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Dr. Joe Robinson Dr. Ty Barnes

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Dr. Johnny Maravich Dr. Sebastian Tietze

Dr. Bradley Acker Dr. Karl Gubser


VOLUME 4 | ISSUE 7 | NOVEMBER 2013

13 I N EACH I SSU E

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40 PROFILE: Jane McCaulley

6 THE SCENE 10 THE 10-SPOT

40 PROFILE: Harvest Music Fest 54

12 ON THE COVER: Retro Christmas ~ Retro Christmas collections ~ Joplin Holiday Celebration ~ Christmas memories ~ Miracle on 34th Street ~ Candy Canes

38 PROFILE: Paul Mulik has extensive Middle-earth weapons collection

THE J TEAM EDITOR Kevin McClintock Phone: 417.627.7279 Fax: 417.623.8598 E-Mail: kmcclintock@joplinglobe.com

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CONTRIBUTING ARTISTS Roma Harmon Regina Carnahan Michael Duntz Jimi Adams

MAGAZINE WRITER Ryan Richardson

PHOTOGRAPHERS T. Rob Brown Roger Nomer Curtis Almeter Ryan Richardson

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Michael Coonrod

COVER DESIGN Gaila Osborn

44 MUSIC TO THE EARS: The Shook Twins 46 MINDING YOUR BUSINESS: Glory Days Guitars

48 STYLE: Relaxed fashion

THE J LIST 56 THE PARTING SHOT

50 TASTE: Holiday recipes

T H E J O P L I N G LO B E

DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING Brent Powers Phone: 417.627.7233 E-mail: bpowers@joplinglobe.com

PRESIDENT AND PUBLISHER Mike Beatty Phone: 417.627.7291 Fax: 417.623.8450 E-Mail: mbeatty@joplinglobe.com

SALES MANAGER Janette Cooper Phone: 417.627.7236 Fax: 417.623.8450 E-Mail: jcooper@joplinglobe.com

EDITOR Carol Stark Phone: 417.627.7278 Fax: 417.623.8598 E-Mail: cstark@joplinglobe.com

CIRCULATION DIRECTOR Jack Kaminsky Phone: 417.627.7341 Fax: 417.623-8450 E-Mail: jkaminsky@joplinglobe.com

GRAPHIC DESIGN Gaila Osborn

DIRECTOR OF MAGAZINES Julie Damer Phone: 417.627.7323 Fax: 417.623.8450 E-Mail: jdamer@joplinglobe.com Joplin Metro Magazine is a publication of Newspaper Holdings Inc. and is published monthly. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any editorial or advertising matter. The publisher assumes no responsibility for return of unsolicited materials.


from the editor

“DEAR EDITOR: I am 8 years old. Some of my little friends say there is no Santa Claus. Papa says, ‘If you see it in THE SUN, it’s so.’ Please tell me the truth; is there a Santa Claus?” ~Virginia O’Hanlon, 115 W. 95th Street

If you’ve never read it, I hope you enjoy it.

Not believe in Santa Claus! You might as well not believe in fairies! You might get your papa to hire men to watch in all the chimneys on Christmas Eve to catch Santa Claus, but even if they did not see Santa Claus coming down, what would that prove? Nobody sees Santa Claus, but that is no sign that there is no Santa Claus. The most real things in the world are those that neither children nor men can see. Did you ever see fairies dancing on the lawn? Of course not, but that’s no proof that they are not there. Nobody can conceive or imagine all the wonders there are unseen and unseeable in the world. You may tear apart the baby’s rattle and see what makes the noise inside, but there is a veil covering the unseen world which not the strongest man, nor even the united strength of all the strongest men that ever lived, could tear apart. Only faith, fancy, poetry, love, romance, can push aside that curtain and view and picture the supernal beauty and glory beyond. Is it all real? Ah, VIRGINIA, in all this world there is nothing else real and abiding.

In this month’s magazine, you’ll read about a Carthage man’s extensive collection of 1960s-era Christmas decorations and toys; a local candy company using turn-of-the-century machinery to make candy canes and five beloved Christmas plays at area theaters.

As always, thank you for reading. You can reach us at kmcclintock@ joplinglobe.com, by mail at Joplin Metro Magazine, 117 E. Fourth St., Joplin, Mo. 64801, by calling us at 417.627.7279 or by finding us on Facebook.

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No Santa Claus! Thank God! he lives, and he lives forever. A thousand years from now, Virginia, nay, ten times ten thousand years from now, he will continue to make glad the heart of childhood.

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Veteran newsman Francis Pharcellus Church received a letter to the editor on September 1897, from eight-yearold Virginia O’Hanlon, asking him whether Santa Claus was real or not. In an unsigned response, Church would write what has since become history’s most reprinted newspaper editorial. Following its printing in the New York Sun on Sept. 21, 1897, Church’s editorial has appeared in dozens of languages, in books, movies, on posters and even on stamps.

Yes, VIRGINIA, there is a Santa Claus. He exists as certainly as love and generosity and devotion exist, and you know that they abound and give to your life its highest beauty and joy. Alas! how dreary would be the world if there were no Santa Claus. It would be as dreary as if there were no VIRGINIAS. There would be no childlike faith then, no poetry, no romance to make tolerable this existence. We should have no enjoyment, except in sense and sight. The eternal light with which childhood fills the world would be extinguished.

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early every newspaper I’ve worked at has run this editorial on Christmas Eve. Since this is our annual Christmas issue of J-Mag, I felt it was only appropriate to reprint it here.

VIRGINIA, your little friends are wrong. They have been affected by the skepticism of a skeptical age. They do not believe except they see. They think that nothing can be which is not comprehensible by their little minds. All minds, Virginia, whether they be men’s or children’s, are little. In this great universe of ours man is a mere insect, an ant, in his intellect, as compared with the boundless world about him, as measured by the intelligence capable of grasping the whole of truth and knowledge.

Kevin McClintock Editor, Joplin Metro Magazine 3


the scene

MOMMY AND ME

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ROGER NOMER

Maggie Neuenschwander, 2, smiles as she draws feathers on her owl at the Mommy and Me Art class at the Spiva Center for the Arts.

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Harry Neuenschwander, 4, makes a hand-print wing for his owl art project.

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Before launching into some owl art work, Karalee McDonald, education coordinator for the Spiva Center for the Arts, reads children a story about owls.


OVER

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AGELESS MUSIC

PHOTOGRAPHY BY CURTIS ALMETER

Area residents turned out to listen to the quartet’s beautiful music, which played last month inside Joplin’s Ozark Christian College Chapel.

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Comprised of violinists Sarah McElravy and Catherine Cosbey, violist Eric Wong and cellist Felix Umansky, The Linden String Quartet formed in 2008 at the Cleveland Institute of Music. Since then, it has won numerous awards.

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The Linden Quartet’s appearance in Joplin, part of Pro Musica’s 2013 schedule, was sponsored, in part, by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Missouri Arts Council, a state agency. Outreach activity sponsored, in part, by Con-way Truckload and the Rusty Smith Memorial Fund.


profile JAN E M CCAULLEY WRITTEN AND PHOTOGRAPHED BY RYAN RICHARDSON

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Jane McCaulley demonstrates how to get a unique color mixture from several small pieces of glass. McCaulley repurposes much of the smaller shards of glass from her projects to create one-of-a-kind materials to use in new pieces.

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Retired teacher finds artistic expression in glass

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or most people, glass is what you look through to see the world. Local artist Jane McCaulley uses glass to tell the world what she sees. Working out of her home near Carl Junction, the former art teacher has made a name for herself in local circles as an artist who works with colored glass to construct mosaics, jewelry and other assorted works of art and crafts. The recognition and success of her art has come as a bit of a surprise to her.

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“I am always taken aback and surprised that I have made a name here for myself,” McCaulley said during a recent tour of her home studio. “When I was in Indiana, I was a teacher. When we moved, I thought life was over for me. To have the opportunity and the time to make art is a gift to me.” McCaulley works with colored glass, cutting different pieces as she sees fit to help make an individual art project come alive. Whether she is cutting large pieces to resurface an old guitar

into a decorative piece for a home, or using smaller etched glass to make a normal piece of jewelry come alive with the vibrant colors of a morning rainbow, she strives to make each piece it own and unique work of art. “A lot of repurposing goes on here, from the materials I am using to what I am using as a canvas, like those discarded instruments,” McCaulley said. She pauses to show a hand covered with fresh bandages. “I get involved with the glass and I treat it


“Spiva has been a huge asset to me and it really is a huge asset to the rest of the community,� McCaulley said. “I truly admire what they do here, because that kind of support for the arts isn’t something you see in every town.� Jane’s beautiful glass art pieces can be found at the Spiva Gift Shop, Wildcat Glades Gift Shop, Oak Street Natural Market in Carthage and on her Etsy shop at www.etsy.com/shop/ janesglassart.

Jane McCaulley ďŹ nds discarded instruments to use as a rather unique canvas for her glass mosaics.

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“Part of the meticulous nature of working with glass comes from how expensive it is, but part of it is the idea that everything has a use. It doesn’t have

Purpose is something McCaulley said she has rediscovered. After moving to Carl Junction to be closer to her family, she has taken the time to teach classes from her home as well as at the nearby Spiva Center for the Arts.

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Several nooks inside the studio are packed with giant sheets of colored glass, which eventually will be fed into her kilns. As the glass is melted down, she saves little snippets to adorn holiday ornaments. She has each piece marked with the weight and type, so when such pieces ďŹ nd their way onto a project, she knows the outcome.

to end up in the trash can,� McCaulley said. “I can go out and buy my own frit [small pieces of glass] or I can make it here in a few seconds with the left over remains of pieces that I can’t use anymore. You’ll see big shards that I have used on other works, but then I have this frit that will go on to ornaments or jewelry that comes from the same glass. Everything here has a purpose.�

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almost like I am working with paper. Sometimes your hands pay the price.�

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Repair of furniture and woodwork

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the 10 spot RETRO CHRISTMAS BY KEVIN MCCLINTOCK PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY THE JOPLIN MUSEUM COMPLEX

This float was one of 66 seen in the 1960 Joplin Christmas parade, which took place on Nov. 28. The float was built and designed by the Joplin Letter Carriers’ Association. Because it was the grand finale, Santa Claus rode in the sleigh, waving to the crowd. The sleigh was pulled by eight tiny motorized reindeer — the reindeer “actually” being three-wheeled mail scooter delivery carts the letter carriers used on their daily routes.

RETRO JOPLIN

Christmas T

Southwestern Bell Telephone Company employees make last-minute preparations to the Christmas boxes for Joplin’s underprivileged children. Taken on Christmas Eve of 1959, the photo shows the interior of the C.W.A. Local Union Hall at 2112 Main St. in Joplin.

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he Christmas spirit is all about giving. The following 10 retro Christmas pictures, photographed by famed Joplin photographer Murwin Mosler, captures the essence and spirit of Christmas.

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While waiting for Santa Claus to appear, 1,500 deserving children were entertained by circus performer Erza Thomas, blindfolded atop his unicycle, on Christmas Eve, 1941, inside Joplin Memorial Hall.

Children of members of the University Club pose in front of a Christmas tree. The children in this picture are (first row, L-R): Edward Larson Jr., Martin Doane Jr., Charles Hays Jr., Preston Pate, Bobbie Martinic, Billy Wieda. (Second row): Jean Shelton, Billy Latimer, Richard Davenport, Mary Aspoas, Mary Lou Montgomery, Billy Christman, Carolyn Childress and Bobby Larson. (Third row): Carter McKee, Billy Potter, Bud Poole, David Doane and Nancy Ettinger. Joyce Shelton and Betsy Pate stand on the right side next to the tree.


A very tall Santa Claus flew in from the North Pole — not on reindeer but in an Artic-American airline prop plane — to greet several area children at the Joplin Municipal Airport in late 1941. The kids (L-R): Eugene Ebright, Dick Demier, Terry Wells, Sylvia Lowe and brothers George and Sonny Doss. Later that day, Santa rode through a snow storm during the 1941 Joplin Christmas Parade. A Christmas display found inside the Paramout Theater at 515 Main St. in Joplin in late 1941. Tickets to watch Bing Crosby in “Birth of the Blues” ran 40 cents after 7 p.m.

Santa (having beard issues, it seems) paid a visit to the Joplin Children’s Home in 1945. The Christmas party was sponsored by the Joplin Kiwanis Club.

A picture of the Joplin High School cafeteria during the Christmas season of 1946. That year, President Harry Truman signed the National School Lunch Act. It was in response to the many military recruits who failed physicals during World War II because of nutrition-related diseases.

Santa Claus was the grand finale during the Nov. 22, 1947, Joplin Christmas parade. This photo, snapped at 613 S. Main St., shows Santa flanked by members of the R.O.T.C. EverReady Rifles. Santa threw candy kisses that were wrapped with dimes to the children along the parade route (Note the kids following Santa on the sidewalk in the foreground).

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Hundreds of underprivileged children from around the Joplin area were guests at the annual Christmas party of the Joplin Christmas Club inside Memorial Hall on December 1945.

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A collection of bulbs made in Japan — a Santa, a snowball, a snow bird, among many — that screw onto a 1960s-era Christmas tree stand that glows.

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One of Jay McBee’s most cherished (and expensive) Christmas decoration, a German-made Santa and reindeer. The Santa, showing its German origins, wears blue-colored pants, while the reindeer possesses real stag hair.

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One of McBee’s favorite decorations, a string of working Noma bubble lights, including the original box they came in, as well as a purple candle, a very rare color.

Close-up shots of various 1960s-era ornaments. By the 1960s, ornaments were shaped into balls of clear colored glass, or decorated with bands of opaque color or even sparkling glitter.


on the cover RETRO CHRISTMAS BY KEVIN MCCLINTOCK PHOTOGRAPHY BY T. ROB BROWN

Really, nothing screams 1960s quite like an aluminum Christmas tree, McBee says with a chuckle. “The whole mess started years ago, when I found (his first aluminum tree) in an

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“Since then, it’s just turned into an addiction.”

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All three are made of stainless aluminum; each loaded down with vintage ornaments made between the 1930s and 1950s. Two of the trees sit on antique, rotating tree stands. A third — a “pom pom” tree — is illuminated by a turning color wheel, splashing the metal with ever-changing shades of green, orange, red and blue.

antique store. I wasn’t looking for one; I really wasn’t looking for anything. But I remember my grandma had one of these trees — just like everyone’s grandma had one of these trees — and I thought, ‘That’s really cool.’ So I bought it.

He now owns a half-dozen aluminum trees and so many ornaments “we don’t have a clue how many we actually have.” He guesses they own at least a couple thousand. The 1960s was a time where Christmas decorations exploded to never-seencontinued on page 15

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nside Jay Kendall McBee’s living room stands three silver Christmas trees.

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Carthage man owns huge collection of 1960s trees/decorations

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on the cover

RETRO CHRISTMAS

In the basement of his Carthage home, Jay McBee speaks about his huge collection of 1960s-era toys. In his hands is a Remco “Monkey Division� motorized gun. Behind him is an extensive “horror� collection of toys.

McBee owns area’s largest 1960s-era toy collection BY KEVIN MCCLINTOCK PHOTOGRAPHY BY T. ROB BROWN

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ight about the time when Jay McBee was buying his ďŹ rst aluminum Christmas tree, he realized he needed toys to place beneath it.

Today, it’s safe to say McBee owns the largest collection of 1960s era toys found in Southwest Missouri. “I have more stu now than I had as a kid,â€? he admits with a laugh. “It’s primarily stu that I remember from my childhood.â€?

Back in the 60s, however, the toys were merely tools for a kid’s active imagination. “That’s what’s cool about it,â€? McBee said. “In that brief moment of time, we’re creating scenarios, we’re using this (taps skull). It’s more cerebral than just sitting in front of a video game. You have to use your brain a little more.â€? Some of the toys in McBee’s collections include: t "OFYUFOTJWF JODI (*+PFDPMMFDUJPO JODMVEJOHUIF four original ďŹ gures (one from each armed service). t ÉŠFmSTUFWFSNBEFSFNPUFDPOUSPMDBS BIVHFSFETQPSUT car, circa 1964. “You’re looking at a 47-year-old remote control car that actually works.â€?

Although many of his toys are worth a lot of money — for example, a Barbie and Ken doll car currently holds a price tag of $500 — he has no plans to sell portions of his collection. “The great thing about these toys is that they won’t go down in value like baseball cards did... when there was a huge glut in production on the market. These toys won’t be produced or made again, so they’ll only gain value as time goes on.�

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The toys of the 1960s dier remarkably from those found on store shelves today, he said. Modern toys, such as an electronic gadget or video game, seemingly do all the work for the child, regulating them to an almost “bystanderâ€? status.

t "+PIOOZ4FWFO0." 0OF.BO"SNZ NVMUJGVODUJPO toy weapon that was the best-selling toy in 1964. It was a missile launcher, grenade launcher, machine-gun and even a detachable pistol. t "i.JHIUZ.BUJMEBwBJSDSBGUDBSSJFS DJSDB UIBUDBNF with moving elevators, projectile-launching airplanes from the ight deck, sirens and the whole thing could move forward or backward. t $BQUBJO ,JSLT QMBTUJD QIBTFS HVO BOE UIF WFSZ SBSF %S Spock’s phaser rie. t " DBSUPPO QSPKFDUPS  FTTFOUJBMMZ B iCBUUFSZQPXFSFE ashlight,â€? showing cartoon slides on walls. Back before the Cartoon Network and when TVs only had two or three channels to choose from, “this was big,â€? McBee said. “This was the coolest thing ever. Before Blu-ray and DVDs, you could make your own movie with this.â€?

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A castle-warrior play set whose contents came inside a metal carrying case.

A G.I. Joe Astronaut inside a NASA Mercury spacecraft.


A beautiful snow bird, snuggled deep inside one of Jay’s stainless aluminum trees from the 1960s. continued from page 13

before proportions. It wasn’t necessarily a step back from the traditional; it was simply a matter of retailers expanding options in an attempt to meet every possible preference and taste. Thus — aluminum trees.

Called bubble lights, each one is essentially a lamp heating the methylene chloride inside to the boiling point. It’s a truly mesmerizing effect when placed on a Christmas tree. “It’s not very complex,” McBee says, “but it sure does look cool.” The lights — some made by Noma, others by Paramount — come with two types of bases — biscuits and saucers.

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But his favorite ornament — the ones McBee cherishes the most — are neither round nor shiny. “Look at these,” he says with visible glee, pointing to a row of decorative lights consisting of bubbling liquid. “How beautiful are these?”

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Most of the 1960s ornaments McBee owns possess a noticeable space motif, manufactured by the Shiny-Brite Company. This makes sense, with the space race heating up in the early 1960s.

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“You gotta remember it was truly the modern age,” McBee says of the late 1950s and early 1960s. “You had industrialization. Factories were booming, pumping stuff out. Suddenly people had money to spend. It was an awesome time, truly, to be alive. Families were buying homes, buying two cars, buying color TVs.”

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Jay holds up two vintage Santa plastic heads, one with a rosy red-tipped nose and the other looking as if it has just come back from vacation in the Bahamas.

He owns multiples of both. He also has at least one purplecolored light, which are extremely rare. “Purples are very hard to find. I’m almost afraid to turn it on. They just produced so few of them” back in the 1950s and 1960s. The other colors, he says, were mass produced in far greater numbers.

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He also owns candle holders used on Christmas trees dating back to the 1920s. After cutting down a live tree and erecting it inside a home, families would clip the tin holders to the various limbs of the tree and place inside them real candle wicks. “Can you believe it,” McBee says. “They’d clamp 50 of these things on

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A very Eisenhower Christmas: During their years in the White House, the Eisenhower family did Christmas on a grand scale. For the 1958 holiday season, Mamie arranged for carols to be piped into every room. Miles of greenery were wrapped around every column, indoors and out, and more than two dozen trees were decorated in classic 1950s style, with glass balls, electric candle lights and waterfalls of tinsel.

a tree, light ‘em and hope for the best. Now, doesn’t that seem like a bad idea on the surface? There were a lot of mistakes made in the evolution of Christmas tree decorating.” McBee owns many Empire-made plastic blow mold decorative pieces, either light-up Santa faces or entire sleighs. There are celluloid-made decorations, and many that came in cardboard boxes. There are wreaths made of teased plastic and light-up tree stands. One stand in particular is unique in that a half-dozen decorative bulb lamps can be screwed into the stand. Each of the bulbs, made in post-war Japan, are of Santa or a snowman or memorable nursery rhyme characters such as Little Bo Peep and Mother Goose. McBee’s most valuable piece — worth at least $700 — is a Santa, sleigh and reindeer set made by Germans right after World War II. The reindeer are made with real stag hair, the antlers are made out of lead, the sleigh is heavy and decorated beautifully, while the Santa wears blue pants, which is the authentic Bavarian interpretation of St. Nick. As for McBee’s love for anything 1960s, he says it’s common for people to cherish what they can remember from their childhood. “I was born in 1959, so the (1960s) reminds me of how it was when I was a child. “People my age, the end of the Baby Boomers, man, we’ve spent our lives chasing traffic and jobs and paychecks, and you reach a certain point where you have a little income and you start looking for something that you haven’t acquired, and it’s those memories of you as a kid during Christmas that you want.”


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We count you. Thank you for allowing us to serve you and yours. Merry Christmas. Join us by sharing your blessings at OurBlessingsCount.com


on the cover CHRISTMAS EXPERIENCE BY KEVIN MCCLINTOCK PHOTOS COURTESY GLOBE FILE

tLive thet

Experience Variety of events planned for Joplin holiday celebration

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eadlining this year’s “DickensFest” is a theatrical play titled, “The Night Before Christmas Carol.” It is a historically accurate and highly humorous holiday production starring renowned Dickens scholar Elliot Engel, according to Mary Anne Phillips of the DickensFest Committee. It takes place in 1843 on the night that Charles Dickens dreams up his idea for a ghostly little Christmas book that becomes world famous. As he composes his winter morality tale, the audience glimpses into the life of the real Dickens explaining his inspirations. In this acclaimed performance, actor David Zum Brunnen portrays Charles Dickens and 17 familiar characters; giving


The event is funded in part by a grant from the Joplin Convention and Visitors Bureau and is a gift to Joplin and its residents from Historic Murphysburg Preservation, Inc. This Christmas play is one of a number of activities planned for the Joplin Holiday Experience, Nov. 25 through Dec. 17. Monday, Nov. 25 r  6 / 7 & * - * / (  0 '  5 ) &  8 * / % 0 8 4  "5  + 0 1 L I N C I T Y H A L L , 5:30 p.m.: Lighting up Joplin’s Main Street with the colors of Christmas.

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Tickets may be purchased at the event for horse-drawn carriage rides as well as train rides. To add even more fun to the festivities, guests are encouraged to wear 1840s period costumes.

Wednesday, Dec. 4 r  i . * 3 "$ - &  0 /    T H S T R E E T,� Joplin Little Theatre, 3009 W. First St., 7:30 p.m.: The play is based, written and directed by George Seaton from a story by Valentine Davies. When the hired Santa Claus for the annual Macy’s Christmas Day Parade is unable to perform, a Macy’s executive hires a kindly, white-bearded man who says he is Kris Kringle. He proves to be such a crowd pleaser, he is hired as Macy’s resident Santa for the holidays. This sets in motion a series of events in which Kris touches the lives of many, teaching them a lot about faith and the true meaning of Christmas. Details: 417.623.3638.

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DickensFest will also feature winter lights, costumed Dickens characters from the Dream Theatre Company, indoor/outdoor food and craft vendors, indoor art show/ sale, live Nativity, petting zoo, visits with Mr. and Mrs. Santa Clause, face painting, visits with Father Christmas and more.

t4JYUI BOOVBM -JHIUJOH PG +PQMJOT $ISJTUNBT 5SFF   p.m.: The event in beautiful Spiva Park is the traditional kicko of Joplin’s holiday season.

Thursday, Dec. 5 r - * 7 * / (  $ ) 3 * 4 5 . " 4  5 3 & & “Beneath His Father’s Heaven,â€? 7:30 p.m.: The 29th annual Living Christmas Tree features excellent music from a 60-plus member choir, an outstanding orchestra and remarkable talent culled from around the Ozark Christian College Campus. Tickets are $7/adults, $5 for children under 12. Overow seating is $5. A pre-show begins 30 minutes before

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personal, social and historical context to the classic,“A Christmas Carol.� Performances will be held at 6:30 p.m. inside the First United Methodist Church’s sanctuary at 501 W. Fourth Street from Friday, Dec. 13 through Sunday, Dec. 15.

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on the cover

CHRISTMAS EXPERIENCE

the performance time. Details: 417.626.1221. r  i ( * ' 5  0 '  5 ) &  . "( * u " / %  i"  $ & - & # 3 "5 * 0 /  0 ' C H R I S T M A S ,� two Stained Glass Theater presentations at 21st and Annie Baxter in Joplin, 7:30 p.m. Details: 417.626.1293.

r5 ) &    T H A N N UA L J O U R N E Y TO B E T H L E H E M , Racine Christian Church, 12218 State Highway K, Seneca, 5:30 p.m.: Experience the “original

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r i $ ) 3* 4 5 ." 4  #&--&4 u Stone’s Throw Theater in Carthage, dinner at 6:30 p.m. and the production at 7:30 p.m.: A church Christmas program spins hilariously out of control in this Southern

farce about squabbling sisters, family secrets, a surly Santa, a vengeful sheep and a reluctant Elvis impersonator. Three feuding sisters ďŹ nd a way to pull together in order to present a Christmas program the citizens of Fayro, Texas, will never forget. Their hilarious holiday journey through a misadventure-ďŹ lled Christmas Eve is guaranteed to bring joy to your world. Details: 417.358.9665.

Christmas present prices from 1943: Toy fire truck: $16.95, or $3 monthly All Steel Tractor: $14.95 or $3 monthly

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Station Wagon: $14.55 M A G A Z I N E

Deluxe Trike: $17.95

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Three-wheel scooter: $1.98

Christmas storyâ€? with this interactive outdoor theater that includes a living nativity scene, real Christmas music, real animals and a live stage show. Admission is free. Details: 417.501.5821. r  5 ) &  /&8 :0 3 , P O LY P H O N Y, part of the ongoing Pro Musica musical season, will perform a Christmasthemed musical show at the Central Christian Center, 415 S. Main St., at 7 p.m.: Comprised of Georey Williams, countertenor, Steven Caldicott Wilson, tenor, Christopher Dylan Herbert, baritone, and Craig Phillips, bass, New York Polyphony will perform “I Sing the Birth,â€? an intimate meditation on the Christmas season. Details: 417.625.1822. r  i . * 3 "$ - &  0/  T H S T R E E T,â€? Joplin Little Theater, 3009 W. First St., 7:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 6 t#FHJOOJOH OPX UISPVHI %FD   the Webb City Farmer’s Market, 555 S. Main St., will be hosting a i $ ) 3 * 4 5 , * / % - . " 3 , & 5 u — a collection of local art and crafts, a sort of street market associated with the celebration of Christmas, similar to the types of markets commonly seen in Germany and Austria. Each day, there will also be a host of local school and church


choirs and musical groups performing. The Christkindlmarket will be in the south section of the pavilion. Details: 417.623.1180. r- * 7 * / ( $ ) 3 * 4 5 . " 4 5 3 & & “Beneath His Father’s Heaven,” 7:30 p.m. r  i ( * ' 5  0 '  5 ) &  . "( * u and “A Celebration of Christmas,” two Stained Glass Theater presentations, 7:30 p.m.

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Saturday, Dec. 7 r 5 ) &   T H " / / 6" - # 3 & " , FA S T W I T H S A N TA at the Joplin Museum Complex, 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.: Kids are given the chance to meet and greet Santa and eat hot cakes and sausage with him. Tickets are $6 and $1 picture with Santa (optional). Pre-registration is required. Bring one can of food

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r 5 ) &   T H A N N UA L J O U R N E Y TO B E T H L E H E M , Racine Christian Church, 12218 State Highway K, Seneca, 5:30 p.m.

M A G A Z I N E

r  i . * 3 "$ - &  0/   TH S T R E E T,” Joplin Little Theatre, 3009 W. First St., 7:30 p.m.

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r i $ ) 3 * 4 5 . " 4  # & - - & 4 u Stone’s Throw Theater in Carthage, dinner at 6:30 p.m. and the production at 7:30 p.m.

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CHRISTMAS EXPERIENCE

and receive $1 off. One can per person please. Details: 417.625.4750. tɩF +PQMJO )VNBOF 4PDJFUZT H O L I D AY O P E N H O U S E , Noon-5 p.m.: Light refreshments and adoption specials all day long. tɩF +PQMJO )VNBOF 4PDJFUZT T R E E O F R E M E M B R A N C E C E R E M O N Y, 6 p.m.: The Tree of Remembrance is an opportunity for families at the Joplin shelter, 140 Emperor Lane, to focus on pets who have passed; includes a poetry reading and followed by the lighting of the tree and reading of names. Details: 417.623.3642. r i ) " / 4 & -  " / %  ( 3 & 5 & -4  $ ) 3 * 4 5 . " 4 A D V E N T U R E ,” Missouri Southern State University’s Taylor Performing Arts Center, 2:30 p.m.: Hansel and Gretel’s family have no food or presents for Christmas Eve. Hansel hatches a plan to raise some money to surprise their father. When they go into the forest to gather mistletoe and sticks, they run into a lost elf from the North Pole. That’s where their adventure begins, as they meet other colorful characters along the way. They even get to meet old St. Nick. Directed by Lyndall Burrow. Details: 417.625.3190.

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r- * 7 * / ( $ ) 3 * 4 5 . " 4 5 3 & & , “Beneath His Father’s Heaven,” 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.

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ri (*'50'5)&."(* u and“A Celebration of Christmas,” two Stained Glass Theater presentations, 7:30 p.m. r i $ ) 3 * 4 5 . " 4  # & - - & 4 u Stone’s Throw Theater in Carthage, dinner at 6:30 p.m. and the production at 7:30 p.m. r  i . * 3 "$ -&  0 /   T H S TR E E T,” Joplin Little Theatre, 3009 W. First St., 7:30 p.m. r  5 ) &    T H A N N UA L JOURNEY TO B E T H L E H E M , Racine Christian Church, 12218 State Highway K, Seneca, 5:30 p.m.

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Sunday, Dec. 8 r  ) 0 - * % ":  0 3 / " . & / 5 4  1 & / % " / 5 4 can be crafted at the Wildcat Glades Conservation and Audubon Center, 201 W. Riviera Dr., in Joplin, from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. Price is $35 per person. The young and old alike are encouraged to come out and fashion beautiful designs to be used for ornaments or pendants that will make lovely handmade jewelry. Details: 417.782.6287. r- * 7 * / (  $ ) 3 * 4 5 . " 4  5 3 & &  “Beneath His Father’s Heaven,” 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. r  i ( * ' 5 0 ' 5 ) & . "( * u and “A Celebration of Christmas,” two Stained Glass Theater presentations, 2:30 p.m. r i ) " / 4 & -  " / %  ( 3 & 5 & -4  $ ) 3 * 4 5 . " 4 A D V E N T U R E ,” Missouri Southern State University’s Taylor Performing Arts Center, 2:30 p.m. r i $ ) 3 * 4 5 . " 4  # & - - & 4 u Stone’s Throw Theater in Carthage, dinner at 1 p.m. and the production at 2 p.m. r  i . * 3 "$ - &  0 /   T H S T R E E T,” Joplin Little Theater, 3009 W. First St., 2:30 p.m.

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Monday, Dec. 9 ri ( * ' 5 0 '  5 ) & . "( * u " / % i" $ & - & # 3 " T I O N O F C H R I S T M A S ,” two Stained Glass Theater presentations, 7:30 p.m.

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on the cover

CHRISTMAS EXPERIENCE

Tuesday, Dec. 10 r + 0 1 - * /  $ ) 3 * 4 5 . " 4 PA R A D E , 6 p.m.: The theme of this year’s parade through downtown Joplin (from 20th to First streets) will be “Christmas Through the Eyes of a Child” and it will include floats, marching bands, horses and clowns. r  ) 0 - * % ":  & 9 1 3 & 4 4 T R A I N , 4 p.m.: The Kansas City Southern’s Holiday Express will stop at the former Union Depot at 201 N. Main St. This six-car train will bring Santa to Joplin for his annual visit and offer visual displays. At each stop, a donation to the Salvation Army will be made. ri(*'5 0' 5)& ."(* u "/% i" $&-&#3"5*0/ 0' CHRISTMAS,” two Stained Glass Theater presentations, 7:30 p.m. W e d n e s d a y, Dec. 11 ri(*'5 0' 5)& ."(* u "/% i" $&-&#3"5*0/ 0' CHRISTMAS,” two Stained Glass Theater presentations, 7:30 p.m.

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Thursday, Dec. 12 r  i $ ) 3 * 4 5 . " 4  # & - - & 4 u Stone’s Throw Theater in Carthage, dinner at 6:30 p.m. and the production begins at 7:30 p.m. ri(*'5 0' 5)& ."(* u "/% i" $&-&#3"5*0/ 0' CHRISTMAS,” two Stained Glass Theater presentations, 7:30 p.m.

Friday, Dec. 13 r ' 0 6 3 5) "//6 "- % * $ , & /4 ' & 4 5 hosted by Historic Murphysburg Preservation, Inc., 6:30-8:30 p.m.: The event will be centered on Moffet and Sergeant Avenues between Third and Fourth streets in Joplin’s residential historic

district. Admission to Festival complimentary, with donation buckets available. DickensFest will feature thousands of winter lights, an Olde English village, costumed characters and more.

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1961: The cost of a First Class stamp: 4 cents

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Cost of attending the Carnegie Hall Christmas Eve concert: 50 cents. The number of Christmas cards sent – three billion – made up more than 25 percent of the mail sent in the U.S. that year. Buyers of Christmas cards had more than 50,000 designs to choose from. Eighty percent of all greeting cards were purchased by women. The White House Christmas card, the first of the Kennedy years, was a simple background of white and dark green, embellished with the Presidential seal and the words “Season’s Greetings” in gold Soviet Christmas cards featured pictures of the Vostok rocket and cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin, commemorating the first manned space flight.


r 5 ) & /*( )5  #&'0 3 & C H RISTMA S CA R O L, 6:30 p.m.: A nationally-renowned theatrical play, it will be held at First United Methodist Church, 501 W. Fourth street. Details: 417.483.3116. r i 5) & (3 */ $) u Midwest Regional Ballet production at the Pittsburgh Memorial Auditorium in Pittsburg, Kan., 7:30 p.m.: “The Grinch” is an adaptation from the popular movie reworked by Kaye Lewis for the stage, using songs from the soundtracks as well as swing music by Brian Setzer. There are 40 cast members, ranging in ages from 5 to 50, and there will be a mixture of hip hop, jazz, ballet and swing. Details: 417.439.9549. r i (*'5 0' 5 )& ." ( * u "/% i" $&-&#3 " 5 *0 / 0 ' C H RISTMA S ,” two Stained Glass Theater presentations, 7:30 p.m. r i $ ) 3*45." 4  #&--&4 u Stone’s Throw Theater in Carthage, dinner at 6:30 p.m. and the production begins at 7:30 p.m.

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tɩF TJYUI BOOVBM W IN T ER WONDERLAN D CAN DY C ANE H UNT , 11 a.m.: Snowie the Snowman is inviting children ages 3-9 to the Joplin Athletic Complex at 3501 W. First St., to participate in the hunt, enter a coloring contest or warm up with cocoa and cookies. Find different

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Saturday, Dec. 14 r 5 ) & 6(- : 48 &" 5 &3  3 6 / will be held in downtown Joplin, Sixth and Main streets, at 9 a.m.: There will be a 5K run ($30) and 1-mile fun run ($15). Wear that holiday sweater mom knitted and bring the whole family downtown to enjoy Joplin’s newest holiday tradition. The 5K race will begin at 9 a.m.; the 1-mile fun run at 9:05 a.m. Details: E-mail at starlitrunningco@gmail.com.

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CHRISTMAS EXPERIENCE

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colored candy canes to win prizes. Limited number of spaces available and pre-registration is required; the last day to register is Dec. 6. Cost is $10 per child. Bring canned food for donations to receive $1 o. Details: 417.625.4750. r  ' 0 6 3 5) " // 6 " - % * $ , &/4 ' & 4 5 hosted by Historic Murphysburg Preservation, Inc., 6:30-8:30 p.m.. r  5 )&  /* ( )5 #& ' 03 & C HR I S TM AS C AR O L , 6:30 p.m.: A nationally-renowned theatrical play, it will be held at First United Methodist Church, 501 W. Fourth St. For more information, call 417.483.3116. r  i $ )3 * 4 5. "4  #& - - & 4 u Stone’s Throw Theater in Carthage, dinner at 6:30 p.m. and the production begins at 7:30 p.m. r  i 5)&  ( 3 * /$ ) u Midwest Regional Ballet production at the Pittsburgh Memorial Auditorium in Pittsburg, Kan., 7:30 p.m. r  i ( * ' 5 0 '  5)&  ." ( * u "/%  i " $ &-&#3 "5 *0/  0' C HR I S TM AS ,� two Stained Glass Theater presentations, 7:30 p.m.


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Sunday, Dec. 15 r  5 ) & / *( )5  #&'03 & C H RIST MAS CAR OL, 6:30 p.m.: A nationallyrenowned theatrical play, it will be held at First United Methodist Church, 501 W. Fourth street. For more information, call 417.483.3116.

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r ' 0635)  " //6 "- %*$ ,&/4'&4 5 hosted by Historic Murphysburg Preservation, Inc., 6:30-8:30 p.m. r i $ ) 3 * 4 5 . " 4  # & - - & 4 u Stone’s Throw Theater in Carthage, dinner at 1 p.m. and the production begins at 2 p.m.

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r  i 5 ) &  ( 3 * / $ ) u Midwest Regional Ballet production at the Pittsburgh Memorial Auditorium in Pittsburg, Kan., 2:30 p.m.

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Saturday, Dec. 21 The annual National Audubon Society C H R I S T M A S B I R D CO U N T will take place from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.: People attending this free event can team up with experienced birders and set out to count as many birds as they can. The longest running Citizen Science survey in the world, Christmas Bird Count provides critical data on population trends. Tens of thousands of participants know that it is also a lot of fun.

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 r i ( * ' 5  0 '  5 ) &  . "( * u " / %  i"  $ & - & # 3 "5 * 0 /  0 ' C H R I S T M A S ,” two Stained Glass Theater presentations, 2:30 p.m.

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on the cover CHRISTMAS MEMORIES BY KEVIN MCCLINTOCK

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Former Joplin resident talks about unique four Christmas get-togethers

F

ace it,” said Lucy Van Pelt to a depressed Charlie Brown, two of the most endearing characters from Charles Schultz’ popular Pea“nuts gang. “We all know that Christmas is a big commercial racket. It’s run by a big Eastern syndicate, you know!” In the Peabody award-winning primetime special, Charlie Brown and the gang used clever dialogue and comical shenanigans to warn kids and parents about the overcommercialization of America’s most cherished holiday. Sadly, this animated classic from 1965 would prove to be rather prophetic. Ted Conn, who was in his early 20s at

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the start of the 1990s, knew all about a commercialized Christmas. It was during that decade when the infamous Black Friday was launched the day after Thanksgiving; where crowds first began pushing and shoving to grab some of the hottest toys of that decade, from Beanie Babies to the uber-popular Tickle Me Elmo dolls. At the time, Conn was working at Northpark Mall, for a long time at the former B. Dalton Bookstore, and he got a large taste of the Christmas season during the economic boom of the 1990s. During that time of his life — attending college, working full-time but still living inside his parent’s Webb City

house — “I was really feeling that Christmas was (almost) a burden.” No longer, of course. Conn is now in his early 40s. Today, he’s the happily married father of two children, working as a speech pathologist/ therapist for the Lee’s Summit school district in the Kansas City metro area. Most of his memorable Christmas moments are fresh ones, involving his son and daughter — from their delighted expressions when ripping open presents sitting beneath the tree to those quiet Christmas Eve toy building sprees down in the basement. Memories from the 1990s, Conn admitted, tend to “blend into a muddled


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But now that he’s able to reect back on that time of his life, he now admits “there were still things I looked forward to doing every year; the traditions my family had established that endured year after year.â€? The 1990s was a rather unsettling

decade, as the nation coped with the ďŹ rst Gulf War and the bombings of the World Trade Center in New York City and the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building closer to home in Oklahoma City. On the economic side, however, the nation was booming, alongside advances in technology that brought the World Wide Web to homes and businesses, connecting people around the world like never before.

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montage of half-forgotten conversations, emotions and moments,� he said.

TO

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Beginner To Advanced

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CHRISTMAS MEMORIES

Christmas was an especially busy time for Ted because he celebrated Christmas on four distinct and separate occasions throughout a very busy seven days.

the mantle and a huge bowl of mixed nuts on the table. They’d decorate a tree they’d cut from the side of the highway and we’d joke that Charlie Brown’s tree looked about as full.�

In fact, the ďŹ rst get-together came a week before Christmas, he said. That involved his father’s side of the family.

This ďŹ rst gather was signiďŹ cant in many ways, Conn continued. “It provided me a chance to see my father, who lives in Texas, and his side of my family. I would only see my cousins, aunts, uncles and grandparents once or twice a year, so I relished this opportunity to ‘rub elbows’ with them over a potluck feast, gift exchange and bingo. I loved visiting them then as I do now.â€?

“The weekend before Christmas (was) the annual Conn get-together in Aurora. It’s as true now as it was then. To attend, I ďŹ rst had to make sure I had the day o from my various mall jobs. With that handled, I was able to anticipate the gathering and think about what I’d get my dad and grandparents‌usually some odd trinket for the former and a gift certiďŹ cate for the latter.

“My mother (Millie Sue Luke Conn Hansen, who sadly passed away in 2006), loved decorating the inside of the house with all sorts of arts and crafts and lavishly the tree with tinsel and ornaments from us kids’ past,� Conn said. “Historically, my brother, sister and I would wake up early as many children do and rouse our sleeping parents to tear into gifts waiting under the tree.�

Next up on the list was meeting and greeting far-ung relatives of his stepfather Larry Hanson’s family. They would often meet at the Shoney’s restaurant in Joplin. “There weren’t any gifts exchanged, just cards with perhaps a check or cash inside.â€?

But by the the early 90s, when Ted was in his 20s, “I tended to sleep in until awakened by my parents,� he said with a laugh. “We’d make and eat breakfast and then open the presents. My mother would be the ‘elf ’ passing out the gifts, usually wearing some ridiculous Christmas hat she’d found to put us in the right mood.�

The third get-together was the most

After the gifts were opened, he and his

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“Back then, we’d meet at my grandparent’s farm and celebrate the holiday. Looking back on it, they didn’t gaudily decorate the house. Ornamentation usually consisted of Christmas cards on

traditional of them all, when he would get out of bed to open presents and eat breakfast inside the family home.

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Other popular toys purchased during the decade included Starter Jackets, Reebok Pumps, the Super Soaker 50 water cannons, Power Rangers, Power Wheels, Pogs, Beanie Babies, Tamagotchi digital dinosaur pets, My Little Pony, Tickle Me Elmo, Micro Machines and probably the most popular toy at the time, Roller Blades.

on the cover

“My grandfather helped build the church and a large part of my extended family was part of the congregation, including me. This meant that we had a place to host the annual family gathering, free of charge and open to all. We’d eat, play games and open gifts while making small talk and answering the inevitable question of ‘So how’s life?’ My mother was infamous for writing a ‘play’ every year and finagling some of my relatives to act out some ridiculously hilarious and embarrassing skit.”

Speaking of toys, a new generation of electronic gaming systems were some of the top sellers during the 1990s. In a span of a just a few years, kids could choose from the Sony Playstation, the Sega Genesis, the Nintendo 64, the handheld Nintendo Gameboy and the Sega Dreamcast.

CHRISTMAS MEMORIES

family would tidy up the front room and prepare for the fourth and final celebration. His mother’s family, the Lukes, would always meet at the First Missionary Baptist church on 20th Street in Joplin.

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After that,” Conn said with a chuckle, “we’d go home and enjoy the rest of the day doing whatever it is that we did 20 years ago.”

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on the cover MIRACLE ON 34TH STREET WRITTEN AND PHOTOGRAPHED BY RYAN RICHARDSON

“Faith is believing when common sense tells you not to. Don’t you see? It’s not just Kris that’s on trial, it’s everything he stands for. It’s kindness and joy and love and all the other intangibles.” — Miracle on 34th Street

I“ BELIEVE… I BELIEVE!”

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Joplin Little Theatre actors bring holiday classic to the stage

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ocal actors are bringing a beloved Christmas classic to the local stage with the production of “Miracle on 34th Street.”

The Joplin Little Theatre adaption of the 1947 film is a modern telling of a Macy’s store Santa Claus named Kris Kringle who claims to be the real Santa Claus. While the famous courtroom scene of bags upon bags of letters coming into a courtroom asserting Kringle’s claim is a timeless piece of film history, director Lisa Olliges Green believes the play goes beyond just telling the story about a store Santa. “It is the idea that the holiday season is really the miracle time of the year,” Green said. “People know how this story ends, but it is still super sweet. It still moves people and that’s why we expect this to be very popular in the community.”

Kris Kringle (Chet Fritz) passes the beard pull test by Susan (Anne Marie Wright) to see if he is the real Santa Claus.


Many of the actors for “Miracle on 34th Street” are children starring in their first professional play. The total cast for the play runs nearly 35 parts.

Green, who recruited Wright to perform for the play after the pair was in “Gypsy” together earlier this year, said that the cast has become united together in conveying the Christmas spirit on stage. “Our mantra for the play comes from a line inside of the play: ‘Faith is believing when common sense tells you not to,’” Green said. “Throughout the play is that debate at the heart of everything and that represents this time of year. Believing in miracles, having faith when something says not to. That is the spirit of the season.”

Webb City resident Anne Marie Wright is one of those kids returning to the stage. The eight-year-old plays Susan, a young girl skeptical of Kringle’s claims that he is the real Santa Claus. “I found out about the play and I said I wanted to be in this,” Wright said. “This is a fun and totally unique way to celebrate the Christmas spirit. While everyone knows the story and the work is hard to get everything right, I believe we are going to tell a story that is a lot of fun to see.”

1942: White Christmas 1943: I’ll Be Home for Christmas 1945: Let It Snow 1947: Here Comes Santa Claus 1949: Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer 1950: Frosty the Snowman 1950: Silver Bells 1951: It’s Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas 1952: I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus 1953: Santa Baby 1957: Jingle-Bell Rock 1957: The Little Drummer Boy 1958: The Chipmunk Song 1958: Rockin’ Around the Christmas Tree 1963: It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year

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An integral part of the cast is the amount of children involved in the production. Green said many of the kids are performing for the first time on the professional stage. “The whole cast is a really great mix of JLT older timers, some new kids in their very first role(s), and then there are kids that have had experience in multiple JLT production,” Green said.

Songs of the Season:

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Over 35 parts were cast for the play, including Jasper County Associate Circuit Judge Richard Copeland and former Missouri Sen. Gary Nodler. Copeland will play the judge who hears the Kringle case, while Nodler takes the role of the campaign director for the judge.

Details: “Miracle on 34th Street” will run Dec. 4-8. Ticket prices are $13 for adults, $11 for seniors and students and $5 for children ages 12 and under. Tickets may be purchased online at www.joplinlittletheater.org or by calling the JLT box office at 417.623.3638.

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Jasper County Associate Judge Richard Copeland (right) and former Missouri State Senator Gary Nodler both have roles in “Miracle on 34th Street.” Copeland plays the judge who hears Kris Kringle’s case, while Nodler assumes the role of his campaign manager.

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on the cover CANDY CANES BY KEVIN MCCLINTOCK PHOTOGRAPHY BY T. ROB BROWN

Minerva Candy Co. resurrects hard candy-making process

What they made hasn’t been seen locally in the area for a long while: 200 giant, 48-inch long candy canes. They are huge, too — thick and heavy. In fact, they look nothing like their smaller cousins often gracing Christmas tree limbs. “The care and attention that comes from hand-made products such as our candy is unique in today’s world,” says The Minerva Candy Store owner. “Our goal is to make candy ‘the old-fashion way’ — by hand, so each (piece of candy) is unique and special to that individual buying it.”

Yep, Minerva’s famed candy canes are back: a favorite among generations of Jasper County residents. In fact, Minerva was known nationally for its hard candy. During its heyday, Minerva’s previous owners constructed 25,000 candy canes each holiday season. “It took us six hours to do those 200 candy canes,” Hamsher says, laughing. “The question is, how long will it take us to make 25,000?” Realistically speaking, “I think our goal is to satisfy as much demand as we can. I would love for us to get back to the heyday of Minerva. “You know, there aren’t a lot of hard candy companies left in this country.”

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ight over here,” says Tom Hamsher, proudly gesturing at a metal cart filled with red and greenstriped candy canes, “is what we made.”

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Owner Tom Hamsher ties a ribbon on a giant candy cane that his Minerva Candy Store made. For generations, the previous owners made the canes and other hard candy, which proved very popular. There are only a few places today in the United States with the capability to make hard candy.

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CANDY CANES

on the cover

He’s right. While there are many soft candy manufacturers here in the Four State Area — Richardson’s Candy House immediately comes to mind — only Minerva has the capability to make hard candy. Doing so, Hamsher says, “is rapidly becoming a lost art.â€? Hamsher is keeping the tradition alive thanks to several pieces of machinery constructed at the turn of the 20th Century: namely, a 1,500-pound tay-making machine built in 1906, as well as a Batch roller, also built in the ďŹ rst decade of the 1900s. Couple those two machines with a massive 100-pound kettle as well as a cooling marble table, and they have all they need to make a huge batch of candy canes.

into the candy store’s huge copper kettle, where it takes 40 minutes for the sugared liquid to reach the boiling point. From there, the mass is dumped onto an oversized marble table, where the contents is allowed to cool. The ambercolored mass is then placed inside the tay-making machine; there, the candy’s color turns to white as it is worked through the machine. The candy is then placed back atop the marble table, where it is manipulated into the shape of a brick. On one side it is given a band of sugared red coloring. On the

The ďŹ nished candy cane is a neat, tidy package, easy to hold and delicious to eat. But the process to make the canes is anything but neat or tidy. Up to 100 pounds of corn syrup, sugar and water are dumped The main copper kettle pot is where 100 pounds of corn syrup, sugar and water are cooked to make candy canes. The candy cane-making process, from start to ďŹ nish, can take up to four hours to complete.

Old-fashioned candy sticks for sale inside the Minerva Candy Store. This scene could have easily been taken within a standard general store from the 1870s.

Candy Cane Facts

The tay-pulling machine used to make candy canes. The machine was built in 1906 and weighs 1,500 pounds.

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Parker Mortuary and crematory

A candy-making machine used to spin candy canes to twirl the colors along the shaft.

other side, it is given three bands of sugared green coloring. The colored brick is then loaded into the Batch roller, where the mass is corkscrewed into the familiar candy cane shape millions have come to know and love. “From start to finish,” Hamsher says, “the process takes between three to four hours” to complete. “And that’s eight to 10 people working on it; a couple of people at the table, a couple of people at the kettle, and a couple of people laying the canes out.

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“It is very labor intensive.” But the results are worth it.

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“Nobody else is doing what we’re doing here,” Hamsher says. “There’s not a lot of people who know how to do this.”

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Area Hearing & Speech Clinic 2311 S. Jackson Joplin, MO 64804

M A G A Z I N E

Making the hard candy, Hamsher says, “is a fulfillment of what people really want out of this building. People remember the candy canes; their memories are strong about that. That’s what they want, and that’s what we hope to give them.”

N O V E M B E R

When they were making the candy canes back in late October, dozens of people showed up to watch the process, some pressing noses against the glass as they watched. It was reminiscent of familiar scenes that took place back in 1905, when the candy store first opened in downtown Webb City.

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profile PAU L M U L I K BY KEVIN MCCLINTOCK PHOTOGRAPHY BY RYAN RICHARDSON AND KEVIN MCCLINTOCK

‘A dozen blades to rule them all’ Paul Mulik, Joplin, holds in his hands the one and only Glamdring, the sword owned by Gandalf the wizard. Glamdring is one of the most beloved swords found in the “Lord of the Rings” saga.

J

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ust north of the human village of Joplin, past the well-traveled Zora trail, inside a cluster of homes named “Forest Ridge” and buried beneath the ground lies an armory of swords, daggers and axes of Middleearth lore and legend.

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In all, there are nine swords, three knives, two axes and two staffs, all but one mounted neatly along two walls. Most of the blades have tongue-twisting names such as “Glamdring,” “Herugrim” and “Narsil.” Fashioned by United Cutlery, and purchased one by one from eBay, Paul Mulik now owns one of the largest weapon collections found in Joplin; certainly one of the largest “Lord of the Rings” weapon collections found in the area. “I saw the movies and I was just blown

Joplin man has extensive Middleearth weapons collection away by them,” Mulik said. “They were like nothing I’d ever seen before.” With more than 100 million copies sold in over 40 languages, millions have grown up with “The Lord of the Rings,” the epic tale by J.R.R. Tolkien, that’s considered to be the greatest fantasy-adventure story ever told. But the books can be difficult reads, so rich in detail as the three books are with historical events, invented languages and characters that sometimes have two or even three names. It was only when the trilogy hit the silver screen, directed by Peter Jackson,

that Mulik’s love for Tokien’s world clicked into place. “When I was able to put a face with a name, that made the whole thing easier to follow and understand,” he said. The movies “really helped put the novels into context.” He was so smitten by Tolkien’s story and their cinematic interpretations that he named his two dogs after book characters, “Elanor” and “Frodo.” Mulik chose to collect the weapons because each is a beautiful work of craftsmanship; also, no two blades are alike. Like the characters that wield them in the movie, each blade is a character in its own right.


The ďŹ rst weapon he purchased was Narsil. The last was Gimli’s main weapon, the “walking axe.â€? He hasn’t purchased a single item since the May 11 tornado, however. That tor-

And now with Jackson’s newest Middle-earth trilogy showing on the silver screen — “The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug� debuts next month — Mulik has a whole new set of weapons to choose from, including “Orcrist,� the sword wielded by Thorin Oakenshield. “I’m thinking about buying them,� Mulik said with a smile. What you won’t see in Mulik’s collection are the faces of the actors who played the famed Tolkien characters. “I’m trying to make it look as

“The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug� is just one of several Hollywood blockbuster movies being released around Christmas. Some other highlyanticipated movies include: r "  ODIPSNBO5IF-FHFOE Continues (comedy) (Friday, Dec. 20) r   3POJO GBOUBTZBEWFOUVSF  (Wednesday, Dec. 25) r 5 IF4FDSFU-JGFPG8BMUFS.JUUZ (drama) (Wednesday, Dec. 25) r (  SVEHF.BUDI DPNFEZ  (Wednesday, Dec. 25) r 5 IF8PMGPG8BMM4USFFU ESBNB  (Wednesday, Dec. 25)

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Each weapon costs between $100 to $200, though he’s nabbed a few items o eBay for as low as $80.

if you were actually there in Middleearth and saw it as it was,� he said of his weapons collection. “I don’t want you walking in and seeing a picture of Liv Tyler.�

N O V E M B E R

While Mulik’s collection is extensive, he’s still hunting down more weapons. He wants to purchase Sam’s short sword, given to him by Strider in the ďŹ rst movie. He’s also searching for another Gimli axe, as well as the blade carried by Faramir.

nado, sadly, destroyed half of their home, and nearly wiped out Mulik’s extensive collection of Andy GriďŹƒth Show paraphernalia. “Somehow, when people lost everything they owned, it just didn’t seem right for me to spend money on collectible decorations,â€? Mulik said. “But now that we’ve moved (into our new house), I do plan to buy a few more.â€?

One of Mulik’s favorite swords, this tainted, aged broadsword was owned by the Witch-king of Angmar, the leader of the Nazgul. Note the heavy detail in the blade.

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Some of the weapons found in Mulik’s collection includes: t /  BSTJM  ɊF TXPSE UIBU DVU UIF One Ring from Sauron. t 4  UJOHɊFTIPSUTXPSEDBSSJFECZ the Hobbits Bilbo and Frodo and used rather eectively, for a brief time, by the Hobbit Sam. t (  MBNESJOH  ɊF 'PF)BNNFS  the sword carried by Gandalf. t 8  IJUF LOJWFT  ɊF UXJO CMBEFT  carried over each shoulder, used by Legolas the Elf. t #  BMJOT"YF"IFBWZ UXPCMBEFE axe carried by Gimli the Dwarf.

A close-up of Gimli’s double-bladed axe.

M A G A Z I N E

Here are ďŹ ve pieces of Mulik’s collection, including the white knives used by Legolas (left), Aragorn’s elf knife, Boromir’s two-handed sword (middle) and two of Gimli’s many axes, the double-bladed Balin’s Axe and the walking axe.

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profile H ARV E S T M US I C F E S T WRITTEN AND PHOTOGRAPHED BY RYAN RICHARDSON

J.J. Grey (left) and saxophonist Art Edmaiston trade licks.

HARVEST

More than 10,000 attendees took part in this three-day camping and music festival, which is located near Ozark, Ark.

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ypical Ozark weather — some sunshine, some light rain, cold nights — lent a cloak of familiarity to the eighth annual Harvest Music Festival, one of the largest outdoor music festivals found within a 300-mile drive of Joplin.

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The festival included popular Joplinbased bands Totojojo and Third Party. Headlining the festival were bluegrass heavy hitters Yonder Mountain String Band and Les Claypool’s new project, Duo De Twang. In all, 70 bands got their rock on.

MUSIC FEST

Yonder Mountain String Band were the official hosts of the three-day Harvest Music Festival. Mandolin player Jeff Austin kicked off the festival’s music with a nearly two-hour set. The band performed all three days.


During the festival temperatures dropped into the 40s, but it didn’t stop BJ Barham and his band American Aquarium from pulling off a nearly two-hour set.

Turnpike Troubadours lead singer Evan Felker brought the Tulsa, Okla.-based band’s alternative country sound to the Harvest Festival.

Uncle Lucius lead singer Kevin Galloway leads the band.

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profile

H ARV E S T M US I C F E S T

Mountain Sprout banjo player Grayson Van Sickle rattles off a solo during the band’s first set.

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Fayetteville, Ark.-based Honeyshine plays one of the first sets during the festival’s official kick off. Electric washboard player Martha McBride plays during a late night set.

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Totojojo bassist Josh Zimmer and the rest of the members of the Joplin-based jam band played for a full hour, drawing in nearly 300 people.


Joplin’s very own Third Party wrapped up the last day of the festival, with singer Patrick Beckett leading the way.

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In addition to bands, street performers like Hot Springs, Ark. resident Kae McWilliams took advantage of the expanded crowds to perform with fire.

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music to the ears THE SHOOK TWINS WRITTEN AND PHOTOGRAPHED BY RYAN RICHARDSON

Music to the Used with permission from The Shook Twins press kit.

H

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ailing from Portland, Ore. by way of the northern reaches of Idaho, identical twin sisters Laurie and Katelyn Shook have become a road-tested and festival-featured act that has jumped to the forefront of indie folk music.

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Adding members Kyle Volkman and Niko Daoussis to round out their touring quartet following their 2009 debut album, “You Can Have the Rest,” The Shook Twins followed up with 2011’s “Window,” which broke new sonic ground for the group. A relentless tour schedule has seen the sisters share the stage with the likes of Ryan Adams, The Lumineers and Blizten Trapper. J: Like many other groups, you are playing multiple sets. I’ve talked to some of the other bands and they said it is optimal because they get to show many sides of a performance

without traveling. Do you feel that a festival is a great environment for people to get a good idea on what The Shook Twins are about? Katelyn Shook: We love the whole festival setup for us. We get a lot of eyes on us at these bigger stages, but then we get an opportunity to get a really close and intimate show at the Backwoods stage this weekend. Laurie Shook: You have to plan ahead on what you want to do at shows like this. You can’t go in and just play a preplanned set. You have certain things you want to do, but you never know what kind of crowd you are going to get. If you get lucky, you have people that have seen you before. If not, you have a limited time to make that connection because that is the first impression they have of you. It makes you work harder, but the payoff is so great.

EARS: THE SHOOK TWINS

J: Payoff? LS: You have an opportunity to reach the most people here than if you were just playing clubs or smaller venues. J: Speaking of playing clubs, you guys have hit the road hard over the past year. KS: We are in the hundreds when it comes to shows this year. LS: One hundred and fifty by my count. We are road dogging it now.


J: How many festivals in all of that? KS: This is our 16th this season. LS: This year has been great for us and we have taken that opportunity. It is our biggest exposure. J: I’ve talked to band members who haven’t wanted to speak to any of the others after that many shows. How do you guys handle that as siblings? KS: We get along well. We always have. LS: There is that typical sibling aggression, but we are twins. We balance the work and the family part. We pick up where the other left off.

Katelyn Shook (pictured) along with her sister Laurie, have been touring together as The Shook Twins and have released two albums thus far, including 2011’s “Window.”

KS: You have to regardless of who you are on the road with. We have a bond and we are close. We are lucky. J: So how did you come to the point of writing together? KS: Dad sang and played, but we did pick it up on our own volition.

To view upcoming tour dates, check out the band’s official page, shooktwins.com, or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ShookTwins.

N O V E M B E R

J: So what is the best part of this lifestyle then? KS: We get recognized when we go out in the crowds after shows. We go out and we interact because we are fans too. Sharing music in the crowds is awesome. We love the interaction that it provides.

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KS: Playing in a band beats that any day of the week.

Katelyn Shook alternates between blowing bubbles and using a telephone repurposed as a microphone during a recent performance at the popular Harvest Music Festival.

M A G A Z I N E

J: So you did the whole college thing? LS: Yeah. We were both in digital media. We started writing together during that time more and more and we never spent a day in actual jobs.

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LS: We started writing together at 18, and the band came together after college.

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Family owners David, Benji and Ben Peterson (Benji is Ben’s son, while Ben and David are brothers) sit with various guitars in hand, and neatly framed by a row of bass guitars in the background, inside the new Glory Days Music in Joplin. It’s the first time the store has opened since the May 22 tornado severely damaged their old store.

minding your business G L O RY D AY S G U I TA R S BY MICHAEL COONROD PHOTOGRAPHY BY T. ROB BROWN

“ONE GUITAR, made his whole life change....” Guitar business reopens after fatal tornado

T

he May 22, 2011, tornado took a lot from Joplin. The storm claimed lives, homes and businesses, but not residents’ spirit and determination.

A drum set ready to be purchased.

Rebuilding efforts continue more than two years after the disaster; proving nothing equals the city’s resolve to recover. “I’m telling you, we’re really, really glad to be back,” said Ben Peterson, owner of the newly-opened Glory Days Music store at 420 N. Range Line Road. “I haven’t worked six days in a row since the tornado, and I don’t feel tired because now I’ve got something to do again.” The old Glory Days, located on South

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Main Street, was destroyed by the May 22, 2011, tornado. It’s taken more than two years, but Peterson (along with son Benji and brother Dave) are back in the music business. Aside from the financial troubles faced by many EF-5 tornado victims, finding a new location also proved troublesome. “Once the tornado hit, a lot of the places available were gone. A lot of doctors (immediately) bought or rented retail locations to put in their practices. So, there was a shortage of places to rent for a business, too. “We physically went and looked at 38 different places as possibilities for our store. They were either not the right location or they were too much money,


or they were too small, too big or the wrong shape. They were recessed so it was blocked for vision. It took that long.” The family needed some place that felt “right” to them. “We were down here for 60 days, just painting. It took me forever to build the stage, frame those holes over there, decide what colors we were going to paint,” said Ben’s brother, Dave Peterson. “Every little detail just took forever. I’d come down here and spend eight hours and go home and feel like I didn’t get anything done. “ Now that the paint is dry, and the store layout finalized, what do they have to offer? Glory Days is the exclusive distributor of Ernie Ball Music Man guitars and basses. They also carry Ibanez and a variety of used guitars. All stringed instruments get a set-up from Benji. For the percussionist; they have Tama drums and as of Jan. 1, they will be the sole distributor for Ludwig drums in the area. Need a new amplifier? They have Mar-

Co-owner Benji Peterson plays a higher-end Music Man guitar as another guitar hangs in the foreground inside the recently-opened Glory Days Music.

shall, Yamaha THR and Orange Amplifiers for guitars as well as TC Electronics bass amplifiers. Add to that a selection of Dunlop and MXR effects pedals and Ernie Ball strings and folks can have everything they need for their very own personal rock concert. For those who want to learn how to play, the Petersons’ offer lessons running $100 per month and include one 30-minute lesson per week for beginners through upper-level intermediate students. “Because we have the

ability to play several instruments, if I’m teaching drums, for example, to a student that’s getting pretty good, I can get on the bass guitar and accompany him,” Ben said. “I can also teach them what to listen (while) I’m playing, to help them understand how it all fits together with what they’re playing. We can take that student to that level.” “I think it’s our aim,” added Benji, “between the three of us owners to be approachable, personable and go that extra mile to treat you like a friend.”

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Bass guitars for sale.

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY CURTIS ALMETER

style 2 0 1 3 N O V E M B E R

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taste H O L I D AY R E C I P E S

OLD-FASHIONED GINGERBREAD WITH LEMON GLAZE 1 2/3 cups all-purpose flour 1 1/4 teaspoons baking soda 1 ½ teaspoons ground ginger ¾ teaspoon salt 1 egg, lightly beaten ½ cup, granulated sugar ½ cup molasses ½ cup boiling water ½ cup vegetable oil 2/3 cup powdered sugar 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

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Preheat oven to 350-degrees. Grease and flour a 9-inch square baking pan; set aside. In a large mixing bowl, sift together flour, baking soda, ginger and salt. Add egg, sugar and molasses; mix well. Stir in boiling water and oil; mix until smooth. Pour batter into prepared pan. Bake 35 to 50 minutes or until top springs back when touched and edges have pulled away slightly from the sides of the pan. Place on a rack to cool. Sift powdered sugar into a small bowl. Stir in lemon juice, stirring until smooth. Drizzle glaze over the top of warm gingerbread. Cut into squares and serve warm or cold. Make 36 bars.

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CORNBREAD AND SAUSAGE STUFFING 12 tablespoons unsalted butter, divided 2 ½ cups finely chopped yellow onions 3 tart apples, cored and chopped; unpeeled 1 pound bulk breakfast sausage 3 cups cubed dry cornbread 3 cups cubed dry whole-wheat bread 3 cups dry white bread 2 teaspoons dried thyme 1 teaspoon dried sage ½ cup chopped fresh parsley 1 ½ cups chopped pecans Salt and pepper to taste Preheat oven to 325 degrees. In a skillet, melt six tablespoons butter; add yellow onion. Cook over medium heat until golden. Pour onions and butter into a large mixing bowl. Melt an additional six tablespoons of butter in the skillet; add apples. Cook over high heat only until just beginning to color but not mushy. Add two onions. Crumble sausage into the skillet and fry until lightly browned. Remove sausage with a slotted spoon and drain. Add sausage and remaining ingredients to onion mixture. Toss to mix. Spoon into a three-quart casserole or refrigerate to cool completely before stuffing turkey. Cover and bake for 30 minutes to 45 minutes. Baste occasionally with chicken broth. Makes enough stuffing for a 20-pound turkey or 12 to 14 servings.


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Lightly grease two 9-x-5-x-3-inch loaf pans. Punch dough down and turn out onto a lightly ďŹ&#x201A;oured board. Lightly knead half the dough and form it into an oblong. Place into prepared pan. Repeat with remaining dough. Brush tops with melted butter. Cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled in bulk. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Bake 45 minutes or until top is golden. Serve warm or wrap tightly in plastic and let ďŹ&#x201A;avors ripen overnight.



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Soften dry yeast in warm water and set aside in a warm place. Scald milk; remove from heat and add butter and sugar. Stir to dissolve butter; cool to lukewarm. Stir in yeast mixture, pumpkin and eggs. Add cardamom, ginger and salt. Add ďŹ&#x201A;our along with raisins. Turn out onto a ďŹ&#x201A;oured board. Knead in remaining ďŹ&#x201A;our until about half of the dough is smooth and satiny. Form into a ball; place in a greased bowl, turning once to grease top. Cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled in size.

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Want a bit of British with your American Christmas feasts? Try these recipes, each of them Victorian favorites.

Victorian Christmas Pudding That’s why we buy from local farmers. 12 National & State Awards, including Grand Champion brat and bacon. The Market across from Lowes offer fresh cut choice aged steaks, Troyer deli meats and cheese, Amish Wedding dry goods and much more. For 4 generations the Fairview plant has serving local agriculture, processing wild game, making and smoking award winning meats. Both locations has a great variety of meat for the freezer.

½ cup candied citrus peel 2 ounces candied lemon peel 2 cups raisins 2 cups currants ½ cup almonds, blanched and chopped 2 small nutmeg grated (1 teaspoon nutmeg) 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1 teaspoon allspice 1 cup flour 1 teaspoon salt ½ cup ground almonds 12 ounces fresh brown-bread crumbs 1 pound fresh suet, finely shredded 8 ounces dark brown sugar 8 eggs, beaten 1 wineglass brandy (4 ounces) 1 wineglass sherry (4 ounces) Enough milk to mix (½ cup) Chop the candied fruit peel, raisins, currants and almonds coarsely. Mix them together thoroughly with all the spices. In a large bowl, blend together the fruit mixture with the flour, salt, and ground almonds. Work in the bread crumbs, suet and sugar (using your hands is easiest) until everything is thoroughly mixed together. Beat the eggs lightly and add them to the mixture. Add the brandy, sherry and milk, stirring until the pudding is a soft paste. Let this mixture sit overnight in the refrigerator.

Remove the wet clothes and cover the pudding with fresh greased paper and fresh muslin. Store the pudding in a cool, dark place for four weeks. On Christmas Day, steam the pudding an additional two hours. Unmold the pudding. Before serving, add a sprig of holly to the top of the pudding, cover with brandy, and bring it to the table flaming.

M A G A Z I N E

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Set the basin in a large open roasting pan filled to the sides with boiling water. Steam the pudding in this manner for eight hours, adding hot water as necessary.

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In the morning pour the mixture into a large, well-buttered pudding basin (or pour into two small pudding basins – this is an ample recipe), cover with greased paper and cloth (plain muslin) and tie it tightly around the rim of the basin.

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Serve Christmas pudding with either brandy butter or whipped cream.


Place in a preheated oven at 400 degrees and bake until golden brown, approximately one hour.

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When done, remove from pan and let cool on a wire rack. Glaze while still warm.

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In a small bowl, cream the yeast with 1 teaspoon milk and 1 teaspoon sugar until frothy. In another bowl, sieve together the

Knead again slightly and place in a lightly greased cast-iron skillet, cover and again allow the bread to rise another 30 minutes.

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1 package active dry yeast 11/4 cups, plus 1 teaspoon, lukewarm milk ¾ cup, plus 1 teaspoon, sugar 4 cups unbleached nutmeg 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1 teaspoon grated allspice 1 teaspoon salt 1 stick unsalted butter, cut in small pieces 2 eggs, beaten with a little watercolor 2 cups mixed fruit (sultanas, raisins) ½ cup mixed candied fruit peel (lemon and orange) Glaze: 3 teaspoons confectioners’ sugar dissolved in 3 teaspoons boiling water

flour, sugar, spices and salt. With your hands, rub in the butter. Make a well in the center of the flour mixture and pour in the yeast, the beaten eggs, and the milk. Mix the ingredients well with a wooden spoon for about 5 minutes until a good dough forms. Add the fruit and fruit peel and work it into the mixture by hand. Cover the bowl with a clean cloth and allow it to rise in a warm place until doubled in size (about 1 hour and 15 minutes).

M A G A Z I N E

Barmbrack

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Dental Implants* may be your salvation.

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COMFORT! Fewer canker sores and abrasions! MUCH MORE COMFORTABLE! SECURITY! No more dental pastes! Eat, chew, talk and laugh with full confidence!

For more information on Implant supported Dentures visit www.AssociatesofDentalArts.com

Call our director of patient education Magan at 417-781-5600 to answer questions or schedule you for a Complimentary Loose Denture Consultation!

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*These specialties are not recognized by the ADA that require no specific educational training to advertise services *.

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1 stick sweet butter 1 cup confectioners’ sugar ¼ cup brandy Allow the butter to warm to room temperature. Beat vigorously until creamy. Gradually beat in confectioners’ sugar until pale and fluffy, adding the brandy a tablespoon at a time. Brandy butter can be made a few days beforehand; store in the refrigerator.

Fortune-Telling Crowdie 1 pint heavy cream, lightlywhipped 1 teaspoon vanilla 4 teaspoons sugar, to taste 2 tablespoons rum (or ½ tablespoon rum flavoring) 4 tablespoons lightly toasted oatmeal (toast on a cookie sheet in a 350-degree oven for 7 minutes) Charms: 1 coin, 1 ring, 1 button, 1 thimble, 1 wishbone – each wrapped in aluminum foil. Whip the cream with vanilla. As peaks form, add sugar and rum and continue to whip until well blended. Combine with oatmeal. Chill for one hour. Just before serving, stir in charms. When you serve this dish, have a spoon for each guest. Let them dish out a spoonful of crowdie on their plates. Serves six; adjust proportions accordingly.


Need some Christmas cheer? If you’re tired of some of the Christmas classics on the T.V., be sure to brave cold weather to catch these five wonderful plays at our area theaters. We guarantee you won’t be disappointed.

What: . * % 8 & 4 5  3 & ( * 0 / " -  # " - - & 5 4  1 3 0 % 6 $ 5 * 0 /  0 ' i 5 ) &  ( 3 * / $ ) u Where: Pittsburg Memorial Auditorium, 503 N. Pine St., Pittsburg, Kan. When: 7:30 p.m. on Dec. 13-14, 2013, and 2:30 p.m. on Dec. 15. Tickets: Prices are $12 and $10 for the Dec. 13 show and $8 and $6 for the Dec. 14 and 15 shows. A percentage of the Friday the 13th performance profits will benefit a sick six-month-old child with a heart defect. About: The Grinch is an adaptation from the popular movie reworked by Kaye Lewis for the stage, using songs from the soundtracks as well as swing music by Brian Setzer. There are 40 cast members, ranging in ages from 5 to 50, and there will be a mixture of hip hop, jazz, ballet and swing. This is the first time the MRB has tackled “The Grinch.” Contact: 417.439.9549

2 0 1 3 N O V E M B E R

What: C H R I S T M A S B E L L E S Where: Stone’s Throw Dinner Theater When: Dec. 5-8 and 12-15, 2013; evening shows times: dinner at 6:30 p.m. and the show at 7:30; Sunday matinee times: dinner at 1 p.m. and the show at 2 p.m. Tickets: $24.50 for adults; $21 for seniors and students and youth (ages 6-18); $12 for children (ages 6-12). About: A church Christmas program spins hilariously out of control in this Southern farce about squabbling sisters, family secrets, a rather surly Santa, a vengeful sheep and a reluctant Elvis impersonator. Directed by Mark Sponaugle, Betty Bell and Pam White. Contact: 417.358.9665

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What: T H E L I V I N G C H R I S T M A S T R E E Where: Ozark Christian College When: Dec. 5-8, 2013 Tickets: $7 (adults); $5 (children under 12) About: The Living Christmas Tree features excellent music from the 60-plus member choir, an outstanding orchestra and remarkable dramatic talent from the OCC student body and Joplin community. OCC’s Mary Green serves as production coordinator and drama director as well as directing the technical aspects of the program. OCC’s Scott Handley, Director of the OCC Music Department, directs the choir and orchestra. There will be seven performances in all. Contact: 417.626.1221

What: ) " / 4 & -  " / %  ( 3 & 5 & -4 CHRISTMAS ADVENTURE Ų $ ) * - % 3 & / 4 5 ) & "5 & 3 ų  Where: Missouri Southern State University’s Taylor Performing Arts Center When: Dec. 7-8, 2013 About: Hansel and Gretel’s family have no food or presents for Christmas Eve. Hansel hatches a plan to raise some money to surprise their father. When they go into the forest to gather mistletoe and sticks, they run into a lost elf from the North Pole. That’s where their adventure begins, as they meet other colorful characters along the way. They even get to meet old St. Nick. Directed by Lyndall Burrow. Contact: For reservations, call the box office at 417.625.3190

M A G A Z I N E

What: G I F T O F T H E M AG I Where: Stained Glass Theater When: Dec. 5-15, 2013 Tickets: $8 (adults); $5 (children) About: “The Gift of the Magi” is a short story written by O. Henry (a pen name for William Sydney Porter), about a young married couple and how they deal with the challenge of buying secret Christmas gifts for each other with very little money. As a sentimental story with a moral lesson about gift-giving, it has been a popular one for adaptation, especially for presentation at Christmas time. The plot and its “twist ending” are well-known, and the ending is generally considered an example of cosmic irony. Contact: 417.626.1293

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parting shot TWINKLING CHEER PHOTOGRAPHY BY T. ROB BROWN

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Joplin Metro Magazine, Retro Christmas, November 2013