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Jordan Amoth

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Typeface Design

Jordan Amoth Typface Design: Doubler February 2013 Digital

8.5 x 8.5

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Jordan Amoth Typface Design: Doubler February 2013 Digital

8.5 x 8.5

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The DeepSpace Suit Astronauts can only travel so far in existing space suits. What will it take to see the universe? BY:

Jordan Amoth Layout: The Deep Space Suit Article November 2012 Digital 17 x 11

ERIC SOFGE

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THE LAUNCH SUIT

What Will It Take To See The Universe?

The first new suits will be streamlined successors to ACES, only they won’t be designed for steely-eyed missile men, but for a new cohort of pilots and passengers who paid hundreds of thousands of dollars to be whisked into space. Called intravehicular activity or launch-entry suits, these are the drop-down oxygen masks of the space industry, devices whose true functionality—which includes pressurization and some measure of life support—kicks in during emergencies. In its initial contract with a suit maker, SpaceX stipulated that the pressure garment must look “badass.”As designers deal for the first time with clients other than NASA, they are being forced to take on new challenges. In an initial contract with suit-maker Orbital Outfitters, SpaceX stipulated that the pressure garment must look “badass.” “You don’t get that

sort of verbiage in government contracts,” says Chris Gilman, chief designer at Orbital Outfitters. “I love it.” There are obstacles, however, to badass space suit design. A launch-entry suit is ungainly, an oversize one-piece embedded with rigid interfaces for the helmet and gloves, and enough room to inflate, basketball-like, when pressurized—especially in the seat, so an astronaut isn’t forced to stand up. Gilman plans to counter this “baggy butt” with tactical stitching. Ted Southern, co-founder of Final Frontier Design, which secured initial funding for its 3G Suit through the Kickstarter crowd-funding platform, hopes to use patterning as fashion designers always have—to improve fit. “I honestly think that’s the key,” he says. “The more anthropomorphic it is, the cooler it looks.” This is the new business of space suit design: to satisfy

By the time the alarms go off, he’s back on his feet, hoping the rover wasn’t filming, but knowing that it was—that his face-first sprawl on the surface of Phobos has been recorded for posterity. The visor’s fiber-optic display flashes ominously: suit breach. His body, or some small sliver of it, has been exposed to the raw, airless vacuum of a Martian moon.

the needs of commercial customers, whether that means cramming survivability into a svelter package, or coming up with novel, cost-saving innovations in structure and materials selection. The 3G suit—the first of which is slated for delivery as early as January to the Spanish aerospace start-up zero2infinity—eliminates some metal components. Final Frontier is considering replacing others with high-performance plastic. For the IS3 suit that Orbital Outfitters is providing to XCOR Aerospace for use in its suborbital two-seater, the Lynx, the company is exploring disposable elements. Components such as the bladder layer that seals the suit could be swapped out before each launch.

THE FUTURE SUIT

An astronaut can die many ways, but decompression is one of the more gruesome. A punctured space suit means a race to sanctuary, before the envelope of pure oxygen surrounding the body bleeds away and hypoxia causes the person to black out. Rapid pressure loss isn’t explosive, but it’s ugly: Water in the body begins to vaporize and tries to escape, the lungs collapse, and circulation shuts down.

Astronauts can only travel so far in existing space suits. What will it take to see the u n i v e r s e ?

No one’s dying today, though, at least not on Phobos. The suit he’s wearing isn’t a pressurized balloon. It’s the reverse, really—a squeeze suit, with a lattice of smart-memory alloys that binds it to the body, replacing an oxygen cushion with direct, mechanical counterpressure. The result is formfitting and nimble; it requires less energy to move andincreases an astronaut’s range on foot. And in the event of a rupture, the suit remains viable: It can be patched on the spot with a space explorer’s equivalent of an Ace bandage, its own shape-memory alloys pulling tight to seal the breach.

Custom Fit Augmented Vision Foam Buffers Cooling System Protective Shell Self-Healing Gloves Extreme Insulation Artificial Gravity Adhesive Strength Extra Power

By the time the patch is in place, the alarms have stopped. Epidermal biosensors and path-planning algorithms have shortened the astronaut’s trek across the surface, from six miles out to just over four. He’ll call mission control to argue against this shortcut when his heart rate settles. A nasty bruise isn’t going to kill him. And he didn’t travel 100 million miles from home to turn back now.

In its initial contract with a suit maker, SpaceX stipulated that the pressure garment must look “badass.”

Jordan Amoth Layout: The Deep Space Suit Article November 2012 Digital 17 x 11

Check out the full article http://bit.ly/WbxT1K

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Jordan Amoth

Branding: Be Fit Nutrition September 2012 Digital

3.5 x 2

4 x 2.7

4.25 x 9.5

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Jordan Amoth

Branding: Be Fit Nutrition September 2012 Digital

8.5 x 11

3.5 x 2

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GIG MUSIC BOOKING 542 LIME STREET SEATTLE, WA 98041

STAMP

SOMEONE SOMEBODY 673 MAIN STREET SEATTLE, WA 98041

Jordan Amoth

Branding: Gig Music Booking February 2013 Digital

4x4

4.25 x 9.5

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MUSIC BOOKING

Dear Someone Somebody, Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Praesent mattis eros a tellus. Quisque leo tortor, commodo id, dapibus et, lacinia et, justo. Ut urna sapien, dictum eu, cursus vel, consectetuer tincidunt, eros. Etiam in libero. Etiam tempor. Maecenas ligula felis, commodo eget, scelerisque id, suscipit nec, odio. Vivamus commodo, magna in mollis feugiat, felis nisl dapibus dolor, eu blandit orci nulla in orci. Cras felis ipsum, mollis at, semper et, tincidunt id, ipsum. Ut consectetuer elit nec elit. Cras luctus molestie ligula. In gravida tempor nunc. Curabitur nisl ligula, pulvinar et, volutpat non, porta a, ipsum. Donec tristique ante at est. Pellentesque volutpat est non diam. Aenean vel velit. Suspendisse facilisis nisl et massa. Mauris nec erat. Pellentesque luctus arcu ut dui. Proin suscipit lorem id augue. Maecenas eget ipsum nec orci convallis viverra. Suspendisse potenti. Donec sed enim. Ut et turpis. Ut mattis enim nec nisl. Ut quam. Pellentesque lobortis vehicula risus. Etiam massa erat, tempor et, elementum fringilla, pellentesque ac, odio. Cras sed felis. Aliquam erat volutpat. Etiam tristique. Donec pellentesque, nulla semper adipiscing faucibus, nibh augue semper sapien, eget feugiat dui massa et urna. Nullam ac arcu. Quisque interdum. Morbi tristique sagittis arcu. Phasellus euismod ante eget risus. Nam convallis rutrum augue. Pellentesque placerat ultrices tellus. Ut lacinia. Sed aliquet diam at odio. Nunc ultrices pretium urna. Sed risus velit, nonummy eget, suscipit at, sagittis in, tortor. Quisque risus. Duis porta. Nunc blandit, augue et nonummy ultrices, lacus justo tincidunt nibh, eu vestibulum turpis metus iaculis ipsum. Morbi neque. Quisque augue. Etiam eleifend rhoncus metus. Aliquam auctor libero non nisi. Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Nullam justo lectus, lobortis id, pharetra eu, pulvinar ac, nibh. Sed hendrerit pretium urna. Vivamus ut ipsum eget justo adipiscing adipiscing. Donec lectus arcu, interdum eget, malesuada a, euismod sed, sapien. Proin imperdiet, nulla sit amet mattis adipiscing, enim nibh condimentum metus, sit amet lacinia tortor arcu eget magna. Mauris eget enim at ante luctus ultricies. Integer eu nunc eget tellus iaculis vestibulum. Suspendisse potenti. Aenean aliquam mauris id turpis. Aenean a augue id urna laoreet pretium. Suspendisse pharetra viverra mi. Mauris ornare dignissim purus. Nulla urna. Aliquam gravida, nibh at tempor luctus, nisl dui ullamcorper mi, sit amet pellentesque odio orci in sapien. Duis urna.

GIG MUSIC BOOKING

542 LIME STREET SEATTLE, WA 98041

BOOK@GIGMUSICBOOKING.COM

Sincerely, Someone

206 551 2689

542 LIME STREET SEATTLE, WA 98041

Jordan Amoth

206 551 2689

BOOK@GIGMUSICBOOKING.COM

Branding: Gig Music Booking February 2013 Digital

8.5 x 11

3.5 x 3.5

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Allow events to change you. You have to be willing to grow. Growth is different from something that happens to you. You produce it. You live it. The prerequisites for growth: the openness to experience events and the willingness to be changed by them. Forget about good. Good is a known quantity. Good is what we all agree on. Growth is not necessarily good. Growth is an exploration of unlit recesses that may or may not yield to our research. As long as you stick to good you’ll never have real growth. Process is more important than outcome. When the outcome drives the process we will only ever go to where we’ve already been. If process drives outcome we may not know where we’re going, but we will know we want to be there. Love your experiments (as you would an ugly child). Joy is the engine of growth. Exploit the liberty in casting your work as beautiful experiments, iterations, attempts, trials, and errors. Take the long view and allow yourself the fun of failure every day. Go deep. The deeper you go the more likely you will discover something of value. Capture accidents. The wrong answer is the right answer in search of a different question. Collect wrong answers as part of the process. Ask different questions. Study. A studio is a place of study. Use the necessity of production as an excuse to study. Everyone will benefit. Drift. Allow yourself to wander aimlessly. Explore adjacencies. Lack judgment. Postpone criticism. Begin anywhere. John Cage tells us that not knowing where to begin is a common form of paralysis. His advice: begin anywhere. Everyone is a leader. Growth happens. Whenever it does, allow it to emerge. Learn to follow when it makes sense. Let anyone lead.Harvest ideas. Edit applications. Ideas need a dynamic, fluid, generous environment to sustain life. Applications, on the other hand, benefit from critical rigor. Produce a high ratio of ideas to applications. Keep moving. The market and its operations have a tendency to reinforce success. Resist it. Allow failure and migration to be part of your practice. Slow down. Desynchronize from standard time frames and surprising opportunities may present themselves. Don’t be cool. Cool is conservative fear dressed in black. Free yourself from limits of this sort. Ask stupid questions. Growth is fueled by desire and innocence. Assess the answer, not the question. Imagine learning throughout your life at the rate of an infant. Collaborate. The space between people working together is filled with conflict, friction, strife, exhilaration, delight, and vast creative potential.____________________. Intentionally left blank. Allow space for the ideas you haven’t had yet, and for the ideas of others. Stay up late. Strange things happen when you’ve gone too far, been up too long, worked too hard, and you’re separated from the rest of the world.Work the metaphor. Every object has the capacity to stand for something other than what is apparent. Work on what it stands for. Be careful to take risks. Time is genetic. Today is the child of yesterday and the parent of tomorrow. The work you produce today will create your future. Repeat yourself. If you like it, do it again. If you don’t like it, do it again. Make your own tools. Hybridize your tools in order to build unique things. Even simple tools that are your own can yield entirely new avenues of exploration. Remember, tools amplify our capacities, so even a small tool can make a big difference. Stand on someone’s shoulders. You can travel farther carried on the accomplishments of those who came before you. And the view is so much better. Avoid software. The problem with software is that everyone has it. Don’t clean your desk. You might find something in the morning that you can’t see tonight. Don’t enter awards competitions. Just don’t. It’s not good for you. Read only left-hand pages. Marshall McLuhan did this. By decreasing the amount of information, we leave room for what he called our "noodle." Make new words. Expand the lexicon. The new conditions demand a new way of thinking. The thinking demands new forms of expression. The expression generates new conditions. Think with your mind.Forget technology. Creativity is not device-dependent Organization = Liberty. Real innovation in design, or any other field, happens in context. That context is usually some form of cooperatively managed enterprise. Frank Gehry, for instance, is only able to realize Bilbao because his studio can deliver it on budget. The myth of a split between "creatives" and "suits" is what Leonard Cohen calls a ‘charming artifact of the past.’ Don’t borrow money. Once again, Frank Gehry’s advice. By maintaining financial control, we maintain creative control. It’s not exactly rocket science, but it’s surprising how hard it is to maintain this discipline, and how many have failed. Listen carefully. Every collaborator who enters our orbit brings with him or her a world more strange and complex than any we could ever hope to imagine. By listening to the details and the subtlety of their needs, desires, or ambitions, we fold their world onto our own. Neither party will ever be the same. Take field trips. The bandwidth of the world is greater than that of your TV set, or the nternet, or even a totally immersive, interactive, dynamically rendered, object-oriented, real-time, computer graphic–simulated environment. Make mistakes faster. This isn’t my idea — I borrowed it. I think it belongs to Andy Grove. Imitate. Don’t be shy about it. Try to get as close as you can. You’ll never get all the way, and the separation might be truly remarkable. We have only to look to Richard Hamilton and his version of Marcel Duchamp’s large glass to see how rich, discredited, and underused imitation is as a technique. Scat. When you forget the words, do what Ella did: make up something else … but not words. Break it, stretch it, bend it, crush it, crack it, fold it. Explore the other edge. Great liberty exists when we avoid trying to run with the technological pack. We can’t find the leading edge because it’s trampled underfoot. Try using old-tech equipment made obsolete by an economic cycle but still rich with potential. Coffee breaks, cab rides, green rooms. Real growth often happens outside of where we intend it to, in the interstitial spaces — what Dr. Seuss calls "the waiting place." Hans Ulrich Obrist once organized a science and art conference with all of the infrastructure of a conference — the parties, chats, lunches, airport arrivals — but with no actual conference. Apparently it was hugely successful and spawned many ongoing collaborations.

NOV 28 | 7-9 PM | SUB BALLROOM

Avoid fields. Jump fences. Disciplinary boundaries and regulatory regimes are attempts to control the wilding of creative life. They are often understandable efforts to order what are manifold, complex, evolutionary processes. Our job is to jump the fences and cross the fields. Laugh. People visiting the studio often comment on how much we laugh. Since I’ve become aware of this, I use it as a barometer of how comfortably we are expressing ourselves. Remember. Growth is only possible as a product of history. Without memory, innovation is merely novelty. History gives growth a direction. But a memory is never perfect. Every memory is a degraded or composite image of a previous moment or event. That’s what makes us aware of its quality as a past and not a present. It means that every memory is new, a partial construct different from its source, and, as such, a potential for growth itself. Power to the people. Play can only happen when people feel they have control over their lives. We can’t be free agents if we’re not free. - Incomplete Manifesto for Growth

Jordan Amoth

Poster: Bruce Mau October 2012 Digital

17 x 11

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Jordan Amoth

Composite: Potential Change February 2013 Digital

16 x 7

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younglife

u i of

college

Jordan Amoth

T-Shirt Design: College Younglife February 2013 Digital

8x8

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Jordan Amoth

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Jordan Amoth Portfolio