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Thomas J. Kennedy of Missouri, DDS, LLC, and Associates General Dentistry

Dr. Joe Robinson Dr. Ty Barnes

Thomas J. Kennedy of Oklahoma, DDS, PLLC, and Associates General Dentistry

Dr. Johnny Maravich Dr. Sebastian Tietze

Dr. Bradley Acker Dr. Karl Gubser


VOLUME 4 | ISSUE 6 | OCTOBER 2013

13 I N EACH I SSU E

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34 PROFILE: Hannah Alexander revealed

6 THE SCENE 10 THE 10-SPOT

36 PROFILE: Paul Johnson—veteran recognized

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12 ON THE COVER: Holiday buyers guide

44 PROFILE: Chad Wagoner “shoots” the stars

THE J LIST

24 LIVING: Decorating for the holidays

48 PROFILE: Chris Greninger plays some of

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Europe’s oldest organs

30 STYLE: Fun fall fashion

48 MUSIC TO THE EARS: Me Like Bees

THE PARTING SHOT

32 PROFILE: Allen Shirley entertains and educates with historical collection

THE J TEAM EDITOR Kevin McClintock Phone: 417.627.7279 Fax: 417.623.8598 E-Mail: kmcclintock@joplinglobe.com MAGAZINE WRITER Ryan Richardson CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Scott Meeker CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Katy Schrader Michael Coonrod

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CONTRIBUTING ARTISTS Roma Harmon Regina Carnahan Michael Duntz Jimi Adams

GRAPHIC DESIGN Gaila Osborn T H E J O P L I N G LO B E

DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING Brent Powers Phone: 417.627.7233 E-mail: bpowers@joplinglobe.com

PHOTOGRAPHERS T. Rob Brown Roger Nomer Curtis Almeter B.W. Shepherd Ryan Richardson Drew Kimble

PRESIDENT AND PUBLISHER Mike Beatty Phone: 417.627.7291 Fax: 417.623.8450 E-Mail: mbeatty@joplinglobe.com

SALES MANAGER Janette Cooper Phone: 417.627.7236 Fax: 417.623.8450 E-Mail: jcooper@joplinglobe.com

EDITOR Carol Stark Phone: 417.627.7278 Fax: 417.623.8598 E-Mail: cstark@joplinglobe.com

CIRCULATION DIRECTOR Jack Kaminsky Phone: 417.627.7341 Fax: 417.623-8450 E-Mail: jkaminsky@joplinglobe.com

COVER DESIGN Jimi Adams

DIRECTOR OF MAGAZINES Julie Damer Phone: 417.627.7323 Fax: 417.623.8450 E-Mail: jdamer@joplinglobe.com Joplin Metro Magazine is a publication of Newspaper Holdings Inc. and is published monthly. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any editorial or advertising matter. The publisher assumes no responsibility for return of unsolicited materials.


from the editor

HOLIDAY FOCUS....

GIVING! C

What we didn’t want are national items that can easily be found and ordered online or by catalog. We also didn’t want to solicit items from a chain store. Nope, our focus was solely on local shops and stores here in Joplin, over in Carthage and up north in Carl Junction. In doing so, we were able to feature a sizable range of gifts from nearly 20 stores and shops.

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It’s as simple as that.

As always, thank you for reading. You can reach us at kmcclintock@ joplinglobe.com, by mail at Joplin Metro Magazine, 117 E. Fourth St., Joplin, Mo., 64801, call us at 417.627.7279 or find us on Facebook.

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J-Mag photographer Curtis Almeter’s picture neatly sums up what we wanted to do with our gift guide. Our basic goal was a simple one: try to contact a nice, wide range of local businesses here in Jasper County. In doing so, we would highlight between one to five items that are made here in Southwest Missouri or are unique to the store.

Aside from the big gift blow-out in the middle of the magazine, you’ll also read about historian Allen Shirley and his prized historical collection of artifacts; military veteran Paul Johnson, who served during three wars; holiday decorating tips for the home; what local Joplin people are thankful for this Thanksgiving; and a Joplin man who received the rare treat of going to Eastern Europe to play vintage organs.

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We’re hoping this month’s cover piece, our holiday gift guide, will bring about happiness for you and your friends and family, too.

Our hope is that you’ll see these gifts, like what you see, and go visit these stores, purchasing some of the noted items. We think you’ll be pleasantly surprised at what these locally-owned businesses have to offer in terms of items that fit every possible eclectic taste of your friends and family members.

Kevin McClintock Editor Joplin Metro Magazine

M A G A Z I N E

arthage couple Mike and Katie Dunlavy are the handsome couple gracing the cover of our inside package, the holiday gift guide, on page 12. In Katie’s hands sits a boxed gift that has obviously made her very happy.

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the scene

D O G D AY A F T E R N O O N

PHOTOGRAPHY BY B.W. SHEPHERD

Jase Camacho, 10, reads to Bess, 10, an American Pit Bull. Therapy dogs are trained to provide affection and comfort to people in hospitals, retirement homes, nursing homes, schools, hospices, disaster areas and to people with learning difficulties.

Emma Sitton-Coats, 8, of Joplin, reads about whales to a grinning Bedlington Terrier named Ricky recently at the Joplin Public Library.

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Eleven-year-old Chase Hopper of Joplin reads to Puravida, an 8-year-old English Mastiff therapy dog, during the Joplin Public Library’s Dog Day Afternoon.

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the scene WINEFEST

PHOTOGRAPHY BY CURTIS ALMETER

Mendy McCluey, of Sarcoxie, joins a long line of wine tasters during the fundraiser inside the Joplin Convention Center.

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Nicole Mash and husband Joseph (left) accept a free sample of Stella Rose wine from Steve Hunter (right) of Joplin during the 2013 Winefest.

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Tina Surgi (left) and daughter Theresa Surgi (right) sample a sip of Japanese wine during the 2013 Winefest.


profile HANNAH ALEXANDER BY MICHAEL COONROD PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY CHERYL AND MEL HODDE

A Shared Career The answer to all writing, to any career for that matter, is love. — Ray Bradbury

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ove is an important part of writing for Cheryl and Dr. Mel Hodde. The Monett couple, who write under the pen name “Hannah Alexander,” have published more than 20 books together. “Mel and I came up with that because when we started this together, and when we first started getting published, I wanted one name that reflected both of our characters. I chose Hannah, and he chose Alexander,” Cheryl said. “Hannah means, ‘her hope is in the Lord,’ Alexander means, ‘servant of mankind.’ That was something we had read in some of our baby name books, so that’s what we came up with. I answer to Hannah as much as I answer to Cheryl now.”

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Introduced by their pastor, they were initially reluctant to date, but friends kept bringing them together until months later when Mel asked Cheryl out. “That’s when he started reading all my manuscripts, and I started changing all of the heroes in all of my manuscripts to more reflect what he was like. Because he was a true hero, he was a good person,” Cheryl said. She’s not exaggerating. “We were rock climbing in Utah, wearing backpacks out hiking in Arches National Park, and there was a slick rock, I was holding onto it and sliding over, and I started to fall backwards, and Mel risked his own life and came around behind me

and almost fell himself, and shoved me back up against the rock,” Cheryl said. “I would’ve died. It was about 30 feet down; it was in the rocks. So, he saved my life. He’s a real hero.” The pair writes medical romance and suspense novels, but always include their Christian beliefs in the story. “I started writing just a romance, and I couldn’t because I had to show somehow that these two people were spiritually on the same page,” Cheryl said. “I have to have this couple in love with the right person, the person who believes the same.” Mel, who enjoyed writing poetry as child, read the manuscripts and offered suggestions as well as encouragement when needed. “I would get discouraged and he would read it out loud, (with) Mel and Cheryl Hodde

dramatic flair, and he would suggest other things and he especially was good with the medical,” Cheryl said. “The medical was what I needed him for.” So did the readers. The novels were something new when the television show “ER” was popular. “My mother would have fainted to think her ‘doctor son’ would become a romance writer,” Mel said. “I’ve enjoyed reading fiction since childhood, but when I began to study medicine I didn’t know if I’d ever get back into reading it, much less helping write it, so it’s been a pleasant surprise. “The perspective of actually being married to a novelist has been exciting.” So does Mel write, too? “I’ve tried my hand at writing a full scene or two, but


Published titles by “Hannah Alexander” Stand alone novels: Hidden Motive (2008) A Killing Frost (2009) The Wedding Kiss (2011) Silent Night, Deadly Night (2011) Eye of the Storm (2012) Keeping the Faith (2013)

So what’s it like sharing a career with your spouse? “Pretty darn neat,” Mel said. “It gives us a chance to share both our worlds, and gives each of us an

Sacred Trust series: Sacred Trust (reprinted 2009) Solemn Oath (reprinted 2009) Silent Pledge (reprinted 2009)

Parker Mortuary

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1502 S. Joplin, Joplin, MO 64804 (417) 623-4321

www.parkermortuary.com

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O C T O B E R

He was sobbing when he called Cheryl and Mel to tell them about the incident. “It was just so overwhelming, and we both decided if nothing ever comes of our books, this is it. We saved a child’s life,” Cheryl said.

Healing Touch series: Second Opinion (2002) Necessary Measures (2002) Urgent Care (2003)

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The doctor/novelist collaboration even saved a girl‘s life. The editor for their book, “Sacred Trust,” had just read a scene where a character is treated for anaphylactic shock. Then, at a birthday party, his daughter began to show similar symptoms. “She started swelling up,“ Cheryl said, “and he thought about that scene, and he knew what was happening because of that, otherwise he said he might not have done anything. He got her to the ER immediately, and the doctor told him that if you’d gotten her here any later, she would’ve died.“

appreciation for what the other does. Cheryl starts from scratch to create an entire fictional world. I can’t quite wrap my head around that. I take individual pieces of a puzzle and put them together to make a diagnosis, and Cheryl has always been fascinated by that. Some of those puzzles are tough, but Cheryl creates the puzzle parts within the puzzle, which blows my mind.”

M A G A Z I N E

quickly realized that wasn’t my forte, especially when it came to a ‘free-writing’ portion of a writer’s retreat,” Mel said. “Cheryl and her friends would just be zipping along on their laptops and I’d (be sitting) there with my mouth hanging open, feeling stupid. I’m the doctor in the house. Cheryl’s the novelist.”

Hideaway series: Hideaway (2003) Safe Haven (2004) Last Resort (2005) Note of Peril (2005) Fair Warning (2006) Under Suspicion (2006) Grave Risk (2007) Death Benefits (2007) Double Blind (2008) Hideaway Home (2008)

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the 10 spot THANKFULNESS PHOTOGRAPHY BY RYAN RICHARDSON

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“I am thankful that I am back with my family after spending ten months on the road. It is really good to be home safe.” — Jacob Relogle, Joplin

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“I am thankful to be able to travel throughout America and see wonderful towns like Joplin.” — Arlyne Scott, Sober Island, Nova Scotia, Canada

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ith summer officially over and trees beginning to turn, it’s time to sit back and reflect on what makes our lives so special. To acknowledge what we find special in our lives, we here at J-Mag went around Joplin and asked random Four State Area residents (and even one international traveler) a simple question: “What are you thankful for?”

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3)

“I am thankful for my family and that salvation I have through Jesus Christ.” — Robert Williams, Liberal, Mo.

4)

“I am thankful that I have the opportunity to play football.” — Josh Lanz, Liberal, Mo.


5)

6)

7)

8)

9)

10)

“I am thankful for the country standing as a republic and the good times we’ve had.” — Marylin Heater, Neosho, Mo.

“I’m thankful that I held out to get the job I wanted. I love working.” — Graham Starkweather, Joplin

“My boyfriend is in the military. I’m thankful that he is safe and that he is coming home soon.” — Shelby Eaton, Joplin

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“Family and great support of the people that are in my life.” — Lily’a De Leon, Joplin

“My family is what I’m thankful for.” — Jake McClarnon, Joplin

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“My family and the opportunities in my life that have come my way.” — Chris Henry, Wichita, Kan.

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on the cover H O L I D AY G I F T G U I D E WRITTEN AND PHOTOGRAPHED BY KEVIN MCCLINTOCK AND RYAN RICHARDSON

Holiday O C T O B E R

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The following is the ultimate guide for finding creative gift ideas for everyone on your list. The premise is simple: gifts ranging from affordable to adorable, all found inside local businesses here in Jasper County. You won’t find a chain brand store on this list, and that’s the whole idea, you don’t have to go to chain stores to get what you want. That perfect something for that perfect someone can be found right under your nose, inside a shop or store here in Joplin, Carl Junction or Carthage.

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t’s never too early to start shopping, particularly if you don’t want to wait until the very last weekend before Christmas.

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Gift Guide 2013

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Blue Moon Market 613 S. Main St. 417.553.0826

Fashionable dresses One of numerous dresses that can be found inside the store, all below manufacturer cost. $40-$55

LA Idol Bling Jeans Designer-inspired denim jeans that take style notes from the hottest trends, with unique pocket details and extreme side stitching. $60

Bigger Than Beads Handmade jewelry created by Ugandan women; 100 percent of proceeds goes directly to the village of Masese, Uganda, to help provide a sustainable income for these women. $20-$24 14


Lois Campbell hand-made quilts At the back of the store are a number of beautiful quilts, of all colors, sizes and patterns. $550 (hand-made quilts) $300 (machine-made quilts)

Magnolia House Gifts & Antiques 1202 S. Joplin Ave. 417.623.7750

Lampe Berger Paris Direct from France, these “swirl fragrance lampsâ€? deodorize by eliminating odors, creating a beautiful scent inside the home. Twenty minutes of burn time per 110 square feet is all that’s needed for air puriďŹ cation. Gift sets include catalytic burner, solid snuer cap, decorative shade, ďŹ lling funnel and instructions. $77-$100-plus (lamps)

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Think of Six-Eleven as a onestop shop where three unique businesses co-exist beneath a single roof. The store is comprised of the following businesses: Lagow Portrait Designs Inc.; Dan’s Tuxedos and Breezy’s Distinctive Floral & Event Designs.

M A G A Z I N E

611 S. Main St. 417.782.6320

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Six-Eleven

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Hackett’s Hot Wings on the cover

H O L I D AY B U Y I N G G U I D E

520 S. Main St. 417.625.1333

Seasonal fall coats of all patterns and colors . $90-$100

One of Joplin’s favorite restaurants is now selling their famed dry rubs in a beautiful gift basket. The ďŹ ve unique avors include: House, Cajun, Caribbean Jerk, Greek and Lemon Pepper.

Upstairs Boutique

t0OFESZSVC PVODFT t"NJYONBUDIDBTFPGTJYESZSVC seasonings: $70.15

Upstairs Boutique carries unique lines of clothing that you won’t ďŹ nd in most run of the mill stores or shopping malls.

502 S. Main St. 417.781.6581

Spiva Center For The Arts Gift Shop

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222 W. Third St. 417.623.0183

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The gift shop is always receiving new items.

Pottery and sculptures from local artists.


Newton’s Jewelers 428 S. Main St. 417.781.4400

t $  BOEJFEPSDBSBNFM apples: $4 t $  IPDPMBUFDPWFSFE strawberries: $4 (a half-dozen) or $28 (tray of 30) t 5  XPDIPDPMBUFEJQQFE bananas: $3

Carmen’s Apples

2501 N. Range Line Road, Suite 4 417.434.8939

Rolex “President� watch. Rolex is arguably the most popular name in watches, certainly when it comes to luxury watches. A Rolex watch can last for decades with simple care. t  

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Randy Wright hand-carved rings $200

Fridge Arte acrylic drawings Ruth Snider $10

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Silver & goldplated jewelry Janes Glass Art of Carl Junction $20-$30

This local family sells 88 apples a day, 30 bags of strawberries, 30 bags of pineapples, about 25 bulk mixed fruit bowls and 15 bags of chocolate-covered bananas.

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Vintage Vogue 144 S. Main St., Carl Junction 417.649.7911

Annie Sloan Chalk Paint One of the largest selections of chalk paint found in Missouri; the paint is versatile and can work on any surface — from wood to metal to plastic — on items indoor or out. $36.95 for 32-ounce; $12.95 for a 4-ounce bottle

Hobo bags Handcrafted leather handbags under the popular Hobo brand. Ranges in price from $38-$300

Glenda Gies handbags

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Merging old Hollywood glamor and sophistication to new generations of fashionable women. $42.95 and up

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Bombshell Betty vintage leather cuffs Very popular items made from reclaimed belts and vintage and antique metal tags. $39

John Wind “Sorority Gal” charm bracelets John Wind discovered these ‘sorority’ gal script initials on a dusty sample board in a New England jewelry factory; since then, they have become a worldwide favorite. $78


Colonial table

on the cover

Windsor chairs are hand-crafted by River Bend Chair Co. with the same building techniques used 200 years ago; each chair is handmade and beautifully finished. Chairs are available with a comb; rockers and settees are also available. Individual chair: $295

H O L I D AY B U Y I N G G U I D E

Windsor Chairs

All the tables and furniture are custom made; the table in the picture is made of Tiger Maple, a prized wood known for its beauty and strength. Table: $495

Colonial Lamp

Décor & More 1204 Grand Ave., Carthage 417.434.5843 2 0 1 3

All kinds of furniture can be found inside this new Carthage shop, from sofas to end-tables. This checkered sofa comes complete with accompanied foot rest. Sofa: $300 Red pillows: $12 each

Jewelry Handmade and discounted jewelry is the shop’s biggest seller: rings, bracelets, necklaces of all sizes and colors. Prices range from as low as $6 to as high as $30

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Furniture

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348 Grant Ave., Carthage 417.553.0826

Colonial lighting is an important element for all colonial decorating needs. Iron and tin light fixtures from well known brands are found here, such as Lt Moses Willard. Lamp. $339

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Colonial House

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on the cover

H O L I D AY B U Y I N G G U I D E

Between Friends 1200 Grand Ave., Carthage 417.358.4111

Chevron InďŹ nity Scarves Lightweight scarves that come in all colors; great to keep the breeze away and made of very good quality; just the right length to wrap around the neck twice. $15-$22

Beaucoup Designs Jewelry People of all ages and backgrounds will ďŹ nd pieces within Beaucoup Designs to suit their tastes. From high-school graduates to new moms, and birthday girls to bridesmaids, Beaucoup jewelry is designed with everyone in mind. Starting at $16

Hobo wallets Find the perfect wallet for you hand: Laurens, wristlets, continentals, compact and credit card; comes in all colors and prints. $50-$120

Forget Me Not Florists

Forget Me Not Florists sells handmade planters and pottery from local artists. Planter $21.00

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197 W. 2nd Street 417.782.5757

Handmade Planter

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WoodWick Lavender Candle With a wick made from organic wood, these candles are rated at 100 hours of burn time. $19.50

WoodWick Reed Diffuser Starter Kit Bring a long lasting fresh sent to your home via a decorative starter kit from WoodWick, which includes reeds, holder and scent. $27.95


Scentations Potpurri Bag Bold, fruity aroma from the Arkansas-based company will liven up any home. $16.50

Sabino Crystal Vase

Golfer Desk Piece For the refined sportsman in the family, here is a desk statue for the study. $50

on the cover

422 S. Joplin Ave. 417.781.3719

H O L I D AY B U Y I N G G U I D E

Countryside Flowers

Ozark Athletic 1222 S. Main St. 417.623.0626

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Celebrate your student’s achievements in school with a jacket sporting their school’s colors and logos, along with awards that they have earned. Jackets start at $100, with additional costs relating to adding letters and patches.

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High School Letterman Jacket

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Countryside offers one-of-a-kind collector pieces from the Sabino opalescent crystal collection. Some of these highly collectable crystal pieces date back to the 1940s and have become sought-after. $1,100

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All Things Grand on the cover

H O L I D AY B U Y I N G G U I D E

1027 S. Main (Inside the Gryphon Building) 417.627.9500

All Thing Grand’s owners scour Europe twice a year to secure unique pieces, such as the following pieces.

Italian Terra Cotta “Duomo” $137.50 Silver on porcelain serving plate from Match $ 244 French candlesticks $135 per pair

Italian Intrada $142

Brush and Blade

Leggett & Platt

11027 S. Main St. (Inside the Gryphon Building) 417.621.0392

One of Southwest Missouri’s largest employers, the company has pioneered sleep technology for more than 125 years.

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Leggett & Platt beds

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For the beard and mustache enthusiast, the Brush and Blade is now carrying homemade mustache wax and hair pomade. Made from all-natural ingredients in Springfield, these products are now officially sold at the Brush and Blade.

Rock-A-Billy Pomade $15 Stiff Upper Lip $8 Ditch Digger Mustache Wax $8

Complete beds, headboards and footboards, platform beds, daybeds, futons, and juvenile beds made from a variety of materials including metal, wood, and synthetic leather are all available at a number of local furniture stores. Prices can range from $900 to more than $2,000, depending on bed size and design of headboard.

Leggett & Platt Brisa Memory Foam Pillow For a comfortable sleep, sometimes it comes down to the pillow. A leading pillow bestseller is this foammemory Brisa pillow, which stays cool and dry and does not retain sweat or odor, while the memory foam contours to the curves of the head and neck. $40 to $50.


Stephen Joseph Ladybug signature quilted backpack When a plain bag just won’t do, try the Signature Collection of personalized and monogrammed backpacks for kids from Stephen Joseph; made with mixed fabric styles and patterns to create a unique, eye-catching design for your little one. Backpack: $29.99 Personalized: $7

The Crazy Dazy 337 S. Main St., Carthage 417.358.8513

Tooth Fairy Pillows from Maison Chic The shark is a store favorite, but there are all kinds of pillows (owls, cars, elephants) needing homes. And when a young one loses a tooth, it can fit down into the shark’s mouth; a fun way to keep a tooth safe until the Tooth Fairy arrives. $13.99

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Perfect for tweens all the way down to toddlers. It can carry everything you or your little girl needs when they are running about with you on errands. The gingham pattern backpack is something that no other Jasper County-based store has. Small: $17.99 Large: $26.99 Personalized: $7

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Mint backpack

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During the holiday season, many homeowners turn to fall colors like orange, green and rust to accent existing colors inside of a home.

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living H O L I D AY D É C O R WRITTEN AND PHOTOGRAPHED BY RYAN RICHARDSON

for t he holidays

Home décor

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s summer yields to fall, natural colors take ever the landscape as Mother Nature paints a scene with fallen leaves.

Pam Mense shows off an aluminum serving tray that can be used as a home accent on its own, or combined with other pieces to make an attractive centerpiece.

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Fall also kicks off the decorating season as homes open up to friends and families for the holidays. For Madison Lane Interiors co-owners Pam Mense and Amber Sachetta, fall signals the start of the busiest time of the year for the duo. For more than seven years, Madison Lane Interiors, at 505 W. Second St., has helped homeowners add a distinct flair to their homes during fall and holiday season.

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living

H O L I D AY D É C O R

Apothecary jars can add a versatile touch of color and class to any home.

“I think it starts in September with people focusing on the whole season, not just the holidays,” Mense said. “This is when people focus on beautifying their homes for upcoming guests. This is the time that they do all of the prep work for when guests will enter their homes.”

❄ ❆ Toys & Holiday Decor - Housewares ❆ ❄ ❄ ❆ Beautiful Furniture - Lay-A-Way ❆ ❄

Suzanne Boulware is an advisor at the Joplin Decorating Center, 2027 Roosevelt Ave., and agreed that colors like grey, orange and gold have become especially trendy over the past year. “It is refreshing to see grays and gold joining orange as a popular color now in the area,” Boulware said. “In the past years, we’ve had a lot of homeowners go for a beige color, but now people are focusing on using these colors to accent what they already have in their homes.”

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Mense said that during the fall, traditional table centerpieces like gourds and pumpkins will make appearances throughout a typical home. Sachetta added that the bright orange colors associated with these items also act as a catalyst to bring out other colors. “You’ll see orange in the fall and it helps spur a trendy look to rest of their homes with matching colors,” Sachetta said. “A lot of people come in asking for darker reds or rust-colored items to go with the browns already inside of their homes. It really is the time of year to bring a trendy look to their homes with just a change of color.”

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Boulware said that home decoration tends to grow throughout the fall and winter as Thanksgiving and Christmas approach. “We tend to really build our homes around the holidays,” Boulware said. “Most people will rearrange their whole living room to put a Christmas tree in and a lot of our customers take


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Mense pointed out that in addition to adding splashes of color to homes, many people use decorations such as serving plates that can add function and class to a home. “Our aluminum serving dishes are very popular this time of the year because they are so versatile,” Mense said. “Some people will use them as shelving pieces or they will join other table decorations like apothecary jars that can be filled with color.” Those kinds of choices are what Sachetta finds most attractive about the fall season. “There really are so many ways to make a home ready for the holidays,” Sachetta said. “It always comes down to presentation and how you want others to perceive your home.”

During the holiday season, many homeowners turn to fall colors like orange, green and rust to accent existing colors inside of a home.

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that time to spruce up the rest of their home to match that warm feeling of the holidays. Table pieces become popular and wreaths are commonplace both for indoors and outdoors. A nicely made wreath is a traditional symbol that serves as a warm greeting for the fall.”

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F UN FAL L FAS H I O N

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profile ALLEN SHIRLEY BY KEVIN MCCLINTOCK PHOTOGRAPHY BY T. ROB BROWN

Protecting history Joplin man entertains and educates public with extensive historical collection

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llen Shirley’s hobby, 25 years in the making, spans more than 400 years of human development. “I love really old things,� the Joplin resident said with a chuckle. His 300-item collection begins roughly around the mid-1560s and ends at the conclusion of World War II. That historical timeframe particularly fascinates Shirley because “that was the end of the dark ages, so to speak, and the beginning of Europe and the age of enlightenment. That’s always been interesting to me.� Collection pieces include: t /  FXTQBQFST GSPN "NFSJDBT DPMPnial times bearing signatures from George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and John Adams.

t "   ZFBSPMEQMVT (FSNBO “broadside,� or single-page publication — precursor of modernday newspapers, that was printed in 1566 and depicts an important meeting of royalty leaders congregating for a meeting outside either a Brussels, Belgium church or castle. “It’s the oldest piece of paper I’ve got,� Shirley said.

t 4  FWFSBM QJFDFT GSPN UIF BDUVBM HMS Titanic, which had been salvaged from 14,000 feet below sea level. “They’re original,� Shirley said, “and they’re unique. You can’t go to Walmart and buy them.�

t "   OFXTQBQFS GSPN 7JSHJOJB  DJSDB 1766, with editorials denouncing the British Stamp Act; and on the paper itself is an authentic British tax stamp.

One of his most prized possessions is the ďŹ rst collection piece he ever purchased: an indentured servant document from 1747. The document shows that Samuel Wood was buying a piece of property for his young family from a gentleman by the name of John Marsh, at a cost of $500.

t '  JSTUQSJOUJOHPGUIFFOUJSF&NBODJpation Proclamation text by President Abraham Lincoln by the Secular, of Oneida, N.Y. (Sept. 25, 1862).

t "   /PW     /FX :PSL 5SJbune edition detailing the Jack the Ripper killings from London.

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Allen Shirley pushing for new museum location at tornado ground zero BY KEVIN MCCLINTOCK

Shirley, president of the Friends of the Museum board, said twice the Smithsonian Institute has looked at the JMC to be an affiliate. “They loved the product,� he said, “just not the building.�

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Shirley recently advanced a petition with 150 signatures supporting a new museum complex on the land, of which he’s described as being “absolutely perfect� for the museum. “I think it was a great endorsement of the museum,� Shirley recently told The Joplin Globe. “I think people realize the museum has been neglected for way too long.�

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Mercy Hospital Joplin has offered 13 acres of land to the city for a community project that receives the most support from Joplin residents.

Other ideas for the land could include: r "  IJTUPSZNVTFVNPG+PQMJOGSPNJUTNJOing roots to the tornado, and its future possibilities. r #  PUBOJDBMHBSEFOJODPSQPSBUFEXJUIBNVseum or with walking trails. r "   TDJFODF NVTFVN XJUI PVUEPPS XBMLJOH trails featuring landscaping and sculptures. r + PQMJOTNJOJOHIJTUPSZEPOFBTBOJOUFSBDtive exhibit. r "  OPQFOTQBDFXJUIBOPVUEPPSDMBTTSPPN for neighboring schools. r "   NVTJDBM QBSL XIFSF PVUEPPS JOTUSVments can be played. r "   IVNBO SFTPVSDFT DBNQVT UP DPOOFDU people with services provided by local nonprofit agencies. r "  O BSUT NVTFVN BOE DVMUVSBM BSUT DFOUFS with a museum exhibit space. r "OPVUEPPSUIFBUFS r "NQIJUIFBUFSPSDPODFSUIBMM r "   SBJTFE WJFX DIBQFM XJUI B NFNPSJBM UP those who were born and died at the former St. John’s.

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An ideal location for an expanded, technologically-advanced Joplin Museum Complex, he added, would be at 26th Street across from Cunningham Park, the area considered to be ground zero for the EF-5 tornado that hit Joplin on May 22, 2011.

A new facility would meet the demands of the Smithsonian, such as moisture control, temperature and security. This would allow the new museum to display traveling Smithsonian exhibits the likes of which can now only be viewed in Oklahoma City, Kansas City or St. Louis. “That is a huge thing that could open the door to Joplin,� Shirley said, “to have traveling exhibits two or three times a year, bringing more people to Joplin and to the museum. What a tremendous thing to bring to Joplin for residents to enjoy.�

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llen Shirley, historian, collector and “highest-paid volunteer� at the Joplin Museum Complex, said he would donate his entire 300-piece collection to the museum should it move away from its present location at 504 S. Schifferdecker Ave. “If we can get a state-of-the-art building, than my entire collection would be donated to the museum,� he said. “I want to share what I have in history for others to see and enjoy.�

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profile

ALLEN SHIRLEY

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To pay for it, the man would become Marsh’s servant for as many years as it took for him to pay off the amount. “It’s really what got me hooked,” Shirley said. The document is beautiful, he said, written in quill ink on vellum, or animal skin, likely sheep or goat. “It was a spur of the moment thing, but I just found it and thought, ‘Man, we’re talking about King George II, not King George III, his son, who we fought against for our freedom. So we’re going back there quite a ways (in time).” The document states at one point that, should Samuel Wood die, his wife and even his young son would have to fulfill the contract until its duration. “I look at this man’s signature at the bottom and I think maybe it’s shaking just a little bit,” Shirley said. He found the document inside an antique store, which set him back $125. However, “you can’t put a price on history.” Besides, he continued, “as time goes along, because of the rarity of these items, they just go up more and more in value.”

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Most of his “finds” happen online, however. Shirley deals closely with about a dozen historical dealers through websites and e-mails. He also has purchased items from two

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international dealers: one based in Argentina, the other in Australia. Most folks own private collections, either unique or expensive. A good majority of these collections, however, are squirreled away from the public, tucked away and hidden inside a third bedroom or basement. The last thing Shirley wants to do with his collection is to keep it hidden. “My feelings have always been if you have a historical document, and you don’t share it with the public, and you don’t tell them the story behind the document, it’s just a simple piece of paper.” The important fact to remember about Shirley’s collection is its authenticity. “Everything is the real thing,” he said. “You can go online and see everything, but in the end, it’s a reproduction. But to see the actual thing that someone signed, that really adds some significance to it.” And there’s no manipulating or whitewashing history with his collection, he continued. “There’s no political correctness here. When you look at a newspaper headline, that’s exactly what was said for that particular day in history. You can’t manipulate this.”

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profile PAU L J O H N S O N BY KEVIN MCCLINTOCK PHOTOGRAPHY BY T. ROB BROWN

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Paul Thompson receives medals and a handshake during a ceremony in Joplin during the Patriot’s Day Veterans Award Ceremony on Sept. 11.

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s a 17-year-old boy, desperate to fight for his country, Paul Johnson stopped a stranger on the street and begged him to be his poppa — temporarily, of course. “I just said, ‘I wish you could help me out. I want to be a Marine,’” the 86-year-old war veteran said, chuckling now at the memory dating back to 1944. Johnson at the time was far from his Joplin home. He was, in fact, living

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in Oak Ridge, Tenn., visiting his two brothers there, and he was desperate to join the military so he could head east and fight the Japanese in the Pacific before the war ended. Unfortunately, the recruiting station in Oak Ridge would only be open for a few more days. There wasn’t enough time for Johnson to drive back to Joplin, beg his parents for their consent, and drive all the way back to Tennessee to apply.

So, like a good U.S. Marine, he improvised.“I asked the man,‘Would you be my father?’ And he did,” Johnson said with a chuckle.“He was very nice about it.” Had he gone back to Joplin, he never would have received his parents’ blessings to head off to war, he added — particularly from his mother. “I know my mother would have said no,” he said. “And my dad did what my mom told him to do.”


Triple Duty

Joplin war veteran Paul Johnson served during three wars: WWII, Korea and Vietnam

So why a Marine? “Because I was gung-ho. And they were strict,” Johnson said. “And that’s what I wanted.”

The battle would have been a bloody one. Projected casualties were 1.2 million, with more than 250,000 dead. And that was just the southern island. “Yeah, I knew that,” he admitted. However, “it’s what I signed up for, so I was ready for it.

By 1945, now a fully-trained U.S. Marine infantryman, Johnson found

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Had it happened, the initial invasion would have been the world’s largest — spanning 35 separate landing beaches and involving 14 U.S. divisions. It would have easily dwarfed the landings in Normandy, France, of 1944, which had involved 12 divisions.

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Johnson’s love for the military blossomed during his tenure at Joplin High School, where he was a devout cadet of the school’s JROTC program. “I really learned to like the military there,” he said about the high school’s program, which today is the oldest continuously active JROTC program in the United States, having been established in 1919. “It was then that I made up my mind to have a military career. I was very patriotic in high school.”

himself on a boat in the Pacific Ocean, staged at the recently captured Okinawa. All attention had turned to the invasion of the Japanese Islands, to ensure Japan’s unconditional surrender. Code-named Operation Downfall, the invasion of the southernmost main Japanese island, Kyushu, was scheduled to take place in October, 1945. A second invasion of the more populated northern island, which included the capital of Tokyo, would have occurred in March, 1946.

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But thanks to the help from a sympathetic stranger, all of that didn’t matter. Within days, Johnson was a U.S. Marine. His actions on that summer day in 1944 would launch a career that would see Johnson rise to the rank of lieutenant colonel by the time he retired in 1971. It would be a career that would span three wars — from World War II to the tangled jungles of Vietnam — and would involve three of America’s four armed forces.

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Confusion between Veterans Day profile

PAU L J O H N S O N

and Memorial Day

eterans Day is often confused with Memorial Day. While Memorial Day is often a somber event, with flowers placed on graves and the mournful call of “Taps� filtering through the air, Veterans Day is often looked upon as a solemn day of thanks to those — living and dead — who served and potentially put their lives on the line for their fellow countryman.

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to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations.�

Here’s the official differences between these two very American holidays, according to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: “Memorial Day is a day for remembering and honoring military personnel who died in the service of their country, particularly those who died in battle or as a result of wounds sustained in battle.

Congress amended this act on June 1, 1954, replacing “Armistice� with “Veterans,� and it has been known as Veterans Day since

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“While those who died are also remembered, Veterans Day is the day set aside to thank and honor ALL those who served honorably in the military — in wartime or peacetime. In fact, Veterans Day is largely intended to thank living veterans for their service, to acknowledge that their contributions to our national security are appreciated, and to underscore the fact that all those who served — not only those who died — have sacrificed and done their duty.�

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BY KEVIN MCCLINTOCK

History: U.S. President Woodrow Wilson first proclaimed Armistice Day for November 11, 1919. In proclaiming the holiday, he said: “To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America

In 1945, World War II veteran Raymond Weeks from Birmingham, Ala., had the idea to expand Armistice Day to celebrate all veterans, not just those who died in World War I.

CO O L FAC T S : r 7  FUFSBOT%BZBMTPNBSLTUIFBOOJWFSTBSZPGUIFFOEUP World War I, the “war to end all wars.� Major hostilities ended on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, with the German signing of the Armistice. r   NJMMJPOWFUTMJWFJOUIF648BOUUPQVUUIBUJO perspective? If all the veterans in America started their own country, they’d have slightly more people than Romania, and slightly less than Australia. And of that 21.8 million, there are 1.6 million female vets r "   XIPQQJOH  QFSDFOU PG WFUFSBOT DBTU B CBMMPU in the 2012 presidential election. Compare that to the regular national turnout of 61 percent that year. And vets still beat the national average when it comes to mid-term elections. Fifty-seven percent of veterans voted in 2010, versus 40 percent for the nation as a whole. r /  PUBMMWFUFSBOTGPVHIUJOBXBSMJWJOHWFUFSBOT served in peacetime only. r 5 IF 1PTUBM 4FSWJDF JT UIF MBSHFTU FNQMPZFS PG veterans: 130,000 vets now work for the Post Office, making up 22 percent of their workforce.


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profile

PAU L J O H N S O N

“I would have been on one of the first waves onto the island.” The invasion was canceled, of course, in August 1945, with the detonation of the two atomic bombs. Johnson was a U.S. Marine for four years. After that, he briefly joined the U.S. Navy. He studied at the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md., graduating in 1952. But Johnson had always harbored a deep love for flying. To meet that goal, he would join his third branch of the U.S. military in eight years: the U.S. Air Force.

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The Air Force, Johnson’s wife, Bess, said, “was something new (established in late 1947) and so Paul took his commission to the Air Force. He’d always wanted to fly. He loved to fly.” Though he was in service during the Korean War, he saw no combat there. But he did quickly find a role in the air. Not as a pilot, but as a member of a team of highly-trained men flying some of America’s most advanced strategic bombers. Unlike tactical bombers or ground attack aircraft, which are used to hit a bridge or attack a group of enemy soldiers, strategic bombers are built to fly into an enemy’s heartland to destroy major military installations, factories or entire cities. Paul served as a radar bombardier from 1952 to 1971. He was too late to fly on either the B-17 Flying Fortress or the B-29 Superfortress during World War II; rather, the first two bombers he served on was the B-36 Peacemaker and the B-47 Stratojet. The purpose of these jet-engined bombers was to drop nuclear bombs on the Soviet Union. He would later graduate up to the B-52 Stratofortress, which, though it entered service in 1955, is still in use today. “I was the guy who pushed the

button to release the bombs,” Johnson said. On a bombing run, he would also temporarily take control of the plane so the B-52’s 50,000 tons of bombs would fall correctly on target. “It was an important job.” He was on ready-alert during the chilliest years of the Cold War during the 1950s, ready to jump into the plane and take off at a moment’s notice toward the Soviet Union. They were trained to fly low, below radar, so they could enter the Soviet Union undetected. “We flew low, (sometimes) flying about 20 feet above the water, with wheels up, of course, because we wanted to be below radar, if we could. And before we got to our target we would begin our climb to go in for the bomb run, because the waves from that bomb would get you if you didn’t get away from it.” While he never had to drop nuclear bombs during the Cold War, he did drop conventional bombs during the Vietnam War. He was manning his station inside one of 30 B-52s on June 18, 1965, during Operation Arc Light, when the big planes bombarded the communist stronghold near the Ben Cát District in South Vietnam. He would also participate in Operation Linebacker II, when B52s, during 12 days, flew 729 attacks and dropped more than 15,000 tons of bombs on Hanoi. During those 12 days, 15 B-52s were shot down. “We had a lot of flak around us quite a bit,” he said. “We’d go in low, and as soon as we got rid of our bombs, we’d go out high.” He flew hundreds of flights, “too many to count.” But he wasn’t scared. “I volunteered for it, so no, I wasn’t scared. If I’d been scared, I wouldn’t have joined up.” He retired from the military in 1971. “When soldiers got their long hair, that’s when Paul decided to get out,” Bess said. “There wasn’t enough discipline, he felt, in the military.” He would go on to obtain his Master’s


degree from the University of Oklahoma and would spend the next decade teaching. He taught economics at then Missouri Southern State College from 1972 to 1977. During the 1980s, he and Bess traveled to every state, every national park, and Canada and Mexico inside their RV. Still, Johnson is recognized for his decades of service for his country. “There’s always someone who comes up and thanks him for his service and how nice he thinks that is,” Bess said.

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Usually, he’s stopped to have his hand shaken when he wears a baseball cap displaying his service in all three wars: World War II, Korea and Vietnam. But lately, Ann hasn’t reminded her husband to wear it when they go out in public. “I sometimes get tired of people stopping us,” Bess said with a kidding grin.

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D I D YO U K N O W During a special ceremony back on Sept. 11, Johnson was honored at the Missouri National Guard armory, 2000 W. 32nd St., Joplin. There, Lt. Col. Paul Johnson received a medal, a certificate and a letter from the governor of Missouri and from the Adjutant General of the Missouri National Guard for his service in World War II, Korea and Vietnam. In all, about 50 area veterans who have served the country since World War II will be honored during the ceremony. “I really appreciated it,” Johnson said.


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profile C H A D WA G O N E R WRITTEN AND PHOTOGRAPHED BY RYAN RICHARDSON

Look to the Skies! Carthage family practitioner finds a lifetime hobby in the sky W

hen Dr. Chad Wagoner looks up into the night sky, he doesn’t just see a constellation or the movement of planets across a horizon line. Wagoner sees a photo waiting to be captured where the stars tell a story millions of years in the making. Thanks to a bit of ingenuity and a large domed observatory in his backyard, the Carthage doctor is taking his hobby of astrophotography to the next level.

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Chad Wagoner’s main telescope is his Meade LX200, pictured here inside of his observatory. His telescope connects with a laptop to help Wagoner locate and capture images of the night sky.

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Astrophotography is a branch of celestial observation that uses hyper-specific equipment and techniques to overcome the challenges of filming small, bright objects against the night sky. Part of that challenge is what brought Wagoner into the hobby. Over the past decade, Wagoner has taken what began as a small hobby during his residency period and turned it into a focused effort to record some of the most breathtaking action in the


Wagoner built his observatory in his backyard to increase the time he could actively enjoy his hobby. Wagoner said that he can be ready to start tracking objects within five minutes of rolling his roof away to show the sky.

Though it may be daytime, Wagoner still likes tracking objects in the sky. Armed with a Coronado Personal Solar Telescope, he gets to catch an up-close glimpse of the sun.

“I put this up in the backyard because coming out to set everything up was a huge chore,” Wagoner said. “There was

Through the execution of his careful planning, Wagoner now has a space he can house up to four people. Because of his location on the outskirts of Car-

While his skills have continued to expand since 2001, Wagoner has also found time to help others enter into his hobby. He hosted an enrichment course at the Carthage Technical Center in October, focusing on the basics of astronomy. While the course touches just the basics of locating certain celestial objects and finding a good starter telescope, Wagoner enjoys introducing the hobby to others, much like a friend once did with him. After he moved to Colorado Springs, Colo., shortly after purchasing his original telescope, Wagoner met with a group of like-minded people that showed him the ropes.

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“We over-engineered to say the least, but we wanted something that would last down here,” Wagoner said. “A tornado could come through here and this deck and the equipment will still be here. We planned for animals, we planned for the weather. This is the type of thing that I wanted to plan properly so I could focus on the actual work I wanted to do outdoors.”

“To a degree, it’s the pretty. The other part of it is the challenge and the science,” Wagoner said. “But at the end of the day, I can look at my work and say I did that. I found that, I took that picture.”

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Those early efforts are a far cry from the professional set up Wagoner now uses in his backyard. As Wagoner climbed onto an observation deck that he constructed in the summer of 2007, now housing a heavy-duty domed structure, he showed off his pride and joy — the LX200 model.

After pouring two tons of concrete, constructing a 3-foot tall deck and placing an 8-foot-tall heavy-duty plastic observatory complete with rollaway roof courtesy of Canadian-based SkyShed, Wagoner said he could shoot the night sky within about five minutes of leaving his house.

thage and a relatively uninterrupted skyline, Wagoner said building a backyard observatory has increased his love of his hobby.

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“I had a Meade ETX-90 starting out, which I had no idea of how to use it right,” Wagoner said. “It was a definite pain of getting it set up right and I would go outside to find nothing. I was trying to run before I had even taken my first steps. I had this great car, but I had no map to tell me where to go. Just being a few arc minutes off is the difference in seeing nothing and then seeing something beautiful. I have no problem admitting how lost I was then.”

a lot of set up and tear down time and it was cutting into the actual observation time. I wanted something permanent that also helped me increase what I could do.”

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sky. Though Wagoner is a seasoned veteran of the art now, his original efforts were less than fruitful.

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profile

C H A D WA G O N E R

“It really took time for me to be around folks who knew what they were doing to get me going on this,â€? Wagoner said. “I’d go with members of the Colorado Springs Astronomical Society and we would just set up outside of town at dusk. That ďŹ rst night I went out with them, I saw more objects than I had in two years of working by myself. I ďŹ nally had the map that I so desperately needed.â€? That is the kind of assistance and mentorship Wagoner wants to pass on to people who may be in the same position that he was when he started. “I found something really unique that challenges me and it has kept me interested for a long time,â€? Wagoner said. “I’m not slowing down and I feel like I’m just scratching the surface of what I can do. This is something I see myself doing when I’m old. I’ll still be in my backyard looking at the sky.â€?

Wagoner rolls away the roof of his observatory to prepare for a night of tracking and shooting.

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One of the toughest obstacles to overcome early in his hobby was ďŹ guring out how to get the most out of his equipment. Wagoner said that minute adjustments to his equipment and learning how to properly locate objects were the cornerstones in getting oďŹ&#x20AC; the ground.

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profile V I N TA G E O R G A N S BY KATY SCHRADER PHOTOGRAPHED BY T. ROB BROWN

‘The Chance of a Lifetime’

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Joplin man plays some of Europe’s oldest organs

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Chris Greninger of Joplin plays a 1987 Baldwin 645 3-manual electronic pipe organ made in Arkansas, which he modified with Conn speakers under the pipes. An organist of 23 years at St. Paul’s United Methodist Church, he recently played some of Europe’s oldest organs.

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hris Greninger has played the organ for 30 years, but during that time he never dreamed he would get to play some of Europe’s oldest organs in some of the most architecturally breathtaking churches still in existence. But last May, Greninger found himself on a flight to Romania to do just that, and he is still coming down from the excitement. “It was the chance of a lifetime. Not only did this fulfill a musical fantasy for me, it was kind of a missionary trip,” he said.

An organist for St. Paul’s United Methodist Church for 23 years, Greninger is an Allen Organ Company consultant and owner of SGS Enterprises, a tool grinding and machine shop in Joplin. He wasn’t anticipating a European tour, but life had other plans. Greninger’s overseas adventure was arranged by his brother, Larry Knowlton, a Texas oil executive who purchased a custom-made travel package for Greninger to tour Romania. The company that organized Greninger’s tour gained permission for him to play organs in

some of Romania’s historical churches. They also arranged for his organ-playing sessions at the churches to be professionally recorded. Greninger visited Romania for approximately two weeks, during which time he played 14 organs in 12 churches; after a recording session at a radio station, his music was also broadcast to the public. Greninger arrived in the Romanian capitol of Bucharest on May 15. From there, he made about a dozen stops in large cities and small towns as he went on his organ-playing circuit. One of


One of the organs Greninger was able to play during his tour of Eastern Europe. The organ, considered one of Europe’s biggest, has 4,000 pipes, four manuals with 56 keys, one pedal with 27 keys and 63 audio registers.

Vlad Dracul House. As Chris Greninger’s fingers play across the organ’s keys, you can almost hear Johann Sebastian Bach’s Toccata and Fugue in D minor, the music often associated with Dracula.

the most interesting parts of the experience for Greninger was discovering the differences between the old European church organs and the modern organs he has played at home.

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Bran Castle, a medieval Transylvanian fortress.

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Pipe organs produce sound by driving air through pipes that are selected by depressing keys on keyboards (called manuals). The Greeks used hydraulic pressure to move wind through the pipes in order to make sound. Electricity, however, has made the distribution of air through the pipes on modern organs a much less complicated process. Although the church organs Greninger played in Romania did have electric blowers, other important functions controlled through levers and switches were mechanical due to the age of the organs.

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“It was amazing to be able to play these instruments,” he said. “I would go to each of these churches not knowing anything about these pipe organs. Some of them had a very crisp sound, very bright and very bold. The tonal variety is much different in Europe than it is here.”

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“It was amazing to be able to play these instruments,” Greninger said of his trip. “I would go to each of these churches not knowing anything about these pipe organs. Some of them had a very crisp sound, very bright and very bold. The tonal variety is much different in Europe than it is here.”

“Some of the organs were very tiring. You had to have a lot of muscles to play them,” he said. “A lot of them have so much wood and so many different types of levers. There is so much (mechanics) going into them.” The complexity of the organ consoles, the area from which the organ is played, was another difference Greninger observed.

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“They were unlike any consoles I had ever seen. I really had to make my brain work to make them go,” he said. Among the many places Greninger played the organ were The Black Church in Brasov, The Palace of Culture and the Catholic Church in Targu Mures, and the Monastery Church in Sighisoara. Playing the organ at The Black Church was one of the more memorable experiences because of the sheer size of the instrument. The mechanical organ there is the largest in Romania, with 4,000 organ-pipes, four manuals, one pedal, 63 organ stops and 76 stop knobs. Because of the size of this organ, Greninger said The Black Church is “the most coveted place for organists to play.” At the Catholic Church in Targu Mures, Greninger encountered the same organ once played by a musical master: Mozart. He said it was a personal high point knowing that “I got to

play on the same instrument Mozart played on when he was touring Europe.” Another fascinating part of his experience was simply observing the beauty of the organs. Historically, organ cases were treated by their creators as almost sculptural objects, and the designs on the cases were used as marks of distinction. “The cases are architectural wonders – the amazing craftsmanship just built into the case,” said Greninger. When he wasn’t playing the organ on his tour, Greninger took in the culture by sightseeing, dining on Romanian cuisine, attending concerts and theater performances, and making friends with the Romanian people, whom he described as warm and welcoming. He also visited several historical landmarks that serve as reminders of Romania’s legends and blood-soaked past. In Sighisoara, Greninger visited the Vlad Dracul House, which is traditionally known as the birthplace of Vlad the Impaler, the 15th-century prince of Wallachia notorious for his torture methods involving six-foot wooden stakes. Later in the trip, he made it to the famous Bran Castle, a medieval Transylvanian fortress used to stop the expansion of the Ottoman Empire. The castle will forever be linked to Bram Stoker’s imaginary vampire, Dracula, because Stoker


based Dracula’s castle on an actual description of Bran Castle available to him at the time he wrote his novel. Another highlight of Greninger’s trip was attending a concert performed by singer-songwriter Andrea Bocelli. At the concert, Greninger was seated about a dozen feet from the Prime Minister of Romania. Although it was difficult to come home after experiencing such an adventure, Greninger is thrilled and thankful that his brother presented him with such an opportunity. “I could not (have done) this myself. There’s no way,” he said. “It made me have an appreciation of how blessed we are here in the U.S., but also an appreciation of the wonders of the world we haven’t seen.” Once the recordings of Greninger playing the organ have been transferred to CDs, Greninger hopes to make them available to other musicians or anyone else who may have an interest in them.

“Some of the organs were very tiring. You had to have a lot of muscles to play them,” Greninger said. “A lot of them have so much wood and so many different types of levers. There is so much (mechanics) going into them.”

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music to the ears ME LIKE BEES WRITTEN AND PHOTOGRAPHED BY RYAN RICHARDSON

Music to the

H

EARS:

ow does a Joplin indie band break out of the local scene to take on major venues?

It’s simple, really. Just release one of the strongest recorded efforts from a regional act and add in a dedicated touring schedule, while steadily revisiting your hometown that gave you the support to make the album in the first place.

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After releasing their first album, “The Ides,” in July, Joplin’s own Me Like Bees has started taking on venues throughout the state including The Riot Room and The Record Bar in Kansas City. In that time, they also managed to grab a spot on an area stop of the Vans Warped tour, according to the band’s lead singer and guitarist, Luke Sheafer.

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J: You guys just wrapped two shows this past weekend. One in Warrensburg, one in St. Louis and you’re already back here gearing up for a show at The Blackthorn Friday. How is the band working towards getting those out of town shows? Luke Sheafer: We played a lot of Tuesday night shows where we just put our time in. We would go into these shows knowing there wouldn’t be anyone there, but we were getting our foot in the door so we could get to the point where we were getting the bigger shows at the venues. J: But then you guys are coming back here and the shows are an event. L.S.: We try to play at least one show a month here because there is such a different feeling playing for these people

that have been with us for so long. I like those out of town shows as we watch the crowds get bigger, but there is still a huge rush of playing here. J: Now that you have an album out of new material, is it really pushing that touring schedule out harder now? Is the album response motivating the band to do more writing? L.S.: We’re always writing. It is a perpetual thing for us. That’s how you move forward. We record our practices because of how many ideas are coming out of our work. J: Is there hours and hours of recordings just sitting there? Is there an archive? L.S.: (Laughs) There are days of recordings. Literally days. We are practicing for four hours on non-show weeks and we still have ideas coming out of us. You don’t want to miss a good idea when there are that many flying about. J: With the album out and with the positive reviews that it has received, what is the next step? Are you guys always setting new goals for the group or is there any bit of a downtime for the band? L.S.: We want to do another national tour. We’re still young. We’ve already been out there and we’ve made that

ME LIKE BEES investment before. We have a strong commitment to this and we’re in to it. That’s what we think is the right mindset is to make this work. We’re about 95 percent music and a little bit of business. J: You guys formed a little bit later than most bands do. How did this come together? The band has only been as it has for about three years right? L.S.: (Bassist) Nick Bynum came on in July (of 2012) and Tim has been on drums since 2010. Pete and I have known each other the longest, but it wasn’t until after college that we played together. We’ve tagged people in and out since 2009 when we came together. Our first show was at a battle of the bands at Boomtown Days. We took third after being together for about two weeks. Things definitely have changed since then. With the people that have left, it was always amicable. We still have support from them and they come to shows. People move on in their lives sometimes. The group’s 14-track album “The Ides” is now available on iTunes for $9.99. Check out the band on Facebook at facebook.com/melikebees.


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2013 BANNED BOOKS

W C A P TA I N U N D E R PA N T S BY D AV P I L K E Y Reasons: Offensive language, unsuited for age group. Plot: Captain Underpants is a children’s novel series that revolves around two fourthgraders, George Beard and Harold Hutchins, and Captain Underpants, an aptly named superhero from one of George & Harold’s comic books, that accidentally becomes real when George and Harold hypnotize their megalomaniacal principal, Mr. Krupp.

FIFTY SHADES OF G R E Y, BY E . L . JAMES Reasons: Offensive language, sexually explicit. Plot: It is the first installment in the Fifty Shades trilogy that traces the deepening relationship between a college graduate, Anastasia Steele, and a young business magnate, Christian Grey. It is notable for its explicitly erotic scenes.

hile books didn’t make our gift list in the cover story, we did want to go ahead and mention some of the top banned books for the last year. After all, between real books and electronic books, literature remains some of the most popular gifts during the holiday season. If you want to avoid these books, or buy them and revel in their outrageousness, give these five a try.

“A N D TA N G O M A K E S T H R E E ,” BY P E T E R PA R N E L L AND JUSTIN RICHARDSON. Reasons: Homosexuality, unsuited for age group. Plot: A children’s book about penguins in New York’s Central Park Zoo, the book has won many awards but also been at the center of numerous censorship and culture war debates on same-sex marriage, adoption, and homosexuality in animals. The American Library Association reports that “And Tango Makes Three” was the most challenged book of 2006 to 2010, except for 2009, when it was the second most challenged.

THIRTEEN R E A S O N S W H Y, BY J AY A S H E R . Reasons: Drugs/alcohol/ smoking, sexually explicit, suicide, unsuited for age group. Plot: Hannah Baker, who committed suicide, mails 13 cassette tapes to 13 classmates telling them how each played a part in her suicide.

S C A R Y S TO R I E S TO T E L L I N T H E D A R K ( S E R I E S ) , BY A LV I N S C H WA R T Z Reasons: Unsuited for age group, violence. Plot: Stories based off folklore and urban legends. This series is listed as being the most challenged series of books from 1990–1999 and seventh most challenged from 2000-2009 by the American Library Association for its violence. 54


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parting shot ARTIFICIAL SUNSET PHOTOGRAPHY BY ROGER NOMER

A hot air balloon flares to life during the Columbus Day Festival in Columbus, Kan., earlier this month.

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Joplin Metro Magazine, Gift Guide, October 2013  

Business, hospital, development and industrial news about Joplin, Missouri.

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