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Week 01 - Week 17 The Creative Process Journal

THIS IS THE CREATIVE PROCESS JOURNAL OF SEMESTER TWO, BORN TO CAPTURE THE PROCESS AND INSIGHTS OF MY PROJECT - WONDERFUL.


First published and distributed by

Designed & edited by Jooey Lek Copyright Š 2013 Jooey Lek The copyright on the individual text and design work is held by the respective designer and contributors. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in retrieval systems or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage or retrieval system, without permission in writing from the copyright owner(s). All contributions are based on a subjective selection of interviews from various design house and studios featured in this book and other source of journals and publications. Printed and bound in Singapore


OVERVIEW

Overview Week 01-17: January 07 to May 05, 2013

RESEARCH Initial / Brainstorm Key Findings Artist Philosophy / Concept* The Idea / Intent

CONCEPTUALISATION Chosen Idea Research question Strategy Research Methodology Chosen strategy

VISUALISATION Research Methodology* Emotional drivers* Visual Intent (Art direction) Visual Research Sketches/ Ideas Finalised Art Direction

REALISATION Planning/ Execution Refinements Final Product Portfolio shoot

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RESEARCH (DECEMBER HOLIDAYS)


RESEARCH

Prologue Prologue: December Holidays, 2012

DURING THE BREAK Had a talk with another lecturer, Guo Wen on the day of Assessment Debrief. Some pointers to look out for in the future plans of Semester 2: - What kind of strategy work for what kind of business? - Proposed what kind of set up work? - Include all variables such as the different outfits (Who’s in the team), kind of medium, business models, etc. - Proposed the best strategy for what kind of designers or design teams? - Interviews of different teams which could include illustrators, advertising agencies - Interventions (User Testing) Over the December holidays, it was a month for me to catch up on my research. The primary research for my FYP focused heavily on the workspace of design studios. Therefore I have to approach many design house of various sizes in Singapore to collect relevant research. Beside, I have also found other interesting indie art magazines that provided me with much inspiration like Cereal and Kinfolk. In addition, I have came across very useful information from The Design Society Journal No. 5 that I think help me dearly in my FYP. A summary extracted of the latest issue: This issue’s highlight is a set of interviews we conducted with 10 independent Singapore design studios. They were selected from the 10 studios that received the most votes when the society asked online who to invite to speak at this year’s conference. In this series, we took the opportunity to look beyond the studios’ work to understand their design philosophy, how they operate, as well as their history and influences – or what defines their “Independence”. The surveys were so detailed and in-depth that it caught several of the studios by surprise!

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RESEARCH

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RESEARCH

Featured Design Studio Prologue: December Holidays, 2012

KAWAKONG Started in 1999, Kawakong is a graphic and identity design studio from Malaysia, who strives with passion for making a living by selling creative ideas and design craftwork at a very reasonable fee. Founded by Chung & Ming, they started the studio together and has remained with just two of them ever since. Works they do involve: creative direction, art direction. identity, design positioning, re-identity design, corporate identity system, graphic design, logo design, illustration, production consultant. Partner /Creative Director, Chung Partner /Creative Director, Ming http://www.kawakong.com/

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RESEARCH

02/ Identity design for Advertising. Client: Duapersona.

01/ Identity design for Architecture Firm. Client: Building Bloc.

03/ Kid’s menu design for Hotel & Restaurant. Client: Mandarin Oriental.

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RESEARCH

Featured Design Studio Prologue: December Holidays, 2012

BRAVO COMPANY Bravo Company is a creatively led, independent design studio based in Singapore. They work with a variety of individuals and organisations to deliver considered and engaging design. Specialised in identity & brand development, printed communications and art direction, Bravo has come up with charming and relevant branding designs for many various restaurants. Some of their clients include Lucha Loco, The Sichilian, Balzac Brasserie and many more. Partner / Creative Director, Edwin Tan Partner / Studio Director, Janice Teo http://bravo-company.info/

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RESEARCH

01/ Identity design for French restaurant in Singapore. Client: Balzac Brasserie.

02/ Art Direction & Branding for Mexican Restaurant. Client: Lucha Loco.

03/ Web Design & Art Direction. Client: Multicourse.

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RESEARCH

Featured Design Studio Prologue: December Holidays, 2012

SOMEWHERE ELSE Having spent nearly five years at Asylum, Yong currently heads Somewhere Else where he and his team dream up solutions for a wide range of selected clients. Through their approach and processes, Somewhere Else provide distilled solutions for businesses as they push to create unique works that are idea-driven, relevant and intelligently crafted. Some of these works have been featured in a number of publications worldwide. Founder/Creative Director, Yong http://www.somewhere-else.info/

01/ Misomber Nuan. Lookbook Collection 1

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RESEARCH

02/ NUS DID Folio 2012

03/ Smoulder: Packaging, Storefront & Web Design

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RESEARCH

Featured Design Studio Prologue: December Holidays, 2012

ACRE Co-founded in 2011 by T Y Zheng and Jason Song, ACRE operates from the industrial heartlands of Singapore. They are an art collective of idea crafters. They believe the collaborative experience between clients and themselves ensure good design, clear communication and holistic brand projection. Whether they are digital or print, they are all good soil. ACRE believes that untapped potential and limitless possibilities lie within the seed of every good idea. Co-Founder /Creative Director, TY Zheng Co-Founder / Managing Director, Jason Song http://www.acre.sg/

01/ Studio Branding & Stationary Design. Client: ACRE self promotion

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RESEARCH

02/ Branding & Identity Design. Client: Pact

03/ Pop-Up Store Branding & Collateral. Client: Spur

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EVALUATION (WEEK 01)


EVALUATION

Consultation Week 01: January 09, 2013

STUDIO’S UPDATE A quick follow up consultation with Yasser on the first week of school reopen. The aim of the consultation was to discuss primarily about our last semester design outcomes and to update him of our progress over the holidays. I have also managed to clarify with him on the upcoming user testing’s presentation; in term of its intents and methods. Here are some pointers concluded from the discussion:

- Yasser thinks it is interesting to add in illustrators as they are a different kind of creatives. Their workspace may be full of their work, illustrations of theirs and other artists they like which is a good mix. For example, Basit has a very different approach of design thinking which based mainly on concept and philosophy.

- It is good if I can hook up with these foreign studios and visit them. Yasser encouraged me to explore design house from overseas so not too focused on just local studios.

- Messy Msxi

Recommended Illustrators / Design House:

- Terrain: Daniel & Basit - Trinity (Jeffrey) Influential design house in Malaysia.

- Based on the research, try to propose what I think is the best way to design a space. It would be interesting in that manner. In a way, I can link back to my Design Issue and proposed what works best particularly for a school environment. - Can consider the options of making the space design into 3D so people can visualize. As 3D is the physicality of spacial design. However, it maybe leaning towards interior designer so the challenge is how I can contribute my input as a graphic designer comes in to the picture. Eg. Is it just about structure, material, texture, etc.? - He has expressed his initial concerns for my FYP. As he heard comments from other lecturers, wondering why did I get into a topic that seems more relevant to an interior designer. But he mentioned that it was alright as I put a very good show last semester. The panel of lecturers will very impressed especially with my publications. They all loved it including my CPJ. Yasser expects to see that kind of extension this semester. Add more. - It is interesting to conduct user-testing among other design students apart from Lasalle. We are encouraged to do so in order to gather more objective feedbacks of our FYP. The reply and feedback I get from them, compiled it and conclude these findings.

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EVALUATION

Afterthoughts Week 01: January 07 to January 13, 2013

PROJECT RECAP

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CONCEPTUALISATION

Project Summary Week 01: January 07 to January 13, 2013

OBJECTIVES

BACKGROUND

Main Objective

How a workspace is designed & occupied, affects not only how people feel, but also their work performance, their commitment to their employer, and the creation of new knowledge in the organisation.

To help design students and young designers to work better in their design process by creating a conducive and inspiring environment for them. Specific Objective

DESIGN ISSUE

It is no longer about workspace personalisation (that is leaning more to individual workstation). The plan for Semester 2 is to propose what is the best formula of a workspace set up for the different groups of individuals and business models.

There is a lack or unfavourable work environment for design students to do work due to physical space constraints in school. Therefore the poor set up of workspace fails to provide support for the students’ design process. Thus affecting the designers’ work performance, morale, and also the studio culture.

POSSIBLE OUTCOMES 3 separate editorial publications featuring different groups of design teams/ culture 1. What kind of set up would be best for illustrators? (Who usually work alone & from home, their spaces decorated with many different illustrations, etc.) 2. What kind of set up would be best for design studios? (They could be a small studio team faced with physical space constraints. How do they overcome it?) 3. What kind of set up would be best for design/advertising agencies? (They are of a big team that consists of 30 plus people. How do they maintain the flow of communication?)

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CONCEPTUALISATION

Revised Target Audience Week 01: January 07 to January 13, 2013

PRIMARY

WHAT ARE THE CHANGES?

DESIGN STUDENTS (19-28 YEARS OLD)

I have made some changes to the age group of the target audience. Reason for doing so was that I realise from my last semester in Week 09 survey results, there was a high percentage of students (76%) that fall in the group between the age of 21-25 years old. Therefore the age group of both primary and secondary groups have been increased to include more matured students. Young designers are considered for the secondary target audience as they are the ones who may face more workspace problems when setting up their own studios in the future.

SECONDARY YOUNG EMERGING DESIGNERS (21-30 YEARS OLD)

HOW IS IT HELPFUL TO THE TARGET AUDIENCE? Design students and young designers could absorb and understand the many different studio cultures both locally and internationally. The editorial help them to understand how each and every studio has their workspace set up to provide support to their studio culture and work process. As a result, young emerging designers are inspired can could apply the principles they learn to their existing workspace to help support their work process. It is the creative culture over creative spaces. On a side note, the rental in Singapore is demandingly high so it is a constant headache to find a spacious workplace and thus the constraints of physical space. Moreover, for young emerging designers, they may not have the budget to highly design their workplaces similarly to big companies such as Google. Therefore the insights of other creatives’ workspaces could help young designers and design students to help define a supportive workspace. In turn, improving their work process, morale and work performance.

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RESEARCH (WEEK 02)


RESEARCH

User Testing Summary Week 02: January 14 to January 20, 2013

USER TESTING GUIDE

USER TESTING OUTLINE

How to carry out user testing:

What to include in user testing:

1. Compile questions to ask people.

- People you have tested on

2. Test on your Target Audience.

- Things they like about (If objectives are achieved)

3. Try to get different groups of TA so as to achieve an objective opinions.

- Problems they highlighted - Solutions they proposed

4. Record the session, curate it and transcribe.

- Additional suggestions (Which I can look out for)

5. Use the findings and plan for this current semester.

- Future plans for Semester 2 (What can I learn from this user testing?)

6. User Testing Presentation at Week 02. (Not a formal presentation, can be in any forms)

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RESEARCH

OBJECTIVES

CONSIDERATIONS

It is to observe people using the product to discover errors and areas of improvement. In this case, it aims to see if my Semester 1 outcomes (LIMIT publication) are effective in delivering the message. The findings of user testing is gathered based on last semester outcomes.

In order to obtain a fair and credible results, the user testing was conducted among 4 separate groups of target audience. Reason why I chose to include ADM students as they have a different approach to design as compared to Lasalle students due to their school curriculum. So it’ll helps to gain their opinions as they provide a different perspective to my design outcomes. As for Lasalle seniors, they are fresh graduates which have just step foot into the design industry. Therefore, they make a good candidate for user testing. I chose to conduct my user testing less on Lasalle schoolmates as they already have an idea of my project thus the opinions provided may be biased. The 4 groups are: categorised according: - NTU Students (Faculty of ADM- Art Design Media) - Lasalle Students (Graphic Com) - Lasalle Seniors (Graphic Com & Image Com) - Young Working Designers

* The user testing was carried out mostly digital while some was face to face interviews. A compilation of items was sent to the target audience including: PDF publication, portfolio shoots and digital copy of user testing questions for them to fill up after viewing my works.

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RESEARCH

User Testing Questions Week 02: January 14 to January 20, 2013

QUESTIONS TEMPLATE User Testing Results (Sem 1 Outcomes)

Week 02

Q1. In terms of contents, does the outcomes (editorial) speaks clearly of its concerns? - Does the editorial helps to provide an in depth understandings and insights of the creatives’ workspace, studio culture & work process?

- Which area are you most drawn to / that won you over (Eg. Photos, interviews, layout, etc.)

- Do you gain inspirations from the readings which you can apply to your existing or future workspace?

Q2. In terms of visual aesthetics, does the editorial design help to bring the message across effectively? - What are your thoughts & suggestions on it? (Eg. Layout, font, photo correction, etc.)

- Is the current dimensions of the book to your liking? Current Dimension: 170mm(W) by 240mm(H) Or would you prefer it to be in like in a bigger/ A4 size? (Eg. The Design Society Journal. Does it affect / restrict the photos?)

Q3. Future Plans for Semester 2 (3 editorial publication issue for 3 different groups of individuals) - Any further suggestions on how else I could make this project better? (In terms of areas that I could look into which the project outcomes maybe lacking in now)

Additional questions Q4. Do you think the project outcomes (editorial publication) is a good way to reach out to the young designers of Singapore?

Q5. Would you be more keen in the subject of studio culture rather than the workspace personalisation?

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RESEARCH

User Testing Analysis Week 02: January 14 to January 20, 2013

PROFILE OF PARTICIPANTS

Total Number of People:

16

ADM Students: 4 Young Working Designers: 4 Lasalle Seniors: 5 Lasalle Students: 3

M

M F

M

F

F

F

NTU. ADM STUDENTS

YOUNG WORKING DESIGNERS

LASALLE SENIORS

LASALLE STUDENTS

Age: 23-26

Age: 26-28

Age: 21-25

Age: 23-26

RESEARCH THOUGHTS It was a surprise to discover that Lasalle Seniors (fresh graduates) that have been approached for the user testing, are all younger than the rest of participants. On contrary, it was a good mix as it helps to provide a balanced and objective views. For most of the participants, they fall between 21-28 years old. This better support the change of my target audience’s age group. It also help to reflect the general demographic of students studying in college.

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RESEARCH

THINGS THEY LIKE/POSITIVE ABOUT (OBJECTIVES ACHIEVED) CONTENTS How many people agree that editorial helps to provide an in depth understandings and insights of the creatives’ workspace, studio culture & work process?

Yes: 15

RESPONSES SUMMARY

No: 1

Reason: The quotes helps to summaries the chunk of information & makes it digestible. Comment 1: It’s interesting to see how different studios organize their space uniquely. Comment 2: The very nature of the editorial provides a very personal and intimate look. From a creative p.o.v. it definitely aids in the magazine purpose. Comment 3: Consider asking designers their opinions, “If a designer’s workspace can influence his or her work. Or if they have been in situation where the workspace was not conducive, in what way.” Comment 4: Consider asking designers, “If they could change one thing about their studio what would it be & what their dream studio is like.” Comment 5: Consider asking designers, “What made you settle on this studio space and coming designers who are looking for their own studio space.” Comment 6: I feel that this is editorial that you’ve done up is something of a necessity in the local context.

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RESEARCH

Do you gain inspirations from the readings which you can apply to your existing or future workspace?

Yes: 14

RESPONSES SUMMARY

No: 2

Comment 1: More of insights rather than inspirations. Comment 2: The editorial give me an urge to restructure my home workspace to feel like those depicted in the magazine. Comment 3: It made me realize that my working progression does really improve with a good workspace as mentioned in your magazine.

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RESEARCH

Which area are you most drawn to or that has won you over ? (Eg. Photos, interviews, layout, etc.) Conclusion based on votes: Photos: 11 Quotes: 2 Interviews: 3 Layout: 8 Workspace Answers: 2 All of the above: 2

RESPONSES SUMMARY Comment 1: The photos look genuine, semi-candid look. Comment 2: The layout is breaking the conventional style but still retains a good reading flow. Comment 3: The quotes help in providing an easy read for those who don’t have patience to read all the body text. Comment 4: The minimalistic approach to the design has made the interview the primary focus of the editorial.

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RESEARCH

VISUAL AESTHETICS What are your thoughts & suggestions on the visual aesthetics? (Eg. Layout, font, photo correction, etc.)

16/16

ADDITIONAL COMMENTS

Participants like the publication.

2 people like the paper texture and printed colors. 5 people like the spreads layout as it is clean and simple, easy to read. Comment 1: One of those magazines you would just buy because it looks nice. Comment 2: Complement the crisp and cleanliness of your current design.

What are your thoughts to the current dimension of the editorial? Is it to your liking?

16/16

ADDITIONAL COMMENTS

Participants has no issue with the dimension.

Comment 1: However, 2 suggested that the book can afford to go sightly bigger, around 1cm the border. (Objective: a better view display of the photos) Comment 2: Explore more with the paper usage. Comment 3: I like the size of magazine but it should be min. A4?

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RESEARCH

PROBLEMS THEY HIGHLIGHTED & SOLUTIONS PROPOSED CONTENTS PROBLEM 1

PROBLEM 3

The interview is too lengthy, big chunks of text. It may get dry after long reading.

Why the magazine named LIMIT? The lack of explanation here.

Solution 1: Pick up key points on the design studio’s philosophy to gain a quick understanding.

Solution 1: A headline or a thesis statement to support the magazine title.

Solution 2: Try to break the text up & make it interesting as possible. Inserts of trivia to make the interview less lengthy.

PROBLEM 4 The current copy writing needs to be improved.

Solution 3: The information of the theme can be intertwined with interviews instead of a strict 2nd half just interviews.

Solution 1: It needs to copy proof. Run the text through Word Document to rephrase the sentence structure or to spot spellings.

PROBLEM 2 To better bring across the insights of creative workspace, studio culture & work process. Solution 1: Add in blueprints and layout of the place so it can help in the understanding of the place better. Like how physical space of studio could impact on the design and work process.

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RESEARCH

VISUAL AESTHETICS PROBLEM 1

PROBLEM 3

There is a lack of graphic element inside the publication.

The book is perfect bound, thus cannot open flat to get a good look of some of the photos. The cover can be improved.

Solution 1: Try to create a visual link between the text & motif of triangle that symbolize ‘W’. The shape can be abstract.

Solution 1: Seek other alternatives of binding which best reflect the tone of voice of your project.

Solution 2: Add in a small portion of simple illustration such as entrance of workspace instead of introducing each studio with just text.

Solution 2: Experiment more with the form of the book since the project is about space. Take the risk & juxtaposed the simple design of the book with something outrageous on the outside for instance. Refer to the book “Browsing Copy”. Consider adding some effect eg. Die cut or emboss.

Solution 3: Design your magazine layout more fun. Refer to IKEA as an example.

PROBLEM 2

Solution 3: Make the 1st triangle picture of each book cover colored, leaving the back black & white. This will help to draw attention to your book. The picture chosen for the cover can be replaced with one that displayed the idea of ‘space’.

The sentence and paragraphing style can be improved. - The jaggedness of the right edge of the body text feels a bit “off ” and brings about uncomfortable readability in a way. Solution 1: Look into the book “Type Matters“ (Merrell Publishing) to take note of your hanging punctuations and paragraph shaping especially. Solution 2: Try left justified, it is better reading when in a few paragraphs & article form. If chose to remain as flash left, make sure the paragraph don’t get jagged. Take note of orphan & widow. Solution 3: The body text for interviews and write-ups should bring forward, the emphasis of the minimalistic approach by justifying the alignments.

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RESEARCH

ADDITIONAL SUGGESTIONS (WHAT CAN I LOOK OUT FOR) POINTERS - One big editorial book which contains just only the photos. Then each designer interviews are featured in a smaller mini booklet attached to the pages.

What is a good way to reach out to the young designers in Singapore? In a way to reach out to the young crowd, you need to make it social and put it online. Like you are addressing to the young people. Right now, the editorial is not addressing to them yet. In terms of the way it is written. It goes back to the fact that these 2 publications are basically to display the research finding. Still not the actual deliverables yet.

- Brand your editorial issues into a volume of 4 to 5 max. Attached with a give away? - Consider including and juxtaposing the designers’ works against the studio space. It will gives an extra reason to read about workspaces and more meaning to publication.

Solution 1: Can tweak and use it some other way. Make the findings more relevant and appealing to target audience. Key questions: how to me as a young designer find this useful; why should I be interested in looking at it.

- Should approach interior designers on the areas of using space. Blueprints and plans of space could also help in the design of workspace. Eg. IKEA with proposed design ideas for small spaces, MUJI with design of their homes.

The studio culture of the studio is not effectively/ visually brought across in the editorial? Solution 1: Each concept of the book can have a bit more content (in terms of info and graphics to add in the first few pages).

- Take note of the photos taken in ROOTS. Play with the levels as there is a tinge of yellow tone over it.

Solution 2: The interview part could be split up to show an unique quality of each studio (like 1/2 spread in the interview section which focus on the culture and space of studio) Solution 3: Feature an item or a corner of a studio to reflect the studio design beliefs. This can also help to understand how their studio culture is being reflected into physical space. Solution 4: Explore resting areas around their workplace, like company resting area Eg. parks around workplace, as these resting spaces can relate back to the creative workspace environment, also the designers’ working behaviour or process.

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RESEARCH

PLANS FOR SEMESTER 2 (WHAT HAVE I LEARNT) POINTERS Both studio culture and workspace personalisation are intertwined. They are an umbrella of each other. Thus combining both topics is a good idea to work on. The current direction of the book is right. Solution 1: Just need to emphasis certain message across in the editorial. Think of a voice that my project is heading to. Create a link with the reason why I actually came out with this project. This relation has to go back to the motivation of the project. As all the information I have now in the book, they are all factual information which can be used to back up a campaign/ project that I want to launch. Solution 1: I need to make use of the data to come out with something that would be called LIMIT. Which is to push for something, like launching a campaign. Solution 2: A platform where the target audience can actually design their own workspace. Solution 3: Design one of workspace into real space so people can go in and experience like IKEA. Solution 4: A website which contains all the photos of the different studios with just their quoted captions. This could act as teaser to get people interested in purchasing your magazine. Future plans to discuss the best set-ups for studios/ illustrators/designers would be an awesome close to the project. And at this level, I think the overall feel of your editorial is mainly of DIY culture, aiming at studios rather agencies. It is good as its speaking towards the student designer demographic. Important to include tips on how to design your workspaces for better workflow, or the workspace necessities that a designer should have.

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CONCEPTUALISATION (WEEK 03)


CONCEPTUALISATION

Revised Project Premise Week 03: January 21 to January 27, 2013

REVISED PREMISE

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CONCEPTUALISATION

Revised Project Breakdown Week 03: January 21 to January 27, 2013

PREMISE How a workspace is designed & occupied can affect: 1. How people feel (morale) 2. Their work performance (design process) 3. Their commitment to their employer (Sense of belonging which can be strengthen by studio culture/ workspace personalisation) 4. Creation of new knowledge in the organisation (creativity)

DESIGN ISSUE

OBJECTIVES Main Objective

On the contrary to established companies, schools may have a lack of creative spaces and even unfavourable work environment for students to work in, as the set up of workspace is difficult to meet the demands of every student’s needs. This would pose a greater problem in particular to design students as they depend heavily on their work environment to help generate creative ideas and to aid in their design process.

To help design students and young designers to work better in their design process by creating a conducive and inspiring environment for them. Specific Objective Through the understanding of other design studios’ culture, type and size, it will help young designers and design students to apply the principals onto their existing workspace to better support their design process.

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CONCEPTUALISATION

Revised Essay Title Week 03: January 21 to January 27, 2013

POSSIBLE TITLES

CHOSEN TITLE

The ‘Limit’ of Workspace

A PARADIGM SHIFT OF WORKSPACE

What is your workspace like? What is your dream studio like?

A study on the studio environment of designers, and to investigate the role it plays in their design process.

What is your ideal workspace?

What does Paradigm Shift means ?

The Ideal Studio spaces

Think of a Paradigm Shift as a change from one way of thinking to another. It’s a revolution, a transformation, a sort of metamorphosis. It just does not happen, but rather it is driven by agents of change. Paradigm Shift also means “shift of direction” or “change of perspective”, which is a change of thinking. Therefore, ‘A Paradigm Shift of Workspace’ refers to adopting a fresh new approach or perceptive towards workspace.

The ideals of a workspace An ideal of workspace The doctrine of workspace The Workspace Dogma Paradigm The paradigm of a successful workspace The paradigm of a dream workspace The paradigm of an ideal workspace The paradigm shift of workspace

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CONCEPTUALISATION

Revised Abstract Week 03: January 21 to January 27, 2013

RESEARCH THOUGHTS

ABSTRACT How a workspace is designed and occupied, can affect not only how people feel, but also their work performance; their commitment to their employer, and the creation of new knowledge in the organisation (Vischer, 2008). This reason to why some organisations have their workspace designed to reflect their beliefs so as to help their employees to work better. An example of this would be The Lego Group where their playful and trustful spirit were reinforced by their physical openness and relaxed atmosphere of the working environment. This encouraged their employees to relax and connect with colleagues easily (Groves, 2010).

• Based on last semester feedback both assessment markers have concluded that the discussion of my research paper was more relevant to interior design where the practice of defining workspace has already been established. • Reason was that the paper was written before the primary research- interviews were carried out. As a result, the research paper (Chapter 2- Literature Review) was written with a structure based greatly on books that were more relevant to interior design. • After conducting interviews with many design studios, I have gained a better understanding of my project and its direction. With that information obtained, I realised that the current Design Hypothesis may not be working so I plan to make changes to it by restructing the entire Chapter 2 and coming up with new research questions.

On the contrary to established companies, schools may have a lack of creative spaces and even unfavourable work environment for students to work in, as the set up of workspace is difficult to meet the demands of every student’s needs. This would pose a greater problem in particular to design students as they depend heavily on their work environment to help generate creative ideas. Moreover when projects are under way, it is very common for design students to work around the clock to meet tight deadlines (The Princeton Review, 2012). Therefore, a conducive and inspiring work environment is essentially important as it helps to motivate them to work efficiently even at stressful times. Hence, if a workspace fails to provide support to the students’ design process, it will have an adverse effects on their morale, work performance and creative thoughts.

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EVALUATION

Consultation Week 03: January 21, 2013

DRM’S UPDATE

BOOKS TO READ UP

Yasser’s Comments: Based on the abstract, the essay’s direction right now is more concise and clearer as compared to the previous submitted draft. As earlier, the essay focus only on an area which was leaning more towards interior design (workspace personalisation). With the addition of another area of study (studio culture), it helps to include a better perspective of graphic designer.

• Type Matters By Jim Williams • Studio Culture By Unit Editions Type Matters deals with history of type, tips on improving type (screen/print), principles of type setting which all provide a clear guidance to the basics of typography. This is essentially useful for editorial design as it help to create a readable and elegant document. Based from user testing results, many has pointed out of the paragraph setting thus reading this book definitely help in taking note of these type problems. I urged all designers to own this book which is a plus for the understanding of type fundamentals. It will come in handy for sure.

However after much discussion with Yasser, I discovered that Design Hypothesis cannot be changed. Hence, instead of restructuring Chapter 2 (changing the research questions), I am tweaking it to fit the conclusion in Chapter 5 to evaluate what I have discover and why current Deign Hypothesis might not work.

As for book 2, Studio Culture provide a unique glimpse into the inner workings of 28 leading graphic design studios. It features penetrating interview which reveal the secret life of studio, the mechanics of building and each vibrant studio culture. This book is definitely great for my project as its topic is very relevant to mine. I just made an advance purchase from Basheer so can’t wait to get my hands on it and start reading!

STUDIO’S UPDATE Yasser’s Comments: Very meticulous in the conducting of user testing.

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CONCEPTUALISATION

Revisions for Studio Outcomes Week 03: January 21 to January 27, 2013

REVISIONS TO MAKE 1. Analysis of Studios

5. Workspace Answers (Graph Paper)

Additional Information include: - Studio Type (Studio space) - Studio Culture - Studio Breakdown Refer to The Design Society Journal #5

Re-adjust the photo to make it consistent for all studios. 6. Be experimental with the Editorial Cover & explore on the book binding Refer to visual references such as Browsing Copy, etc. Experiment more with the form of the book. Take the risk & juxtaposed the simple design of book with something outrageous. Alternatives which best reflect the tone of voice of my project.

Feature an item or a studio space which reflects the studio design beliefs. Help to understand how the studio culture is reflected into the the physical space. 2. Clean & Simple layout

7. Include a thesis statement/ supporting copy title: LIMIT

Refer to visual references. Refer to art magazines like CEREAL / KINFOLK Refer to magazines which revolves around space like IKEA / MUJI Sentence & paragraphing style to be improved.

Why is the magazine named LIMIT? LIMIT aspires to encourage individuals to explore the endless possibilities at work without mentally bounded by their physical space constraints. May consider changing the title to fit the tone of voice for my project better.

3. Paper type for the publication Will be changing to ECO Frontier (white, texture) Inside Pages A4: 120-140gsm Cover: A3: 300gsm 4. Interview Answers Re-edit the copy. Summarise the answers just enough to give it character. Not necessarily need to put all the anecdotes inside. Picking up quotes & key points which reflect the design studios’ philosophy which helps to gain a quick understanding.

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CONCEPTUALISATION

Strategised Plan for Studio Week 03: January 21 to January 27, 2013

STRATEGISED PLAN

TONE OF VOICE

1. To reach out to young designers, I have to make it social & online?

Genuine, Simple, Direct, Personal, Intimate Look along this direction for visual references.

Therefore the 3rd outcome which is a website.

KEY QUESTIONS

2. Think of a voice that my project is heading to. Create a link with the reason why I actually came out with this project. This relation has to go back to the motivation of the project. To push for something bigger. Editorial is a start.

- How do I address to young designers and make my FYP appealing to them? - How is my findings useful for young designers & why should they be interested in knowing it?

My FYP tone of voice: Genuine, Simple, Direct, Personal, Intimate. Colour Scheme: Green, Orange, Pink, Blue, Grey (3M Post it) 3. Connecting with creatives in the local scene & some around the world. 4. Peeking behind the scenes of creative studios to satisfy the never ending curiosity towards spaces and people alike. Human are inquisitive creatures, intrigued by what we normally cannot see and where we don’t have access to. This FYP can be a stimulation to young designers. (Young designers include design students) 5. Everyone perceive space differently. What is my stand here? To create a conducive and inspiring work environment for design students to work better in school. It is though the workspace set up that can help support their design process. Proposing what is the best workspace set up formula for school environment.

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CONCEPTUALISATION

DELIVERABLES 1. EDITORIAL

4. WEBSITE

Editorial publications: 3 separate issues featuring different groups of design individuals & teams

Digital Platform: Website (It is needed!) What is my stand here different from Where They Create & the Selby? I want people to be part of it. I want it to connect with creatives around the world. I want it to be stimulating to young designers. I am targeting to young emerging designers. LIMIT features photographs and interviews by mainly designers and illustrators in their creative workspaces.

Issue #01: What kind of set up would be best for illustrators? (Who usually work alone & from home, their spaces decorated with many different illustrations, etc.) Issue #02: What kind of set up would be best for design studios? (They could be a small studio team faced with physical space constraints. How do they overcome it?)

What sets me apart from Where They Create & the Selby? LIMIT(rethink my project title) is a student’s attempt at improving the situation of studio space in school. It started off from the lack of unfavourable work environment due to the physical space constraints. Its’s intention is direct and simple: using workspace as a tool to help improve young designer in their work process.

Issue #03: What kind of set up would be best for design/advertising agencies? (They are of a big team that consists of 30 plus people. How do they maintain the flow of communication?)

2. DIRECT MAILER Direct Mailer: to all the design studios/illustrators that has contributed to my FYP

Website Plan Main Page: a representative photograph of the designer/illustrator space with quoted captions over (To reflect their design beliefs and studio culture)

Invitation to the Lasalle show which contains a CD CD contents include: Photos of their studio space & editorial issue which features their studio.

Each featured studio will contain: their intro, website, photos & workspace answer (graph paper), Pin it*.

3. FACEBOOK PAGE

Sub Pages: Home, About, Contact, The Editorials, Press* (if there is), Tags/Search (Categories of Studios), Summary of tips for workspace

Facebook Page of the project: LIMIT

About: include the book & my FYP, Jooey’s Bio Contact: my email, facebook The Editorials: people testimonials on it, a brief summary of each issue Tags/Search: Include the different categories by designers/illustrators, design agencies/design studios, city area/ locations, etc. Summary of tips for workspace: 10 short tips of making your workspace better.

What should be updated in LIMIT facebook page? Refer to MINK, Where they create, The Selby as examples. It could include entries/post: - Photos of workspace (interior decor I found in ffffound.com or the ones I took). - Related stories of interior design. - Studio Culture reflected through the collection of things in studio.

Include acknowledgements (the contributors) Social Media: Facebook, Twitter, RSS Feed, Pinterest.

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CONCEPTUALISATION

Project Weekly Schedule Week 03: January 21 to January 27, 2013

TO-DO LIST After coming up with a stratergised plan for Studio, I decided to come up with a weekly schedule. The purpose was to have a rough plan for both Studio and other modules so as to ensure that I am on track. Of course I don’t follow it strictly as it is just a brief overview of the timeline for all projects .

WEEK 03 BUSY WITH ESSAY & D&AD

WEEK 06 PROJECT WEEK (CNY). CHIONG STUDIO!

• Transcript of SPLASH, ACRE (Kenneth) • Interview: Andrew (Fri) • Background of Jessica Hische & H55

• New Project Name, Revised Logo • Art Direction of Books (Experimental..) • Body Content for Website • Graphic Elements for Website • Digital Layout for Website

• Essay Chapter 2 (Finish by Sun, 27 Jan) • D&AD (Finish by Sat, 26 Jan)

• Facebook Group • HTML for Website (75%) • Interviews (1/2 more) • Transcripts of Interviews

WEEK 04 BUSY WITH ESSAY. TOUGH WEEK!

• Edit Studio Photos (1) • Prepare 3 sample groups of photos, workspace answer, edit interview (each categories for editorial) • HTML for Website (100%) • Few pages of Editorial (Mock Up: for the feel) • CPJ (for Week 03-06)

• Interviews: Bureau, BBH • Analysis of Studio (helpful for Essay) • Focus Groups needed?

WEEK 05 D&AD & ESSAY 1ST DRAFT DUE • Transcript: Interview with Andrew Tan • Transcript: Interview with BBH • Complete Essay Chapter 3 & 4 • Add User testing • CPJ (Week 01-02)

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CONCEPTUALISATION

WEEK 07 WIP

WEEK 10 CATCH UP ON STUDIO!

• Confirm Foreign Policy. Tofu? • Transcript of Foreign Policy • Interview: Basit (Mon) • FYI emails with Caught in the Ad, Paradox, &Larry & Kilo, L.I.E, Dominiquefam, Foreign Policy. • Printed Mock up of Editorial • Gain feedbacks • Revise outcomes • CPJ (Up to date)

• Interviews (1/2 more) • Edit transcript (Finish for Dec & Jan) • Edit Studio Photos (Finish for Dec & Jan) • Editorial (3 Issues: Dec & Jan) • CPJ (Up to date)

WEEK 11 WIP

• Complete Essay Chapter 3 & 4

• Website • Print deliverables • CPJ (Up to date)

WEEK 08 ROUNDTABLE SESSION

WEEK 12 PROJECT DEVELOPMENTS, ANALYSIS AND EVALUATION OF WIP PROCESS(70% COMPLETE)

• Interviews (1/2 more) • Edit transcript (1) • Edit Studio Photos (1) • Update to Website • CPJ (Up to date) • Complete Essay Chapter 2 & 5 (100% ideal)

• Interviews (1/2 more) • Direct Mailer (Art Direction) • Gain feedbacks • Revise outcomes • CPJ ( Up to date)

WEEK 09 ESSAY FINAL DRAFT DUE • Edit transcript (50% of Dec & Jan) • Edit Studio Photos (50% of Dec & Jan) • Editorial (Start!) • CPJ (Up to date)

WEEK 13- WEEK 17 To be updated soon...

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VISUALISATION (WEEK 03)


VISUALISATION

Website Visual Research Week 03: January 21 to January 27, 2013

REF 1: CEREAL

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REF 2: KINFOLK

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VISUALISATION

REF 3: CYCLE LOVE

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REF 4: UNDERSCORE

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REF 5: WHERE THEY CREATE

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REF 6: THE SELBY

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VISUALISATION

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VISUALISATION

Website Visual Plan Week 03: January 21 to January 27, 2013

CONSIDERATIONS CEREAL

WHERE THEY CREATE

• Clean, crisp and simple • Flash Animated Banner (Arrow to click to the sides) • A lot of white space (reflects my project essence) • Logo at the top, centralised • Black & White mostly

• Thumbnails of all different studios (4 Column Grid) • Logo at the top, centralised • Logo name is very unique, one of a kind • Studio page: Studio photos are displayed vertically, scrolling down to see all photos (Downside: people may get impatient to scroll all the way down to see the photos) • Bio Page: 2 Column grid

KINFOLK • A landscape photo centralised top • 3 Column grid • Very classy & elegant • Grayscale Pictures

THE SLEBY • Logo at the top, centralised • Logo Design is very eye catching (Logo projects a distinct personality) • A main featured studio photo is displayed at home page at the top centralised. (This can be in line with the one in Facebook Page Group) • Thumbnails of all different studios (3 Column grid) • Studio page: photos presented in collage manner

CYCLE LOVE • Black & White Social Media Icons • Sub pages at the top left corner • Search Bar on the right UNDERSCORE • Portfolio shot of the Editorial • Flash Animated Banner (yellow box to highlight) • Sub pages lined up horizontally

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VISUALISATION

ART DIRECTION Tone of Voice:

Layout(Studio Page):

• Clean, crisp and simple • A lot of white space (reflects my project essence)

• Studio page: Studio photos displayed vertically (Downside: people may get impatient to scroll all the way down to see all photos) • Flash Animated Banner (Arrow to click to the sides) • Studio page: photos presented in collage manner

Logo Design: • Logo name is very unique, one of a kind • Logo Design is very eye catching (Logo projects a distinct personality)

Layout(Other Sub Page): • Bio Page: 2 Column grid • Editorial Page: Portfolio shot of the Editorial

Header (Home Page): • Logo at the top, centralised • Sub pages at the top left corner • Search Bar on the right • Black & White mostly for other buttons Layout (Home Page): • A main featured studio photo is displayed at home page at the top, centralised. (This can be in line with the one in Facebook Page Group) • Thumbnails of all different studios (3 Column grid)

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Facebook Group Research Week 03: January 21 to January 27, 2013

EXAMPLES

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RESEARCH (WEEK 04)


RESEARCH

Featured Design Studio Week 04: January 28 to February 03, 2013

SPLASH Design, at Splash, is energy, joy, wanderlust, thought, imagination, nostalgia, desire and more. They believe that design is meaningful only if it moves. Stirring your feelings, driving your profits, getting you closer to your goals. Splash has more than 20 creative professionals to help their clients navigate fruitfully in areas of: graphic, interactive, environmental design, campaign development and management, identity and branding, copywriting, editorial and publishing. Since year 2007, Splash received many awards for their beautiful works. Interviewed Norman Lai, Art Director Interviewed Stanley Yap, Creative Director www.splash.sg

01/ Identity and collaterals for Artease Cafe By Stanley Yap

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RESEARCH

02/ Identity Design for Brownice (Vegan Ice Cream)

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RESEARCH

Featured Illustrator Week 04: January 28 to February 03, 2013

DREWSCAPE Andrew aka Drewscape enjoys drawing and inventing stories as a means of bringing to life stories in his dreamy head. Formally an advertising art director, he now does most of his work for advertising agencies as a full-time illustrator. His day job consists of doing commercial illustration and storyboard visuals. When he is not working, he enjoys working on his own comics and perhaps more picture books in the future. His favourite mediums at present are pencil, ink and watercolour and some photoshop to add the finishing touches. Most of his art education is self taught by learning from art books and comics. Among his favourte artists at present are Ashley Wood, Yoshitaka Amano, Aya Takano, Kent Williams, Lisbeth Zwerger, James Jean and the list goes on. Illustrator, Andrew Tan http://www.drewscape.net/

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Featured Design Studio Week 04: January 28 to February 03, 2013

BUREAU Bureau for the Advancement for Lifestyle and Longevity & Success also known as B.A.L.L.S. are not afraid to play the game differently. As designers and strategists, B.A.L.L.S. is motivated to resolve commercial needs effectively. They’re game to tackle challenges with their unconventional strokes and unique brand of humour. B.A.L.L.S. wants to communicate with creativity and build solutions that breathe with life. Even if it means going in and getting their hands dirty by doing things the old-fashioned way. The secret weapon of B.A.L.L.S. is their ability to balance irreverence with relevance, innovation with practicality.

Co-Founders/Designer: Yasser Suratman, Edmund, and Kai. Designer: Aaron http://thebureau.com.sg/

01/ Lasalle Flyers

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RESEARCH

02/ Xmas Poster 2010

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Featured Design Studio Week 04: January 28 to February 03, 2013

FOREIGN POLICY DESIGN Foreign Policy is a team of idea makers, story tellers and problem solvers who help clients evolve their brands using various media and disciplines - design and creative consulting, design strategy, digital strategy, branding, print, web/interactive media & space design. They are located in Singapore, independently owned and creatively motivated. Co-founded by Yah-Leng Yu and Arthur Chin in 2007, Foreign Policy continue to strive in making awesome designs with creative and strategic deployment of ideas that creates an unforgettable experience set to the target audience of their clients. Co-Founder/ Designer, Yah-Leng Yu Co-Founder/ Designer, Arthur Chin http://foreignpolicydesign.com/ 01/ Wanderlust Hotel

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02/ Provisions

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Featured Advertising Agency Week 04: January 28 to February 03, 2013

BBH ASIA PACIFIC Bartel Bogie Hegarty is one of the world’s most famous creative advertising agencies. Founded in 1982 by British ad men John Bartle, Nigel Bogle & Sir John Hegarty, BBH has produced campaigns for many of the world’s most illustrious brands. It’s success has been founded on its belief in creativity and making its clients’ brands famous. BBH has offices in London, New York, Los Angeles, Singapore, São Paulo, Shanghai Mumbai and recently Los Angeles. Since BBH Asia Pacific opened it doors sixteen years ago in Singapore, it has built itself a reputation for producing some of the regions most creatively impactful and effective work. It’s currently leading three global client / brand relationships from Singapore - Vaseline, Chupa Chups and The Singapore Tourism Board.

01/ NTU: Essentials

Co-Founders, John Bartle Co-Founders, Nigel Bogle Co-Founders, Sir John Hegarty http://www.bartleboglehegarty.com/

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02/ British Airways: Push Pins

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Featured Design Studio Week 04: January 28 to February 03, 2013

TOFU Tofu is a small creative shop, big on ideas. They tell stories and build brands through design and advertising. Their work is simple, honest and fresh, just like their namesake. From corporate doodles to pop-up illustrations, they do it all. Set up in 2011 by Michelle and Jenny, they have been producing many beautiful works that display their great love for craft and illustration. So if you need a tagline, a 360 degrees campaign or novel idea, order in Tofu pronto. Partner /Creative Director, Michelle Au Partner/ Business manager, Jenny Widjaja http://tofu.com.sg/

01/ KIZUKI is 2Pins

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02/ The Unclear Origins of Mooncake Festival

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Featured Design Studio Week 04: January 28 to February 03, 2013

LIE LIE is an acronym of Little Ideas Everyday, a graphic design studio based in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Founded by Driv Loo in 2011, LIE works across a diverse range of visual communication projects. Constantly practice and seeking for fresh approaches, provide innovative, beautiful solutions for clients, as well as self-initiated projects. Not sticking with the norm or certain patterns, LIE believes there’s always room to explore in graphic design. Founder / Designer, Driv Loo http://www.wearenotlie.com

01/ Start Paper

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02/Citizens of Ice-Cream

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Featured Design Studio Week 04: January 28 to February 03, 2013

H55 Hanson Ho is an award winning Creative Director who works under the studio name of H55, which he founded in 1999. Since then, Hanson has created numerous visual identities, brand applications, and publications which have represented Singapore on an international level. Featured by the Sunday Times as one of the top Graphic Designers in Singapore, Hanson has received many recognition and awards from some of the most prestigious international design competitions for his works. Founder / Creative Director, Hanson Ho http://www.h55studio.com/

01/ The Architecture Of Atmosphere

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02/ 1000 Singapore Venice Biennale

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REALISATION (WEEK 05)


VISUALISATION

Revised Project Name Week 05: February 04 to February 10, 2013

MINDMAP

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VISUALISATION

MEANINGS

CHOSEN NAME Wonderful A peek into creative workspaces

Consider changing the title to fit the tone of voice for my project better. After mind-mapping a few names, I came up with something direct and simple that fits my project & its values.

Wonderful is about inspiring delight and admiration. It’s about exciting a feeling of marvellous. It’s about being charming and beautiful. Most of all, it’s about peeking into the wonderful studios of creative people designers and illustrators.

Wonderful (Old English: Wundorful) Meanings: Inspiring delight, pleasure/admiration Capable of eliciting wonder; astonishing Exciting a feeling of wonder; marvellous or strange Admirable; excellent Great, extraordinary, marvellous Physically attractive, charming, beautiful Awesome, brilliant, phenomenal

It is born to capture the awesome workspaces of design creatives: in the details of their personal experiences and work process.

Adjective (Poetic/Literary): Wondrous Meanings: Inspiring a feeling of wonder or delight; marvellous Remarkable or extraordinary; wonderful. Other Attempts for Sub title: - Peeking into the studios of design creatives - Born to capture the workspace of creatives - In pursuit of studio culture & design - Born to capture the awesome workspace of creatives - A marvellous collection of creative workspaces - Born to capture the insights of design creative workspace

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REALISATION

Revised Logo Design Week 05: February 04 to February 10, 2013

WHAT IS A LOGO? This information may come in late but it’s still good to have a basic understanding of what a logo is. A logo is a perspicuous glyph or symbolic, identifying mark that conveys origin, identity, or ownership. The main function is to elicit recognition. The object of a logo is to act as a mnemonic device and identifier, to communicate a desired thought or feeling, and to generate a desired emotional response. A thought-provoking logo design can strengthen the brand image and corporate identity, giving individuals a psychological advantage over other competition. The logo is the core of the corporate identity, defining and symbolizing the character of the company or organization. There are three basic types of logos: Iconic/Symbolic, Logotype/Wordmark and Combination Marks. http://www.logodesignsource.com/types.html

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SKETCHES

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SYMBOLIC LOGO VERSION 1.

VERSION 2.

VERSION 3.

VERSION 4.

Futura ‘W’

Century Gothic ‘W’

VERSION 5.

VERSION 6.

VV

VV V V Century Gothic ‘V’

Champagne ‘V’

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VERSION 7.

VERSION 8.

Champagne ‘V’

V V

VV

Bernhard ‘V’

Geo Sans ‘V’

Iconic/Symbolic Icons and symbols are compelling yet uncomplicated images that are emblematic of a particular company or product. They use imagery that conveys a literal or abstract representation of your organization. Symbols are less direct than straight text, leaving room for broader interpretation of what the organization represents. In order for a symbol to be a truly effective logo, it should conform to these maxims: • Instantaneously recognizable. • Memorable. • Clarity when reproduced in small sizes. • Can be illustrative in nature, either concrete or abstract.

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LOGOTYPE

Futura Regular

WONDERFUL

Futura Light

WONDERFUL

Futura Book

WONDERFUL

VV VV VV

Geo Sans Light

WONDERFUL

VV

Caviar Dreams

WONDERFUL

VV

Century Gothic

WONDERFUL

Champagne & Limousines

WONDERFUL

Ostrich Sans

WONDERFUL

Bernhard Fashion

WONDERFUL

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REALISATION

Dalle

WONDERFUL

Pablo Skinny

WONDERFUL

Baskerville Oldface

WONDERFUL

New Baskerville

WONDERFUL

Logotype/Wordmark A logotype, commonly known in the design industry as a “word mark”, incorporates a company or brand name into a uniquely styled type font treatment. Type fonts come in thousands of possible variations, shapes, sizes, and styles, each conveying a slightly different impression upon your intended audience. Type font treatments can also include hand-drawn letters, characters or symbols that have been rendered in such a way as to intrigue the eye and capture the interest. Examples of type fonts: • Script fonts imply a sense of formality and refinement. • Thick fonts proclaim strength and power. • Slanted type fonts impart a sense of motion or movement. Images can also be integrated into a logotype, often to great visual effect. Of prime consideration when selecting a logotype or wordmark is legibility and ease of recognition, even when reduced to the size required for printing your business cards.

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COMBINATION LOGO

VERSION 1.

WONDERFUL VERSION 2.

VVON DE RFUL

Combination Marks Combination Marks are graphics with both text and a symbol/icon that signifies the brand image that the individual wish to project for his/her company or organization. Concise text can complement an icon or symbol, providing supplemental clarity as to what the enterprise is all about. There are integrated and stand alone combination marks.

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Chosen Logo Design Week 05: February 04 to February 10, 2013

CHOSEN LOGO- DRAFT

VVON DE RFUL First thing after creating the various versions of logos (include the 3 different categories), always to print them out and pin on the wall. This is really a crucial stage! It helps you to spot errors or areas of the logo you think can be refined. By pinning up on the wall, you are forced to stare at it thus it easier for you to spot mistakes. Also it helps to see which logo looks best from far. Remember a logo not only has to be direct and simple to withstand the different scale size, but it also has to be appealing and embody the project brand values and mission.

Based from my last sem editorial cover which has 2 triangles overlapped to represents the letter ‘W’, it inspired me to think along the line to create a unique and iconic ‘W’. The ‘W’ represent workspace. Naming it ‘Wonderful’ further embody the idea of inspiring delight and admiration by peeking into creaking workspaces. With the unconventional approach to the letter ‘W’, it conveys the message of looking into workspace with a different perspective. This iconic ‘W’ will appear on it own as an icon in editorial design and other design outcomes, even on Favicon (Website url icon). Which simply encapsulate my entire project’s intention.

Thus, this leads to the reason why I have chosen this logo version. Reason is that my brand values (mentioned previously in Semester 1) are listed as: freedom, warm, community, joy and inspiring. The tone of voice is genuine, simple and direct. So I believed this logo embodies my project intentions and brand values.

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REVISIONS

Futura Book After Kerning Century Gothic ‘V’

Geo Sans Light After Kerning Geo Sans Light ‘V’

Geo Sans Light After Kerning Champagne ‘V’

Caviar Dream After Kerning Champagne ‘V’

Caviar Dream After Kerning Caviar Dream ‘V’

Champagne After Kerning Champagne ‘V’

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Century Gothic After Kerning Century Gothic ‘V’

Tw Cen After Kerning Tw Cen ‘V

Walkyway Condensed Semi Bold After Kerning Walkway Semi ‘V’

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Final Logo Design #3 Week 05: February 04 to February 10, 2013

CHOSEN LOGO- FINAL

RATIONALE Wonderful is about inspiring delight and admiration. It’s about exciting a feeling of marvellous. It’s about being charming and beautiful. Most of all, it’s about peeking into the wonderful studios of creative people - designers and illustrators. Wonderful is born to capture the personal experiences, insights and work process of design creatives. The ‘W’ represent workspace. With the unconventional approach to the letter ‘W’, it conveys the message of looking into workspace with a whole new perspective, breaking away from the norm. This iconic ‘W’ simply encapsulate my entire project’s intention.

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Colour in Logo Design Week 05: February 04 to February 10, 2013

THE COLOUR WHEEL

COLOUR MEANING & THEORY

It is important for every designer to have the basic fundamentals and understanding of colours. It will come in handy as one learns how to use colour in logo design, to effectively communicate the right message.

• Red evokes aggressiveness, passion, strength and vitality. • Pink evokes femininity, innocence, softness and health. • Orange evokes fun, cheeriness and warm exuberance.

Below is a ‘cheat sheet’ on how to use colour effectively to communicate the right message.

• Yellow evokes positivity, sunshine and cowardice.

The wheel is a simple guide into the world of colours. It helps designers to work effectively, in the decision making of colours for any projects. Sometimes one may decide to ignore the colour wheel, but work with colour meanings and psychology instead. However, this colour wheel cheat sheet is still a great starting point as it give designers an insight into how our target audience may instinctively perceive something that we have put together, in this case a logo design.

• Green evokes tranquility, health and freshness. • Blue evokes authority, dignity, security and faithfulness. • Purple evokes sophistication, spirituality, costliness, royalty and mystery. • Brown evokes utility, earthiness, woodsy-ness and subtle richness. • White evokes purity, truthfulness, being contemporary and refined. • Gray evokes somberness, authority, practicality and a corporate mentality. • Black evokes seriousness, distinctiveness, boldness and being classic.

Extracted from: http://logodesignerblog.com/how-touse-colour-in-logo-design/

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Revised Project Moodboard Week 05: February 04 to February 10, 2013

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Revised Project Art Direction Week 05: February 04 to February 10, 2013

COLOUR PALETTE

PASTEL

C=0 M =68 Y = 41 K=0

C = 59 M =0 Y = 33 K=0

C = 100 M =91 Y=0 K=0

C=0 M =76 Y = 60 K=0

C = 59 M =0 Y = 33 K=0

C = 100 M =91 Y=0 K=0

VIBRANT

CHOSEN TYPEFACE

HEADLINE

DINPRO - CONDENSED MEDIUM

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse. MINION PRO

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REALISATION (WEEK 06)


VISUALISATION

Website Sketches Week 06: February 11 to February 17, 2013

SKETCHES

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Website Design Process Week 06: February 11 to February 17, 2013

HOME PAGE - WONDERFUL

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PROCESS OF WEB DESIGNING Intro (Design in Ai)

Stage 4 (Layout skeleton in Dreamweaver)

Building a home page a.k.a the index page of a website is essentially important. When you are working on a web project, building the skeleton of the website is a very crucial yet difficult stage. I first started off the designing in Adobe Illustrator before slicing off to png files. From my understanding, the images are then brought over to insert inside Dreamweaver. Sounds easy. But trust me it is not. Especially for someone with little background of web design skills.

Before I can insert the images that I have just sliced, first I have to plan the structure/skeleton of my web page. I have to analyse the columns (which is already roughly planned when doing the design in Ai) and see which is the best method to contain my website. What I learn was that there are 2 most relevant steps for me to lay my website out. The most basic step for building website is to first draw container (draw Ap Div) before inserting the images. However, I insert an additional step of inserting table first before finally inserting my images. The pros of it is to make the website layout neater. The cons on the other hand is that you need to be very precise in drawing your guides earlier in Ai so you know exactly where is the placement for each table, and if the row or column of table fits your image dimension size.

Stage 2 (Slicing images) Slicing images is a very tricky issue. You need to be very precise and anal about it! Remember to give 1-2 pixels outside of the area that you are slicing to ensures none of your artwork will be cropped off. Slices can be made using guides or a selection. To use guides to make slices first drag guides onto your page around each object that will require its own link. For example, an icon that, when clicked, goes to a specific page. In my case, I have 6 navigation button which leads the visitor to a different web page or area of the site. Stage 3 (Saving png files) After saving the slices images, do take note also that naming your png files is a very important stage too. In particular for big scale projects which contain many other web pages of the same site. All the png files are sorted out inside the images folder, therefore it can get very difficult to find the image if you don’t name it properly. Also not forgetting that when renaming a png file, always start with small caps. It is a web designer’s tip that my friend taught me. Reason is that you won’t get confuse with the rest of your files naming, I presumed.

Stage 5 (Search Bar in Dreamweaver) Currently, I’m only in my index page as I faced many problems in coding the search bar. It is the most difficult task ever. I need to first understand coding of different scripts which luckily my friend, Wenjing was patient to guide me through. However, the search bar is still in the work-in-progress stage for now as it does not load properly. The problems will be further explained in the next few pages. As a result, I am unable to continue with the rest of my webpages layout in Dreamweaver. Reason is that they are created by the duplications of the index page. So if one slight change is made in the index page at a later stage, all the rest of the pages will be directly affected as well. Therefore creating the index page is a very crucial and demanding stage as it is key to the entire web design project and thus cannot be rushed. Yes, Web design is a headache!

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USER’S EXPERIENCE

Navigation Buttons

Social Media Icon

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Search Bar

Navigation Buttons It helps user to access other web pages just by clicking on it. When the mouse hover or click on the buttons, the text will change colour from grey to peach orange. Social Media Icons It helps user to connect to the website through other social media platforms. When the mouse hover or click on the buttons, the icons will change colour from grey to green. Search Bar This is the area where user will type in text to search for anything. Related text will appeared and provide links of other web pages. Currently it is still in the work-inprogress stage.

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Website Search Bar Week 06: February 11 to February 17, 2013

METADATA SEARCH BAR Why use XML instead of Meta name?

This may get a little dry so bear with me. The next few pages will be a break down of coding problems that I faced. It is to explain the difficulties in creating a search bar which is more to a simple set up function than meets the eye. In order to do the live search, one needs to have a basic understanding/ knowledge of coding.

XML is a better source. During the process of my research, I found a similar approach which read the meta name of a webpage which is PHP & AJAX live search. Meta name are commonly used on website for search engines because they search by key word. For my project, it is deem inappropriate to use as there are quite a number of web pages (every individual studios) to put and thus may end up with too many key words. As a result, the coding will get too messy inside the HTML file. Therefore I decide to sort it out in a different file called (“livesearch.xml�). In order to read and retrieve links form xml file, I need a Javascript and php.

There many different ways of coding a search bar. In my case, I have decide to adopt the PHP & AJAX live search for my website instead of the usual HTML <meta> tag. What is HTML <meta> Tag? Metadata is data (information) about data. The <meta> tag provides metadata about the HTML document. Metadata will not be displayed on the page, but will be machine parsable. Meta elements are typically used to specify page description, keywords, author of the document, last modified, and other metadata.

The group of studio pages can be add in at a later stage which will not affect the HTML. In a way, using XML is more organised and neater.

The metadata can be used by browsers (how to display content or reload page), search engines (keywords), or other web services. <meta> tags always goes inside the <head> element. An example of a HTML <meta> Tag

108


REALISATION

PHP AND AJAX LIVE SEARCH An example of a AJAX script consist of 4 pages: • a simple HTML form • a JavaScript • a PHP page • an XML document AJAX can be used for a more user friendly and interactive search. For live search, it has many benefits compared to traditional searching: • Matching results are shown as you type. • Results narrow as you continue typing. • If results become too narrow, remove characters to see a broader result. Extracted from: http://elearning-rpl.smkn5solo. net/tutorial/www/www.w3schools.com/php/php_ ajax_livesearch.asp.htm http://www.w3schools.com/tags/tag_meta.asp

109


REALISATION

Search Bar Process Week 06: February 11 to February 17, 2013

HOW DOES AJAX LIVE SEARCH WORK? read form

HTML

send request

Java Script

load & find links

PHP

XML

contain links

1. Check if browser compatible. 2. No results will show. 3. Send results. When a user type something into the search bar.

THE PROCESS This is the HTML page. It contains a simple HTML form, style for the form and a link to a JavaScript:

HTML will carry out the search function via the <livesearch script>

The JavaScript code is stored in “livesearch.js” and linked to the HTML document.

The JavaScript code contains a series of functions. Function 1: To check the version of web browser of the user. If the browser is too old/ not the right version, the javascript will inform the user that is not supported.

No need for the search bar to function. However to cater to group of audience who can’t browse via search, they can still manoeuvre the website through the navigation buttons.>>

110


REALISATION

For those users with supported browsers. Function 2: to show the results. Nothing will show up unless user type something inside the search bar area.

After typing something, it will receive the input from user & send a request to PHP which will obtain the file from XML.

In order to run PHP, Javascript need to pass first. Then it can load & read XML file.

It will get the link, take the title: length of name/url link & return to the user.

111

If this request fail, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no point in continuing. No results found will be prompt. Otherwise, it will retrieve the file & send result to user.

The current problem that it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t work now as it runs on server. Everything is working except for PHP. In order to know if the javascript if working, go to check if the request is being process and send through.


EVALUATION (WEEK 07)


EVALUATION

Studio Feedback Week 07: February 18 to February 24, 2013

CRITIQUE BY PEERS

114


EVALUATION

CRITIQUE BY ME Personally, I agreed mostly with my peers’ feedbacks. I’m a big fan of white space, thus love the simplistic layout of the website. New logo looks good to me. I definitely like the revised brand name and logo as it sounded more positive. (Refer to Sem 1 for branding process). Previous brand name “LIMIT” has a negative connotation to it so decided to change it off to better suit my project intentions and direction. Below listed changes that I thought it ought to be made. Changes that I would like to make: • The length of the search bar is a little too long. Search bar & subscription to newsletter area seems very tight. • Logo (Main header) probably can be reduced to give more breathing space at the top of website. • Maybe I should do something about the lines. Seem a little too many? • An animated flash banner in the index page so get to feature different studios and also include an intro of the project. • Revised website layout. The index page layout could be used for archive page instead. A new index page will be created soon. Can’t wait! But first I need to do more research and planning...

115


EVALUATION

Revised Interview Questions Week 07: February 18 to February 24, 2013

INTERVIEW QUESTIONS LIST Background (Design Studio) 1. Tell us a little about your studio. How did it get started? - How many people work at the studio / You work alone? 2. What type of work do you do? Eg. branding, illustration, lettering, etc. Studio Space (Why they settle on it?) 3. What is your physical studio size like?  4. What made you settle on this studio space? (location, rent, space, etc) 5. What do you like most about your workspace? 6. Do you have any favourite spot in the studio and why? 7. Your desk is usually cluttered with? 8. If you have a window view at your work area, share with us what you see from the window. Studio Culture (How they work individually & in groups?) 9. What is the first thing you’ll do when you enter the studio; to kick start your day? 10. What is your typical day like in studio?  11. What kind of music do you listen to while working? *12. What is your design process like? For 1 person studio & illustrators *12. Tell us how does your studio tackles a project? How is the team structured & work divided? For big design studios 13. How has the set up of your workspace helps to support your studio culture & design process? Useful Advices/ Tips (Young Designers) 14. What do you do when you are faced with creative blocks? 15. If you could give one piece of advice to young designers, what would it be? Optional Questions (For Design Agency) 1. When did the agency has it office first set up in Singapore? 2. e agency has set up many offices in different regions. How has the set up of Singapore’s office any different from the rest? 3. How has the company’s beliefs reflected in the physical space of the current work environment?

116


EVALUATION

THE OBJECTIVE OF QUESTIONS The interview questions used for design studios were similar to the ones for illustrators. On the other hand, the list of questions used for the interview of advertising agency was altered with a couple of changes for the background area. For both design studios and illustrator, they were asked to share about the history of their studios, the number of people working in the studio and also the type of works they do. These questions were posed for profiling purposes which not only helped to gain a general breakdown of each individual studio, but also a basic understanding of how these studios get started. For illustrators, it was posed to find out about their journey of becoming an illustrator and to verify if they work alone mostly. As for advertising agency, it was replaced with the question of â&#x20AC;&#x153;When did the agency has it office first set up in Singapore?â&#x20AC;?. The reason was that an advertising agency has many offices set up all over the world therefore it would be more relevant to find out how it had set up in Singapore rather than the history of how the agency get started. Similarly, the agency was requested to reveal a detailed breakdown of its agency size in Singapore in terms of the various departments and the number of people working in it.

117


EVALUATION

Interview Evaluation Week 07: February 18 to February 24, 2013

PROFILE OF PARTICIPANTS Company

Person

Founding Year

Type of Works

Country

Studio / Agency / Illustrator

Roots

Jonathan Yuen

2011 (May)

Brand & Identity Print & Publication Retail & Environment Packaging Posters Digital Interactive Website

Singapore, East

Studio

A Beautiful Design

Roy Poh

2011

Anything graphic design Singapore, East which includes: branding, publication,advertising, TVCs and web solutions.

Studio

Relay Room

Mark De Winne

2011

Branding & Corporate Singapore, Central Communications, Custom Typography, Editorial & Exhibition Design and Web & Mobile App Design.

Studio

The Press Room

Kelley Cheng

2008

Graphic design, many Singapore, Central areas of it such as branding, publication and assortment of designs. The Press Room also do some 3D and interior projects, set designs. They like to draw themselves to challenges from time to time.

Studio

Kawakong

Chung & Ming

1999 (Sept)

Creative direction. Art direction. Identity design positioning. Re-identity design. Corporate identity system. Graphic design. Logo design. Illustration. Production consultant.

Malaysia, Jaya Selangor

Studio

Bravo Company

Edwin Tan & Janice Teo

2010

Our core business is brand design. Slowly going into the space design as well.

Singapore, Central

Studio

Somewhere Else

Yong

2011

Mostly branding work. Singapore, Central Somewhere Else does extend their services broadly to other disciplines which includes web design.

Studio

ACRE

TY Zheng

2011

Primarily centred on branding and graphic design. ACRE does a little bit of advertising as well together with future plans of extending to the area of product and space design.

Studio

Splash

Stanley Yap, Norman Lai 2005

Graphic, Interactive and Singapore, Central Environmental Design. Identify & Branding. Campaigns. Copywriting, Editorials and Publishing. 118

Studio

H55

Hanson Ho

Visual identities, Brand applications, and Publications.

Studio

1999

Singapore, East

Singapore, North East


They like to draw themselves to challenges from time to time.

EVALUATION Creative direction.

Kawakong

Chung & Ming

1999 (Sept)

Bravo Company

Edwin Tan & Janice Teo

2010

Our core business is brand design. Slowly going into the space design as well.

Somewhere Else

Yong

2011

Company

Person

Founding Year

ACRE Roots

TY ZhengYuen Jonathan

A Beautiful Design Splash

Roy Poh 2011 Stanley Yap, Norman Lai 2005

Relay Room H55

Mark De Winne Hanson Ho

2011 1999

The Bureau

Yasser Suratman, Edmund Kelley Cheng

2009

The Press Room

Foreign Policy Group Yah-Leng Yu

2011 (May)

2008

2007

Kawakong

Chung & Ming

1999 (Sept)

BBH - Singapore Bravo Company

Scott Mcclelland

1997 (Set Up Year)

Edwin Tan & Janice Teo

2010

Somewhere Else Jessica Hische

Yong Jessica Hische

2011 2008

Drewscape

Andrew Tan

2004

ACRE

TY Zheng

2011

Splash

Stanley Yap, Norman Lai 2005

H55

Hanson Ho

1999

Malaysia, Jaya Selangor

Studio

Singapore, Central

Studio

Singapore, Central Mostly branding work. Somewhere Else does extend their services broadly to other disciplines which includes web Type design.of Works Country

Studio

Primarily centred on Brand & Identity branding and graphic Print & Publication design. does a Retail &ACRE Environment little bit of advertising as Packaging well together with future Posters plans extending to the DigitalofInteractive area of product and Website space design.

Singapore, East

Studio

Anything graphic design Graphic, Interactive and which includes: branding, Environmental Design. publication,advertising, Identify & Branding. TVCs and web solutions. Campaigns. Copywriting, Editorials and Publishing. Branding & Corporate Communications, Custom Visual identities, Brand Typography, and Editorial & applications, Exhibition Design and Publications. Web & Mobile App Design. Graphic design: brand

Singapore, East Singapore, Central

Studio Studio

Singapore, Central Singapore, North East

Studio Studio

Art direction. Identity design positioning. Re-identity design. Corporate identity system. Graphic design. Logo design. Illustration. Production consultant.

Singapore, Central identity, publications, etc. Graphic design,design, many Singapore, Central A bit of interior areas ofdesign it such and as below product branding, publication and the line and retail work. assortment of designs. The Press Room also do Singapore, Central They are ideas makers, sometellers 3D and interior story and problem projects, set designs. solvers. To Foreign They like to draw Policy, design is beyond themselves challenges the basic of to just making from time to time. things beautiful but it is

also solving problems. Creative direction. Malaysia, Jaya Selangor They provide Art direction. advisory and consultancy, Identity design solutions to their clients. positioning. Therefore, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t limit Re-identity they design. to any any identity specific kind of Corporate system. or mediums projects Graphic design. strictly. There is no Logo design. boundaries to the type of Illustration. works they do. Production consultant. Advertising which is featured many Our core across business is platforms suchSlowly as brand design. branded digital going intocontent, the space and interactive, design as well. print, tv and cinema, etc.

Studio / Agency / Illustrator

Studio Studio

Studio

Studio

Singapore, Central

Agency

Singapore, Central

Studio

Singapore, Central Mostly branding work. Lettering, type design, US, San Francisco Somewhere Else does and illustration. extend their services broadly to other Illustration, Storyboards & Singapore, Central disciplines which includes Visuals, Comics. web design.

Studio Illustrator

Primarily centred on branding and graphic design. ACRE does a little bit of advertising as well together with future plans of extending to the area of product and space design.

Studio

Singapore, East

Graphic, Interactive and Singapore, Central Environmental Design. Identify & Branding. Campaigns. Copywriting, Editorials and Publishing. 119 Visual identities, Brand applications, and Publications.

Singapore, North East

Illustrator

Studio

Studio


EVALUATION

STUDIO SIZE Company

Total no. of people

Studio Breakdown

Studio Type

Studio Size (Approximately)

Roots

1

1 Creative Director

Rents a single storey terrace along Chiku Road. Shares the space together with SLINT.

300 square feet

A Beautiful Design

1

1 Creative Director

Owns a room of a private landed property along Poole Road. half the size of a badminton court.

440 square feet

Relay Room

6

1 Creative Director, 1 Business Rents a room from a co-habit space unit in HDB flat along 300 square feet. Development Director, 3 Waterloo Street. Designers, 1 Intern

The Press Room

7

1 Creative Director, 6 Designers

Rents a three-storey shophouse along Selegie Road.

1500 square feet.

Kawakong

2

2 Creative Directors

Rents a unit in a shophouse along Jalan PJU1/3B.

750 square feet.

Bravo Company

9

2 Working Partners, 3 Graphic Rents a unit in a shophouse along Outram Road. Designer, 1 Interior Designer, 2 Interns and 1 Account

1000 square feet

Somewhere Else

3

1 Creative Director, 1 Designer, 1 Intern

800 square feet

ACRE

4

1 Creative Director, 1 Rents a unit in the industrial estate along Kallang Sector. Managing Director, 1 Designer, 1 Account Executive

500 square feet

Splash

25-29

1 Managing Director, 1 Account Director, 1 Creative Director, 1 Senior Art Director, 3 Art Directors, 1 Traffic Manager, 3 Writers, 10 to 12 Designers and 2 Account Executives, 3 to 7 Interns (2 Editorial Interns, 1 Interactive Interns, 4 Design Interns)

Rents the entire space of the third storey in a warehouse along Cavan Road.

6000 square feet

H55

3

1 Creative Director, 2 Graphic Designers

Owns basement of a private landed property along Cactus 900 square feet road.

The Bureau

5

4 Designers, 1 Administrative/ Rents and co-share a pre-war residential unit along Chay Research Executive (part-time) Yan Street, which includes a courtyard

1400 square feet.

Foreign Policy Group 5

2 Working Partners, 3 Graphic Designer

1200 square feet.

BBH - Singapore

For Creative Department (20 Rents the entire space of the third storey in a warehouse and 30 people) : 1 Executive along Magazine Road. Creative Director, 1 Regional Creative Director, 4 Creative Directors, 6 teams of Art Directors and Writers, 3 Studio people and 3 visualizer.

100 plus

Rents a unit in a shophouse along Jalan Kledek. Share the space together with other designers.

Rents a pre-war residential unit along Yong Siak Street.

N.A

For Management Side (20 plus people): 6 people in Management Board (1 representative of each department) Account managers, Account directors, Executives and Support Staff. For Production Department and Creative Services: 3 people in Project Management, 3 Print Producers, 5 Broadcast Producers, others from Digital Productions, IT department, Floor/ Strategics Planners, Engagement Planners, Mobile App Development Group. For Finances Side: N.A

Jessica Hische

1

N.A

Rents 120a unit along 22nd Street in San Francisco. Shares the space together with a studio mate-Erik Marinovich, who is a letterer too. Approximately 400 square feet.

400 square feet

Drewscape

1

N.A

Own a room of a HDB along Holland Drive. Shares the

N.A


Splash

25-29

1 Managing Director, 1 Rents the entire space of the third storey in a warehouse along Cavan Road. Account Director, 1 Creative Director, 1 Senior Art Director, 3 Art Directors, 1 Traffic EVALUATION Manager, 3 Writers, 10 to 12 Designers and 2 Account Executives, 3 to 7 Interns (2 Editorial Interns, 1 Interactive Interns, 4 Design Interns)

H55

3

1 Creative Director, 2 Graphic Designers

The Bureau

5

4 Designers, 1 Administrative/ Rents and co-share a pre-war residential unit along Chay Research Executive (part-time) Yan Street, which includes a courtyard

1400 square feet.

2 Working Partners, 3 Graphic Designer Studio Breakdown

Rents a pre-war residential unit along Yong Siak Street.

1200 square feet.

For Creative Department (20 1 Creative Director and 30 people) : 1 Executive Creative Director, 1 Regional Creative Director, 4 Creative 1 Creative Director Directors, 6 teams of Art Directors and Writers, 3 Studio people and 3 visualizer. 1 Creative Director, 1 Business Development Director, 3 plus For Management Side (20 Designers, 1 Intern people): 6 people in Management Board (1 1 Creative Director, representative of each 6 Designers Account department) managers, Account directors, Executives and Support Staff. 2 Creative Directors

the entirestorey spaceterrace of the along third storey a warehouse Rents a single Chikuin Road. Shares along Magazine Road. the space together with SLINT.

N.A square feet 300

Owns a room of a private landed property along Poole Road. half the size of a badminton court.

440 square feet

Foreign Policy Group 5 Company Total no. of people 100 plus BBH - Singapore 1 Roots

A Beautiful Design

1

Relay Room

6

The Press Room

7

Kawakong

2

Bravo Company

9

Somewhere Else

3

ACRE

4

Splash Jessica Hische

25-29 1

6000 square feet

Owns basement of a private landed property along Cactus 900 square feet road.

Studio Type

Studio Size (Approximately)

Rents a room from a co-habit space unit in HDB flat along 300 square feet. Waterloo Street.

Rents a three-storey shophouse along Selegie Road.

1500 square feet.

Rents a unit in a shophouse along Jalan PJU1/3B.

750 square feet.

For Production Department 2 Working Partners, 3 Graphic Rents a unit in a shophouse along Outram Road. and Creative Services: 3 Designer, 1 Interior Designer, 2 people in Project Management, Interns and 1 Account 3 Print Producers, 5 Broadcast Producers, others from Digital 1 Creative Director, 1 Rents a unit in a shophouse along Jalan Kledek. Share Productions, IT department, Designer, 1 InternPlanners, the space together with other designers. Floor/ Strategics

Engagement Planners, Mobile 1 Creative Director,Group. 1 Rents a unit in the industrial estate along Kallang Sector. App Development Managing Director, 1 Designer, 1 Account Executive For Finances Side: N.A

1000 square feet

800 square feet

500 square feet

1 Managing Director, 1 N.A Account Director, 1 Creative Director, 1 Senior Art Director, 3 Art Directors, 1 Traffic Manager, 3 Writers, 10 to 12 N.A Designers and 2 Account Executives, 3 to 7 Interns (2 Editorial Interns, 1 Interactive Interns, 4 Design Interns)

Rents the entire space the third storey in a warehouse a unit along 22ndofStreet in San Francisco. Shares along Cavan Road.with a studio mate-Erik Marinovich, the space together

6000 squarefeet feet 400 square

Owns basement of a private landed property along Cactus 900 square feet road.

who is a letterer too. Approximately 400 square feet.

Drewscape

1

H55

3

1 Creative Director, 2 Graphic Designers

The Bureau

5

4 Designers, 1 Administrative/ Rents and co-share a pre-war residential unit along Chay Research Executive (part-time) Yan Street, which includes a courtyard

1400 square feet.

Foreign Policy Group 5

2 Working Partners, 3 Graphic Designer

1200 square feet.

BBH - Singapore

For Creative Department (20 Rents the entire space of the third storey in a warehouse and 30 people) : 1 Executive along Magazine Road. Creative Director, 1 Regional Creative Director, 4 Creative Directors, 6 teams of Art Directors and Writers, 3 Studio people and 3 visualizer.

100 plus

Own a room of a HDB along Holland Drive. Shares the N.A space together with his wife, who is a copy writer but they work on their separate projects.

Rents a pre-war residential unit along Yong Siak Street.

N.A

For Management Side (20 plus people): 6 people in Management Board (1 representative of each department) Account managers, Account directors, Executives and Support Staff. For Production Department and Creative Services: 3 people in Project Management, 3 Print Producers, 5 Broadcast Producers, others from Digital Productions, IT department, Floor/ Strategics Planners, Engagement Planners, Mobile App Development Group. For Finances Side: N.A

Jessica Hische

1

N.A

Rents a unit along 22nd Street in San Francisco. Shares 121

Drewscape

1

N.A

Own a room of a HDB along Holland Drive. Shares the

the space together with a studio mate-Erik Marinovich, who is a letterer too. Approximately 400 square feet.

400 square feet

N.A


EVALUATION

STUDIO SPACE Company

What is their desk cluttered with?

What do they like most about their workspace? Quiet, spacious and comfortable.

Do they play music in the studio?

Roots

Jonathan likes his table to be neat, including his desktop.

Sometimes. Random songs.

A Beautiful Design

Roy’s desk is usually not cluttered as he is a Everything. He’s proud that he own it. It's None, he likes peace and quiet. neat person. Most of the time it'll be reference more of an accomplishment feeling. materials, drawing papers, writing materials and work briefs. He’ll clean up at the end of the day because the next day he might be starting on another job and thus having space to place new materials on the table.

Relay Room

Marks finds himself a messy person. His desk is usually cluttered with namecards, reference books and papers, handphone, notepad, laptop, papers so no additional space.

They feel lucky to have their own room despite working in a co-habit workspace. There are some places there which is open and that can have very little or no privacy.

Not really. If anyone wants to listen to music, they’ll listen by earpieces which happen usually.

The Press Room

Cluttered with so many things. Kelley don’t like her table to be messy but it always become messy after 2 days. It is a reflection of her current state of mind.

Siting area which is an informal space to relax.

N.A

Kawakong

Ming : Code, alphabets, numbering, figure, scribble on A3 writing pad. Chung : Cables, external hard disc and remote control.

The studio allow them to do whatever they can afford to do.

The selections of music or sound on the menu depending from their crave of the day and their list of fresh downloaded music.

Bravo Company

Not very neat. A lot of business cards, mails, parcels, pile of books and laptop.

An open concept. Everybody working together in the big room rather than in a segregated space for different designations. It is quite a transparent working environment.

Airpot speaker set up which all of the designers’ computer are connected to it so anyone can play their music from there, taking turns. But most of the designers listen to music via their earpieces.

Somewhere Else

His desk can be described as organised chaos.

He share the workspace with very nice people. They have two big windows where sunlight streams in beautifully every morning and it’s quite a cosy environment.

Music is important to him when working. When Yong has to think, it has to be very quiet. So sometimes he use the music to drown out everything. Mostly he listens to post rock and instrumental these days.

ACRE

He try to be neat but it is more of an organised chaos as he described.

A small space but come with such big Usually indie music. Most of them share the windows which he gets to see the outside similar taste of music. The speakers are world. communal and can be play via airport.

Splash

N: Books, papers, notes, emails. S: A lot of reference books.

The big space they are entitled to have which the spacious studio allows them to have more opportunities and imagination that they can have as a designer. All of their designers have a lot of space around in their work areas.

H55

Books.

Hanson owned the studio space so it has Don’t listen to music. been an excellent financial investment.

The Bureau

Bills. The standard stuff like projects we are working on, timeline, work in progress, references books and coffee! Usually when we are running on a couple of jobs, it will tend to get a little messy.

It has their own character as Bureau has They listen to radio, usually 95 or 99.5FM. It designed in such a way that they have acts more like an ambience to fill up the their own private storage space without silence. worries of public coming in for a visit. The place here is quite friendly.

Radio usually Lush 99.5 FM. They don’t encourage designers to listen music via earpiece.

Foreign Policy Group She will keep it as neat as possible.

Yah-Leng like her workspace to be organised. She has always strive in making sure things are always in a certain place and orderly manner.

It depends actually. They encourage people to bring their music so they are able to share music.

BBH - Singapore

Generally a very neat and tidy person. Has a photo of his son too!

Openness. Having a nice energy out of it because the workplace is open and bright.

Scott don’t actually as he finds it really distracting. Anyone can play their music but they usually on their headphones.

Jessica Hische

It is actually usually pretty uncluttered.

She loves the light, and that during the day she and her studio mate can just rely on natural light instead of having to use overhead lighting all the time.

When Jessica’s alone, she likes to work to television rather than music because it helps her pace herself and feel like she is not working long hours.

Drewscape

Cluttered with mails rough papers and art tools.

Homey down to earth feel like a cafe. Very comfortable.

He will listen to whatever that has the same mood or feel as what he’s drawing.

122


Somewhere Else

His desk can be described as organised chaos.

designations. It is quite a transparent working environment.

taking turns. But most of the designers listen to music via their earpieces.

He share the workspace with very nice

Music is important to him when working. When Yong has to think, it has to be very quiet. So sometimes he use the music to drown out everything. Mostly he listens to post rock and instrumental these days.

people. They have two big windows EVALUATION

where sunlight streams in beautifully every morning and it’s quite a cosy environment.

ACRE

He try to be neat but it is more of an organised chaos as he described.

A small space but come with such big Usually indie music. Most of them share the windows which he gets to see the outside similar taste of music. The speakers are world. communal and can be play via airport.

Splash

N: Books, papers, notes, emails. S: A lot of reference books.

The big space they are entitled to have Radio usually Lush 99.5 FM. They don’t which the spacious studio allows them to encourage designers to listen music via have more opportunities and imagination earpiece. that they can have as a designer. All of their designers have a lot of space What do theywork likeareas. most about their Do they play music in the studio? around in their

Company

What is their desk cluttered with?

workspace?

Roots H55

Jonathan Books. likes his table to be neat, including his desktop.

Quiet, spacious andstudio comfortable. Random Hanson owned the space so it has Sometimes. Don’t listen to music. songs. been an excellent financial investment.

A Beautiful The Bureau Design

Roy’s desk is usually notlike cluttered aswe he are is a Bills. The standard stuff projects neat person. Most of work the time it'll be reference working on, timeline, in progress, materials, drawing papers, writing materials references books and coffee! Usually when and work briefs.on He’ll clean up at theit end of we are running a couple of jobs, will tend theget day the next day he might be to a because little messy. starting on another job and thus having space to place new materials table. She will keep it as neaton as the possible.

Everything. He’scharacter proud that own it.has It's None, he likes peaceusually and quiet. It has their own ashe Bureau They listen to radio, 95 or 99.5FM. It more of aninaccomplishment designed such a way that feeling. they have acts more like an ambience to fill up the their own private storage space without silence. worries of public coming in for a visit. The place here is quite friendly.

Foreign Policy Group

Yah-Leng like her workspace to be organised. She has always strive in Marks finds himself a messy person. His desk They feel lucky to have their own making sure things are always in aroom despite working a co-habit workspace. is usually cluttered with namecards, reference certain place andinorderly manner. There are some places there which is books and papers, handphone, notepad, open and that can have very little or no laptop, papers soneat no additional space. Has a privacy. Generally a very and tidy person. Openness. Having a nice energy out of it photo of his son too! because the workplace is open and bright. Cluttered with so many things. Kelley don’t Siting area which is an informal space to like her table to be messy but it always relax. become messy after 2 days. It is a reflection It isher actually pretty uncluttered. She loves the light, and that during the of currentusually state of mind. day she and her studio mate can just rely on natural light instead of having to use Ming : Code, alphabets, numbering, figure, The studio allow them to do whatever overhead lighting scribble on A3 writing pad. they can afford to all do.the time. Chung : Cables, external hard disc and remote control. Cluttered with mails rough papers and Homey down to earth feel like a cafe.

It depends actually. They encourage people to bring their music so they are able to Not really. If anyone wants to listen to share music. music, they’ll listen by earpieces which happen usually.

art tools. Not very neat. A lot of business cards, mails, parcels, pile of books and laptop.

Very comfortable. An open concept. Everybody working together in the big room rather than in a segregated space for different designations. It is quite a transparent working environment.

When Jessica’s alone, she likes to work to television rather than music because it helps her pace herself and feel like she is The selections of music or sound on the not working long hours. menu depending from their crave of the day and their list of fresh downloaded music. He will listen to whatever that has the same mood or feel as what he’s drawing. Airpot speaker set up which all of the designers’ computer are connected to it so anyone can play their music from there, taking turns. But most of the designers listen to music via their earpieces.

Somewhere Else

His desk can be described as organised chaos.

He share the workspace with very nice people. They have two big windows where sunlight streams in beautifully every morning and it’s quite a cosy environment.

Music is important to him when working. When Yong has to think, it has to be very quiet. So sometimes he use the music to drown out everything. Mostly he listens to post rock and instrumental these days.

ACRE

He try to be neat but it is more of an organised chaos as he described.

A small space but come with such big Usually indie music. Most of them share the windows which he gets to see the outside similar taste of music. The speakers are world. communal and can be play via airport.

Splash

N: Books, papers, notes, emails. S: A lot of reference books.

The big space they are entitled to have which the spacious studio allows them to have more opportunities and imagination that they can have as a designer. All of their designers have a lot of space around in their work areas.

H55

Books.

Hanson owned the studio space so it has Don’t listen to music. been an excellent financial investment.

The Bureau

Bills. The standard stuff like projects we are working on, timeline, work in progress, references books and coffee! Usually when we are running on a couple of jobs, it will tend to get a little messy.

It has their own character as Bureau has They listen to radio, usually 95 or 99.5FM. It designed in such a way that they have acts more like an ambience to fill up the their own private storage space without silence. worries of public coming in for a visit. The place here is quite friendly.

Relay Room

BBH - Singapore The Press Room Jessica Hische Kawakong Drewscape Bravo Company

Scott don’t actually as he finds it really distracting. Anyone can play their music but they usually on their headphones. N.A

Radio usually Lush 99.5 FM. They don’t encourage designers to listen music via earpiece.

Foreign Policy Group She will keep it as neat as possible.

Yah-Leng like her workspace to be organised. She has always strive in making sure things are always in a certain place and orderly manner.

It depends actually. They encourage people to bring their music so they are able to share music.

BBH - Singapore

Generally a very neat and tidy person. Has a photo of his son too!

Openness. Having a nice energy out of it because the workplace is open and bright.

Scott don’t actually as he finds it really distracting. Anyone can play their music but they usually on their headphones.

Jessica Hische

It is actually usually pretty uncluttered.

She loves the light, and that during the day she and her studio mate can just rely on natural light instead of having to use overhead lighting all the time.

When Jessica’s alone, she likes to work to television rather than music because it helps her pace herself and feel like she is not working long hours.

Drewscape

Cluttered with mails rough papers and art tools.

Homey down to earth feel like a cafe. Very comfortable.

He will listen to whatever that has the same mood or feel as what he’s drawing.

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EVALUATION

STUDIO CULTURE & SET UP Company

Studio Culture

Studio Set up

Roots

Jonathan like his studio to be comfortable and quiet. He enjoys one’s solitude very much as he believed a quiet and peaceful working environment helps him to be conducive and work efficiently.

The workspace reflects the kind of work environment Jonathan like to work in. A clean, neat and organised workspace. Given a decent space to organise the things that he likes around him, Jonathan enjoys retreating to his workspace where he can feel comfortable to work.

A Beautiful Design

Roy dislike things that are regimental and he never follows a fixed system. He always treat work as something fun.

Which is why his workspace has no system. If Roy see something he likes, he would get it and put it somewhere in the room. It doesn't matter if it looks odd with the rest of the room.

Relay Room

It is a collaborative culture over in Relay Room with very little hierarchy involved. Mark constantly encourages his designers to be open in sharing and contributing ideas especially during internal feedbacks. As he believes that even a causal passing remarks from somebody could be very inspiring for some project else. Being the creative director in Relay Room, Mark however does not sit at a different room from everybody else. Instead, he sits closer to the door because he often travel out of studio for meetings.

The tables are arranged in a linear manner so everybody is facing each other. In that way, this set up helps to support the circular flow of communication. Moreover, the seating arrangement can be changed accordingly to who’s working best beside each other. The collaborative workspace help to energise designers, making them feel connected with their colleagues and open them up to an exploration and exchanged of ideas. Lastly, there is no telephone in the studio to prevent distractions.

The Press Room

The Press Room has a very causal, free and easy culture. Being a democratic studio themselves, they do not run on a fixed regimental routine. In a lot of ways, Kelley prefer to see her designers more of like a family as she believe working in an intimate relationship, it helps them to do work a lot more enjoyable. The work life balance is also encompassed into the studio space.

To reflect the idea of a work life balance into the studio space, fun elements are placed in the studio to liven up the atmosphere. The designers’ tables are arranged in a linear manner which encourage spontaneous conversations and idea exchange among the designers easily. In addition, Kelley also likes to do her rounds randomly by siting next to the designer and discuss on projects.

Kawakong

Helpful. Habitat. Happy.

The studio works as one of a creative tools for Kawakong which allows them to "play" with their work. Mentally, their studio has served as a honest and productive space that help them to work better and motivated to create new things.

Bravo Company

Open and transparent working environment. Edwin prefers everybody to be together so that all his designers can work as a team. Therefore everybody is in this big room rather than segregated into different spaces. The concept of openness is reflected into the physical space of Bravo.

The workspace is set up in a very comfortable manner. Bravo has open space, good lighting, provides good machines for their designers to work on and also table lamps for each individual desks. A nice pantry is set up with a coffee machine and well-stocked fridge. A shelves of many references books to browse for ideas. A desk to do mock up which is located beside the printer. A storeroom to hid all the clutter and a washroom beside it. Also a side corner of the room is used for photography. A very well-thought plan and full utilise of space is reflected clearly in Bravo. All these features help the designers to feel comfortable at work so they will feel less stressed and as a result they think and perform better.

Somewhere Else

An independent work culture is adopted where the designer is given the opportunity to dictate a project. The workspace is rather cosy and comfortable which feels like a home. That comfort helps build the team into a family and that aids the openness and peacefulness required for their collaborative methods.

Somewhere Else shares the workspace with very nice people. The space is only suitable for the current set up—the way it is arranged, only allow 3 people per company. On and off Somewhere Else might call in freelancers but due to space constraints, they do not have the extra space to fit them.

ACRE

ACRE makes people feel comfortable like at home which encourage individuals to speak out and share ideas. The designers here work like a family and there is very little or flat hierarchy in the studio.

ARCE is always a work-in-progress. Everything at ACRE is modular with nothings that is fixed or glued to the wall. The set up can be changed easily and accordingly to fit the number of people in the team. The crate table is the central piece of ACRE. It not only reflects their love for wood as a material, but also holds sentimental value to them as it is exclusively made by them. The crate table is multi purposed and can be used for meetings, parties, mock up, photography and even storage.

Splash

Happy, Open & Fun. The concept of openness is something that Splash tried to instil in their studio space. The designers are encouraged to be constantly open: learning new things beyond their comfort zone and communicating with others from different levels and groups

In terms of sitting and table arrangements, Splash practices “musical chair” which is carried out periodically every 6 months. This change of work environment and neighbours get their designers out from their comfort zones which help to create a fresh new perspective for them when designing. The seats are allocated to ensure that there is a good mix of juniors and seniors: including interns, which helps to promote the sharing of ideas and experiences among different individuals.

H55

NA.

The set up does not help in the design process.He is not sentimental about his studio space.

The Bureau

Open & Unique. The studio has its very distinct own character, lined with many nostalgic old school mix of collections, like the letterpress machine. It has the ambience of an industry gastro bar, with brick walls and wooden furniture.

The workspace set up in terms of sitting arrangement is very flexible. A long desk is shared among all the designers and could be used to maximise the siting capacity. Beside, it helps to maintain the line of sight and support spontaneous communication.

Foreign Policy Group Sharing is the backbone basic principle that Foreign

Policy have in their studio. They alway encourage sharing as being open in exchanges, getting to know the new culture and exposing people from different

124 Traits of orderliness is reflected clearly in the workspace of Foreign Policy.

Designated place are set up to store things like tools and books so that they can always be returned to its original place and remained neat. A ‘Clean Desktop” policy is enforced in the team where everyone is required to clear


a family and that aids the openness and peacefulness required for their collaborative methods.

ACRE

ACRE makes people feel comfortable like at home ARCE is always a work-in-progress. Everything at ACRE is modular with which encourage individuals to speak out and share nothings that is fixed or glued to the wall. The set up can be changed easily EVALUATION ideas. The designers here work like a family and there and accordingly to fit the number of people in the team. The crate table is the is very little or flat hierarchy in the studio. central piece of ACRE. It not only reflects their love for wood as a material, but also holds sentimental value to them as it is exclusively made by them. The crate table is multi purposed and can be used for meetings, parties, mock up, photography and even storage.

Splash

Happy, Open & Fun. The concept of openness is something that Splash tried to instil in their studio space. The designers are encouraged to be constantly open: learning new things beyond their comfort zone and communicating with others from different levels and groups

Company H55 Roots The Bureau A Beautiful Design

Studio Culture Jonathan like his studio to be comfortable and quiet. He NA. enjoys one’s solitude very much as he believed a quiet and peaceful working environment helps him to be Open & Unique. Theefficiently. studio has its very distinct own conducive and work character, lined with many nostalgic old school mix of collections, like thethat letterpress machine. hasnever the Roy dislike things are regimental andIt he ambience of ansystem. industryHe gastro bar, withwork brickaswalls and follows a fixed always treat wooden furniture. something fun.

In terms of sitting and table arrangements, Splash practices “musical chair” which is carried out periodically every 6 months. This change of work environment and neighbours get their designers out from their comfort zones which help to create a fresh new perspective for them when designing. The seats are allocated to ensure that there is a good mix of juniors and seniors: including interns, which helps to promote the sharing of ideas and experiences among different individuals.

Studio Set up

The workspace of workprocess.He environment Jonathan like toabout work set up doesreflects not helpthe in kind the design is not sentimental his Astudio in. clean,space. neat and organised workspace. Given a decent space to organise the things that he likes around him, Jonathan enjoys retreating to Theworkspace workspacewhere set uphe in can terms of comfortable sitting arrangement his feel to work. is very flexible. A long desk is shared among all the designers and could be used to maximise the siting capacity. Beside, it helps maintain line of sight and support Which is why his workspace hastono system.the If Roy see something he likes, spontaneous he would get itcommunication. and put it somewhere in the room. It doesn't matter if it looks odd with the rest of the room.

is the backbone basic Foreign Traitstables of orderliness is reflected clearly in the Policy. Foreign Policy Group Sharing It is a collaborative culture overprinciple in Relaythat Room with very The are arranged in a linear manner soworkspace everybodyofis Foreign facing each Relay Room Policy have in involved. their studio. They alway encourage little hierarchy Mark constantly encourages his sharing asto being openininsharing exchanges, getting to know designers be open and contributing ideas the new culture exposing people As from especially duringand internal feedbacks. hedifferent believes that backgrounds a new environment individuals to even a causaltopassing remarks fromhelp somebody could gain newinspiring perspective. Designers the Being team learn be very for some projectin else. the and become better through the notion of sharing. creative director in Relay Room, Mark however does not

The Press Room

BBH - Singapore

Kawakong

Bravo Company

sit at a different room from everybody else. Instead, he Another cultural Foreign he Policy is travel the sense sits closer to the trait doorofbecause often out ofof responsibility that they instilled by ensuring everyone in studio for meetings. the team to keep their workspace neat and clean. They believe strongly that a workspace reflect much of an The Press Room has a very causal, free and easy individual: one who respect the workspace, will respect culture. Being a democratic studio themselves, they do their own work and respect to work as a result. not run on a fixed regimental routine. In a lot of ways, Kelley prefer to see her designers more of like a family BBH Singapore has a positive workingrelationship, environmentit as she believe working in an intimate which is very inspiring to many helps them toencouraging do work a lotand more enjoyable. The young work designers. It is a lot more casual and relax here than life balance is also encompassed into the studio space. any other BBH offices, as it reflects very much of Singapore cosmopolitan culture. They were very Helpful. Habitat. Happy. conscious not to have that divide which keep people away and that they are all of the same level working together like ‘One Singapore’ as they believed it is very important to all work together in a team rather than in a very hierarchy culture. With that, BBH is truly a Open and transparent working environment. Edwin integrated agency as they encourage collaborations prefers everybody to be together that all his with many other external partnersso and entrepreneurs as designers work ason a team. Therefore everybody is well. They can are always the look out for interesting in this big roomtogether rather than segregated into different people to work as they believed that through spaces. The concept of openness reflectedand intoshare the collaborations, they could develop is learnings physical space of Bravo. resources or projects with them.

Designated storetothings likethe tools and books other. In thatplace way, are thisset setup upto helps support circular flow ofso that they can always be returned to its and remained neat. A ‘Clean communication. Moreover, theoriginal seatingplace arrangement can be changed Desktop” policy is enforced the team where is collaborative required to clear accordingly to who’s workinginbest beside eacheveryone other. The their desktop by to theenergise end of everyday somaking it helpsthem to keep feel afresh the workspace help designers, feelthem connected with their next working day. Topthem of the are set up and to provide spaceoffor the team colleagues and open upshelves to an exploration exchanged ideas. to display any items that they want and like to share about which reflect their Lastly, there is no telephone in the studio to prevent distractions. design belief of sharing.

To reflect the idea of a work life balance into the studio space, fun elements are placed in the studio to liven up the atmosphere. The designers’ tables are arranged in a linear manner which encourage spontaneous conversations and idea exchange among the designers easily. In addition, Kelley also likes Incorporating the randomly spirit of Singapore within environment, BBH to do her rounds by siting next to the the work designer and discuss on Singapore do not have a typical office set up. Instead it is replaced with an projects. open space that calls for collaboration, where people can see each other and work with impromptu meetings, making work more efficiency. This open plan set up reflects very much of BBH design beliefs. On the other hand, they also The studio works as one of a creative tools for Kawakong which allows them have lot of hidden spaces where people can actually go and hide to get some to "play" with their work. Mentally, their studio has served as a honest and work done privately. Creatives are given their own space to work together so productive space that help them to work better and motivated to create it is easier for them to discuss and bounce ideas off each other without new things. interruptions from other departments. Moreover, they also have walls to help pin up works for the team to critic as that is a very important process for the The workspace is setOn up top in aof very comfortable manner. hasreflect open very creative department. that, the character of theBravo building space, lighting, provides machines to work on much ofgood the BBH design belief good of being unique,for bigtheir anddesigners open. and also table lamps for each individual desks. A nice pantry is set up with a coffee machine and well-stocked fridge. A shelves of many references books to browse for ideas. A desk to do mock up which is located beside the printer. A storeroom to hid all the clutter and a washroom beside it. Also a side corner of the room is used for photography. A very well-thought plan and full utilise of space is reflected clearly in Bravo. N.A All these features help the designers to feel comfortable at work so they will feel less stressed and as a result they think and perform better.

Jessica Hische

It's definitely the most "designy" office but feels comfortable and like a room Jessica would have in her home.

Somewhere Else Drewscape

An independent work culture is adopted where the Cafe like, peaceful and quiet. It has a very homey down designer is given the opportunity to dictate a project. to earth feel which puts people at ease. The entire The workspace is rather cosy and comfortable which house feel like a cafe/studio as it is very comfortable feels like a home. That comfort helps build the team into and relax to work even at any part of the house, be it a family and that aids the openness and peacefulness the living room or kitchen. It is better than cafes outside required for their collaborative methods. as they can get very noisy.

ACRE

ACRE makes people feel comfortable like at home which encourage individuals to speak out and share ideas. The designers here work like a family and there is very little or flat hierarchy in the studio.

Splash

Happy, Open & Fun. The concept of openness is something that Splash tried to instil in their studio space. The designers are encouraged to be constantly open: learning new things beyond their comfort zone and communicating with others from different levels and groups

In terms of sitting and table arrangements, Splash practices “musical chair” which is carried out periodically every 6 months. This change of work environment and neighbours get their designers out from their comfort zones which help to create a fresh new perspective for them when designing. The seats are allocated to ensure that there is a good mix of juniors and seniors: including interns, which helps to promote the sharing of ideas and experiences among different individuals.

H55

NA.

The set up does not help in the design process.He is not sentimental about his studio space.

The Bureau

Open & Unique. The studio has its very distinct own character, lined with many nostalgic old school mix of collections, like the letterpress machine. It has the ambience of an industry gastro bar, with brick walls and wooden furniture.

The workspace set up in terms of sitting arrangement is very flexible. A long desk is shared among all the designers and could be used to maximise the siting capacity. Beside, it helps to maintain the line of sight and support spontaneous communication.

Somewhere Else shares the workspace with very nice people. The space is In order to create a conducive work environment, no television is placed in only suitable for the current set up—the way it is arranged, only allow 3 the living room. That is so that people will actually talk and read in the living people per company. On and off Somewhere Else might call in freelancers room ‘cafe’ as TV noise can be quite distracting. Peace and quiet is more but due to space constraints, they do not have the extra space to fit them. conducive for creativity as there is less disturbance and distractions. The table, drawers and every cabinets are all custom made, designed to suit the needs of his work. One example would be the curved table which is designed to maximise the working space. This allows Andrew to be able to reach to his ARCE is or always a work-in-progress. at ACRE is modular art tools materials at any end of hisEverything table. It also provided plenty ofwith space nothings is fixed or glued to font the wall. The set encourages up can be changed easily for him tothat display his art tools in of him. That him to use and accordingly to fit the number of people in the team. The crate table is the them and be inspired to create new drawings out. central piece of ACRE. It not only reflects their love for wood as a material, but also holds sentimental value to them as it is exclusively made by them. The crate table is multi purposed and can be used for meetings, parties, mock up, photography and even storage.

Foreign Policy Group Sharing is the backbone basic principle that Foreign125 Traits of orderliness is reflected clearly in the workspace of Foreign Policy. Policy have in their studio. They alway encourage sharing as being open in exchanges, getting to know the new culture and exposing people from different

Designated place are set up to store things like tools and books so that they can always be returned to its original place and remained neat. A ‘Clean Desktop” policy is enforced in the team where everyone is required to clear


CONCEPTUALISATION (WEEK 08)


EVALUATION

Project Evaluation Week 08: February 25 to March 03, 2013

SO, WHAT’S NEXT? In the midst of writing my essay, I have been thinking about my studio work constantly. Perhaps it’s due to the upcoming Round Table that make one feel uneasy. Anyway, a question have been popping up at the back of my mind quite often. I keep feeling as if something is missing from my project, making it seem a little incomplete. It seem like my project needs a design push/twist. With all the important and necessary research findings (studios visit & interviews) that have already been collected, I asked myself what many lecturers like to say, “So, what’s next?”.

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CONCEPTUALISATION

Project Strategy Week 08: February 25 to March 03, 2013

COMING UP WITH A STRATEGY Based on the previous week of user testing, I remember one participant have questioned me what is the bigger picture of my project when I showed her my editorials. Reason why she said that was because she felt the editorials: containing the studio interviews and photos were just a compilation of research findings. Having said that, it make me rethink about my project and knew something has to be done in order to make this project seem completed. Therefore I went on to jot down my thoughts and understandings (on right page) of the project so as to better formulate a strategy plan. The key question here is “How can I get young designers (TA) to be interested in applying the knowledge/ tips to their workspace?” This question got me thinking really hard. How can I attract the interest of my target audience- young designers to get inspired by my project and apply the tips to their existing/future workspace. Hence, I revisited my design issue and from there I went on to list down several important pointers that later guide me to the answer I’m looking for.

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Studio Creative Direction Week 08: February 25 to March 03, 2013

DESIGN ISSUE

CHARACTERISTICS OF TA: STUDENTS

• Design students lack of experience so when designing, they faced more challenges in their design process than professional creatives.

• Experimenters & action-orientated people.

• Poor and unfavourable workspace set up in school because of two reasons: physical space constraints (stem from external factor) and open plan workspace brings noise distractions. • On a side note ,high rental cost in Singapore so hard for young designers to find an ideal studio space for them to work.

BENEFITS • Improve design process • Increase learnings (creation of new knowledge)

• Expect a higher level of control over decisions. (Eg. When, where, how they study). • Highly visual, group focused & media fluent.

THIS GOT ME THINKING... Q1: How do I let them be part of this project? Q2: How do I get the target audience to see the awesomeness of design studios that I visited which could aspire them? Q3: How do I get students to be interested to try setting up their workspace set up based on my proposed tips?

• Improve morale • Improve work performance

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CONCEPTUALISATION

THE STRATEGY

DOES THE PROPOSED STRATEGY MEET THE OBJECTIVES OF THE PROJECT?

For Q1: This is address by the Facebook whereby it keep people interested with the projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s updates.

Self-Promo Benefit Target Audience

For Q2: This is address by both Editorial and Website. Editorial features in-depth interviews and photos of various design studios. Whereas website contains more wonderful photos of various design studios and help to reach out to more students because of it accessibility.

Look visually appealing (Basic aspect) Thank contributors Inspiring (Fit the tone of voice)

For Q3: This is where I finally came up with the strategy. The answer that I have been searching for and has all along been lying in front of me, going unnoticed. Based on a designer point of view, what can I come up with to answer question 3. The answer is: an infographic flow chart that guides people in setting up a workspace that best meet their needs and suit their personalities. Workspace is not proposed according to the type or size of a design team. Instead, it is suggesting workspace according to the preferences of each design individuals (Refer to next page for CANAL as case study).

Motivate Target Audience to apply the knowledge or tips they learn of workspace set up

Reasons why infographic is the best solution: 1. Coming up with a flow chart rather than a checklist allow target audience to take part in making decisions and get them interested to find out the set up that is proposed to them. In a way, it is interactive. 2. This infographic flow chart is presented in the medium of a poster which can also be folded to become a direct mailer. (Refer to next page for ACRE- Unit of Measurement Calender as case study). This way, the poster can reach out to more intended target audience and help to acts as a self-promo. 3. If designers like the poster, they can keep it and paste it on their wall/workspace. In a way, it help them as well as they can always refer to it as and when for designers are very visual creatures. This is my strategy!

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VISUALISATION (WEEK 09)


VISUALISATION

Infographics Case Study Week 09: March 04 to March 10, 2013

CANAL+ POSTERS Canal Plus, the French television channel, is promoting its support for the film industry with a series of print advertisements featuring complicated flow charts. Four forms are presented: Action, Animation, Horror, Porn and Short film. “Shooting a film isn’t that simple. Canal+ supports those who make movies”. Each is like a maze through film production that begins with the conception of an idea, then goes through story issues, funding, problems with pre-production, filming, editing, effects and eventually distribution. It all seems so easy with these posters.

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Direct Mailer Case Study Week 09: March 04 to March 10, 2013

ACRE - UNITS OF MEASUREMENT A calender created by ACRE, a design studio based in Singapore. As the studio is named after a unit of measure, the team worked to create a calendar that would highlight 12 units of measure. This brought a lot of symmetry to their design philosophy which melds sense and practicality together. The craft-centric calendar is designed to be practically functional as well as aesthetically pleasing. “Measurements are at the heart of analysis, testing and discovery. The British scientist Lord Kelvin once said, “When you can measure what you are speaking about and express it in numbers you know something about it.” In the same way, the calendar wishes to illustrate measurements commonly used by a wide spectrum of people. Find more traditional units of measure like degree celsius, kilogram and hectare as well as explore less well-known units of measure like astronomical unit, decibel and aperture. Of course, we couldn’t resist representing pica, a unit of measure synonymous with design.” Extracted from #375/500 edition. Dimensions: 990 × 680 mm (39 × 26.75 in) Paper Stock: Cyclus, 80gsm Number of Colours: 2 (Black, Copper) http://www.unitsofmeasure.net/

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VISUALISATION

Space Design Case Study Week 09: March 04 to March 10, 2013

THE SPACE PROGRAM The Space Program is a traveling insertion concept by Foreign Policy Design Group. The project is about redefining and re-engaging the interaction between the visitors and a space where a new level of experience is activated. Intended as part museum, part retail store and part installation, it features a curated mix of objects where design, intellect and contemporary culture meet. Globally expandable as a concept, the goal is to embed the Space Program within different cities around the world, such that each new insertion introduces a renewed appreciation of the space. For this New Majestic Hotel insertion, Foreign Policy Design Group have explored contextual elements and worked along the lines of bringing design, intellect and contemporary culture of Singapore to the hotel visitors. The selection of products and art pieces form the fabric of the three principles. The primary building block of this installation is the washboard - which is iconic of the grit and hard work of Singapore founding fathers. It is made up of more than 200 pieces of overlapping washboards featuring a 2meter high structure and a series of low structures, multi-functioning as display units. Extracted from: http://vimeo.com/43399632

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VISUALISATION

Studio Art Direction Week 09: March 04 to March 10, 2013

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VISUALISATION

ART DIRECTION After coming up with the strategy, the next step is to ensure the idea/intention can be transcended through the visual language.

FINAL DELIVERABLES 1. EDITORIAL - A book contains all design studios & illustrators - Colour coded according to type of studio size - Fonts remained: Futura + Minion - Include photos, interviews (edited), workspace answer - Cover: Wood 4mm thick with debossed effect - Open spine stitching

2. POSTER + DIRECT MAILER - Infographic poster folded into a direct mailer - Thank you appreciation to all contributors - Self promote my project as well - Work on poster folding (drawn inspirations from The Space Program Poster) - Floor plan inspired - Wabi Sabi philosophy - Flow chart (drawn inspirations from Sliver Linings Playbook & Canal Plus Movie Posters)

3. WEBSITE - Refer to http://www.black.se/ - Include # tags - Animated Banner for Home Page

4. FACEBOOK PAGE - Updates of relevant posts: home decor, stationary, lifestyle, interior design, collection of things in living/ workspace, useful tips - Wabi Sabi living

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VISUALISATION

Poster Moodboard Week 09: March 04 to March 10, 2013

FOLDING + LAYOUT

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VISUALISATION

Editorial Moodboard Week 09: March 04 to March 10, 2013

FINISHING / BINDING

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Editorial Art Direction Week 09: March 04 to March 10, 2013

PLANNING

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EVALUATION

RoundTable/Feedbacks Week 09: March 04 to March 10, 2013

ADDITIONAL FEEDBACKS Feedback from Roundtable (David & Yasser) - Feeds from different studio. When the studio update works in their studio, it will pop up in your website. - David love the topic of my project! Glad he thinks it is a self-driven project fueled with passion. - Grid system for the book is really strong. - Anticpate how I would design my workspace based on my knowledge through my research. The design of my space. Do up & take a picture of it. All the knowledge and research tie together. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like icing on the cake! Feedback from Peer (Wenjing) - Create an extra subpage, called my Dreamspace. It links to a new page contain flash papercut. Take photos of the objects I like, then put them together in the workspace but using digital platform. So when people hover the mouse, revealing details of each object. It just to give people an idea of what your personal worksapce will be like.

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EVALUATION

AFTERTHOUGHTS So after much discussion with another lecturer beside Yasser, it was assuring to know that other people like my project too. This shows that I’m going on the right track. Actually I really learnt more of my project only in this 2nd semester after months of visiting so many studios. I came to have a better understanding of the role a workspace plays in establishing the studio culture of a design studio. Here’s an article which provides an interesting perspective to my topic. As quoted saying “ When we employ creative people, we enter into an arrangement where creative fulfilment is often more important than money... But in this tumultuous era of late capitalism, the desire for creative fulfilment among designers is stronger than ever. Many will forgo opportunities to work in studios where they can earn large salaries producing bland work, preferring instead to join smaller studios where they can do the type of work they most want to do... None of this means that designers will tolerate being underpaid, or that they don’t value money. Rather, it acknowledges the fact that they will always try to balance the need to earn money with the opportunity to do the sort of work that inspires them to get up in the morning. Studios that get the balance right between remuneration and the right sort of work are the ones that proper.” I highly agreed with the author as the whole reason why we chose to be designer, a creative profession is to gain these creative fulfilment which is unable to gain from the typical industry such as business, etc. However, many companies do not acknowledge the contribution of designers and thus underpaid and overworked designers. Therefore it is important for an organisation to take note of the psychological factors to a workspace as it can have great effects on designers. If a studio acknowledge the contribution of individuals, give designers the sort of work that will inspire them, this really make a great difference to the studio culture which will attract like-minded individuals to join the company. This links back to the establishment of studio culture and how workspace can be deem as tool or a form of extension to support the studio culture across, continuing motivating the design individuals.

Article extracted from the book named Studio Culture: The Secret life of the graphic design studio.

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VISUALISATION (WEEK 10)


VISUALISATION

Planning for Book (Outcome 1) Week 10: March 11 to March 17, 2013

BOOK CONTENT

152


VISUALISATION

BOOK SKETCHES

As I have intention to sew this book by coptic stitching, hence I need to first plan my book layout by 16pp. 4 sheets of papers = 16pp = 1 signature for a book. The estimated plan is that each studio will take at least 8 spreads equivalent to 1 signature. I did consider splitting up the book into different issue. I tried but it didn’t work out as there too many variables to factor into the studio culture and set up. Thus it is difficult to categorise them into a specific group. The most general that I came up with was to group them by personnels within a studio. At least there is a fair share of studios split up equally for each group. It is much interesting to design them,all condensed into a book so I get to play with the colour coding as a divider. I can foresee that my book as the final outcome will be super thick which is great for sewing!

But it may weigh too heavy and that pose inconvenience for people to bring around. In this case I will need to take note of the paper gsm too. Using 140gsm paper, I printed 1/4 of the book as a mock up today for WIP. It already weight so heavy. Current paper type isn’t my final paper choice as it is too smooth, lacking in the slight texture feel. Will need to make a trip to RJ paper really soon to get FRONTIER. The book will be a condensed copy of very useful information which will be covering 4 areas: Workspace psychology (my interpretation of workspace), featured design studios, steps in building a workspace, advice from design creatives. I’m excited to finish it and can’t wait to start sewing. On top of that, I will be using wood for the packaging case of the book. I hope to finish it by Week 12! Wish me luck.

153


VISUALISATION

Planning for Website (Outcome 2) Week 10: March 11 to March 17, 2013

WEBSITE CONTENT

154


VISUALISATION

THE OBJECTIVE After reviewing the feedbacks from Week 7 & Roundtable, I decided to revised my website. In terms of the small amendments to the design on the index page so I can duplicate the rest of the design to other pages. Also a better planning of what are the features that’re going to be included in the website. The main pages will be Home, About, Book, Tags/ Search, Archive & Features. Home Page: The main index page which will have an animated flash banner featuring the quote of the day & a few design studios. About: What this project is all about & how I come up with the topic. Book: An animated flash banner of the book’s portfolio shots, showing a sneek peak to the inside spreads. Tags/Search: It’s the area where all the design studios are re-catergorised according to similar characteristics they shared in their workspace set up. This helps people easier to search according to the tags. Archive: It will covered all the design studios which included more photos & their workspace interpretation. Features (A new section): It acts like a blog where it get regular updates that covered on various area relevant to my FYP. It will include the process chart, my ideal workspace (if I do build one), tips to workspace, etc. As it’s more like a compilation of topics, it will help consolidate all related information and get regular updates as I continue on the project even after graduation.

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VISUALISATION

Sketches of Revised Website Week 10: March 11 to March 17, 2013

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VISUALISATION

157


EVALUATION (WEEK 11)


EVALUATION

W.I.P Feedbacks Week 11: March 18 to March 24, 2013

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EVALUATION

161


REALISATION (WEEK 12- WEEK 15: BOOK)


REALISATION

Book Design Stage 1 Week 12: March 25 to March 31, 2013

BOOK PLANNING 1ST There is a lot of planning to do before starting on the book design. Especially in my case when I am doing a coptic stitch binding and that requires me to do the pagination in a multiple of 4 or 8. It is even more challenging when it is my first time dealing with a 300 ++ pages book volume. Plus I am using different paper for each section of the book. Therefore it can get confusing and a little intimidating at first. I made so many mistakes along the way. Enough mishaps to throw me off the wall. Paper after paper of plannings... The first time when I plan for the book, I intend to categorise the studio by the total number of people working inside. It was categorised as 1 man studio, 2 to 5 people, 6 to 10 people and lastly 30 or more people. Content for the book Part 1: Foreword Part 2: Featured interviews Part 3: Ideas on creating an ideal workspace Part 4: Advice on design process Part 5: Grid paper (for people to draw their space)

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REALISATION

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REALISATION

BOOK PLANNING 2ND Had a discussion with Weiming and he suggested that perhaps I should change the way the design house are being categorised. It is too predictable by revealing the number of people working in each design house at the start. Hence, I went to replan and reanalyse my information. After a round of intense thinking, I managed to come up with 4 categories of workspace set-up: communication, personalisation, comfort and efficacy. Each workspace set-up has a total number of 4 different design house which share similar values and studio culture. I try to make an estimation of 32 spreads for each studio: 1 studio would have 8 spreads to layout their interviews and photos.

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REALISATION

BOOK PLANNING 3RD As seen below, this was the final round of planning. It is necessary to do so for better ease when buying paper. You will know exactly how many extra sheets of paper to buy and also the paper size and type. The initial idea was to include Part 3 which talk about ideas: suggestions, theories and beliefs to help creatives in creating their ideal workspace. However, it is too lengthy and too text chunky. I tried inserting illustration to make it more interesting but it does not gel well with the whole art direction of the book. Hence I decided to drop that whole section as I do not want to ruin the book visual aesthetics. The content for Part 3 would be reduce and summarise to use for poster/direct mailer instead.

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CONCEPTUALISATION

Ideal Physical Workspace Week 12: March 25 to March 31, 2013

PHYSICAL WORKSPACE SIZE While I was planning for the book, I tried out many different ways of categorising each design house. One of them was to tabulate and determine the density of an individual physical studio space. It was interesting to note that among 16 interviewed design creatives, a comfortable ideal physical space for an individual to work in was on an average between 120- 300 square feet.

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REALISATION

Book Design Stage 2 Week 13: April 01 to April 07, 2013

FONT CHANGE Time for feedback! After I was done with the a quarter section of the interviews layout, I went to meet up with Weiming and have a â&#x20AC;&#x153;consultationâ&#x20AC;?. He told me to take note of my typesetting of course judging by the large amount of text I need to handle. He also shared with me some handy tips on photo editing. The photo editing is a killer at the later stage with almost 16 different design house to edit. No joke. He also suggested me to try other fonts as Minion (the initial chosen font for body copy) gets too plain after reading for long. Weiming recommended me some very nice ones which will come in really handy next time. I took quite some time to try the various fonts and test printed them before I come to a conclusion. On a side note, when doing test prints and revisions, it is easier to do it with your peers so you can a second opinion which help to expertise your whole design process. After all, when you design something for too long, you may be confused by the visuals.

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REALISATION

INTERSTATE

DINPRO (CURRENT)

ACRE

ACRE

ACRE OPERATES FROM THE INDUSTRIAL HEARTLANDS OF SINGAPORE. THEY ARE AN ART COLLECTIVE OF IDEA CRAFTERS.

ACRE OPERATES FROM THE INDUSTRIAL HEARTLANDS OF SINGAPORE. THEY ARE AN ART COLLECTIVE OF IDEA CRAFTERS.

Interview with TY Zheng

Interview with TY Zheng

FAGOCO

TRADEGOTHIC LT CONDEIGHTEEN

ACRE

ACRE

ACRE OPERATES FROM THE INDUSTRIAL HEARTLANDS OF SINGAPORE. THEY ARE AN ART COLLECTIVE OF IDEA CRAFTERS.

ACRE OPERATES FROM THE INDUSTRIAL HEARTLANDS OF SINGAPORE. THEY ARE AN ART COLLECTIVE OF IDEA CRAFTERS.

Interview with TY Zheng

Interview with TY Zheng

AKZIDENZ GROTESK CE LIGHT

UNIVERS LT STD

ACRE

ACRE ACRE OPERATES FROM THE INDUSTRIAL HEARTLANDS OF SINGAPORE. THEY ARE AN ART

ACRE OPERATES FROM THE INDUSTRIAL HEARTLANDS OF SINGAPORE. THEY ARE AN ART COLLECTIVE OF IDEA CRAFTERS.

Interview with TY Zheng

Interview with TY Zheng

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NT)

DIRECTOR, 1 MANAGING EXECUTIVE

REALISATION

INTERSTATE

FOUNDING YEAR: 2011 PERSONNEL: 4 STUDIO BREAKDOWN: 1 CREATIVE DIRECTOR, 1 MANAGING DIRECTOR, 1 DESIGNER, 1 ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE LOCATION: SINGAPORE, EAST WWW.ACRE.SG

DINPRO (CURRENT)

UNIVERS LT STD

ABSTRACT

FOUNDING YEAR: 2011 PERSONNEL: 4 STUDIO BREAKDOWN: 1 CREATIVE DIRECTOR, 1 MANAGING DIRECTOR, 1 DESIGNER, 1 ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE LOCATION: SINGAPORE, EAST WWW.ACRE.SG

ACRE OPERATES FROM THE INDUSTRIAL HEARTLANDS OF SINGAPORE. THEY ARE AN ART COLLECTIVE OF IDEA CRAFTERS. Interview with TY Zheng

INTERSTATE

UNIVERSAL LT

FOUNDING YEAR: 2011 PERSONNEL: 4 STUDIO BREAKDOWN: 1 CREATIVE DIRECTOR, 1 MANAGING DIRECTOR, 1 DESIGNER, 1 ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE LOCATION: SINGAPORE, EAST WWW.ACRE.SG

FOUNDING YEAR: 2011 PERSONNEL: 4 STUDIO BREAKDOWN: 1 CREATIVE DIRECTOR, 1 MANAGING DIRECTOR, 1 DESIGNER, 1 ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE LOCATION: SINGAPORE, EAST WWW.ACRE.SG

E

UNIVERS LT STD

ABSTRACT

EATIVE DIRECTOR, 1 SIGNER, 1 ACCOUNT

ACRE ACRE OPERATES OPERATES FROM FROM THE THE INDUSTRIAL INDUSTRIAL HEARTLANDS OF SINGAPORE. HEARTLANDS OF SINGAPORE. THEY THEY ARE ARE AN AN ART ART COLLECTIVE COLLECTIVE OF OF IDEA IDEA CRAFTERS. CRAFTERS. Interview Interview with with TY TY Zheng Zheng

T STD

RACT

172

UN

FOUNDING FOUNDING YEAR: YEAR: PERSONNEL: PERSONNEL: 44 STUDIO STUDIO BREAKDO BREAKDO 11 MANAGING MANAGING DIREC DIREC ACCOUNT ACCOUNT EXECUTIV EXECUTIV LOCATION: LOCATION: SINGAP SINGAP WWW.ACRE.SG WWW.ACRE.SG


REALISATION

ITCITC NEW NEW BASKERVILLE BASKERVILLE STUDIO STUDIO TYPE TYPE

BEMBO BEMBO STUDIO STUDIO TYPE TYPE

Rents Rents a unit a unit in the in the industrial industrial estate estate along along Kallang Kallang Sector. Sector. Rents Rents a unit a unit in the in the industrial industrial estate estate along along Kallang Kallang Sector. Sector. Approximately Approximately 500500 square square feet. feet. Approximately Approximately 500500 square square feet.feet.

STUDIO STUDIO CULTURE CULTURE ACRE ACRE makes makes people people feelfeel comfortable comfortable likelike at home at home which which encourage encourage individuals individuals to speak to speak outout andand share share ideas. ideas. TheThe designers designers here here work work likelike a family a family andand there there is very is very little little or or flatflat hierarchy hierarchy in the in the studio. studio.

STUDIO STUDIO SETSET UP UP ARCE ARCE is always is always a work-in-progress. a work-in-progress. Everything Everything at ACRE at ACRE is is modular modular with with nothings nothings thatthat is fixed is fixed or glued or glued to the to the wall. wall. TheThe set set up up cancan be be changed changed easily easily andand accordingly accordingly to fit to fit thethe number number of people of people in the in the team. team. TheThe crate crate table table is the is the central central piece piece of ACRE. of ACRE. It not It not only only reflects reflects their their lovelove forfor wood wood as aasmaterial, a material, butbut alsoalso holds holds sentimental sentimental value value to them to them as itasisitexclusively is exclusively made made by them. by them. TheThe crate crate table table is multi is multi purposed purposed andand cancan be used be used for for meetings, meetings, parties, parties, mock mock up,up, photography photography andand even even storage. storage.

STUDIO STUDIO CULTURE CULTURE ACRE ACRE makes makes people people feelfeel comfortable comfortable likelike at home at home which which encourage encourage individuals individuals to speak to speak outout andand share share ideas. ideas. TheThe designers designers here here work work likelike a family a family andand there there is very is very little little or or flatflat hierarchy hierarchy in the in the studio. studio. STUDIO STUDIO SETSET UP UP ARCE ARCE is always is always a work-in-progress. a work-in-progress. Everything Everything at ACRE at ACRE is modular is modular with with nothings nothings thatthat is fixed is fixed or glued or glued to the to the wall. wall. TheThe set set up up cancan be changed be changed easily easily andand accordingly accordingly to fit to the fit the number number of people of people in the in the team. team. TheThe crate crate table table is the is the central central piece piece of ACRE. of ACRE. It not It not only only reflects reflects their their lovelove for for wood wood as as a material, a material, butbut alsoalso holds holds sentimental sentimental value value to them to them as itasisit is exclusively exclusively made made by them. by them. TheThe crate crate table table is multi is multi purposed purposed andand cancan be used be used for for meetings, meetings, parties, parties, mock mock up,up, photography photography andand even even storage. storage.

Interview with TY Zheng

MINION MINION PROPRO (CURRENT) SABON LT (CURRENT) STD

ADOBE ADOBE GARAMOND GARAMOND PROPRO

STUDIO STUDIO TYPE TYPE STUDIO STUDIO TYPE TYPE STUDIO TYPE Rents Rents aa unit a unit in in industrial industrial estate estate along along Kallang Kallang Sector. Sector. Rents Rents a unit a unit in the in the industrial industrial estate estate along along Kallang Kallang Sector. Sector. Rents unit in the thethe industrial estate along Kallang Sector. Approximately Approximately 500 500 square square feet. feet. Approximately Approximately 500500 square square feet.feet. Approximately 500 square feet. STUDIO STUDIO CULTURE CULTURE STUDIO CULTURE ACRE ACRE makes makes people people feel comfortable comfortable like at at home which which ACRE makes people feelfeel comfortable likelike at home home which encourage encourage individuals individuals to speak speak to speak outout andand share share ideas. ideas. TheThe encourage individuals to out and share ideas. The designers designers here here work work like aa family a family and there there is is very little little or designers here work likelike family andand there is very very little or or flat hierarchy hierarchy in in studio. studio. flatflat hierarchy in the thethe studio.

STUDIO STUDIO CULTURE CULTURE ACRE ACRE makes makes people people feelfeel comfortable comfortable likelike at home at home which which encourage encourage individuals individuals to speak to speak outout andand share share ideas. ideas. TheThe designers designers herehere work work likelike a family a family andand there there is very is very little little or flat or flat hierarchy hierarchy in the in the studio. studio.

STUDIO STUDIO SET UP STUDIO SETSET UP UP ARCE ARCE isisalways is always a awork-in-progress. a work-in-progress. Everything Everything at at ACRE atACRE ACRE is is ARCE always work-in-progress. Everything modular modular with with nothings nothings that that isisfixed is fixed or or glued to to wall. wall. is modular with nothings that fixed orglued glued to the thethe wall. The set up can be be changed easily easily and accordingly accordingly to to the fit the TheThe setset upup cancan be changed changed easily andand accordingly to fit fit the number number of of people in in the team. team. The crate crate table table isis the is the central central number of people people in the the team. TheThe crate table the central piece piece of of ACRE. ItIt not It not only only reflects reflects their their love for wood wood as piece of ACRE. ACRE. not only reflects their lovelove for for wood as aaas a material, material, but also also holds holds sentimental sentimental value value to to them as asis material, butbut also holds sentimental value to them them as it it isit is exclusively exclusively made made by them. by them. The The crate crate table table is multi is multi purposed purposed exclusively made by them. The crate table is multi purposed and can be be used for meetings, meetings, parties, parties, mock mock up, photography photography andand cancan be used used forfor meetings, parties, mock up,up, photography and and even even storage. storage. and even storage.

STUDIO STUDIO SETSET UP UP ARCE ARCE is always is always a work-in-progress. a work-in-progress. Everything Everything at ACRE at ACRE is is modular modular with with nothings nothings thatthat is fixed is fixed or glued or glued to the to the wall. wall. TheThe set set up can up can be changed be changed easily easily andand accordingly accordingly to fit tothe fit the number number of people of people in the in the team. team. TheThe crate crate table table is the is the central central piece piece of of ACRE. ACRE. It not It not onlyonly reflects reflects their their lovelove for for wood wood as aasmaterial, a material, butbut alsoalso holds holds sentimental sentimental value value to them to them as itasisitexclusively is exclusively made made by them. by them. TheThe crate crate table table is multi is multi purposed purposed andand cancan be used be used for for meetings, meetings, parties, parties, mock mock up,up, photography photography andand even even storage. storage.

173


VISUALISATION

Revised Project Art Direction Week 13: April 01 to April 07, 2013

CHOSEN TYPEFACE

HEADLINE

DINPRO - CONDENSED MEDIUM

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse. SABON LT STD

COLOUR PALETTE

C = 100 M =34 Y=0 K=2

C = 57 M =0 Y = 100 K=0

C=0 M =76 Y = 60 K=0

C=0 M =0 Y = 79 K=0

Each colour represent a category of workspace set-up. Blue is for comfort. Green is for personalisation. Orange/Salmon is for communication. Yellow is for efficacy. Purple is the paper colour for part 4 Advice.

174

C = 30 M = 43 Y=0 K=0


VISUALISATION

COLOUR MEANING Blue - Comfort

Green- Personalisation

A pure blue is the color of inspiration, sincerity and spirituality. Blue is the color of trust and peace. It can suggest loyalty and integrity.

Possessiveness: Green is a color that encourages us to want to own things and people, to collect and possess. The color green is the color of balance and harmony.

From a color psychology perspective, blue is reliable and responsible. This color exhibits an inner security and confidence. You can rely on it to take control and do the right thing in difficult times. It has a need for order and direction in its life, including its living and work spaces.

From a meaning of colors perspective, green is also the color of growth, the color of spring, of renewal and rebirth. It renews and restores depleted energy. It is the sanctuary away from the stresses of modern living, restoring us back to a sense of well being.

Blue seeks peace and tranquility above everything else, promoting both physical and mental relaxation. It reduces stress, creating a sense of calmness, relaxation and order - we certainly feel a sense of calm if we lie on our backs and look into a bright blue cloudless sky. It slows the metabolism. The paler the blue the more freedom we feel.

Green is an emotionally positive color, giving us the ability to love and nurture ourselves and others unconditionally. A natural peacemaker, it must avoid the tendency to become a martyr.

Orange (Peach) - Communication

Yellow - Efficacy

The colour orange is the colour of social communication and optimism. Orange brings spontaneity and a positive outlook on life and is a great colour to use during tough economic times, keeping us motivated and helping us to look on the bright side of life.

In the meaning of colors, yellow inspires original thought and inquisitiveness. Yellow is creative from a mental aspect, the color of new ideas, helping us to find new ways of doing things. It is the practical thinker, not the dreamer.

The colour orange relates to social communication, stimulating two way conversations. A warm and inviting colour, it is both physically and mentally stimulating, so it gets people thinking and talking!

Yellow is the best color to create enthusiasm for life and can awaken greater confidence and optimism.

Orange aids in the assimilation of new ideas and frees the spirit of its limitations, giving us the freedom to be ourselves. At the same time it encourages self-respect and respect of others.

Yellow helps with decision making as it relates to clarity of thought and ideas, although it can often be impulsive. Yellow helps us focus, study and recall information, useful during exam time.

Information extracted from: http://www.empoweryourself-with-color-psychology.com/

175


REALISATION

Book Design (Inside Pages) Week 14: April 08 to April 14, 2013

DESIGN LAYOUT Here is a sneak preview of my book inside pages, with the foreword part and also a bit of the interview with Andrew Tan also known as Drewscape.

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REALISATION

177


REALISATION

178


REALISATION

179


REALISATION

180


REALISATION

181


REALISATION

Book Design (Binding) Week 15: April 15 to April 21, 2013

EXECUTION

STEP 1.

I made a lot of mistakes when going for print. Firstly, the pagination confused me even after working on the book for so long. The time taken to design this book took far much longer time than I expect. The typesetting, font changing, photos and interview editing, pagination all required a great deal of effort and patience. Editorial is never easy, especially when you are doing under such tight deadline... Once the book is printed out, I have to get it bind through coptic stitch. It took me a while to get the sewing right and another 6 hours to complete sewing that book. After that, I have to applied glue to the book so it will be sturdy for a trim. Lastly, it is sticking the book cover which is using wood panel embossed with the project logo - Wonderful onto the sew book. When doing like such crafty work, one has to be very very patient.

Get all the tools lay out in front of you. It makes your sewing a lot easier. Tools needed: silicon glue, awl, penknife, bone folder, pencil, many clips, long rulers, wax, thread, needle.

182


REALISATION

STEP 2.

STEP 3.

I folded the paper into half and sort them into signatures accordingly. After poking holes at the side, it is time to sew the signatures together. I did a coptic stitching with an open spine.

The book is getting thicker as I added more signatures to the volume. It becomes very unstable so try to use clips to hold the signature tight the one beneath it, whenever you are sewing a new signature.

The book is getting thicker as I added more signatures to the volume. It becomes very unstable so try to use clips to hold the signature tight the one beneath it, whenever you are sewing a new signature.

Once you are done with the book sewing, it is time to glue the spine. First, clamped it tight by using clips. I bet there are other better alternatives in doing it. I applied glue to the side on the open spine about 5 times. To ensure that the signatures sticks, I put on heavy books to add to the weight. When dried, it is ready to be trimmed. Lastly, stick the wood panels for the front and back cover and we are done!

183


REALISATION (WEEK 14- WEEK 16: POSTER)


REALISATION

Poster Design Influence Week 14: April 08 to April 14, 2013

BLUEPRINT Using floorplan as the blueprint for my poster design, I have taken my own house floorplan as reference to see the typical characteristics of it. The standard patterns are: Black thin and thick strokes Arrows lines Rectangle boxes Door diagram

186


REALISATION

Poster Content Week 15: April 15 to April 21, 2013

POSTER CONTENT Personnel When planning a workspace, it is important to first take into consideration of several factors. In terms of the number of people working in the team, business model, creative works and the work process, etc. Try to configure your workspace to make it as efficient as possible in order to support your design process and aid in establishing your studio culture. Studio Type The few common studio types are shophouse, industrial estate, private landed property and terrace house. For big organisations, warehouse is a much preferred choice. Its spacious and open space provides opportunities for creatives to collaborate. The open space supports spontaneous communication which makes work become more efficient, as designers are encouraged to speak out and discuss ideas freely. If you are working alone, you can chose to work from home instead. Working from home has it perks, such as having the maximum freedom to configure your workspace and saving on high rental cost. Just ensure that your workspace is set up in a conducive manner which distinctly separate you from work and leisure. This helps to reduce distractions when working. Studio Location Try to find a studio that is near to your house. That way, you can save on your time and money in travelling. Having a studio in the central area has its many benefits, such as the accessibility and convenience of public transport and food choices. However such popular locations’ drawback is the high studio rental. Hence, when choosing a studio location, one had to foremost weigh the pros and cons of the studio features. Studio Space There are several things to take note in choosing your studio space. Here’s a checklist to help you.

- Seek for a studio that is located in a quaint neighbour hood. Quiet yet not disconnected from the city. - Get a studio space that has windows. Natural lighting is good to have in design studios as it creates a positive energy. Plus you can save on electric bills too! - Seek for a studio that has big walls for you to pin up works. It is an important design process which help you to spot mistakes with ease. It is also helpful to gather feedbacks from others for further revisions. - Get an open space with no divided walls or door so as to better support communication among team. Workspace Set-up It is every designers’ dream to own a workspace that provides a conducive and inspiring environment for them; where they can work comfortably without getting distracted. There is no fixed formula but here are 4 types of creative workspace set-up to give you an idea. They are categorised as workspace for Personalisation, Comfort, Communication and Efficacy. Set-up for personalisation is highly related to creativity and has found to express one’s personality and uniqueness. Workspace personalisation is common among creatives who work alone mostly such as illustrators. Set-up that support communication usually have designers working in an open plan area with no segregation of spaces. Designers are sat together with tables arranged in a linear manner; where line of sight is maintained among the team. Set-up for comfort helps to build the team into a family, that aids the openness and peacefulness required for collaborative methods. When a workspace is comfortable and functional, it make designers feel happy and motivated to work. Set-up for efficacy reflects of one organisation’s design beliefs and values. It helps in establishing the organisational culture of a particular design house.

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REALISATION

CONTENT IN A FLOW CHART

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REALISATION

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REALISATION

Poster Design Week 15: April 15 to April 21, 2013

SKETCHES Drawing up sketches of how the poster will look and when folded. I decided to do double side, with 1 side thanking the contributors to my project, the other is the ideas in creating the ideal workspace.

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REALISATION

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REALISATION

Poster / Direct Mailer Week 15: April 15 to April 21, 2013

FOLDING I decided to do A2 size poster double side, folded in 3 folds. So its closed size would by 14 cm (W) by 20cm (H).

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REALISATION

PACKAGING I intended to mail the poster out as a direct mailer to personally thank the contributors to my Wonderful project. Hence I came up with ideas to package the poster so it looks more complete. I decided to adopt the idea of clipboard using wood material with the logo Wonderful embossed in it. That way, the packaging is still functional and contributors can keep and use.

193


REALISATION (WEEK 15: FOLDER & ILLUSTRATION


REALISATION

Document Folder Week 15: April 15 to April 21, 2013

FOLDER DESIGN I came up with the folder design to sort out the interviewed design house accordingly to 4 different catergories of workspace set-up. Each folder has a colour that is as seen in the book design.

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REALISATION

Illustration Week 15: April 15 to April 21, 2013

MY IDEAL WORKSPACE After much discussions with my lecturers, we all felt that it would be awesome If I can come up with own ideal workspace since I have gathered so much information about workspace. All the ideas and suggestions about creating a creative and efficient workspace. Rather than doing the actual real workspace up (which I hope to do in the future when I get real available space of my own), I decided to illustrate it. Which is an important step in all workspace planning.

197


VISUALISATION (WEEK 16)


VISUALISATION

Curation for Assessment Week 16: April 22 to April 28, 2013

FINAL DELIVERABLES 1. EDITORIAL BOOK

3. ILLUSTRATION

The book will be documenting wonderful workspaces of design creatives, both established and emerging, from different parts of the world. The purpose of this book is to inspire, through beautiful imaginary and in-depth interviews, young designers in taking pride of their workspaces. The book also includes an interpretation of workspace, ideas on setting up a supportive workspace and advices reveal from the professional design creatives.

My interpretation of an ideal workspace which acts like a form of workspace planning as well. With all the useful information gathered by the research and interviews, it is my respond to the project.

2. POSTER / DIRECT MAILER The ideas in creating your ideal workspace is presented in the medium of a poster which can also be folded to become a direct mailer. This way, the poster can reach out to more intended target audience and help to acts as a self-promo. It will create an awareness among target audience through the possible suggestions theories and beliefs in a workspace set-up. If designers like the poster, they can keep it and paste it on their wall or workspace. In a way, it help them as well as they can always refer to it as and when for designers are very visual creatures.

4. FACEBOOK PAGE A digital platform to keep people interested with the projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s updates. It will include: photos of workspace (interior decor I found online or the ones that I have taken, related stories of workspace design, studio culture reflected through the collection of little things in studio.

5. WEBSITE The website contains photos of various design studios categorised by different tags. It is a medium that can tie all the project deliverables together and enables to reach out to a bigger crowd of target audience because of it accessibility.

200


VISUALISATION

CURATION Planning how to lay out my deliverables for the assesment.

201


DELIVERABLES (WEEK 17)


REALISATION

Deliverable 1: Wonderful Book Week 17: April 29 to May 05, 2013

WONDERFUL BOOK

205


REALISATION

206


REALISATION

Deliverable 2: Poster / Direct Mailer Week 17: April 29 to May 05, 2013

FONT

207


REALISATION

BACK

208


REALISATION

Deliverable 3: Illustration Week 17: April 29 to May 05, 2013

JOOEY IDEAL WORKSPACE

209


REALISATION

Deliverable 4: Facebook Page Week 17: April 29 to May 05, 2013

210


REALISATION

Deliverable 5: Website Week 17: April 29 to May 05, 2013

WWW.WONDERFULSPACE.NET

211


REALISATION

212


REALISATION

WWW.WONDERFULSPACE.NET

213


REALISATION

214


1

OH NO! BRAINSTORM FOR IDEAS

No ideaa...

TO GAIN INSPIRATIONS

READ BOOKS

WATCH TV

REALISATION

WEEK 02

To come up with a list of potential issues to work on

INSPIRATION STRIKES!

MINDMAP THINGS THAT I LIKE

TAKE A NAP

WEEK 04 To understand the environmental psychological effects of workspace

Best chance to go out and observe the surroundings

Revised Process Chart DESIGN ISSUES

SOCIAL ISSUES

Choose 2 Design Issues

“A home sweet home is not curated or produced by acquiring a perfect arrangement of chairs, lamps and friends. A real living space is made from living, not decorating. A bored materialist can’t understand that a house has to become a home. It happens, not through perfection but by participation.”

To develop on both topics, defining the area of study

DESIGN ISSUE #1 Week 17: April 29 to May 05, 2013

Prepare interview questions for surveys

DESIGN ISSUE #2

READ ON BOOK “WHERE THEY CREATE”

YOUR ROOM = YOUR PERSONALITY

MOMENTS OF DISTRACTIONS

AREA OF STUDY AREA OF STUDY

ANDY & ELSA BEACH APARTAMENTO ISSUE #07

Change direction to

WORKSPACE PERSONALISATION

COLLECTING THINGS

CONSULATION WITH YASSER

To find out the specific problems that students faced when working in school

Ground research on school studio - H503

CLOSER LOOK

SURVEYS

IT’S OK!

To produce design responds for studio

C

WEEK 06

Yasser: “Lack of analytical skills.”

TIME TO CATCH UP ON CPJ!

Compiled research into a booklet

CASE STUDY

JUST LEARN TO ANALYSE

FEEDBACK “It was quite an experience for us.”

Conceptualise on chosen topic

Presentation of chosen topic Space ‘Bound’

WEEK 08

WEEK 10

CREATIVE PROCESS CHART “Impressive presentation.”

384

FEEDBACK

PRESENTATION

31

DESIGN ISSUE #2

Refine Design Research Proposal

SPACE ‘BOUND’

SURVEYS

A The Miner And A Major Brooklyn

START

1

MORE READINGS

To better suport my Deisgn Hypothesis

Van Bo Le-mentzel: One Sqm House

BRAINSTORM FOR IDEAS

Yi-Cong Lu: Wohnwerkzeuge (Living Tools)

Easier to conceptualise for design outcomes

TO GAIN INSPIRATIONS

READ BOOKS

WATCH TV

WEEK 12

TAKE A NAP

WEEK 02

PROJECT OVERVIEW

INFOGRAPHICS A POSTER THAT REFLECTS MY RESEARCH TO BETTER SUPPORT MY DESIGN ISSUE

A POSTER THAT GIVES A SUMMARY OF MY PROJECT DESIGN ISSUES & BRAND GUIDELINES Choose 2 Design Issues

WEEK 04

SOCIAL ISSUES

C

WEEK 13

DESIGN HYPOTHESIS COLLABORATIVE PARTICIPATION

Prepare interview questions for surveys

NEW DESIGNDESIGN ISSUE #2 HYPOTHESIS IS BORN YOUR ROOM = YOUR PERSONALITY

DESIGN ISSUE #1

MOMENTS OF DISTRACTIONS

READ ON BOOK “WHERE THEY CREATE” FEEDBACK

OH NO! INTERVIEWS WITH DESIGNERS

ANDY & ELSA BEACH APARTAMENTO ISSUE #07

AREA OF STUDY

MORE READINGS

Yasser: “Please rationalize

WORKSPACE your brand with clarity” PERSONALISATION CASE STUDY

A NEW DESIGN HYPOTHESIS IS NEEDED

To find out the specific problems that students faced when working in school

SURVEYS

A SERIES OF PUBLICATIONS, DOCUMENTING THE WORKSPACES OF DESIGNERS

JUST LEARN TO ANALYSE

To produce design responds for studio

BUSY UPDATING CPJ!

SEMESTER 1 STUDIO ASSESSMENT

WEEK 06

Yasser: “Lack of analytical skills.”

TIME TO CATCH UP ON CPJ!

Compiled research into a booklet

Ground research on school studio - H503

WEEK 15

PUBLICATIONS

A CHART THAT TELLS THE IT’S OK! PLAN OF MY PROCESS TO ACHIEVING MY OUTCOMES

AREA OF STUDY

Change direction to

COLLECTING THINGS

CONSULATION WITH YASSER

PROCESS CHART

To understand the environmental psychological effects of workspace

Best chance Ready for theto go out and observe the surroundings next challenge after a good rest

To develop on both topics, defining the area of study

ESSAY WRITING

VISUAL RESEARCH

STUDIO SEM 1 DELIVERABLES

CREATED MY BRAND VALUES

MINDMAP THINGS THAT I LIKE

TAKE A NAP

W.I.P SHOW

“A home sweet home is not curated or produced by acquiring a perfect arrangement of chairs, lamps and friends. A real living space is made PLAN STUDIO from living, not decorating. A DELIVERABLES bored materialist can’t understand FOR SEM that a1 house has to become a home. It happens, not through perfection but by participation.”

FEEDBACK “It was quite an experience for us.”

ER

2

No ideaa...

To come up with a list of potential issues to work on

A CHART THAT TELLS THE PLAN OF MY PROCESS TO ACHIEVING MY OUTCOMES

After endless nights of working on my Studio Outcomes, they are finally completed

VISUAL RESEARCH

WEEK 11

OH NO!

CASE STUDY

W.I.P DELIVERABLES

READ ON BOOK: “HUMANISING BRANDS THROUGH EMOTIONAL DESIGN” BY MARC GOBÉ.

thoughts process

To work on the outcomes for W.I.P. Show

INSPIRATION STRIKES! PROCESS CHART

C

READ ON BOOK: “DEVELOPING QUESTIONNAIRS” BY BILL GILLHAMMy regular creative

PLAN DELIVERABLES FOR SEM 1 & SEM 2

SEMESTER

“I am very convinced by your topic. Looking forward to your studio outcomes.”

To master how to draft interview questions

Confirm on the area of study

Understanding my topic better

“Extend on your design hypothesis.”

2nd round of survey with refined interview questions

Conceptualise on chosen topic

HOLIDAYS

OK!

WEEK 02

RESPONSE WERE POSITIVE

USER-TESTING

To gather more research for the project, more interviews were conducted over the holidays.

WEEK 08

CarriedDESIGN out amongISSUE 4 groups: #2 1. NTU (Arts Design Media) students 2. YoungSPACE working‘BOUND’ designers 3. Lasalle seniors 4. Existing Lasalle students

Think of a voice that my project is heading to

WEEK 03 - 09

EDITORIAL

VERY BUSY WRITING ESSAY

UDIO SEM 2 LIVERABLES

DESIGNED TO SHARE IDEAS: SUGGESTIONS, THEORIES AND BELIEFS TO HELP CREATIVES IN CREATING THEIR IDEAL WORKSPACE

MORE READINGS

WORKING REALLY HARD FOR STUDIO

SURVEYS

The Miner ILLUSTRATION And A Major Brooklyn A RESPONSE TO MY PROJECT, WHERE I ILLUSTRATE THE IDEAL WORKSPACE OF MINE Van Bo Le-mentzel: One Sqm House

“Extend on your design hypothesis.”

“I am very convinced by your topic. Looking forward to your studio outcomes.”

Change my project name to Wonderful. It sounded genuine and positive which reflects my project brand values.

To master how to draft interview questions

Confirm on the area of study

POSTER/DIRECT MAILER

“Impressive presentation.”

WEEK 10 -16 FEEDBACK

2nd round of survey with refined interview questions NEW STRATEGY

PLAN DELIVERABLES FOR SEM 1 & SEM 2

A BOOK THAT FEATURES ALL RESPECTIVE 16 INTERVIEWED DESIGN CREATIVES FROM VARIOUS DESIGN HOUSE

WEEK 10

OMG!

PRESENTATION

“I like the photos. ”

Refine Design Research Proposal

“The very nature of the editorial provides a very personal and intimate look”

Understanding my topic better

Presentation of chosen topic Space ‘Bound’

To better suport WEBSITE my Deisgn Hypothesis

WEEK 17

READ ON BOOK: “DEVELOPING QUESTIONNAIRS” BY BILL GILLHAM FACEBOOK PAGE

A DIGITAL PLATFORM THAT TIES ALL THE PRINTED OUTCOMES TOGETHER. ITS ACCESSIBILITY HELPS TO REACH To work on the outcomes OUT Show TO MORE YOUNG CREATIVES for W.I.P.

REGULAR UPDATES OF MY PROJECT AND ARTICLES / TOPICS RELEVANT TO WORKSPACE & STUDIO CULTURE

READ ON BOOK: “HUMANISING FINAL FINAL BRANDS THROUGH EMOTIONAL ASSESSMENT DESIGN” BY MARC GOBÉ. THE IMPORTANT DAY HAS COME!

VISUAL RESEARCH

WEEK 11

CREATED MY BRAND VALUES

CASE STUDY Yi-Cong Lu: Wohnwerkzeuge (Living Tools)

Easier to conceptualise for design outcomes

WEEK 12

TAKE A NAP

W.I.P SHOW

W.I.P DELIVERABLES C

PROCESS CHART

PROJECT OVERVIEW

INFOGRAPHICS

A CHART THAT TELLS THE PLAN OF MY PROCESS TO ACHIEVING MY OUTCOMES

A POSTER THAT GIVES A SUMMARY OF MY PROJECT & BRAND GUIDELINES

A POSTER THAT REFLECTS MY RESEARCH TO BETTER SUPPORT MY DESIGN ISSUE

215

WEEK 13

DESIGN HYPOTHESIS

After endless

PLAN STUDIO DELIVERABLES

ESSAY WRITING

COLLABORATIVE PARTICIPATION

Ready for the next challenge after a good rest

NEW DESIGN HYPOTHESIS


REALISATION

CREATIVE PROCESS CHART 384

31

A

B My regular creative thoughts process

START

SEMESTER

1

OH NO! BRAINSTORM FOR IDEAS

No ideaa...

INSPIRATION STRIKES!

MINDMAP THINGS THAT I LIKE

TAKE A NAP

TO GAIN INSPIRATIONS

READ BOOKS

WATCH TV

WEEK 04

WEEK 02

To come up with a list of potential issues to work on

To understand the environmental psychological effects of workspace

Best chance to go out and observe the surroundings

DESIGN ISSUES

SOCIAL ISSUES

Choose 2 Design Issues

“A home sweet home is not curated or produced by acquiring a perfect arrangement of chairs, lamps and friends. A real living space is made from living, not decorating. A bored materialist can’t understand that a house has to become a home. It happens, not through perfection but by participation.”

To develop on both topics, defining the area of study

DESIGN ISSUE #1

DESIGN ISSUE #2

MOMENTS OF DISTRACTIONS

YOUR ROOM = YOUR PERSONALITY

Prepare interview questions for surveys

READ ON BOOK “WHERE THEY CREATE”

AREA OF STUDY AREA OF STUDY

ANDY & ELSA BEACH APARTAMENTO ISSUE #07

Change direction to

WORKSPACE PERSONALISATION

COLLECTING THINGS

CONSULATION WITH YASSER

To find out the specific problems that students faced when working in school

SURVEYS

IT’S OK!

C

To produce design responds for studio

C

WEEK 06

Yasser: “Lack of analytical skills.”

TIME TO CATCH UP ON CPJ!

Compiled research into a booklet

CASE STUDY

Ground research on school studio - H503

JUST LEARN TO ANALYSE

FEEDBACK “It was quite an experience for us.”

Conceptualise on chosen topic

Presentation of chosen topic Space ‘Bound’

WEEK 08

WEEK 10

“Impressive presentation.”

FEEDBACK

PRESENTATION DESIGN ISSUE #2

Refine Design Research Proposal

SPACE ‘BOUND’

2nd round of survey with refined interview questions

SURVEYS

READ ON BOOK: “DEVELOPING QUESTIONNAIRS” BY BILL GILLHAM

PLAN DELIVERABLES FOR SEM 1 & SEM 2 The Miner And A Major Brooklyn

MORE READINGS

“I am very convinced by your topic. Looking forward to your studio outcomes.”

To master how to draft interview questions

Confirm on the area of study

Understanding my topic better

“Extend on your design hypothesis.”

To better suport my Deisgn Hypothesis

Van Bo Le-mentzel: One Sqm House

To work on the outcomes for W.I.P. Show

Yi-Cong Lu: Wohnwerkzeuge (Living Tools)

Easier to conceptualise for design outcomes

READ ON BOOK: “HUMANISING BRANDS THROUGH EMOTIONAL DESIGN” BY MARC GOBÉ.

VISUAL RESEARCH

WEEK 11 CREATED MY BRAND VALUES

CASE STUDY

WEEK 12

TAKE A NAP

W.I.P SHOW

W.I.P DELIVERABLES C

PROCESS CHART

PROJECT OVERVIEW

INFOGRAPHICS

A CHART THAT TELLS THE PLAN OF MY PROCESS TO ACHIEVING MY OUTCOMES

A POSTER THAT GIVES A SUMMARY OF MY PROJECT & BRAND GUIDELINES

A POSTER THAT REFLECTS MY RESEARCH TO BETTER SUPPORT MY DESIGN ISSUE

Ready for the next challenge after a good rest C

WEEK 13

DESIGN HYPOTHESIS PLAN STUDIO DELIVERABLES FOR SEM 1

After endless nights of working on my Studio Outcomes, they are finally completed

COLLABORATIVE PARTICIPATION

ESSAY WRITING

NEW DESIGN HYPOTHESIS IS BORN FEEDBACK

OH NO! VISUAL RESEARCH

STUDIO SEM 1 DELIVERABLES

INTERVIEWS WITH DESIGNERS

MORE READINGS

Yasser: “Please rationalize your brand with clarity”

A NEW DESIGN HYPOTHESIS IS NEEDED

PROCESS CHART

PUBLICATIONS

WEEK 15

A CHART THAT TELLS THE PLAN OF MY PROCESS TO ACHIEVING MY OUTCOMES

A SERIES OF PUBLICATIONS, DOCUMENTING THE WORKSPACES OF DESIGNERS

SEMESTER 1 STUDIO ASSESSMENT

BUSY UPDATING CPJ!

WEEK 03 - 09

WEEK 10 -16

OMG!

SEMESTER

2

HOLIDAYS To gather more research for the project, more interviews were conducted over the holidays.

WEEK 02 USER-TESTING Carried out among 4 groups: 1. NTU (Arts Design Media) students 2. Young working designers 3. Lasalle seniors 4. Existing Lasalle students

OK! RESPONSE WERE POSITIVE

Think of a voice that my project is heading to

WORKING REALLY HARD FOR STUDIO

“I like the photos. ”

“The very nature of the editorial provides a very personal and intimate look”

VERY BUSY WRITING ESSAY

NEW STRATEGY Change my project name to Wonderful. It sounded genuine and positive which reflects my project brand values.

WEEK 17

EDITORIAL STUDIO SEM 2 DELIVERABLES

A BOOK THAT FEATURES ALL RESPECTIVE 16 INTERVIEWED DESIGN CREATIVES FROM VARIOUS DESIGN HOUSE

POSTER/DIRECT MAILER

ILLUSTRATION

WEBSITE

FACEBOOK PAGE

DESIGNED TO SHARE IDEAS: SUGGESTIONS, THEORIES AND BELIEFS TO HELP CREATIVES IN CREATING THEIR IDEAL WORKSPACE

A RESPONSE TO MY PROJECT, WHERE I ILLUSTRATE THE IDEAL WORKSPACE OF MINE

A DIGITAL PLATFORM THAT TIES ALL THE PRINTED OUTCOMES TOGETHER. ITS ACCESSIBILITY HELPS TO REACH OUT TO MORE YOUNG CREATIVES

REGULAR UPDATES OF MY PROJECT AND ARTICLES / TOPICS RELEVANT TO WORKSPACE & STUDIO CULTURE

216

FINAL FINAL ASSESSMENT THE IMPORTANT DAY HAS COME!


REFERENCES (WEEK 01 - WEEK 17)


EXTRAS

References List Week 01-17: January 07 to May 05, 2013

WEBSITES Roots, 2012. Where Roots Are. [online] Available at: <http://www.whererootsare.com/> [Accessed 06 Jan 2013]. Beautiful, 2012. A Beautiful Design. [online] Available at: <http://www.abeautifuldesign.com.sg/> [Accessed 06 Jan 2013]. The Press Room, n.d. The Press Room. [online] Available at: <http://www.thepressroom.com.sg> [Accessed 06 Jan 2013]. Relay Room, n.d. Relay Room. [online] Available at: <http://www.relayroom.com/> [Accessed 06 Jan 2013]. Kawakong, 1999. Kawakong. [online] Available at: <http://www.kawakong.com/> [Accessed 06 Jan 2013]. Acre, n.d. Acre. [online] Available at: <http://www.acre.sg/> [Accessed 06 Jan 2013]. Bravo Company, 2012. Bravo Company. [online] Available at: <http://bravo-company.info/> [Accessed 06 Jan 2013]. Somewhere Else, n.d. Somewhere Else. [online] Available at: <http://www.somewhere-else.info/> [Accessed 06 Jan 2013]. Lie, 2012. We are not lie [online] Available at: <www.wearenotlie.com> [Accessed 06 Jan 2013]. Tofu, 2011. Tofu. [online] Available at: <http://tofu.com.sg> [Accessed 06 Jan 2013]. Splash, n.d. Splash. [online] Available at: <http://www.splash.sg/> [Accessed 06 Jan 2013]. Farm, n.d. Farm. [online] Available at: <http://www.farm.sg/> [Accessed 06 Jan 2013]. H Fifty Five, 1999. H55 Studio. [online] Available at: <http://www.h55studio.com/> [Accessed 06 Jan 2013]. Bartle Bogle Hegarty, n.d. Bartle Bogle Hegarty. [online] Available at: <www.bartleboglehegarty.com> [Accessed 06 Jan 2013]. Hische, J., n.d. Jessica Hische. [online] Available at: <http://www.jessicahische.is/> [Accessed 06 Jan 2013]. Tan, A., 2012. Drewscape. [online] Available at: <http://www.drewscape.net/> [Accessed 06 Jan 2013]. Greig, J., 2012. Cyclelove. [online] Available at: <http://www.cyclelove.net/> [Accessed 27 Jan 2013]. Cereal Magazine, 2013. Cereal Magazine. [online] Available at: <http://readcereal.com/> [Accessed 27 Jan 2013]. Kinfolk, 2013. Kinfolk. [online] Available at: <http://www.kinfolkmag.com/> [Accessed 27 Jan 2013]. Underscore, 2013. Underscore. [online] Available at: <http://www.underscoremagazine.com/> [Accessed 27 Jan 2013].

219


EXTRAS

It’s Nice That, 2013. It’s Nice That. [online] Available at: <http://www.itsnicethat.com/> [Accessed 30 Jan 2013]. Offscreen, 2013. Offscreen Magazine. [online] Available at: <http://blog.offscreenmag.com/post/43105497701/ourdesktop-series-features-5-inspiring> [Accessed 30 Jan 2013]. W3Schools, 1999. HTML Meta Tag. [online] Available at: <http://www.w3schools.com/tags/tag_meta.asp> [Accessed 17 Feb 2013]. W3Schools. 1999. PHP and AJAX Live Search. [online] Available at: <http://elearning-rpl.smkn5solo.net/tutorial/ www/www.w3schools.com/php/php_ajax_livesearch.asp.htm> [Accessed 17 Feb 2013]. THIS IS Studio, 2013. THIS IS Studio. [online] Available at: <http://thisisstudio.co.uk/project/greenpeace/> [Accessed 17 Feb 2013]. Pinterest, 2013. Home & Working spaces. [online] Available at: <http://pinterest.com/mrcup/home-workingspaces/> [Accessed 10 March 2013]. Bläck & Co Reklambyrå, 2013. Black.Se. [online] Available at: <http://www.black.se/> [Accessed 18 March 2013]. The Lego Group, 2013. Piece of Peace. [online] Available at: <http://www.pofp.jp/> [Accessed 18 March 2013]. Empower yourself with color psychology, 2009. Color Psychology to Empower and Inspire You. [online] Available at: <http://www.empower-yourself-with-color-psychology.com/> [Accessed 01 April 2013]. ArchDaily, 2013. The Japanese House / Konishi Gaffney Architects. [online] Available at: <http://www.empoweryourself-with-color-psychology.com/> [Accessed 07 April 2013]. September Industry, 2012. SI Special: North x Fourth Corner Shop. [online] Available at: <http://www. septemberindustry.co.uk/north-fourth-floor-corner-shop/> [Accessed 07 April 2013].

VIDEO Bloomberg TV, n.d. Google: Create an Office People Never Want To Leave. [video online] Available at: <http://www. bloomberg.com/video/how-to-create-an-office-people-never-want-to-leave-BunWtu_hRIKIPyXcDR5AhQ.html> [Accessed 07 April 2013].

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Wonderful_CPJ Sem 2  

A creative process journal of semester two, born to capture the process and insights of my project: Wonderful.

Wonderful_CPJ Sem 2  

A creative process journal of semester two, born to capture the process and insights of my project: Wonderful.

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