor was helping her when suddenly she slipped and fell do·wn. Four men rushed to her assistance and, as they were manfully endeavoring to assist her to her feet, she said, "Oh, do hurry, tl;tis floor is so lumpy." "I'm not a ltimp," came a voice from below. "I'm the instructor."

1

IDA BROWN'S SOLILOQUY. I think of you, Bill, ·when I am sad, And I long· to hear•.y<mr--voice, So to please me, Bill, just stay around And help me to rejoice; You see the times I want you near Are just the times when you're not here.

ANTOMINA IN D. S. CLASS, TASTING CAKE FROSTING. "Oh, this tastes just like the kind of kisses I like so well."

SPEAKING OF WISDOM. To jump into a bramble May not be very wise, But what of men \\"ho haven't push Enough to advertise?

I

A watch may have no gender, But you really can't efface The fact that, nearly always, There's a "·oman in the case. Mr. Jorgenson dreamed one night that he died and went to heaven. St. Peter took him around to inspect the choir. On being told that he could arrange the singers acc,ording to his own taste he said: "I shall need twenty thousand more altos,. twenty thousand more sopranoes, and ten thousand· more. tenors." St. Peter: "-But what are you· going to do for bass?" Mr. Jorgenson: "Oh! I can sing bass."

'100

'


CLOTHING

FOR MEN AND

BOYS

We carry the Fan10us Special Ready Made clothing for Men and Boys. Nothing better and more Durable from $10 to $25 per suit. Special made to measure clothes $15 to $25 per suit. Just Right Shoes for . Men and Bo}s

SHOES

Sherwood Shoes for Women and Children. Frank lin $3.00 Hats for Men

The FAMOUS,

·-~--

Chas. Prizky, Prop.

I

-

:

1-

'

c

MIDVALE

.,. ..

.' --..

.-

"If a miss is as good a~ a mile," How t:nany would it take to reach

~

from here to Draper?

--···+-~-RIGID

RULES~·~·~···~

No dass of busine5s requires more careful attention, or insists upon more rigid rules than that of Banking.

It

has always been our earnest endeavor

to conform to ·these reguirements. . - /'

Safety

First, Liherality Next •

JORDAN VALLEY BANK RIVERTON, UTAH 101


STUDENTS

' •

When you leave ~chool you will still \Vant to read

r-----

Good Books If

in to our store, Mail us order. _ It will have our careful

you can't come ::'jlo~r

,.

attention. l

SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION . · B-OOK STORE·

I,.. t••············$·4 0~ sl~ Te~ple .................................. 44' East

.

.

Salt Lake City

. Iv.Iarjorie Stuart in a department store: "Which way to you go to the corset department?" she asked of the floor walker. · "Straight back, madam." "No/' was the reply, "I want 'a straight front."

i

. When in nec:d of

...

1 '

Lumber Cement Plaster Paints Oils Auto Supplies Electtic Washers Liuoleums Range~

Coal · -"-1

We are at

PAY -BY CHECK ·And know where your money goes. Your canceled check is a receipt KEEP YOUR ACCOUNT

WITH

Your Service

. JENSEN&KUHRE:CO

SAND): CITY, !UTAH ..>:"'

1916 1917  
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