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Jordan D. Eure Portfolio 2007 - 2012 Bachelor of Architecture, May 2012 College of Design, NC State University Contact: jdeure@ncsu.edu or 252-312-9596


Urban Horticulture Center

Spring 2012 - Instructors: Patrick Rand & Dennis Stallings

Durham Recreation + Wellness Center Fall 2011 - Instructor: David Hill

Digital - Material Translations

Urban Design: Raleigh

Fall 2011 - Instructor: David Hill

Fall 2010 - Instructor: Paul Battaglia

ACSA/AISC Steel Design Competition Spring 2010 - Instructor: Dr. Wayne Place

Experiences Within the Landscape

Precedent Analysis + Synthesis

Fall 2009 - Instructor: Patricia Morgado

Spring 2009 - Instructor: Jessica Johnson

Urban Analysis: Georgetown

Fall 2008 - Instructor: Patrick Rhodes

Additional Work

Summer 2010, 2007


Urban Horticulture Center Spring 2012 Instructors: Patrick Rand & Dennis Stallings


URBAN HORTICULTURE CENTER

SPRING 2012 - INSTRUCTORS: PATRICK RAND & DENNIS STALLINGS Design Problem – Design an urban horticulture center for a vacant site in close proximity to downtown Raleigh, with a focus on the integration between interior spaces and exterior site elements. The program will include an exhibit hall, library, multipurpose/auditorium room, administrative suite, and support spaces. Each student will decide how to best incorporate the requirement for exterior demonstration gardens into their site. (Individual Project)

Solution – The main building stretches across the open, grassy site to connect two existing treelines and subdivide the large, exterior space into different zones of activity. The building is intended to complement its surroundings, acting as a backdrop for the natural elements while serving as a transparent bar to allow visual and physical connections across the site. From the level of the road, an 18’ drop in topography creates a challenge for access to the site. Passersby and visitors arriving at a nearby bus-stop may enter through a pedestrian bridge that connects the existing sidewalk to the upper level of the building. A loosely defined space surrounded by existing trees provides room for parking and a path to the greenhouse for entrance to the pedestrian bridge. Parti

Initial Parti Model Studies

Site Plan

Pedestrian Bridge Entrance

1/32” = 1’ Site and Building Study Model 3”h x 31”w x 18”d


URBAN HORTICULTURE CENTER SPRING 2012 - INSTRUCTORS: PATRICK RAND & DENNIS STALLINGS Design Problem – Design an urban horticulture center for a vacant site in close proximity to downtown Raleigh, with a focus on the integration between interior spaces and exterior site elements. The program will include an exhibit hall, library, multipurpose/auditorium room, administrative suite, and support spaces. Each student will decide how to best incorporate the requirement for exterior demonstration gardens into their site. (Individual Project)

Solution – A greenhouse acts as a threshold for entrance to the building. The pedestrian bridge tunnels through the greenhouse, while visitors travelling by car enter the greenhouse at the ground level to move up one story for access to the bridge. This creates a sensory experience, encouraging them to see and understand the activities/purpose of the horticulture center before they have arrived at the main building.

South Elevation

North Elevation

1/32” = 1’ Study Model Greenhouse Detail 3”h x 31”w x 18”d

View from Southern Gardens

View of Greenhouse Interior

Section (A) through the Horticulture Center

Section (B) through the Site


URBAN HORTICULTURE CENTER SPRING 2012 - INSTRUCTORS: PATRICK RAND & DENNIS STALLINGS Solution – From the bridge, visitors enter an open breezeway space, providing views of the southern gardens. The building is zoned into different areas of activity, with flexible spaces to allow for future adaptation of the space. The design incorporates a heavy timber construction system to reflect the wooded surroundings. Curtain walls surround the public, open spaces along the main portion of the bar, with cedar siding enclosing the secondary spaces pinched into the trees. A trellis system on the southern facade acts as an armature for future plant growth to shade the interior spaces from harsh summer sunlight.

Design Problem – Design an urban horticulture center for a vacant site in close proximity to downtown Raleigh, with a focus on the integration between interior spaces and exterior site elements. The program will include an exhibit hall, library, multipurpose/auditorium room, administrative suite, and support spaces. Each student will decide how to best incorporate the requirement for exterior demonstration gardens into their site. (Individual Project)

Overhead View of 1/16” = 1’ Building Model 5”h x 32”w x 22”d

1/16” = 1’ Site and Building Detail of South Facade 5”h x 32”w x 22”d

Greenhouse Plan 1. Mechanical 2. Catering Kitchen 3. Auditorium - Multipurpose Room 4. Breezeway 5. Open Conference Space 6. Offices

A 11

28

39

10

6 10

10

610

10

610

B

A 11

4

8 2

9

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57

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3

6 1

10

6 10

10

6 10

10

6 10

6 1

4

B

Ground Floor Plan

A

7

5

4

1. Mechanical 2. Library Storage 3. Library 4. Breezeway 5. Exhibit Space 6. Classrooms

B

B

Upper (Entry) Level Floor Plan


URBAN HORTICULTURE CENTER SPRING 2012 - INSTRUCTORS: PATRICK RAND & DENNIS STALLINGS Design Problem – Design an urban horticulture center for a vacant site in close proximity to downtown Raleigh, with a focus on the integration between interior spaces and exterior site elements. The program will include an exhibit hall, library, multipurpose/auditorium room, administrative suite, and support spaces. Each student will decide how to best incorporate the requirement for exterior demonstration gardens into their site. (Individual Project)

Solution – A gridded nursery of trees surrounds the greenhouse, continuing the idea of the nearby forest. To the south, 4’ x 4’ garden blocks (ideal garden plot dimensions) reference the original urban plan of downtown Raleigh. The gardens alternate in form, rising to different heights to accomodate a wide range of visitors’ needs.

Interior Exhibit Space

1/16” = 1’ Model - Greenhouse Detail 5”h x 32”w x 22”d

View from Interior Classroom

View from the Parking Entry

1/16” = 1’ Model - Facade Detail 5”h x 32”w x 22”d


Durham Recreation + Wellness Center Fall 2011 Instructor: David Hill


RECREATION + WELLNESS CENTER FALL 2011 - INSTRUCTOR: DAVID HILL

MAIN STREET

DUKE STREET

Solution – As shown in the parti diagram, the wellness center stretches across an elongated site near downtown Durham to address both corners while framing a public green space. The main entrance is on the northeast corner (towards downtown), while a secondary entrance into the cafe on the opposite corner accommodates foot traffic from a residential neighborhood to the northwest. The focal point of the design is the central space with two community pools. Curtain walls frame this double height volume, highlighting the open, public space extending through the site. Between indoor and outdoor activities, visual reciprocity catalyzes community residents to become more deeply engaged with the center.

GREGSON STREET

Design Problem – Design a recreation and wellness center for downtown Durham. Consider a broad range of factors, including site and cultural characteristics, construction methods and details, and sustainable building systems. The program will include spaces for exercise and motion, cafe, gardens, service spaces, and other indoor/outdoor spaces that will activate the street edge. Each student will incorporate either a gym or a swimming pool into their program elements. (Individual Project)

Site Plan Shading Louvers

Skylight Parapet Cap Metal Studs Horizontal Studs Translucent Metal Panels Waterproofing Layer Sheathing Insulation Metal Decking

SITE PLAN

Steel Truss

First 3 Parti Models Hung Ipe Wood Ceiling

1”=32’

Steel Structural Grid - 30’ System Structure Diagram - 30’ Bay Overlay with Section Cut

1/32” = 1’

Curtain Wall System (2’ Deep)

Suspended Balcony

Steel Tube Support for Curtain Wall Hung Ipe Wood Ceiling

Floor 1 HVAC Plan - Includes Outdoor Boreholes for Geothermal Heatpump System 1/32” = 1’ Supply Return

Bench Within Curtain Wall Concrete Base for Steel Column

Swimming Pool Floor 2 HVAC Plan 1/32” = 1’ Supply

Parti Diagram Return

WALL SECTION 3/4” = 1’

Courtyard View - South Facade

1/32” = 1’ Site and Building Model 4”h x 31”w x 18”d


RECREATION + WELLNESS CENTER FALL 2011 - INSTRUCTOR: DAVID HILL

Design Problem – Design a recreation and wellness center for downtown Durham. Consider a broad range of factors, including site and cultural characteristics, construction methods and details, and sustainable building systems. The program will include spaces for exercise and motion, cafe, gardens, service spaces, and other indoor/outdoor spaces that will activate the street edge. Each student will incorporate either a gym or a swimming pool into their program elements. (Individual Project)

Solution – The curtain wall is two feet wide, creating a deep facade with recessed benches. These act as a threshold before entering the interior space. The main structural system is steel on a 30’ grid, with exposed trusses in the pool area to highlight the space’s importance. A large skylight above the pool space allows more natural light throughout the building. The enclosed anchors contain private spaces (locker rooms, studios, service space, offices, etc.) and are clad in weathered zinc, with a red tint to compliment the surrounding brick buildings. Trees in the courtyard correspond to the 30’ interior structural grid, framing an exterior space for studio classes and relaxation.

Canopy Detail of 1/32” = 1’ Building Model

Section (A) through Studio Spaces

South Elevation

North Elevation

West Elevation

Interior Pool Space with Skylights

East Elevation

Section (B) through Pool Space


RECREATION + WELLNESS CENTER FALL 2011 - INSTRUCTOR: DAVID HILL

Design Problem – Design a recreation and wellness center for downtown Durham. Consider a broad range of factors, including site and cultural characteristics, construction methods and details, and sustainable building systems. The program will include spaces for exercise and motion, cafe, gardens, service spaces, and other indoor/outdoor spaces that will activate the street edge. Each student will incorporate either a gym or a swimming pool into their program elements. (Individual Project)

Solution – Vertical Fins on the north facade of the two anchors allow for an open visual connection with the street, while creating some privacy for the interior. As seen in the ground floor plan below, the lobby acts as a gathering area for the pool space, with locker rooms, a fitness area, and cafe beyond. Mechanical space holds the southeast corner of the site, framing both the courtyard space to the west and a small entry court to the east. The entry court is cut into the existing site, accommodating a change in topography at the corner while creating a rest space removed from sidewalk activity.

1/16” = 1’ Site and Building Model 8”h x 35”w x 22”d

Overhead View of 1/16” = 1’ Building Model A

B

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22

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A

Ground Floor Plan

B

26

16

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1. Lobby / Reception Space 2. Pump Room / Storage Space 3. Mechanical Room 4. Pool Space 5. Fitness Area 6. Cafe 7. Kitchen 8. Men’s Locker Room 9. Mechanical 10. Women’s Locker Room

11 - 14. Offices 15. Conference Room 16. Storage / Electrical 17. Mechanical 18. Suspended Balconies 19. Open to Pools Below 20 - 23. Studios 24. Communal Studio 25. Mechanical 26. Studio

Upper Level Floor Plan


RECREATION + WELLNESS CENTER FALL 2011 - INSTRUCTOR: DAVID HILL

Design Problem – Design a recreation and wellness center for downtown Durham. Consider a broad range of factors, including site and cultural characteristics, construction methods and details, and sustainable building systems. The program will include spaces for exercise and motion, cafe, gardens, service spaces, and other indoor/outdoor spaces that will activate the street edge. Each student will incorporate either a gym or a swimming pool into their program elements. (Individual Project)

Solution – Shading louvers extend from the north to the south facades, protecting the entire building from weather and overheating. Geothermal wells are located beneath the grassy courtyard space to provide a renewable energy source for the building.

Street View - Northeast Corner

Detail of Vertical Fins on North Facade

Street View - Northwest Corner

View towards the Courtyard from Lower Level of Pool Space

Courtyard Detail


RECREATION + WELLNESS CENTER FALL 2011 - INSTRUCTOR: DAVID HILL

Additional Development – Consider the sectional qualities of the building, including materials and specific connections. Create a 3/4” = 1’ section drawing, with the relevant construction details; translate the information into a 3/8” = 1’ section model of an important space within the building. (Individual Project)

Solution – The section model and drawing illustrate the construction details within the central pool space. Suspended balconies run along both sides of the pool to connect second story spaces on either end of the double height pool area. A dropped ceiling over the balconies allows for hidden ducts, with exposed trusses directly above the pool and below the skylight to emphasize the open, central volume.

Aluminum Extrusions for Sun Shading

Single Ply Rubber Roofing Membrane Sheathing Insulation Metal Decking

Aluminum Parapet Aluminum Panel Curtain Wall Clips attached to Metal Stud System

Pressure Equalization Chamber

28’ - 0”

Steel Tube System for Curtain Wall Support Steel Beam - W 12 x

Vents for Supply and Return Air Mechanical Ducts Hung Metal Stud Suspended Tongue and Groove Wood Ceiling Hortizontal Metal Stud Metal Stud System Steel Warren Truss

Skylight Rod Hanger

1/8” = 1’ Study Section Model 8”h x 11”w x 6”d 14’ - 0” Curtain Wall Clip

Steel Tube Connection (wrapped in break metal) Steel Beam - W 12 x Ipe Wood Floor Sleepers Concrete Metal Decking Steel Joists W 8 x Z-Clip Hangers Steel Beam - W 8 x Suspended Tongue and Groove Wood Ceiling Metal Stud Steel Angle

Suspended Balcony Aluminum Curtain Wall

Steel Column - Square Tube, 12 x 12 Steel Column - W 12 x Bench Within Curtain Wall Concrete Base for Steel Column Brick Pavers

Sand Base Gravel Sublayer Drain Slab on Grade Foundation Perimeter Rigid Insulation Compacted Dirt Gravel Waterproofing Membrane Setting Bed Stone Tile Concrete Retaining Wall

Cast in Place Concrete Swimming Pool

Rear View of Section Model

3/8” = 1 Section Model through Pool Space 24”h x 35”w x 22”d ’

Wall Section through Curtain Wall in Pool Space


RECREATION + WELLNESS CENTER FALL 2011 - INSTRUCTOR: DAVID HILL

Additional Development – Consider the sectional qualities of the building, including materials and specific connections. Create a 3/4” = 1’ section drawing, with the relevant construction details; translate the information into a 3/8” = 1’ section model of an important space within the building. (Individual Project)

Solution – The trusses, spaced at 30’, support both the skylight and suspended balconies. The curtain wall (still 2’ deep to accommodate recessed benches and emphasize a transition zone) is tied back to interior steel columns raised on a concrete base for separation from the pools.

Curtain Wall Detail

Overall Model

Truss and Skylight Detail

Overhead Model View


Digital - Material Translations Fall 2011 Instructor: David Hill


DIGITAL - MATERIAL TRANSLATIONS FALL 2011 - INSTRUCTOR: DAVID HILL

Design Problem – Develop a workflow between digital media and physical products to explore the contraints and design applications of a specific material. Student chosen teams will develop a final product of their choosing, using wood as the material, with both Rhino and Grasshopper software as design development tools. (Team Project - Douglas Crawford, Jordan Eure)

Schematic Design – The design focuses on creating a coffee table constructed through wood sectioning methods. The first iteration is a simple extruded profile, with four main joints to connect the five different wooden sections. While AutoCAD worked for this first model, the second step involved double curves, which required development in Rhino. Using Grasshopper, a plugin application for Rhino, a definition allows user control for infinite variations on digital model form. The second profile illustrates the idea of a double curved table, with the corresponding study model utilizing the digital media for desired form.

First Profile with Cut Lines

First Study Model 12” h x 18”w x 11”d

Second Profile

Grasshopper Definition

Loft and Offset Commands in Rhino

Second Study Model 16”h x 22”w x 14”d


DIGITAL - MATERIAL TRANSLATIONS FALL 2011 - INSTRUCTOR: DAVID HILL

Design Problem – Develop a workflow between digital media and physical products to explore the contraints and design applications of a specific material. Student chosen teams will develop a final product of their choosing, using wood as the material, with both Rhino and Grasshopper software as design development tools. (Team Project - Douglas Crawford, Jordan Eure)

Design Development – The definition allowed for multiple form iterations, as shown below. The presence or absence of wooden sections between cut lines is explored in plan in the far right column of the below matrix. The final construction method consists of threaded rods through the wooden sections, with a recessed nut and washer cap on either end of the rods. The modified sectioning method for the table results in 83% less waste than traditional sectioning methods, while also creating a more dynamic form with the interplay between solid and void.

Exploded Assembly

Final Profile with Cut Lines

Waste Diagram: Traditional Sectioning (above) versus Modified Sectioning (below)

Multiple Iterations

Connection Detail


DIGITAL - MATERIAL TRANSLATIONS FALL 2011 - INSTRUCTOR: DAVID HILL

Design Problem – Develop a workflow between digital media and physical products to explore the contraints and design applications of a specific material. Student chosen teams will develop a final product of their choosing, using wood as the material, with both Rhino and Grasshopper software as design development tools. (Team Project - Douglas Crawford, Jordan Eure)

Solution – From the software applications, the form is sectioned and exported to AutoCAD for creating a layout for the CNC (computer numerical control) shop machine. The machine is able to move in three dimensions (x, y, and z) to cut any form. Table assembly involves sanding and sorting of individual wood sections. The final table form is versatile, also able to work as a bench. The rods are tightened enough to support the weight of a person, but able to fold together for ease of transportation.

Side View

Profile View

Front Detail

Finished Coffee Table 30”h x 60”w x 29”d

Folded Coffee Table


Urban Design: Raleigh Fall 2010 Instructor: Paul Battaglia


URBAN DESIGN: RALEIGH

FALL 2010 - INSTRUCTOR: Paul Battaglia Design Problem – Propose changes to improve the urban environment in downtown Raleigh and around Capital Boulevard. The project involved communicating with the public, including a weekend charette with residents of the surrounding communities and a final public presentation of the project at the Urban Design Center in downtown Raleigh. (Team Project – Kyler McClure, Brooke Jones, Jay Ji, Jordan Eure)

Solution – Changes to the sidewalks and road patterns in downtown Raleigh make the city more pedestrian friendly, also increasing the movement of traffic with added bike lanes and a high speed rail. A new proposed green space at the entrance of the city is activated by surrounding mixed-use buildings, including a fitness center, library, and retail. Above the added green space, Capital Boulevard is a problematic zone. The road itself follows confusing traffic patterns, while the immediately surrounding district contains scattered, abandoned warehouses. To handle the congested traffic and frequent flooding, both Capital Boulevard and the current railroad move to the sides to allow ample room for a central greenway. This space connects the two neighborhoods currently divided by Capital, with the restoration of an existing wetland area to the north. Various outdoor amusements facilitate neighborhood interaction, including the conversion of the old farmers market to an open-air event space. A stream running through the area absorbs excess flood water and filters pollutants.

Problem - Capital Boulevard: The Scar Cutting through the City

Model of Flood Prone Zones 18”h x 18”w x 18”d

Plan and Model of Changes to Roads and Added Greenspace in Downtown Raleigh, with Zoomed in View of Greenspace Surrounded by Increased Building Density and Mixed-Use

Solution - Plan of Proposed Greenway and Development around Capital Blvd.

Model of Greenway Replacing Capital Blvd. 3”h x 36”w x 36”d

Section


ACSA/AISC Steel Design Competition Spring 2010 Instructor: Dr. Wayne Place


STEEL DESIGN COMPETITION

SPRING 2010 - INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Wayne Place Design Problem – As part of the ACSA/AISC Steel Design Competition, design a community center (known as the Re-Ligare Institute) to showcase steel’s capabilities as a building material. The site is located in the city market district of downtown Raleigh. Square footage requirements include a variety of spaces with 16,000 square feet of exterior garden space. (Individual Project)

MOORE SQUARE

Solution – The glass north facade responds to the bustling activity of Moore Square, with the stepped down south end opening towards quieter residential neighborhoods. Glass walls facing the roof gardens hinge open for continuous outdoor/indoor connection. The versatility of steel begins with the rectilinear shading aperture on the first level, culminating in the curvilinear structure on the upper roof. Shading devices will move depending on time of year and time of day, providing a visual expression of the sun’s path and its effect on lighting within a building.

SITE

Social Garden Site Plan

Re-Ligare Institute Street View - North Facade

Music Garden


STEEL DESIGN COMPETITION

SPRING 2010 - INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Wayne Place 7

1

8

2

Design Problem – As part of the ACSA/AISC Steel Design Competition, design a community center (known as the Re-Ligare Institute) to showcase steel’s capabilities as a building material. The site is located in the city market district of downtown Raleigh. Square footage requirements include a variety of spaces with 16,000 square feet of exterior garden space. (Individual Project) 10

Solution – The building form steps back to maximize daylighting opportunities, while creating sunny, pleasant outdoor spaces. Steel parallel-chord trusses on the interior appear at regular fifteen-foot intervals, emphasizing the capability of steel to support long spans. Expression of steel structure is found in the shading devices for horizontal glazing on the roof. This glazing on each terrace allows additional light to penetrate deeper into each floor. Diagram of Stepped Building Form and Truss Spacing

9 3

11

6

Third Floor Plan

4 Ground Floor Plan

12

8

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Fourth Floor Plan 5

6

Second Floor Plan

1. Co-op Restaurant 2. Retail Shop 3. Lecture / Performance Hall 4. Library 5. Hydro Therapy Room 6. Social Garden 7. Spinning Room 8. Music Room 9. Dancing Room 10. Weight Room 11. Yoga Room 12. Meditation / Worship 13. Music Garden

Interior Steel Truss Structure

Music Room


Experiences Within the Landscape Fall 2009 Instructor: Patricia Morgado


EXPERIENCES WITHIN THE LANDSCAPE FALL 2009 - INSTRUCTOR: Patricia Morgado

Design Problem – Project 1: Create a clay model from a photo of your face. Translate the clay model into topographical layers. Choose a high and low point in the new ‘site’ to connect with a path.

Solution – Project 1 - Face Photo: A winding path stretches between the high point overlooking a low lying area. The journey is as important as the destination in establishing the experience of the path. Two rills of water clearly articulate the path, introducing another natural element into the site. The winding trip allows one to experience the destination from a variety of vantage points and spaces.

Project 2: Apply lessons from the first project to design an amphitheater in Pullen Park for two annual movie events, creating a multi-functional space for year-round activities. (Individual Projects)

Project 1: Face Photo

B

Project 2 - Amphitheater: A path begins at the Pullen Arts parking lot and extends through a grove of trees deep into the park. At the path’s turn, visitors have the option to continue on the broad outer path, follow the inner and more intimate path, or enter the theater space. The theater is tucked into the land, carved out of its surroundings. Trees line both paths at twenty-foot intervals, creating an experience that changes with the season. The design can act as an outlet for other art forms, with a movable screen for movie viewing. Both the screen and the thickened wall of the backstage area contain nooks of varying sizes for artistic installments. Glass roof apertures accentuate the curved form of the backstage.

Clay Model 2”h x 4”w x 4”d

A

C

Overhead Plan with Section Cuts

Proposed Path 2”h x 4”w x 4”d

Topographic Layers 2”h x 4”w x 4”d

1. Ticket Booth 2. Restrooms 3. Prop/Set Area 4. Dressing Rooms 5. Gathering Space 6. Seating 7. Stage 8. Entrance from Backstage

S1

1 S1

2 2

3 4

4 S2

Section A: Cut through the Stage

S1

8

5

S3

Section B: Cut through the Backstage area

S2

S3

6

Path and Final Destinations 2”h x 4”w x 4”d

Final Model 2”h x 4”w x 4”d

Amphitheater Final Model 3”h x 18”wx 30”d

S4

Section C: Cut through Backstage and Exterior Stage with Seating S2

4

S3

S4

7

Backstage Plan


Precedent Analysis + Synthesis Spring 2009 Instructor: Jessica Johnson


PRECEDENT ANALYSIS

SPRING 2009 - INSTRUCTOR: Jessica Johnson Moore

Site Precedent Analysis Brion Vega Cemetery

Perspective of Chapel in Brion Vega Cemetery

Digrammatic Plan of Brion Vega Cemetery

Design Problem – Through drawings and diagrams, analyze the major concepts of 2 teacher assigned architectural precedents: 1) The residence at Riva San Vitale (Mario Botta, 1972-73, Switzerland), and 2) Brion Vega Cemetery (Carlo Scarpa, 1970-72, Italy). (Individual Project)

Solution – Based on research of the home, diagrams of Riva’s design include: axis/symmetry/ balance, geometry/proportion, repetition, circulation, structure, site, figure ground, hierarchy, materials, and the parti. Further drawings develop the idea of Botta’s design as a play of void vs. mass, with an outer shell enveloping repetitive planes integrally connected to the land by the bridge. Site studes focus on a series of analytical diagrams transformed into axonometric drawings, including: major axes, geometry/ repetition, void vs. mass, symmetry, and sacred spaces.

Building Precedent Analysis Riva San Vitale

Perspective in Brion Vega Cemetery

Diagrams of Brion Vega Cemetery Translated into Axonometric Drawings

Diagram Series of Riva San Vitale in Elevation, Section, and Plan

Mass vs. Void Axonometric Drawings of Riva San Vitale


PRECEDENT SYNTHESIS

SPRING 2009 - INSTRUCTOR: Jessica Johnson Moore Design Problem– Translate the findings from analytical drawings into models. Integrate the Residence at Riva San Vitale into the Brion Vega Cememtery in a way that best maintains the major design concepts of both Botta’s and Scarpa’s work. (Individual Project, except for Riva San Vitale study model, at left: Cliff Gentle, Jordan Eure)

Diagrammatic Model of Riva San Vitale 10”h x 8”w x 14”d

Solution – The outer shell of Riva San Vitale contrasts with the internal planes, and the vertical stair core with the bridge’s horizontal connection to the site. The repetitive tombs of the cemetery are wrapped on two sides by the walled enclosure, with rills and voids blurring the line between the realm of the living and dead. In the site, Riva is situated on the major cross axis of the cemetery, extending the upper leg of Scarpa’s design to the right. Two of Riva’s five stories are depressed into the ground, using Scarpa’s idea of depressions in the cemetery as a source of ambiguity and Botta’s exploitation of a site’s steep topographical change. The bridge in the cemetery extends past the old wall into the new enclosure, physically connecting the residence and the site.

Diagrammatic Model of Brion Vega Cemetery 1”h x 18”w x 18”d

Combining Site + Building Precedents: Site Model locating Riva San Vitale in Brion Vega Cemetery 3”h x 16”w x 10”d


PRECEDENT SYNTHESIS - SCHOOLHOUSE SPRING 2009 - INSTRUCTOR: Jessica Johnson Moore

Design Problem – Located within its new site, transform Riva San Vitale into a small school house, while retaining as many of Botta’s original concepts as possible. (Individual Project)

Solution – Riva’s original 5-story layout was conducive to the small school, allowing for an enlargement of square footage while still maintaining the distinctive vertical core in contrast with the horizontal entrance bridge. Repetitive glass walls with a series of open air classrooms on each floor remained consistent with the original play of mass vs. void in Botta’s original design. The openings in Riva’s outer shell are crenelated, providing depth in the school’s outer surface similar to the play of light and shadow created by Scarpa’s crenelations.

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Ground Floor Plan

1. Exterior Gathering Space 2. Restrooms 3. Kitchen 4. Lunchroom 5. Central Stair

6. Exterior Lunchroom Space 7. Classrooms 8. Exterior Classroom Space 9. Open to Below

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7 9

Synthesis: Schoolhouse Model 11”h x 6”w x 9”d

Sections and Elevations

Fourth Floor Plan


Urban Analysis: Georgetown Fall 2008 Instructor: Patrick Rhodes


URBAN ANALYSIS: GEORGETOWN FALL 2008 - INSTRUCTOR: Patrick Rhodes

Design Problem – Based on research and a class field trip, create diagrammatic models of both the Washington D.C. area and a district in Georgetown. (Team Project - Jenny Williams, Jordan Eure)

Solution – The model of the D.C. area highlights the layering of neighborhoods around the Potomac River. Observations of downtown Georgetown are synthesized in a district model, including three important features of Georgetown: 1) Repetitive facades, 2) Major thoroughfares, and 3) The steep landscape.

Diagrammatic Model of Washington D.C. 15”h x 25”w x 4”d

Axonometric Drawing of Georgetown Model

Model of District in Georgetown 9”h x 13”w x 34”d


Additional Work Summer 2010, 2007


ADDITIONAL WORK

SUMMER 2010 - Home Environments Design Initiative (HEDI) Summer work involved creating Sustainable Strategies for Residential Renovations, a compilation of up-to-date sustainable home renovation strategies for both home-owners and municipalities. The document is available through Home Environments Design Initiative (HEDI), a research and community service extension of the North Carolina State University College of Design. HEDI is founded on the joint priorities of sustainability and community service, placing special emphasis on affordable housing and sustainable design issues. The guide draws from multiple current sources in an easy to use checklist format. Within each of the eleven main sections, there is space for additional notes and ideas, allowing it to become an interactive guide specific to each individual’s project. Sustainable building practices and materials are categorized according to the level of energy savings provided. Appendices include a comprehensive list of additional resources for green building.

4) Structural Frame and Building Envelope: Shading Systems and Gutters

Design appropriate overhangs to allow sunlight into the home during winter months and block sun from entering the building envelope in the summer.1 Shading devices can range from trees, as mentioned in Section 1: Site and Landscape, to trellises and awnings. Consider adjustable shading devices to accommodate various times of the day and year.

Overhangs are also an important moisture management strategy, with at least 1 1/2 foot overhangs recommended on all sides of home for water protection.

Garage

If garage is attached, tightly seal the air barrier between the garage and living area for substantial indoor air quality protection. Also install a garage exhaust fan.

Please note, recommendations concerning vapor/air barriers are not included in these guidelines. At the time of this document’s cations and placement within the wall assembly are inconclusive, with no assurance for successful implementation. One option for dealing with these issues is to insulate exterior walls with closed cell spray foam.

Various overhangs, including trellises, work with the shading system Single Top Plate

Connector Plate

Design appropriate gutter system to work with the slope of

Ceiling/Roof Joists line up with Wall Studs

2

Building Frame/Envelope

Implement advanced framing techniques.3 Advanced framing techniques include spacing studs and roof trusses 24 inches on center, constructing a 2-stud corner, using ladder blocking, having a single instead of a double top plate, and replacing solid wood headers with engineered insulated headers.

Notes:

Use Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) 4

Plan View of 2-Stud Corner Backer Support for Gypsum Board at 2-Stud Corner

Interior Wall Connection

Studs in Wall spaced 24” O.C.

Ladder Blocking

Advanced Framing Diagram

Notes:

If FSC other options for framing include engineered lumber products.

□ □

Install a rain screen wall system to allow water that penetrates the exterior cladding to effectively drain out before penetrating the wall assembly.6

Angle “B” = Latitude + 18.5 Angle “A” = Latitude - 18.5

Size overhangs properly:

Use noncombustible and durable exterior products, preferably with 50-year product life warranty.

To prevent summer gains, Angle “A” should be approximately equal to the latitude, minus 18.5. To prevent winter shading, Angle “B” between Line “W” and Line “V” should be approximately equal to the latitude, plus 18.5. An overhang designed with this formula will provide shade well into the summer and full sun through the coldest part of winter. City Latitudes: Asheville Boone Charlotte Durham Elizabeth City Fayetteville Greensboro Raleigh Rocky Mount Wilmington

For decks, consider composite decking products.5

□ □

Create a sealed attic space.7

around all wall and roof penetrations to prevent air leakage.8

35.5 36.2 35.2 36.0 36.3 35.1 36.1 35.8 36.0 34.3

Air seal and insulate rim joists, using caulking or a sealant with rigid insulation, or a spray polyurethane foam insulation.9

The above diagram is useful in sizing south facing overhangs for successful passive solar design.

4) Structural Frame and Building Envelope

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4) Structural Frame and Building Envelope

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ADDITIONAL WORK 2007

Design Problem – (1) Create an acrylic painting, using only the primary colors with white and black to mix a range of shades. (2) Choose an existing work of art and transform it into a relief image, constructed of paper. (Individual Projects)

Acrylic Painting 15” x 15”

Solution – (1) Varying colors form a pattern based on the growth rings of a tree. (2) A second century Japanese tapestry is translated into a modern paper sculpture, with a typically 2-D medium becoming 3-dimensional. The scored paper creates shadow and depth.

Japanese Paper Sculpture 36”h x 28”w x 2”d


Portfolio - Jordan Eure