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DESIGN STUDIO I : HUMAN EXPERIENCE Sierra Leone Avant-garde Scholastic Complex

''As

an architect you design for the present, with an awareness of the past, for a future which is essentially unknown.'' Norman Foster Foster & Partners

Jordan Davis Professor Dudzik Fall 2012 01


DESIGN STATEMENT:

Education as a front-most design driver with regards to improving the standard of living was the overall intent behind this design. Articulating interior and exterior space, building form and landscaping, public and private circulation, all in regard to the environmental condition of the site was the main concept. Creating a space that not only is pleasurable to the users, but to also condition them and educate them was the main goal.

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INDEX: 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023

Abstract Models Abstract Model Overview Abstract Model 1 & 2 Abstract Model 3 & 4 Abstract Model 5 & 6 Abstract Final Model Program/Site and Inspiration/Case Studies Program and Site Overview Site Analysis: Location Site Analysis: Neighborhood Context Site Analysis: Size and Zoning Preliminary Inspiration Library Exterior Inspiration Library Interior Inspiration Case Study 1: Grand Central Canal Case Study 2: Museum of Afghanistan Preliminary Design Tradegies & ADA Building Form Building Harmony/Orientation Wall Derivative/Design

024 025 026 027 028 029 030 031 032 033 034 035 036 037 038 039 040 041 042 043

Final Product Exterior Perspective Classroom Perspective Classroom Perspective 2 Final Design Overview Assembly/Library Experiential Sketches Bridge/Court Experiential Skeytches Classroom/Dock Experiential Sketches Building Interior Renderings Final Model Final Model Picture Final Model Side Views Final Model Human Perspectives Final Model Shadow Study 1 Final Model Shadow Study 2 Final Model Shadow Study 3 Final Model Shadow Study 4 Final Model Overview Closing Spread Closing Spread

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Abstract Modeling

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We were asked to choose an object from our daily lives that played a significant role in our lifes. I chose my guitar because its the one thing that I interact with everyday (ignoring tangible items that are vital to everyday life). This object is what this entire studio project will be designed around, whether its taken in abstract manner or in a more literal sense.

The first exercise of the studio was to articulate a series of abstract models from an object in our daily lives. We were to make two models that abstracts how our relationship with the object translates spatially. Additionally, make two models that abstractly represent the object as a thing. In addition, we were

to design an additional two models that synthesize our relationship to our object of choosing eith an abstraction of that object. Finally, we designed the final abstract model that articulated our relationship with the object. The final model was the culmination of our investigations that preceeded this model.

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Model 1: Acoustical Qualities This first model represents the acoustical qualities that are emitted from the guitar when in use. The shape represents the constant intertwining of high and low notes. The left side (blue) represents the rhythmatic strumming of a guitar. The right side represents the abstraction and spontaneous note hitting. The holes represent the pattern of a scale, which are found all over the neck of a guitar. Material represents sound/music, which will always exists hence the use of a more permanent material.

Model 2: Physical Qualities The second model represents the more physical aspects of the guitar itself. The shape represents a generic shape that directly relates to the mass produced generic shape of a guitar. The moving parts on the cube represent the different parts on a guitar that move. The size of the cube represents how fragile a guitar is and how sensitive it reacts to its environment.

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Model 3: Human Reaction The third model of the series represents how a human (myself) reacts with the guitar. The circuklar base represents a unity I feel when I’m playing with the guitar. The top is an abstraction of scales that come from each emotion. The colors are emotion which feed the music inspiration. The strong wide base represents a dominance music has in my life.

Model 4: Physical & Emotional Relationship The fourth model of the series deals with the physical and emotional interaction when playing the guitar. Physically I stay the same until my hands slowly start to fatigue (red side). I’m emtionally seperated until I start to warm-up and enjoy playing . Then they start to intertwine with each other.

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Model 5: Physical Aspects The fith model of the series invloves a more complex look at the physical aspects of a guitar. The top represents the technicality of guitar playing. Green represents how easy it is to interpret rhytnm. Other side represents emotion, Red indicates how complex emotions can be when playing the guitar. Wood is the fine line between the two and often can be penetrated through.

Model 6: Emotional Aspects The sixth and final model of the series is also a more complex look at the emotional aspects of the guitar. The body is a literal representation of a guitar. The neck is displaced like a kickstand because it supports the guitar physically and acoustically. the Six strings represent that of a guitar. Color and shape represent emotion. The brain is in center to represent origin of creativity.

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Final Abstract Model: Culmination of Studies

When I play guitar a sense of

RELAXATION

of my hand fretting each note and sense of

CONTROL.

overcomes

moving up and down

The guitar has always intrigued me as being just

as much emotion as physical talent. The are very

structured

, but also

spontaneous

constrained

linear

paths my hands take

. The emotional qualities I possess

when playing the guitar has always been strings being

myself. The feeling

the neck gives me a

ENLIGHTENING

to me. The

under tension and the higher the tension the

higher the note has always fascinated me. The rhythmic patterns that are involved in playing a guitar are very complex and intricate. I love how the guitar

projects into the crowd and CONDITIONS the audience to feel a certain way. The guitar itself is very symmetrical, but also dynamic.

The process of becoming a guitarist is very time consuming and often PAINFUL. Building Traits • • • • •

RELAXATION CONTROL ENLIGHTENING CONDITIONS PAINFUL

Model Characteristics •

OVERCOMES

MOVING UP AND DOWN

LINEAR

STRUCTURED

SPONTANEOUS

CONSTRAINED

RHYTHMIC

PROJECTS

SYMMETRICAL

DYNAMIC

For the final model, I began with a short paragraph that summarized my findings and how the guitar and I interact with each other. I then pulled key words that could be used to describe a building or model and highlighted them. Using these worlds I was able to articulate a model that best described the list of worlds. This list was also very beneficial when it came to picking my program, which in turn, led to the site choice.

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Program and Site Inspiration Photos and Case Studies

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When I play guitar a sense of

RELAXATION

of my hand fretting each note and sense of

CONTROL.

structured

myself. The feeling

the neck gives me a

The guitar has always intrigued me as being just

as much emotion as physical talent. The are very

overcomes

moving up and down

, but also

spontaneous

linear

paths my hands take

. The emotional qualities I possess

when playing the guitar has always been ENLIGHTENING to me. The strings being constrained under tension and the higher the tension the higher the note has always fascinated me. The rhythmic patterns that are involved in playing a guitar are very complex and intricate. I love how the guitar

projects

into the crowd and

CONDITIONS

feel a certain way. The guitar itself is very

the audience to

symmetrical, but also

dynamic

.

The process of becoming a guitarist is very time consuming and often PAINFUL. Building Traits • • • • •

RELAXATION CONTROL ENLIGHTENING CONDITIONS PAINFUL

Model Characteristics •

OVERCOMES

MOVING UP AND DOWN

LINEAR

STRUCTURED

SPONTANEOUS

CONSTRAINED

RHYTHMIC

PROJECTS

SYMMETRICAL

DYNAMIC

As mentioned before, this paragraph became crucial when uncovering the program and site location. Using these building trait words pulled from the paragraph, I began to do research on how a building can have the same effect on its users. This is how I cam across a library. A library can also give its users a sense of relaxation but also can be painful if the user is under an intense studying session. The building also can control and enlighten the intended users. After the discovery of the program, a series of site investigations took place to find where this library would be located.

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Sierra Leone does not have single library in the entire country

Country

Site Analysis:

Location Sierra Leone is known for one of the countries with the lowest literacy rates in the world. Sierra Leone does not currently have a public library. The closest facility they have to a library is a few grammar schools and a Global Innovation Institute. This is the reason why I chose this site to build my interactive library. The library will consist of high tech devices to help improve the learning process for the natives that live in the area. The site is adjacent to the Tagrin Bay which will aalso create some optimistic site opportunities.

Neighborhood

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Sun Study

Civilized to Natural Space

Solid to Void

Neighborhood Context The site is located on the northern side of Freetown, Sierra Leone. The site has a variety of spaces surrounding it from rural to urban. The site sits adjacent to a bay which will allow for some good design opportunities. The site will be a challenge due to its extreme sun exposure. Once the sun rises, the site has full sun exposure until the sun sets. The use of greenery and natural ventilation will be key in this design.

Nearby Uses

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Bay

6.04 Acres

Rural

Suburban

Older towns and villages are “traditional” in that there are no gridlike “streets” per se, and the houses appear in irregular and sometimes densely packed clumps. More recently constructed areas that have sprung up since the expansion of trade and commerce tend to be organized along railroad lines or streets, and are thus more linear in their Urban order. Depending on the size, almost any village will include shops or market areas, a centralized public court space, a church and/or mosque, a school, wells, and latrines. Near the outside of the village is typically a cemetery, and at either edge of town a carefully defined “Poro” or “Bundu” bush, one area strictly off-limits for women, the other area offlimits for men.

Size

Size and Zoning

263,233 Sqft = Buildable Area

Buildable Area

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Inspiration Photos

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Inspiration Photos

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Inspiration Photos

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GRAND CANAL SQUARE THEATRE

By Daniel Libeskind Poland

The design principles evolving around Grand Canal Square Theatre and commercial development was designed to emit a powerful cultural presence expressed in a dynamic fashion. The dynamism of the building was intended to project a fluid and transparent public dialogue with the culturl, commerical, and residential surroundings while communicating a sanctuary-like theatre and office building. This creates a dynamic urban gathering place for all of Dublin to appreciate. The design itself uses a strict geometric grid to divide private and social spaces . The theatre itself seats approximately 2,000 people. This size was perfect for large and small performances.

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THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFGHANISTAN

By TheeAe Architecture Hong Kong

The museum was designed around the lack of cultural prosperity and growth in Afghanistan. The building was nor only designed to educate the population, but to give them a sense of relaxation and a place of peace. The building was designed to harness the natural light and make light almost a tangible object that could be apart of the gallery. The building structure uses a rich geometric pattern that also plays with the way and the amount of light that comes into the gallery. The building takes advantage of the site by utilizing virtually the whole site plan for building space. The articulation of the skylights play a tremendous role in the mood and atmosphere of the space itself.

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Preliminary Design Tradegies and ADA

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Building Form

The initial design process on the building form was rather simple. I started with a single building (the library) and applied a simple geometric form (rectangular prism) to its program and slowly began to manipulate it form based on the envirnomental characteristics of the site. The initial and final design process was based on the idea of maximizing the glazing area of each building without overheating the building. The reasoning behind this was so that the users could

experience the sites beautiful views (because it sits on Tangrin Bay). I slow extruded and reccessed different areas of the building so it would naturally shade itself on crucial sides (mainly south facade). Also, I changed the roof slope so that it would naturally drain and also open areas for cleresotry windows for natural lighting and ventilation. Once this building for was designed, the rest of the complex was designed around the geometries defined in this library.

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Building Harmony/Orientationi

Through several very quick skteches over the course of the quarter, I articulated the educational complex so that the buildings interact with each other on a harmonious level. I first started off with four buildings with non-related form and orientation. It was proven that the complex had no interaction with itself, thus beginning my series of site drawings in order to maximize harmony and composition. I took the library from my first design (because the form was the most successful) and began manipulating the other forms to interact with the

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original library (form). The orientation of each building was a big design problem for the project and took several preliminary sketches to conclude the final outcome. Angling the buildings at a 45 degree angle prove to be the most sucessful design, which allowed for a more intricate exterior landscape (an important role in this design). One final design articulation was the idea of bridging the classroom and the library building, which eventually became an important design decision in the project.


Wall Derivitves/Designs

As seen in the project, the walls are made up of this “peristyle� aesthetic that carries from facade to facade. The column-like features of the wall were derived from the rhythmic qualities of the guitar and music itself. The two other design strategies for the facade design were the use of reinforced steel augmented through a glazing system similar to that of famous architect Daniel Libeskind. This was to

represent the strings on the guitar and the spontaneous reaction a person ha when playing guitar. This system was to allow maximum light into the interior while still having a small amount of shading. The last design decision was to put a standard louvre system on all major south-facing facades to ensure that the interiors relavent were maintained at a comfortable temperature.

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ADA Requirements

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ADA Requirements

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ADA Requirements

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ADA Requirements

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Final Product

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Classroom Perspective

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Classroom Perspective

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Program Diagram Site Plan

North Elevation

Library 2/ Assembly 3 Floor Plan

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Library Experiencial Sketches

Assembly Experiencial Sketches

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34 Courtyard Experiencial Sketches

Bridge Experiencial Sketches


Dock Experiencial Sketches

Classroom Experiencial Sketches

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Assembly Interior

Classroom Interior

Library Interior

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Final Model

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Final Model

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Side View 1

Side View 2

Side View 3

Side View 4

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Human Perspective Entry

Human Perspective Court

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Human Perspective Dock

Human Perspective Court


Shadow Study 1

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Shadow Study 2

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Shadow Study 3

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Shadow Study 4

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Final Model Overview

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In conclusion, The scholastic complex is designed to improve the standard of living in Freetown, Sierra Leone. The buildings are designed to maximize lighting for a more comfortable space when researching and learning. The harmonious balance of exterior and interior spaces are meant to offer a variety of spaces for people to read and enjoy the site. The site is built around a Cotton Tree, which symbolizes national unity and to give the users a sense of pride. The building will help natives to learn English and to teach them basic computer skills to help them become more educated.

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Studio I Portfolio