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Week 01 - Week 17 The Creative Process Journal

THIS IS THE CREATIVE PROCESS JOURNAL OF SEMESTER ONE, BORN TO CAPTURE THE PROCESS AND INSIGHTS OF MY PROJECT - WONDERFUL.


First published and distributed by

Designed & edited by Jooey Lek Copyright Š 2013 Jooey Lek The copyright on the individual text and design work is held by the respective designer and contributors. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in retrieval systems or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage or retrieval system, without permission in writing from the copyright owner(s). All contributions are based on a subjective selection of interviews from various design house and studios featured in this book and other source of journals and publications. Printed and bound in Singapore


OVERVIEW

Overview Week 01-17: August 06 to December 02, 2012

RESEARCH Initial / Brainstorm Key Findings Artist Philosophy / Concept* The Idea / Intent

CONCEPTUALISATION Chosen Idea Research question Strategy Research Methodology Chosen strategy

VISUALISATION Research Methodology* Emotional drivers* Visual Intent (Art direction) Visual Research Sketches/ Ideas Finalised Art Direction

REALISATION Planning/ Execution Refinements Final Product Portfolio shoot

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RESEARCH (JULY HOLIDAYS)


RESEARCH

Prologue Prologue: July Holidays, 2012

THE BEGINNING Over the holidays, I watched many US and British dramas that revolved around the plots of investigation, psychology and thrill. Some of my favourites are Sherlock Homes (from BBC), Lie to me and Hustle. These dramas engaged with the viewers intellectually and always have a surprise twist at the end. Also, I went to read on books that interest me such as MUJI. I have always been inquisitive about MUJI’s brand values and mission. Being one of my favourite store, MUJI has an absolutely fantastic products and I love shopping there. Their brand concept and philosophy - improving the quality of living, very much reflects my aspirations in life. So during the holiday, I took my chance in relaxing to the fullest. Continue to doing things I very much loved and enjoyed. While doing so, I began to brainstorm and list down any ideas that pops into my mind. Some of them could be very random.

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RESEARCH

MINDMAP

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RESEARCH

Initial Brainstorm Prologue: July Holidays, 2012

IDEAS LIST 1

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RESEARCH

IDEAS LIST 2

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EVALUATION (WEEK 01 - WEEK 02)


EVALUATION

Consultation Week 01: August 06, 2012

Design Issue #2: How branding increased the perceived value of a product

I had my very first consultation with my Design Research Method (DRM) lecturer, Yasser today. He went through with every one of us, listening to our brief discussion of any possible ideas that has crossed our mind over the holidays. I shared with him my very first two initial design issue.

Background of problem: Clients are unwilling to spend on design in terms of branding. Rather they will be glad to spurge on other marketing strategies in terms of time and money. They do not understand and see the need of branding their business. The clients think it is a waste of their company’s budget. In results, more and more awful designs surfaced in the market. Moreover, the lack of understanding create a difficult working relationship between the clients and designers.

Design Issue #1: The designer’s pursuit of a balanced lifestyle Background of problem: It becomes a formality that designers here have to work overtime (OT) almost every single day. This is not a necessary routine and such may have been caused by the company’s poor management. In results, designers get burned out soon and suffered from an unhealthy lifestyle. This will affect their creative process and eventually reduce their productivity. Moreover, the designers will neglect their family and be unhappy and thus losing their drive in design. Hence, many designers switched career path after a few years working in the design industry.

Intent: To educate future potential clients and the public of the importance of branding and it’s great effects on the society. Suggestions Yasser suggested me to look into the area of consumerism and its behaviour so I can have a better understanding of branding.

Intent: To encourage a balanced lifestyle and pursue a better quality of living. To improvise Singapore working culture, a more “work hard and play hard” atmosphere.

• What the brand translate? • What is the status of brand? • Perception of brand • How consumer react to branding and purchase something to represent them in the current society.

Suggestions It is a dream everybody wish to pursue but it can never happen in real life. Maybe only in a perfect world. Thus Yasser asked me to look into a bigger picture which generate bigger story. Such as how imbalance lifestyle caused health hazard.

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EVALUATION

Afterthought Week 01: August 12, 2012

Rule No. 1: Always ask your professor/ lecturer when in doubts. Ask many questions till you find your answer. They are here to help and guide you on your FYP.

These long holidays - National Day is nothing but stress. I borrowed many books from topics related to Branding, Consumer Behaviour, Happiness and Design Thinking. The more I read, the greater amount of facts/ knowledge is collected. However, this only make me sink deeper into a pit of confusion as I forget to question myself what is the issue here. What issue can I come up with after reading these borrowed books, beside just plain facts. The issues around us. It is probably time for me to start paying more attention to the environment. Perhaps by doing so, I may have better clue to what I want to do for my FYP (Final Year Project).

Rule No. 2: If you cannot provide question to constantly remind yourself of the issue you are researching on, stop. Try to think it simple! Don’t over think a complicated issue. This forces me to stop reading and start thinking! Thinking hard but simple on the possible design issues. Issue that can be solved or create awareness through design. Issue that are direct.

“Think Simple” my boyfriend said. I was discussing with him about my concerns towards FYP last night. The fact that I am insanely lost and pretty clueless on what possible design topics I can or want to work on. He gave me many design advice of course, being a design student himself (from ADM), he understands my situation very well.

First, I shall go online and try to google and understand how does one approach FYP. Then I shall look through previous LASALLE and ADM students’ FYP, taking references in hope that I have a better understanding in churning out design issues. Cross my fingers.

*On a side note: The main objective of FYP is to arrive at a clearly defined design project proposal, supported by a well-articulated concept statement and thorough research that will inform the design process in the following term. Students often get lost in the literature forgetting the objective of the research and postponing the fact that they have a design project to ‘think’ about till the second term. FYP is actually the time to think of the project and form a clear idea of what it is. Extracted from American University of Beirut - Department of Architecture & Design

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EVALUATION

Consultation Week 02: August 13, 2012

DRM CONSULTATION Over this course of week 2, I was swamped with many new challenges. My initial design issue-Consumerism, seems boring to me and I could not find any relevant issue from that topic despite after so many readings. Perhaps I am not reading enough. Or that is simply not where my interest lies in. So I tried to come out with other issues to use as an alternative for the upcoming consultation. One example was the issue on the current society obsession with plastic surgery. After Tuesday consultation with Yasser for DRM I realize that it is futile to continue working on my initial proposed topics as they seems predictable. Moreover, there is no definite objective in both topics of Consumerism & Plastic Surgery. The topic of plastic surgery may seem flat and short-lived. Thus, I decided to start from stretch since I have the “luxury� of doing so according to the scheduled timeline. Over the span of two days, I went to start on another round of research to brainstorming for new issues. I did anything that I could to gain inspirations, from watching many videos of different seminar talks to reading design articles and observing my surroundings waiting to discover any potential social issues that needs to be addressed.

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RESEARCH

Initial Research & Brainstorm Week 02: August 13 to August 19, 2012

MINDMAP In order to develop more ideas, I drew out a new mindmap based on things which interest me. Some of my favourite topics include food photography, wedding stationary, home decor, movies, sitcom, humour and MUJI. Based on these subjects, I did a new round of research though more readings, videos-watching and observational trips. Finally, a new list of issues is born.

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RESEARCH

Design Issue List Week 02: August 15, 2012

SOCIAL ISSUES

DESIGN ISSUES

- Observation of our surroundings - Any direct problem needs to be resolved?

- Exploration/ Experimentation of something - Design Hypothesis

1. Obsession of Plastic Surgery - Linking self image/ self-concept to plastic surgery -The propaganda of consumerism & media manipulation on beauty

1. Does colours help people associate logo better? http://brandseenapp.com/ 2. Using your brain to visualize the scene you are in through sounds Eg. Virtual Barber Shop http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IUDTlvagjJA

2. Making people motivated to wake up early - Hard to wake up early & start our day? - Design methods to perk people mood

3. Emotional Functionality

3. Foreign Students’ Living Condition Home - Not comfortable, messy

4. Do we actually think beauty, or do we feel it? http://www.ted.com/talks/richard_seymour_how _beauty_feels.html

4. Personal Experience dining in restaurants/cafe - The thoughtful design of a restaurant that makes the diner enjoy his/her meal

5. Your living space reflects your personality or the quality of your life?

5. The Power of Nap http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_ embedded&v=fIPhb1W3DkM

6. The state of your room = the state of your mind. - Does our inner world reflects our outer world or vice versa? -Why do we feel better psychologically in uncluttered settings? - How does our surroundings play a role in enhancing or deteriorating our mental state? Refer to mag: Apartemento Apartamento is a magazine about homes, living spaces and design solutions as opposed to houses, photo ops and design dictatorships. It understands interior design as a means of personal expression, showing how people arrange their homes and the solutions they find to the same problems that everyone has. http://onlyoublog.wordpress.com/2010/10/30/the-stateof-your-room-reflects-the-state-of-your-mind/ 7. Fear of judgment Which may affects our creative confidence http://www.ted.com/talks/david_kelley_how_to_build_ your_creative_confidence.html

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RESEARCH

8. Intangible happiness can be measured? HAPPINESS = WANTING WHAT YOU HAVE / HAVING WHAT YOU WANT http://www.ted.com/talks/chip_conley_measuring_ what_makes_life_worthwhile.html

12. Power of emotion If you ever doubt the power of graphic design, this is a very generic sign that literally says, “Vote for Hitler.” It says nothing else. And this to me is an extreme case of the power of emotion, of graphic design, even though, in fact, was a very generic poster at the time.

9. Failure is fun The importance of imagination http://harvardmagazine.com/2008/06/the-fringebenefits-failure-the-importance-imagination

13. What fear and anxiety does; it causes you to be to focus, not be distracted (a.k.a Depth-First Processing) Refer to Paul Saffo

10. Good Design makes you happy = Happy makes good design

14. Intuition solved problems “The intellect has little to do on the road to discovery. There comes a leap in consciousness -- call it intuition or what you will -- and the solution just comes to you, and you don’t know from where or why.” So, it’s kind of like when somebody says, Who did that song? And the more you try to think about it, the further the answer gets from you, and the minute you stop thinking about it, your intuition gives you that answer, in a sense.

Part 1: Good Design makes you happy - Making things kind of neat & fun = happy - Consumer’s standpoint Part 2: Happy makes good design - Happy helps in your creativity thinking - Designer’s standpoint

15. Don’t mistake legibility for communication I like this for a couple of reasons. If you’ve had any design courses, they would teach you that you can’t read this. I think you eventually can and, more importantly, I think it’s true.

Refer to Don Norman http://www.ted.com/talks/don_norman_on_design_ and_emotion.html http://www.ted.com/speakers/don_norman.html Refer to Stefan Sagmeister http://www.ted.com/talks/stefan_sagmeister_shares_ happy_design.html

“Don’t mistake legibility for communication.” Just because something’s legible doesn’t means it communicates. More importantly, it doesn’t mean it communicates the right thing. So, what is the message sent before somebody actually gets into the material? And I think that’s sometimes an overlooked area.

11. Emotion & Design http://www.ted.com/talks/don_norman_on_design_ and_emotion.html

16. Visual interpretation of the music Refer to David Carson http://www.ted.com/talks/david_carson_on_design.html

Refer to Don Norman http://www.ted.com/speakers/don_norman.html

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EVALUATION

Consultation Week 02: August 16, 2012

Then, I moved on to select the 2 best issues which I feel strongly about.

Afterwards, I presented these 2 issues with Yasser again (for my studio class) and he was pleased with my new proposed design issues. In case you wondering, Yasser is my supervised lecturer for both my DRM and Studio class. He give me the thumbs up to research more on both issues. Awesome.

Design Issue #1: Moments of Distraction (Still working on the title/design hypothesis) Intent: To distract people away from the mundane and worries as seen evident in our current society. Singapore being a cosmopolitan city caused people to lead a fast paced and stressful lifestyle.

So I begin working on the plan of my design process before gathering any research. This is an extremely essential step as it helps to keep your field of study focused so as to avoid getting lost through the research process stage. It is also important to plan the work in advance, including a rough schedule identifying when the designer expects to undertake each experiment, and the proposed deadline for finishing the project. Once this plan has been set, it is time for me to start on my research and visual developments.

Design Issue #2: Your Room = Your Personality (Still working on the title/design hypothesis) Intent: To document the things people collect and keep in their living quarters as a form of expressing who they are and reflection of their personality. I had a consultation earlier with Guo Wen. He has helped me to further develop on both my issues making sure I have covered all areas. The consultation was definitely fruitful.

Let the research begins.

Initially my Design Issue #1 aim was to create good designs to make people happy. But Guo Wen has highlighted to me that it is hard to define happiness among people unless I could find a test or index to prove it. So we both discussed and sort of change the direction to distraction instead. Distracting people away from their mundane lives, in Singapore context.

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EVALUATION

Afterthought Week 02: August 19, 2012

DESIGN ISSUE #1

THE BIG DECISION

Design Issue

During Week 01-06, we are instructed to work on both design issues to produce a set of proposals and design responds. It was a difficult journey for me as everything seem so new and unfamiliar to me.

With technological advancements, it has made people lives become fast paced and more efficient but as a consequence, this has made it harder for people to separate themselves away from work. Many get too caught up with the constant need to earn enough just to meet the pressures of life. They inevitably neglect their well-being such as mental health, relationship and passion. The fear of not being able to keep up has even made the younger generation afraid to take on jobs that pay less but more interesting to them. They then may end up settling for less desirable choices of jobs and result in being dissatisfied in life.

In the beginning weeks, I have found more supporting research for Design Issue #1. This design issue was generated from a point of view I personally feel towards Singapore. However, this design issue may seem too predictable as the specific aim of achieving this project is through the creation of urban interventions. Urban interventions has been a recent trend and they are gaining more popularity nowadays. But it could have be an overdone approach which I wish to steer away from.

Design Hypothesis

After given much thoughts, I decided to chose Design Issue #2 for my final year project (FYP). I feel that generally it is more of a interesting topic. It gives me the freedom to explore the various graphic design methods which could best address or highlight the design issue.

The perpetual rush and chase of financial success detail some of the stress factors faced by many. There is a need for intervene in the fast-paced lifestyles of people by the means of graphic design in public spaces so as to inspire them to live a happier and more fulfilling life.

This could have a positive open-ended results. Moreover, I have a very keen interest towards the topic so despite of the difficult process of research, the investigation could be fun and exciting. I am so looking forward to get started, working on it.

DESIGN ISSUE #2 Design Issue

May the odds be with me as I set forth in my chosen topic - Design Issue 2.

With an increasingly amount of time spent in our workspace, it can make designers both physically and mentally drained. Designers face many difficulties at work when engaging with the tasks at hand and constantly deal with creative blocks, which might result in affecting their thinking and design process. As a consequence, this caused a negative impact on the designers’ creativity, work performance and well-being. Design Hypothesis Faced with many challenges at work, designers should therefore understand the positive effects of being able to define their workspace and how this space in return can help define who they are and aids in their creativity and work productivity.

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RESEARCH (WEEK 03 - WEEK 04)


RESEARCH

Initial Research & Brainstorm Week 03: August 20 to August 26, 2012

DESIGN ISSUE 2: MINDMAP

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RESEARCH

INITIAL IDEA Accordingly to one of the given themes, the below topic interest me greatly - Collecting Things.

This project is sort of a form of personal therapy as I never have my own room since birth. For the past 24 years, I have to share a room together with my elder brother. So you can imagine the inconvenience and discomfort I would have face.

Theme #10: Collecting Things We all have a habit of collecting things; it is just a matter of what the object or purpose is. We collect coins, stamps, badges, toys, fashion, posters, books, films, music, etc. Whatever our motivation, whether it be monetary or pleasure, the true collector collects because of memories and the sentimental value of the object. This archival process can be therapeutic but it also serves the purpose of charting history to remember things in the past. So what do you collect? And what is your motivation for your collection? How can your collection shed light or bring about a better understanding of things?

Thus, I am always curious how does one live and their participation in personalising their home. I am motivated to collect and document many people living spaces (perhaps through the categories of age groups or occupation, etc.). It is through this sharing of their home experiences which allow us to gain an insight of their inner world. We can also look into how people can be connected by a similar object. How this one object may contain different sentimental values in their lives.

RESEARCH QUESTIONS

At the same time, Weiming has recommended me this magazine - *Apartamento. Rather than just featuring pretty houses like how interior magazine typically does, this magazine interviews people and share a insight of their homes.

• Can it be linked to MUJI concept- improving the quality of living? • Can it be compiled into a book that shares with people their personal experience of living in a “home”?

“A real living space is made from living, not decorating. A bored materialist can’t understand that a house has to become a home. It happens, not through perfection but by participation.” Quoted by Andy & Elsa Beach, Apartamento issue #07

• How do I steer away from the direction of an interior magazine? • How does graphic design plays a role into creating a better “home”?

This statement fascinate me greatly as I truly believe that the living quarters of one reflects who you are. It is through the things that you collect and how these items are connected to you that reflects your true personality and your inner world. You can simply own a beautiful decorated house but it may not be considered as a home if you do not feel bonded with it emotionally or have any sentimental values towards it.

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RESEARCH

Source of Inspiration Week 03: August 23, 2012

ARTISANS / DESIGNERS

APARTAMENTO

There are many people’s home which I could look into, according to various categories of different age groups, living properties, occupations or even countries and etc. But after reading Apartamento magazine, I am contemplating to look into the homes of mainly artisans and designers.

Apartamento is a new international editorial project dedicated to the world of interiors, born to tell the story of personal experiences and lifes through the spaces where we live and work. Everyday stories, seen without the usual masks of looka-like interiors perfect to the millimeter, because in real life variables are infinite and unpredictable since every environment has got its own dynamics and peculiarities that make it special.

Home of many artisans/designers usually consists of both working and living space. This is very common due to the nature of their occupation. The working space also known as *atelier, is usually an extensions of what’s inside of a designer’s or artisan’s head.

Apartamento aspires to be a source of inspiration, a new stimulating force to show how common people live, decorate their homes and react to the same everyday life events that at some point might happen to all of us.

Personally, I think it is quite compelling to see the homes of artisans and designers as we would be able to gain a better insight of their work and life. It is through the things they have actively collected or piled up within their living quarters reflects their personality, style and sometimes even philosophy in life. But because many artisans and designers live and work within the same space so sometimes, it could become quite a blur to define what their living area actually is. • Potters • Weavers • Painters, etc. • Graphic Designers, • Interior Designers • Illustrators • Writers • Editors, etc.

* Atelier (noun) is a workshop or studio, esp. one used by an artist or designer.

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RESEARCH

“The inside has strong colours and forms. There was so much living that it never felt empty.”

YRJÖ KUKKAPURO Interior Designer

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RESEARCH

“A home sweet home is not curated or produced by acquiring a perfect arrangement of chairs, lamps and friends. A real living space is made from living, not decorating. A bored materialist can’t understand that a house has to become a home. It happens, not through perfection but by participation.” Andy & Elsa Beach Apartamento issue #07

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RESEARCH

“This is my *métier : an externalised version of what’s inside my head really.”

*Métier (noun) is a trade, profession, or occupation.

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RESEARCH

Key Findings Week 03: August 20 to August 26, 2012

INTERESTING FACT

RESEARCH THOUGHTS

“You are what you curate” Quoted by Om Malik

• Can I use Pinterest such social media as one of a possible design platform to deliver my outcomes?

I definitely agreed with Om Malik on this. People like to collect things which somehow reflects who they are. One good example of this basic human behaviour being transcended onto web is Pinterest.

• Is it possible to record a designer’s workspace & portray it over the web live using satellite? • Will it be invading people privacy as it reflects their intimate work process?

Social Content Curation Pinterest is a site which let people create a visual collections of things that they like and find on the web. The users are also allowed to browse other users’ pinboards which they might get to discover new things and gain inspiration through others who may have share their similar interests. This whole social platform simply reflects the concept of curation.

Example: Stefan Sagmeister’s Design Firm http://www.sagmeister.com/welcome Sagmeister & Walsh is a NYC based design firm that creates identities, commercials, films, books and objects for clients, audiences and ourselves. They have a camera installed in their studio which telecast live of their ongoings at workplace.

Other forms of Curation Tradition forms of curation includes cutting out photos, ads and visuals from fashion and lifestyle magazines and create collages. For example, boys would create collages of scantily clad girls, cars, musicians and sometimes movie stars. Used magazines is bought to get the right image. The clippings are then put together and stick on the bedroom walls. This make people feel very cool, because being able to create an awesome, colourful collage showed a little something about the person.

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OVERVIEW

Studio Plan Week 03: August 20 to August 26, 2012

BOOKS TO RESEARCH

TO-DO LIST

• Home: A Short History of an Idea By Witold Rybczynski

• Read as many related articles. • Start a brief research to find out the background situation and problems.

• Where They Create By Paul Barbera & Alexandra Onderwater

• Try to formulate a design issue & design hypothesis.

• Open Studios By Lotta Jansdotter

• Get the main objective out.

• Other books related to living/working spaces

• Start on the first draft of design research proposal

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EVALUATION

Consultation Week 03: August 23, 2012

After consultation with both Guo Wen and Yasser, I have a slightly better understanding of what is going on. It is Week 3 now and is still a struggle for me despite I have already settled on 2 issues.

My consultation with Yasser was quite a roller coaster ride. Jing Yuan, Suyeon, Jee Min and I were the last group and girls to consult Yasser. We were all shocked when Yasser dropped a bomb saying that he expects to see our outcome by next week.What......!?!

I have heard many talking about the outcomes that is due on Week 6. I have no clue what that was so asking Guo Wen does help to clear up my doubts. He has explained to me what are the possible outcomes that we students can produce for Week 6 - Studio.

We are not totally prepared for this. As for some of my friends, they have yet to finalise on 2 design issue. On top of that, we are all confused with the outcomes due on Week 6. What is expected from us for both the DRM and Studio modules? Are they supposed to be the same? We thought they would.

The three possible outcomes are: 1. Secondary Research Based (Visualising data)

Yasser was kind enough to take time and explain to us in details. He gave us an example of a project like designing milk carton. So for the theory part (DRM), the student is supposed to study into how consumerism works, consumers’ behaviour and the branding effects. While for the practical part (Studio), the student will use the knowledge he/she gain from the theory and applied it necessarily to design the milk carton. Such as researching what is the best font that suits the design and what model design will make the milk carton stands out from the rest in the supermarket shelves.

2. Solution Based (Possible Prototypes) 3. Experimental with a certain concept (Open-end Results) Usually, many students will produce only one outcome but we are definitely encouraged to come up with as many outcomes as possible.

Now, we understood what this is all about.

Through the consultation, Guo Wen further explained to me how I can progress and developed for my outcomes. For my Design Issue #1 - Moments of Distractions, he emphasized on the importance of the appropriate tone of voice used for this project. Thus he suggested me to conduct an experiment using all the different kinds of tone of voice on people to see what work best in our cultural context. Guo Wen also encourage me to do a case study on what caused distraction especially among the blue collar workers. *As blue collar workers may be the highest percentage of people leading a mundane working lifestyle. Using these methods, I can gather and organise my research to use as outcomes.

Design Issue #1: in the theory part (DRM), I will look into how distraction works in design. In the practical part (Studio), I will experiment the different kinds of tone of voice applied in the stickers such as slap stick humour. Design Issue #2: In the theory part (DRM), I can look into how profiling people and their personality. In the practical part (Studio), it will be the different forms of documenting these data. So after consultation with both lecturers, I have a better drift on what is expected from both DRM and Studio for the Week 6 outcomes. So for now, I shall continue on my research and gather the necessary basic information so I can quickly progress and come up with my design hypothesis as soon as possible.

As for my Design Issue #2 - Room Reflecting your Personality, Guo Wen suggested me to look into the art of Archival and Curation. As these areas would help me greatly in documenting the rooms/ living quarters. Look into George Louise Droges, quoted from Guo Wen.

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RESEARCH

Change of Objective Week 04: August 27 to September 02, 2012

CHANGE OF FOCUS AREA My initial focus on this topic was featuring the collection of things that people have collected within their living space and how this collection in turn reflects who they are. However after days of thinking, I realise that was neither my interested area nor my real intent. Rather, I would like to look into the living/working space of designers. It will be compelling to look into their creative minds. I begin to brainstorm and find a connection between designers and their living/working space. How their living/ working space could be a regarded as an outward expression and an extension of their intimate thought process. The article that inspire me to initiate the change of direction: Hate Your Office? Take A Look At Some Of The World’s Most Creative Work Spaces http://www.fastcodesign.com/1670557/hate-your-office-take-a-look-at-some-of-the-worlds-most-creative-workspaces#1

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RESEARCH

Proposed New Direction Week 04: August 27 to September 02, 2012

BACKGROUND

• Profiling people by their living quarters • To prove how the living/working space is a reflection of designer’s inner stirrings, personality & philosophy? • How does the workspace help to feed creativity to designers? • How does the workspace helps to inspire creativity to produce better design? • The need and importance of personal space.

DESIGN HYPOTHESIS

How designers participate in defining their living/ working space and how in return this space could aid in their creativity.

RESEARCH QUESTIONS

1. What are some of the available methods or platform for self-expression? 2. Why is it so important to have personal space? 3. What is the definition of personal space?

KEY ISSUES

1. The scientific study of human behaviour - Self-expression 2. The psychology connection between human & space - History on comfort & privacy - State of domestic well-being 3. Importance & effects of space in graphic design

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RESEARCH

RESEARCH THOUGHTS • A good workspace is not determined by how highly designed the studio is or its decoration of beautiful furniture. It is through the concept of a comfortable and considerate designed workspace that help designers to work better. • The workspace definitely need to support the nature of designers’ workscope and their design process such as: - Having an open space for designer to bounce ideas off each other. - Providing an individual space for each designer to help them concentrate better at work and get less distracted. - Well-equipped facilities to generate efficiency and speed - Providing tools and substantial space for designers to experiment their crafts. • The workspace needs to be pleasant and comfortable so designers could relax and have fun at times when they feel stressed out.

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RESEARCH

Refined New Direction Week 04: August 27 to September 02, 2012

BACKGROUND SITUATION Designer are like problem solvers. Our aim is to communicate ideas across effectively to our intended audience. In order to seek better communication to the intended audience, designers need to constantly explore other creative possibilities and also learn to work with a variety of communication tools. Like Sunita Yeomans, a creative controller at Argos once said, ‘Designers need to be able to put themselves into the minds of their audience, as one day they might be designing for ten year old boys...and the next for the visually impaired.’ (Design Council, n.d.). Therefore, designers are required to invest a great amount of time in creative thinking, intense research and experimentation of craft before they could arrive to produce a final outcome to address the intended problem. As mentioned by AIGA (2012), ‘ The creative process of a designer usually involves a combination of art and technology’. In addition, designers and design students could also face with poor workspace issues such as lack of individual space to work which lead to many distractions and interruptions while designing. This as a result would slow down the design process and have a negative influence on their output. Moreover with the constant time and financial constraints, this make designers’ work process even more creatively challenged and demanding. In spite of the financial and design limits, designers have to produce quality material for clients. When projects are under way, designers are also expected to work long hours, sometimes around the clock to meet tight deadlines (The Princeton Review, 2012). With that increasingly amount of time spent in the workplace, it can make designers both physically and mentally drained. As a consequence, this may caused a negative impact on designers’ creativity, well-being and work performance. Therefore I feel that the best strategy to help directly improve a designer’s work process is by establishing a comfortable work culture through the notion of workspace. I believed that defining a comfortable workspace could help to bring positive effects to designers and have a positive influence on their output.

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RESEARCH

Supporting Statistics Week 04: August 27 to September 02, 2012

ENRICHED SPACES (DECORATED WITH PLANTS & PICTURES) LEAN SPACES (BARE & FUNCTIONAL) EMPOWERED SPACES (ALLOWING THE INDIVIDUAL TO DESIGN THE THE AREA)

PEOPLE WORKING IN ENRICHED SPACES

PEOPLE WORKING IN EMPOWERED SPACES

17%

32%

MORE PRODUCTIVE

MORE PRODUCTIVE & EFFICIENT

THAN THOSE IN LEAN SPACES.

Research undertaken by the University of Exeter (2010)

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RESEARCH

Problem - Case Study Week 04: August 27 to September 02, 2012

OUR SCHOOL STUDIO: H503 Based on the background situation, I decide to use Lasalle, my school studio H503 as a case study. I intend to look into our studio workspace and see how it has an indirect influence on students’ design process. The studio has been segregated into half, with groups of students using panels to mark their own private workspaces. These partitioned cubicles are then personalised to suit the students’ working style. On the other side of the studio, the remaining space is left for lecturers to conduct lessons or consultation.

CONSTRAINTS OF PHYSICAL SPACE IN SCHOOL STUDIO: - HOW PHYSICAL SPACE IS BEING MANAGED & DISTRIBUTED IN SCHOOL? - WHAT ARE THE SPECIFIC PROBLEMS THAT DESIGN STUDENTS FACED WHEN WORKING IN SCHOOL?

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Visionary Boards (Helps designers to gain inspirations)

Enriched Spaces (Decorated with plants & pictures)

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RESEARCH

Lean Spaces (Bare and functional)

Empowered Spaces (The individuals are allowed to design the area)

Remained Spaces (Other students’ working & consultation area)

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RESEARCH

Survey Findings #1 Week 04: August 27 to September 02, 2012

PROBLEMS / ISSUES Personally, I do not like to work in school as I feel that there are too many distractions in the studio which affects me greatly when working. Also, I feel that there is insufficient space for every individual to better do their work, including me. Thus, I decided to conduct a survey interview among my classmates to better understand what are their opinions and take on the school studio.

OBJECTIVES - To find out what are the pros and cons of working in school studio. - To find out what are the common problems that design students faced when working in school studio. - To find out what are the areas that design students look for from their workspace?

INTERVIEW QUESTIONS (DRAFT) 1. Do you like working in school? If Yes, why? If no, what are the problems you faced when working in school? i.e lack of space, lack of privacy, hard to concentrate at work, too noisy, etc. 2. If you can change the school studio to better suit your work process, what would you like to change? 3. Beside school, where do you usually go to do your work (when designing)? 4. What the size of your workspace? 5. What do you like most about your workspace? 6. Can you sum up your work environment in three words? 7. How does your workspace define your work? 8. How does the space & location influence your design outcome? 9. What time do you usually or prefer to do your work? 10. Do you listen to music when you work? 11. What’s on your desk? 12. What are the problems you commonly faced during the work process?

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SURVEY TEMPLATE WHAT IS YOUR WORKSPACE?

Interview Questions Your name: Your age: Course you study: 1. Do you like working in school? If Yes, please indicate the reasons:

If No, please indicate the problems you faced when working in school: i.e lack of space, lack of privacy, hard to concentrate at work, too noisy, etc.

2. If you could change the school studio to better suit your work process, what would you like to change?

3. Beside school, where do you usually go to do your work (when designing)?

4. What do you like most about your workspace?

5. How would you sum up your work environment in three words?

6. How does your workspace define your work?

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RESEARCH

SURVEY RESULTS - PART 1 This survey was conducted among 28 classmates who work in H503 (a mix of different specialism). What I aim to find out from this survey: - How many people like/dislike working in school studio? - What are the pros and cons of working in school studio?

16 PEOPLE

PROS - WORKING IN SCHOOL STUDIO - A circle of supportive friends to help bounce ideas

LIKE WORKING IN SCHOOL STUDIO

- The distinct separation of working and leisure - Motivational support from friends to do work - Less leisure distraction in school eg. Bed, tv - Easier & faster to consult lecturers - Well-equipped facilities eg. Direct access to plugs & internet connection, air-conditioned rooms

12 PEOPLE

CONS - WORKING IN SCHOOL STUDIO - Too many distractions eg. No noise control & constant verbal interruptions during work

DISLIKE WORKING IN SCHOOL STUDIO

- Hard to concentrate at work - Lack of individual space to do work - Lack of individual space to store our research, books & work - No sense of belonging - Lack of privacy - Environment not conducive to do work - No accessible tools eg. Printer & scanner, cleaner tables, comfortable chairs - No accessible food places in school area at night

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RESEARCH

SURVEY RESULTS - PART 2 This survey is conducted among 28 classmates who work in H503 (a mix of different specialism). What I aim to find out from this survey: - Where do students go to do their work beside school? - What do students look for in a workspace?

ALTERNATIVE WORKPLACES - Airport

WHAT DO THEY LOOK FOR IN A WORKSPACE?

- Library

- Quiet & Peaceful

- Home

- Solitude

- Friend’s House

- Clean & clutter-free environment

- Cafe

- Spacious environment

- Starbucks

- Cosy

- Beaches or rivers to relax the mind so can think better & gain some inspirations

- Inspirational moments - Accessible tools eg, books, printers & scanners - Well equipped facilities eg. aircon, clean big tables - Better space organisation: Personal space for every individual (such as cubicles) Communal space to conduct lessons & help people to bounce ideas off each other Comfortable corners to play & relax - Brightly lit - Vibrant - Pantry: food & drink - Music

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EVALUATION

Survey Analysis Week 04: August 27 to September 02, 2012

In our previous year studio, the work environment was really spacious and friends could gather around easily to discuss ideas.

The *groups of students who have created their own personal cubicles know the importance of owning a private workspace. They understand that by personalising their workspace which help them in their design process and influence their output. This is evident in photos as shown in previous pages.

However, in our current year school studio- H503, the studio size is relatively smaller as compared to previous year. With groups of students began to partition spaces to form their own cubicles, it eats into the space used for consultation or lessons.

I shared this topic with some of my classmates and most of them share similar views with me expressing their displeasure towards the constraint studio space. Thus I went around to get the rest of my classmates’ opinions on working in H503 via survey.

As a result, the rest of the students who do not own any workspace were deeply affected as we would have to constantly find substantial space to do our work. Moreover, there are insufficient tables and chairs for everyone.

My objective is to find out if the constraint workspace does affect them and will they as a result dislike working in school studio.

With the pathetic space left for consultation or lessons, students and even lecturer get distracted easily due to the noise level happening within such constraint space. It is hard for students to concentrate the tasks at hand which in turn slow them down in their design process as a result.

To my surprise, the results shows that there is a slightly higher percentage of people who like to do work in school than people who dislike. Out of the students who like to do work in school, half of them owned a personalised workspace. All of the students who like to do work in school is because they can discuss and share ideas with their friends easily.

Due to the insufficient space, Week 06 DRM presentation are conducted at corridors instead, outside the studio. This does not salvage the situation as there are more interference in the corridors. In addition, there is no proper facilities for students to project their presentation slides.

However, the same remaining half of the students who like to do work in school also face the same problems with students who dislike such as noise distraction and lack of personal workspace.

From these observation research, I notice the importance of defining an organised workspace. It is necessary to produce a good workspace which supports the design students’ needs and work process.

It is noticeably hard for design students to find a conducive environment which provide support to meet all their needs in a work process. Such as having wellequipped fatalities like bigger tables for them to work and accessible tools like printers and scanners to expertise the design process.

An organised and pleasant workspace should provide substantial space for every individual to work so they can better focus the task-on-hand. A communal space for lecturers to held consultation, meetings or discussion of ideas among friends and classmates. Comfortable corners for students to help them relax when they are faced with creative blocks.

Thus, I aim to seek possible solutions to improve on the work process of design students by the study of environmental psychology of workspace.

* Group of students who have created their personalised workspace are given permission to do so.

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OVERVIEW

Strategised Plan for Drm Week 04: August 27 to September 02, 2012

RESEARCH THOUGHTS

BOOKS TO RESEARCH

With my initial surveys results, I notice that most of the answers responded are not in the form of my preferred responds. This is probably because the surveys are structured in an open ended questions which requires people to think more and thus giving very vague answers.

• Developing a Questionnaire By Bill Gillham

I learnt that in order to gather the preferred responds that best support my research and design hypothesis, I may have to provide multiple choice questions which includes my preferred responds inside.

• Borrow the book of Developing a Questionnaire By Bill Gillham

TO-DO LIST

• Understand the way of forming interview/ surveys’ questions so can generate better structured questions.

This could help my audience group to answer my surveys with ease. I can steer them into choosing my preferred respond by manipulating their thoughts through the way my questions are structured.

• Generate a new survey to gather my preferred responds that could help further support my design hypothesis. • Compile & create a demographic based on the research results.

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RESEARCH

Research Understandings Week 04: August 27 to September 02, 2012

ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY OF WORKSPACE This is my first reading I came across with regards to the psychology of workspace. I will be referring to this information as it will be crucial in future when writing for both my abstract and essay. Towards an Environmental Psychology of Workspace: How People are Affected by Environments for Work Written by Jacqueline C. Visher.

THE SHIFT IN WORKSPACE DESIGN

RESEARCH ANALYSIS

Workers who are asked to perform rather than to think, who are brought together in space and time so that they can be supervised, so that they have access to necessary tools, and so that there is a clear barrier between work and their other activities, occupy standardized and often uniform workspace.

In the past, the designing of workspace were steered towards cost concerns. However with globalization taking place, it brought along many changes in the 21st century world of work. More people are spending longer hours at work. One such example would be designers ourselves, which our work process requires us to invest in a great amount of time and effort.

Formerly in the form of factories, contemporary workspace is more likely to be in the form of offices, and reducing occupancy costs is a key driver of design decision-making (Vischer, 2007a).

With the ways our work and life is being intersected, there is a need to change the workspace design to better suit the changes. Thus the objective of workspace design is now being emphasise on its quality.

Barriers between work and personal life are breaking down as people seek career opportunities rather thanjobs, work at all hours, make a social life at work, and sleep and eat at work if necessary. What may now be called workspace is diversifying, mobile work and nonterritorial workspace is increasing, and companies are applying quality as well as cost criteria to workspace design (Becker & Kelley, 2004; Preiser & Vischer, 2005).

I have recently came across an example which clearly reflects the above objective: At Otis College of Art and Design’s Ben Maltz Gallery, in Pasadena, Calif., the pair of architects tackled the topic of time in an exhibition that explored the ways work and life intersected, whether the result was inspiring or limiting.

As part of these changes, conceptualization of the environments for work is shifting from the notion of workspace as a backdrop – that is, passive setting – for work, to the concept of workspace as an active support to – and tool for – getting work done (Newsham, 1997).

Works included “Common Ground,” an ambitious attempt by the architects Florian Idenburg and Jin Liu (who are married and have two young children) to design a place where private life and professional practice merge, where sharing costs and responsibilities can free up the brain space for more creative pursuits.

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THE EFFECTS OF WORKSPACE DESIGN To find out how workers interact with and are affected by environmental features. It is split into 2 aspects of research: 1. Study of workspace 2. Type of outcome measure in terms of behavioural results

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THE CONCEPT OF COMFORT IN WORKSPACE The link between satisfaction and productivity is through the notion of comfort, specifically functional comfort. A threeway definition of the concept of comfort has been applied to numerous field studies of office buildings; it posits that people need to be more than simply healthy and safe in the buildings they occupy, they need environmental support for the activities they are there to perform. The concept of comfort is split into physical, functional and psychological comfort.

PHSYICAL COMFORT

PSYCHOLOGICAL COMFORT

Physical comfort refers to basic human needs such as safety, hygiene and accessibility, which must be assured usually through applying existing building codes and standards so that users find their environment habitable and live comfortably.

Psychological comfort includes feelings of belonging, ownership and control over the workspace. It is at a more abstract level than functional comfort but equally important to users at work.

FUNCTIONAL COMFORT Functional comfort refers to the degree to which their environment supports users’ tasks.

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VISUALISATION (WEEK 05)


VISUALISATION

Visual Intent Week 05: September 03 to September 09, 2012

MAIN OBJECTIVE

To help designers to be more engaged at work and overcome creative blocks through the participation of personalising their workspace so that their defined workspace can in return aid in their creativity and improve their well-being and work performance.

SPECIFIC OBJECTIVE

To archive the studios of designers in Singapore, focusing on the little details that define the interior of their creative space. It helps designers-to-be to gain an insight of the creative minds and their intimate thought process and how the daily environment influences their output.

Primary Group: Design & Art Students (Aged 17 - 25) Male & Female

TARGET AUDIENCE

This demographic is at the stage in life that needs to be educated in the participation of defining their workspace. The education could be done to help them understand how to overcome their creative blocks and improve their design process. Secondary Group: Working adults & Management Team (Aged 25 - 40) Male & Female This demographic has a lack of understanding of how crucial the role of a workspace plays in designer’s work process. An increase in the awareness among this group is crucial as they are directly involved in providing a better and pleasant space for the designers to aid in unleashing their creativity and productivity. This in turn will help the employees to feel more committed and loyal which generate better work performance that is a big payoff to the organisation.

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VISUALISATION

DESIGN HYPOTHESIS

Faced with many challenges at work, designers should therefore understand the positive effects of being able to define their workpsace. This defined workspace can help to define their creative thought process and influence their output. In turn, affecting their morale and work performance.

DESIGN CONCEPT

Message • To educate design students the positive effects of defining your workspace. • To create awareness among non-designers and managements teams the importance of creating a supportive workspace. Tone of Voice • Personal, friendly • Imaginative • Welcoming, supportive • Novelty, inspirational Strategy (Research Methodology) • Investigate • Documentary • Exploration

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VISUALISATION

Visual Plan Week 05: September 03 to September 09, 2012

ART DIRECTION The book has to evoke a sense of classy and timeless feel as it contains a collection of many respectable design studios. Thus, presenting the book in a sophisticated look will help to bring the audience into these visionary’s intimate work process as their design studios would greatly reflect their working style and design output. As design students, we would get to understand how the work environments influence and affect designers in their design process. Thus this book acts like a welldesigned encyclopedia for the intended audience.

FONT

DIMENSIONS

Main Copy

Closed Size

Serif font Reason: best evokes a sense of classy feel Examples: Sabon, Caslon, New Baskerville, Century, Bodoni, Minion etc.

17cm (W) x 24cm (H) Column Guides Column Grid: 2 column to 6 columns Margins: 2cm all around

Caption Copy Sans Serif font Reason: stays objective & add an interesting balance to the initial serif main copy Examples: Typewriter, Courier New, etc.

PAPER TYPE Inside Pages Naturalis Beige 100-140gsm

FINISHING

Cover

Die-cut front cover Perfect bind / saddle stitched books

A textured & dark coloured material

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VISUALISATION

Visual Research Week 05: September 03 to September 09, 2012

WHERE THEY CREATE Interior photographer Paul Barbera visited the studios of people whose work he loves and whose space he like. He then documented 32 creative working spaces and interviewed with these creators which reveal not only how their daily environment influnences their output, but also whta’s on their desk and even what’s in their fridge.

Published by Frame Publishers Authored by Alexandra Onderwater Photographed by Paul Barbera

Where They Create gives reader insight into the working process of some of the most creative minds in the world.

OPEN STUDIOS Lotta Jansdotter, a novice designer, found it inspiring to see how other creative people lived and worked. Thus she embarked into the fascinating journey of peeking into other creative spaces and learn what other people do in their spaces. This experience allows her to discover their processes and tools, and also help to gather tips and inspiration on how to organize it all.

Published by Chronicle Books LLC Authored by Lotta Jansdotter Photographed by Jenny Hallengren

She went around three of her favourite cities: Brooklyn, Stockholm and Tokyo documenting and interviewing each designer/artist and their creative spaces.

IKEA IKEA Catalogue includes all the series of new furniture for the year 2013. What is special about this year’s catalogue is that it allows people to be interactive with it. Through the use of iphone, people can enjoy fun films and interesting interactive pictures content when they hold it above from any spread of the printed catalogue.

Published by IKEA in 2013

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0dS5L7zHv74&featu re=player_embedded

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VISUALISATION

Visual Moodboard Week 05: September 03 to September 09, 2012

WHERE THEY CREATE I will be looking into “Where They Create” and “Open Studios” for the principle of photography. The photography style will be used as a reference for my art direction when I carry out my observational research of design studios in the upcoming weeks. The photographer uses only natural light which explains the grey overcast and graphic layer of shadow play on the photographs. The shadows creates a serious and professional touch to the photographs.

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VISUALISATION

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VISUALISATION

Visual Moodboard Week 05: September 03 to September 09, 2012

OPEN STUDIOS The photographer uses mostly natural light which cast a warm orange tone over the photographs. This adds a friendly touch to the photographs as compared to the ones from “Where They Create” which carries a serious and professional feel.

The photos have a variety of shots which includes: - A full/mid shot of people working at their space - An overview shot of their creative spaces - Outdoor shot of the building offices - Up closed shots of the designer’s hand working on their crafts - Several angles of their workspacs (Eg. Windows, shelves , desks + chairs, view of outside scenery, walls pasted with drawings/inspirations/ paintings, stationary, etc.) - A full shot of the favourite corners/space in the studios - A full shot of the entrance of their design studios (sun rays streams in, creating a glare over the picture)

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VISUALISATION

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VISUALISATION

Visual Moodboard Week 05: September 03 to September 09, 2012

IKEA I will be looking into the way IKEA curate their products which I can applied it into my future deliverables. Also the colours of the photographs are vibrant with very saturated colours that make the products seem to come alive and looking irresistibly beautiful.

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VISUALISATION

Book Sketches Week 05: September 03 to September 09, 2012

SKETCHES

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REALISATION (WEEK 06)


REALISATION

Studio Design Outcome Week 06: September 10 to September 16, 2012

RATIONALE Titled “Define your own workspace”, this book is a compilation of several design studios; how they managed their workspace. It also contains photos of their workspaces and also shots of objects that made up the creative spaces. This book seeks to inspire students and acts as an inspiration guide to educate and create awareness on how space could affect an individual’s design process. The book which documents various existing design studios in Singapore has a welcoming and novelty feel to it so as to bring out the inspiration factor which appeals to the target audience.

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REALISATION

INSIDE SPREADS

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REALISATION

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EVALUATION

Afterthought Week 06: September 14, 2012

For many weeks, I have been immersed in writing my proposals. It was a struggle for me as writing was definitely not my forte. Thus, I spent a great amount of time and effort to get the writing right, making sure that it is clear and well-structured before moving on to work on my Studio design responds. However that would probably be a foolish move as I have left with little time to work on my Studio as a result.

What I learnt was the 3 important steps that defines the cycle of design thinking which includes: analyse, responds and problems. Design Thinking: 1. Always analyse the research you have gathered. 2. Come up with ideas to solve or address it as a form of responds to your study of research.

I became very confused with what is required for the Week 06 design responds. As Yasser mentioned in earlier weeks, what I understood was that the Week 6 design responds could be possibly anything, such as mock up or even scamps of your design outcomes.

3. Get feedbacks and work on the new problems derived from your responds. With their encouragement, I decide to use this defeating moment as an inspiration to bounce back harder. Heeding their advice, I try my best to work even doubly hard. Well, this could be a lesson learnt so I can better managed my design thinking and process.

With that in mind, I went ahead to create a book that features several design studios I have found from my research. However, that was not the design responds he was looking for. In Week 07, I received my studio feedback and was completely shocked by the results. It was a huge blow to me as I scored a threshold for my Studio. This was not the average branding/level of my work. As a result, I became very depressed and demoralised. I have really tried my best in delivering for my Studio within the limited available time.

Afterall, every student are different individuals. They work at different paces in their design process. As lecturers, it is essentially important for them to understand, so they can better encourage students and provide the appropriate guidance to help them out if the students are trapped in a pit hole of confusion. As students of course, we work independently hard and do not expect lecturers to spoon feed us.

So I spoke to other lecturers and try to understand what was the probable reasons that have contributed to my poor results. Talking to Andri, my Level 2 lecturer, was an enlightening experience. He explained to me what was design responds about and why my Studio Week 06 ‘design responds’ was not exactly the outcomes that my supervised lecturer would want to see.

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RESEARCH (WEEK 07)


RESEARCH

Research & Understanding Week 07: September 17 to September 23, 2012

MORE UNDERSTANDING OF WORKSPACE Good design can inspire creativity and great ideas, but it is argued that the focus should be less on floor plans and more on ways of working. When’s the last time you had a creative breakthrough in a Monday morning meeting? Creativity springs from unexpected places and sources — from a walk in the park to the rare block of uninterrupted time — so thinking more broadly about the intrinsic motivations (autonomy, learning, etc.) that facilitate good work is likely to have a far happier outcome than the “latest” innovation in cubicles.

The Journal had asked a handful of design firms “to envision a space that could inspire ideas and increase productivity.” Good architecture won’t make for more pleasant working environments that can lead to greater employee satisfaction — the workplace is still relevant no matter how many people work remotely (currently over 50 million, at least part of the time). But it’s also true that creativity can come from anywhere, and probably least of all from inside a cubicle, no matter how sunny and technologically mind-blowing it is.

The Journal had asked a handful of design firms “to envision a space that could inspire ideas and increase productivity.” Good architecture won’t make for more pleasant working environments that can lead to greater employee satisfaction — the workplace is still relevant no matter how many people work remotely (currently over 50 million, at least part of the time). But it’s also true that creativity can come from anywhere, and probably least of all from inside a cubicle, no matter how sunny and technologically mind-blowing it is.

So, apart from furniture and skylights, how might designers (and the companies who hire them) think about work differently? There are some truly inventive things happening in the world of work.

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RESEARCH

Research Example Week 07: September 17 to September 23, 2012

HUB BAY AREA An example would be Hub Bay Area, which celebrates the idea of co-working space, designed by Teri Flynn of Flynn, Craig and Grant. In its design phase it paid a lot of attention to doors and desks, but thought equally about who might be working there and why. The 8,600-square-foot work and event space (you need to join to use it) attracts people working in complementary fields and was designed to promote collaboration and offer flexibility. This is very helpful for some who do their work or take meetings there a few hours a month or others who are there every day. In both the San Francisco and Berkeley locations, there are not only communal spaces but community-wide events ranging from book launches to film screenings. Hub Bay Area has extend over a dew countries, with one located in Singapore SCAPE, near somerset.

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RESEARCH

Case Study Week 07: September 17 to September 23, 2012

VAN BO LE-MENTZEL: ONE SQM HOUSE Berlin-based architect Van Bo Le-mentzel of hartz IV möbel has conceived of the ‘One Sqm House’, a do-ityourself structure which offers 1 square meter of floor area to be used as a dwelling, mobile kiosk or an extra room inside an apartment.

• Mobile Feature This allows people to have the freedom to go anywhere, and live within any area. They can even chose to live outdoor & get in touch with nature. • D.I.Y House It can be put together easily. This gets people to be interactive with the product & have fun setting it up. It is very similar to how IKEA products work.

Made with everyday materials, the wooden frame can be put together with a cordless screwdriver and saw. The waterproof exterior features a slide window and lockable door. Weighing in at 40 kg, the gabled home can be easily moved to the location of the inhabitant’s desire, determining the views and surrounding context.

• Basic & Simplicity This allows people to have control over the design of the house as they can personalised it. The simplicity of the design made the house easy to blend and fit into any surroundings.

Standing at 2 meters tall, the unit may be turned on its side to double as a perfectly sized bed for impromptu sleeping, with the angled roof forming a comfortable lounge for the back.

• Basic materials, like wood The materials used are substantiable and cost effective. Also, using wood material made the product to weigh much lesser. • Flexible Design This allows occupant to adjust the house according to their needs so it can better support their lifestyle, such as lying it horizontally for sleeping and standing it up straight for study and etc.

Personalised 1m square house.

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1m square house with occupants doing various tasks.

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RESEARCH

Case Study Week 07: September 17 to September 23, 2012

THE MINER AND A MAJOR, BROOKLYN The Miner & a Major is designed and built by architects Serban Ionescu, Jim Dreilein and Justin Smith. This project is a free-standing, 5 unit dwelling for 5 different architects/designers/artists, all living in a Brooklyn loft. All the rooms/units act like a puzzle through visual portals and physical interlocking with the neighbouring room(s). With just $4,000 and a willingness to live and work in rather intimate proximity to one another, the trio designed these five container-like sleeping units within a live/work loft space. The project was based on a burst of imagination coming out of an economic downward spiral, experiencing from themselves. Thus, they wanted to challenge their bare minimum need to what a room is: a desk, a bed, a view, and storage, and also what is the private/public border of the adjacent room. Overview of how 5 different units fit together like a puzzle.

Not knowing if this experiment would work outside of their friends and evolved the friendship, the trio believed that its intimate setting can work perfectly for a family or even a studio like office, with the combination of working together but allowing the individual to be. The Miner and a Major may not be for everyone but the compact space that defines it, definitely push through the conventional thinking about live/work space.

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RESEARCH

Exterior of the 5 units standing in Brooklyn loft.

Interior of the 5 units; personalised to suit the 5 different individuals. Windows are attached to allow occupants to climb into each other’s space.

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RESEARCH

Case Study Week 07: September 17 to September 23, 2012

WOHNWERKZEUGE (LIVING TOOLS) Designed by Yi-Cong Lu, a Design Academy Eindhoven graduate. The project consists a series of “Living Tools”, with which one can individually adjust living spaces. Today’s lifestyles are highly varied and individual. They consistently test the limits of conventional architecture. In particular static layouts and their resulting space utilization, scenarios are proven to be not flexible enough. Take for example, a living room could be a temporary office and in the next moment be served as impromptu sleeping quarters. Frustrated to see that most architects still build for a lifestyle that most people do not live anymore, Yi Cong Lu was inspired to create a series of objects which can be adjusted to better suit the various needs of people current lifestyles. The goal of his project was to think beyond architectural spaces with clearly defined layouts and space utilization scenarios (left over) from previous centuries. That explains his minimalist and sculptural product. It may not be for everyone, but it could work for others who live in similarly cramped quarters, like him. http://www.yiconglu.com/

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RESEARCH

PANEL- one of the series of living tools.

LIGHTBOY - one of the series of living tools.

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RESEARCH

Wohnwerkzeuge (Living Tools)

LIGHTBOY: a lamp that can be quickly and easily placed wherever there is a lack of light. (Above) FADE: a flexible multi-section curtain partition, that helps divide the room with ease.(Above next page) PANEL: depending on how it´s turned, can be used as a partition, table or roof. (Bottom next page)

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CONCEPTUALISATION (WEEK 08)


CONCEPTUALISATION

Project Summary Week 08: September 24 to September 30, 2012

MINDMAP - ESSAY TITLE

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CONCEPTUALISATION

TITLE: SPACE ‘BOUND’ SUBTITLE: REDEFINING OUR CREATIVE WORKSPACES We are often constrained and limited to the space that surrounds us. This ‘fixed’ space curbs our ability to roam free, to take risks and explore hidden potentials. Mentally and physically, we feel bounded by this sense of space. Is the space around us controlling how we think, act and live? Space ‘bound’ is an investigative exploration of how individuals can break free from this constriction of space, to set forth in new and promising directions that are shaped and moulded by our attitudes, in the redefinition of our creative workspace.

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CONCEPTUALISATION

Project Premise Week 08: September 24 to September 30, 2012

Space

Mental Capacity Motivation Interest

Ability Potential

Likes/Dislikes

Character Environment

Personality Our Decision

Constraints of physical Physical Psychological workspace

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CONCEPTUALISATION

HYPOTHESIS STATEMENT Due to lack of or an unconducive environment to do work, designers are not functioning at their full potential, as creatives depend heavily on a conducive environment to help generate ideas.

PREMISE SPACE AFFECTS THE THINKING ABILITY OF CREATIVES. WHAT KIND OF SPACE SPECIFICALLY? Physical

Psychological

Size?

Mental?

Too big? Too small?

Is it personalised?

Too big - distractions? Too small - constraints?

Feeling of comfort? Unfamiliar with environment?

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CONCEPTUALISATION

Project Breakdown Week 08: September 24 to September 30, 2012

1ST ISSUE SPACE AFFECTS THINKING POTENTIAL How much space in general do creatives feel they need to have? Small? Large? Discuss pros and cons. Results? It might vary as it is subjected to personal preference.

2ND ISSUE WORKSPACE DEFINES/INFLUENCE CREATIVE THOUGHT/PROCESS What is the amount of space that is deemed sufficient? Large? Small? Result - Workspace size is constrained by external factors which we cannot control.

3RD ISSUE CONSTRAINTS OF PHYSICAL SPACE (NO CONTROL) We are limited to the current amount of space that we have. The space here is fixed and cannot change. Solution? Seek other means of creating space for ourselves. By doing so we overcome issues 1 and 2.

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CONCEPTUALISATION

Design Research Purpose Week 08: September 24 to September 30, 2012

DESIGN ISSUE

DESIGN HYPOTHESIS

If an organisation fails to manage the workspace properly, this could lead to an increased flow of distractions, i.e. noise levels and verbal interruptions, within the work environment. However, this is beyond the worker’s control as the workspace problems caused by the physical space constraints stems from an external factor. We are limited to the workspaces which are already defined and controlled by organisations.

Due to lack of or an unfavourable environment to do work, design students are not functioning at their full potential, as creatives depend heavily on a conducive environment to help generate ideas. Understanding that space could affects the ability of creatives both physically and psychologically, I want to use graphic design to create a visual identity which aims to inspire design students to define their own workspace. By redefining their own creative workspace, this could help them to generate better creative thinking and work process. In turn, improving their morale and work performance.

As a result, design students are affected in their thinking potential as they are required to expand more energy to function and focus better at workplace. Subsequently, this influences negatively on their creative thoughts, design process and their output. In turn, affecting their morale and work performance. With the long hours that design students spend on their design process, they get physically drained as well.

87


CONCEPTUALISATION

Design Research Methods Week 08: September 24 to September 30, 2012

PRIMARY

SECONDARY

SURVEYS + QUESTIONNAIRES

LITERATURE REVIEW

To collect information on:

To do further research through e-journals, books & online articles:

- Design students’ preferences of a workspace & the specific problems they faced working in school.

- Environmental psychological effects of a workspace. - Benefits of defining a workspace.

INTERVIEWS To gather direct information on: - Designers’ opinions of their working space, in relative to the quality of their creative thinking & their rate of work efficiency.

CASE STUDIES To observe & understand how: - Design studios managed their workspaces, how this defined workspaces support & influence designers in their work process in terms of creative thinking & design outputs.

88


CONCEPTUALISATION

Design Research Objectives Week 08: September 24 to September 30, 2012

MAIN OBJECTIVE

To create a conducive and inspiring work environment for design students so they can better perform in their creative thinking and design process.

SPECIFIC OBJECTIVE

To design a brand that inspire students to define their own workspace, as a mental state of ‘attitude’ that they could carry around and occupy at different work environments. However, it should be abided with a set of rules so that the act of defining workspace would not pose as an inconvenience to others. Thus this brand of attitude helps influencing and encouraging other students to follow subsequently.

SIGNIFICANCE OF STUDY

As designers in all parts of the world spend an increasing amounts of time on their design process, the effects of these work environments on occupants’ performance, health and morale, urgently needs to be understood. The knowledge yielded by this research could inspire design students to take control in “defining” their own workspace which helps to develop their creative thinking and working ability. Subsequently, these students would not be bounded mentally by the physical space constraint. Being equipped with this useful knowledge, design students could manage their space more effectively and instinctively which helps to support their overall design process and thus, improving their morale and work performance.

89


CONCEPTUALISATION

Target Audience Week 08: September 24 to September 30, 2012

PRIMARY

SECONDARY

DESIGN STUDENTS (AGE 17- 25) MALE & FEMALE

SECONDARY & TERTIARY STUDENTS (AGE 14- 25) MALE & FEMALE

Unfavourable work environment

Younger Generation

Design students do not have excess money to set up our own design studio to do work.

Easier for them to be educated & grounded with these basic principles and knowledge on how to use space effectively.

Unlike designers, design students are usually restricted to working within the given amount of space we have in school.

Well-managed workspace in the future Being equipped with the knowledge at an early age, they could managed their workspace more effectively & instinctively to better support their work process. In turn, improving their morale and work performance. It will have a positive impact on the society in the future.

Comparing school to design studios, it may have a lack or an unfavourable work environment for students. Think Creatively As creatives, design students have to be constantly inspired and think creatively for design solutions. Thus, we depend heavily on a conducive environment to help generate ideas. Being educated in the participation of defining our own workspace could help us work efficiently in regardless of the physical space constraints. Highly Influenced Generation We are easily motivated by external influences such as peers, social media and trends. So by creating a visual identity, this brand of attitude could easily inspire students to redefine their own creative workspaces and thus, influencing and encouraging others to follow subsequently.

90


CONCEPTUALISATION

Key Issues & Research Questions Week 08: September 24 to September 30, 2012

KEY AREA 1

PHYSICAL SPACE AFFECT THINKING POTENTIAL AND ABILITY - poor management of space and its impact on designers - the size of a space and its effects on thinking potential - the environmental psychological effects of workspace

KEY AREA 2

WORKSPACE DEFINES & INFLUENCES CREATIVE THOUGHTS PROCESS & WORK PERFORMANCE? - The relationship between workspace and creative thinking - Theory of psychological comfort applied in workspace - Benefits on defining a workspace physically and psychologically

KEY AREA 3

CONSTRAINTS OF PHYSICAL SPACE STEMS FROM AN EXTERNAL FACTOR (BEYOND THE OCCUPANT’S CONTROL) -The management and distribution of physical space in the workplace -The physical workspace and its effects on designers in their design process - Benefits of the workspace defined in design studios

RESEARCH QUESTIONS 1. How does physical space affect thinking potential and ability; what is the size of space in relative to the quality of thinking? 2. How does workspace defines and influences creative thoughts process and work performance? 3. What are the constraints of physical space and its effects on designers?

91


RESEARCH (WEEK 09)


RESEARCH

Survey Findings #2 Week 09: October 01 to October 07, 2012

BACKGROUND

OBJECTIVES

After 1st round of survey research, I have the basic understanding of students’ opinions towards working in school. However in order to get a more specific respond, I went ahead to refine the survey. I make most of the questions in the structure of closed questions so it is easier for students to answer them accordingly.

To find out: - Design students’ preferences of a workspace; how much physical space in general do they feel they need to have in order to better support their design process? - The problems that design students faced working in school and how does workspace affect designers in their creative thinking?

My research is to gather first hand information from design students on how workspace affects their thinking ability and work performance. In turn, how does this workspace defines and influences their creative thought process and work performance.

These objectives are based on the 3 key issues: 1. How does physical space affect thinking potential and ability; what is the size of space in relative to the quality of thinking?

As students spend an increasingly amount of time working in school, I would also like to find out what are the problems students faced due to the constraints of physical space.

2. How does workspace defines and influences creative thoughts process and work performance? 3. What are the constraints of physical space and its problems and effects on design students?

* On a side note: I learnt the way of structuring the project’s survey questions from the book: How to develop a questionnaire by Bill Gillham

94


RESEARCH

SURVEY QUESTIONS

95


RESEARCH

SURVEY QUESTIONS

96


RESEARCH

SURVEY RESULTS

97


RESEARCH

SURVEY RESULTS

98


RESEARCH

SURVEY RESULTS

99


RESEARCH

SURVEY RESULTS

100


EVALUATION

Presentation Feedback Week 10: October 11, 2012

FEEDBACK Well, I was so relieved that it ended well. I have managed to finish my presentation and delivered the points successfully within the given 5 minutes time. The panel of lecturers complimented my presentation, saying that it was an experience for them, with Yasser applauding that he was impressed by it. The points were well-articulated thus the lecturers were very much convinced by my topic. Furthermore, they commented that they were looking forward to my Studio outcomes. Well, I do hope I could manage to produce something that is substantial, out in time. This is going to be a demanding span of 6 weeks till assessment which falls on Week 17!

Below are areas that the lecturers have advised which I could work on to better improve my essay: Design Hypothesis: Take note for design hypothesis, do not use “I” or “aim” inside. Refine to make it better. Research Methods / Key Issues: Selection of research methods is appropriate, but identification of key areas for each chosen method could be clearer. - Key Issue 1: Can consider looking into the area of study by interior designers how they manage the physical spaces within a work environment. - Key Issue 3: Refine the sentence & elaborate on what “no control” mean? Such as mentioned in design issue“This is beyond the worker’s control as the workspace problems caused by the physical space constraints stems from an external factor. We are limited to the workspaces which are already defined and controlled by organisations.” Specific Objective: Expand more specifically on how using a visual identify can help to inspire design students in defining their workspaces. Provide and elaborate the extended possible examples of visual identity. This can bring over to Studio outcomes. Research Questions: Have managed to formulate good top key research questions in relation to the topics of research, but the objective given to each question could be clearer. Overall Your background and research portion is well researched but could do well with better analytical work. Accentuate with better references to drive your point across. Beef up your on your Key Issues with expanded iterations. The design hypothesis deserves a more intellectual take, right now it is adequate but bordering on basic knowledge. Revisit your working titles.

101


VISUALISATION (WEEK 10)


VISUALISATION

Project Brand Philosophy Week 10: October 08 to October 14, 2012

MINDMAP

104


VISUALISATION

KEY ASSOCIATIONS: FREEDOM WARM COMMUNITY JOY INSPIRING

105


VISUALISATION

Key Association - Freedom Week 10: October 08 to October 14, 2012

FLEXIBILITY

LIBERTY

POWER

Breathing Space

Free-will

Desires

Free

Equity

Responsibilities

Rooms

Independence

Actions

Empty

Opportunity

Moral

Adjustable

Choice

Ethics

Without restraint

Grace

Undue restrictions

106


VISUALISATION

PRIVILEGE

OPENNESS

Entitlement

Space

Empowerment

Universe

Authority

Unclutter

Confident

Airy

Strong

Access

Benefits

Navigable

Rights

Extended

DIRECTION / CONCEPT - To have a set of moral ethics and responsibilities - A room of breathing space - The notion of free-will - Liberty of power to design

Clear

107


VISUALISATION

Key Association - Warm Week 10: October 08 to October 14, 2012

FRIENDLY

SUN

SINCERE

Kind

Tress

Genuine

Helpful

Clouds

Real

Charitable

Sky

Positive

Heart

Scenery

Optimistic

Hospitable

Fine

Heartfelt

Benevolent

Nature

Straightforward

Responsive

Candid Trust

108


VISUALISATION

ENTHUSIASM

COMFORTABLE

Eager

Cosy

- Free from constraints

Excited

Relaxed

- Filled with zealous and passion

Stimulate

Familiar surroundings

- Friendly and Warm

Live

Ease

- Positive and Candid

Contagious

Free from constraints

Passionate Zealous

109

DIRECTION / CONCEPT


VISUALISATION

Key Association - Community Week 10: October 08 to October 14, 2012

SUPPORT

SHARE

CITIZENS

Helpful

Discuss

Inhabitants

Substantiality

Communicate

Residents

Fulfilling

Listen

Urban

Assistance

Interactive

Public

Functional

Intertwine

Locality

Encourage

Connected

Society

Collaboration

Meetings

Necessities Help someone in distress

110


VISUALISATION

NEIGHBOURHOOD

GANG

Region

Circle of friends

- Communicative society

Area

Clique

- A collaboration of ideas

Restrict

Attitude

Spirit

Frequency

- Shared interests within a community

Town

Shared interests

DIRECTION / CONCEPT

- Functional and Encouraging

Crowd

111


VISUALISATION

Key Association - Joy Week 10: October 08 to October 14, 2012

HAPPINESS

ELATION

EMOTIONS

Birthdays

Euphoria

Lively

Anniversaries

Ecstasy

High

Source

Vibrant

Motivated

Love

Colours

Keen

Relationships

Merry

Triumph

Bliss

Gaiety

Pride

“Joie” in French

Festive Cheerful

112


VISUALISATION

DELIGHT

ENJOYMENT

Glee

Favourites

- Having a good time

Contentment

Recreation

- Source of contentment

Satisfied

Hobbies

- Glee with pleasure

Gladness

Relaxed

- Euphoria surroundings

Pleasure

Have a good time

- Be merry and lively

113

DIRECTION / CONCEPT


VISUALISATION

Key Association - Inspiring Week 10: October 08 to October 14, 2012

AWAKEN

CREATIVE

IMPACT

Senses

Ideas

Positive

Sparks

Insights

Life-changing

Stir

Muses

Influential

Trigger

Brain juice

Significance

Ignite

Thoughts

Modify

Stimulating

Have an effect on Transform Shape Mould

114


VISUALISATION

DIRECTION / CONCEPT

UPLIFTING

PROMPT

Good spirits

Kindle

- Awaken your senses

Optimism

Animate

- Gain insights to your stirring

Encouraging

Revive

- Feed on creative juice

Determined

Confidence Boost

- Transformative future

Motivated

Incline

Heartwarming

Spur on

Touching

Feed

115


VISUALISATION

Project Brand Direction Week 10: October 08 to October 14, 2012

FREEDOM

WARM COMMUNITY

To have a set of moral ethics and responsibilities, A room of breathing space, The notion of free-will, Liberty of power to design

Free from constraints, Filled with zealous and passion, Friendly and Warm, Positive and Candid

Communicative society, A collaboration of ideas, Shared interest within a community, Functional and Encouraging

JOY

Having a good time, Source of contentment, Glee with pleasure, Euphoria surroundings, Be merry and lively

INSPIRING

Awaken your senses, Gain insights to your stirring, Feed on creative juice, Transformative future

BRAND DIRECTION

- To encourage the notion of free-will & liberty to live a merrier life with a positive set of moral ethics and responsibilities. - To create a brand that is friendly and warm which is uplifting and positive. - To create a brand that is able to ignite people zeal and passion for creativity by encouraging collaborative of interests and ideas. - To be a source of contentment that would constantly makes people glee with pleasure. - Design that is supportive, functional and inspiring.

Brand values are generated from Jooey’s mind-map of ideas.

116


VISUALISATION

Branding with Emotion Week 10: October 08 to October 14, 2012

BRAND VALUES EMOTION DRIVER

EMOTIONAL PROMISE

Freedom, Warm, Community, Joy, Inspiring

Inspiring When people associate with themselves with the brand, they will be surrounded with a supportive, functional and inspiring community.

Positivity To create a brand that is friendly and warm which is uplifting and positive. Also, aim to be a source of contentment that would constantly makes people glee with pleasure after interacting with the brand.

CONSUMER ASPIRATION

A sense of freedom When people view the brand, they will embrace the notion of free-will & liberty to live a merrier life with a positive set of moral ethics and responsibilities.

CONSUMER MOTIVATION

Stimulate a creative community When people interact with the brand, they will be ignited with zeal and passion for creativity through the encouragement of collaborative interests and ideas.

EXAMPLE OF AN EMOTION DRIVER

The emotion driver harmony characterises brands known for sharing, support and optisim (like Disney, Coca Cola, and eBay). Travelocity clearly is primarily a harmony brand for its sense of community and a freedom brand for the discovery it brings to its guest. Harmony brands will connect with people who aspire to belong to the tribe, as a springboard for celebrating life, exploring new horizons, and sharing joy. The emotional promise is conviviality, and the consumer motivation is to participate in life, share joy. This example is extracted from the book “Humanising Brands through Emotional Design” by Marc Gobé

117


RESEARCH

Artist Philosophy Week 10: October 08 to October 14, 2012

MATTHIAS HEIDERICH Born in 1982 in Bad Hersfeld, Germany, Matthias Heiderich is a self-taught photographer currently living and working in Berlin, where his images have been exhibited widely. Following his studies in linguistics and phonetics, he completed a Master of Arts from Trinity College, Dublin, in 2007. In addition to pursuing personal photographic projects, Matthias also operates a record label, WeirdandWired.net, and is a DJ and music producer. His photos are widely bright colours which evokes a sense of warmth. The bright complimentary colours schemes is so attractive which is very uplifting for our morale and bring much joy to our lives. Matthias’s photography was a great source of inspiration for my brand as I feel that his works shared a similar intention as my brand values. Thus, I inspired to create a colour scheme and patterns based on his works which could help to reflect my brand values perfectly. Extracted from: http://www.matthias-heiderich.de/

118


RESEARCH

119


VISUALISATION

Brand Moodboard Week 10: October 08 to October 14, 2012

120


VISUALISATION

121


VISUALISATION

Project Brand Name Week 10: October 08 to October 14, 2012

POSSIBLE NAMES Birds Birds of Joy Appetite Bask Ardour Fervour Zeal Joie (Joy in French) Convivial Latitude Fanatic

CHOSEN NAME L’ attitude (Pronounced as ‘lit-litude’) L’ attitude in french when translated to english means “The Attitude”. However, latitude also refers to space, region and freedom of action. With the conjoined name, it forms the meaning of having the right attitude and liberty to define your own creative space. This brand name clearly reflects the brand values and aspire the consumer with a sense of freedom. Thus when people view the brand, they will embrace the notion of free-will & liberty to live a merrier life with a positive set of moral ethics and responsibilities.

STRATEGY FOR CHOOSING A BRAND NAME Conjoined (combined or portmanteau) A conjoined brand name occurs when a brand name contains more than one than word to form something new. Typically, the combined name gives two different meanings or understanding to the new. It’s a good alternative to an acronym, especially if you don’t want to deliberately spell out what you do, and still be clear and inventive. Examples: FedEx, PayPal, Coca-Cola, Microsoft Extracted from: http://www.thedesigncubicle.com/2008/11/ strategies-for-choosing-a-memorable-brand-name/

122


VISUALISATION

L’attitude Art Direction Week 10: October 08 to October 14, 2012

COLOUR PALETTE PRIMARY

C = 63 M=0 Y = 18 K=0

C = 83 M=0 Y = 21 K=0

C = 83 M=0 Y = 21 K = 50

C=0 M =79 Y =100 K = 11

C = 11 M = 01 Y=0 K = 90

SECONDARY

C=0 M =75 Y = 90 K=0

CHOSEN TYPEFACE

HEADLINE FUTURA LTD

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse. MINION PRO

123


VISUALISATION

Logo Moodboard Week 10: October 08 to October 14, 2012

124


VISUALISATION

125


VISUALISATION

Process Charts Examples Week 10: October 08 to October 14, 2012

126


VISUALISATION

After few rounds of revisions, I adopt some of the visual references and adapt them to my final process chart!

127


REALISATION (WEEK 11)


REALISATION

Logo Design Week 11: October 15 to October 21, 2012

SKETCHES

130


REALISATION

SYMBOLIC LOGO VERSION 1.

VERSION 2.

VERSION 3.

VERSION 4.

131


REALISATION

LOGOTYPE

Century Gothic

Avenir

Caviar Dreams

Geo Sans Light

Futura Lt

132


REALISATION

COMBINATION LOGO

VERSION 1.

VERSION 2.

VERSION 3.

133


REALISATION

Chosen Logo Design #1 Week 11: October 15 to October 21, 2012

LOGO (B/W)

LOGO WITH SLOGAN (B/W)

THE BREAKDOWN

BREAKING FREE FROM THE CONSTRICTION OF SPACE

SPACE CONSTRAINTS

FREEDOM. NOT BOUNDED

134

L’ATTITUDE BREAK FREE


REALISATION

CHOSEN LOGO

RATIONALE L’ attitude (Pronounced as ‘lit-litude’) Bird is a symbol of free-will. Birds travelling to different places in packs reflect their tight and supportive community which the brands aim to encourage among individuals. These triangles are parts of square which reflects the notion of breaking away from the constraints represented by the box. With the 5 triangles forming the symbolic bird, each represents a brand value: FREEDOM. WARM. COMMUNITY. JOY. INSPIRING. L’ attitude in french when translated to English means “The Attitude”. However, latitude also refers to space, region and freedom of action. With the conjoined name, it forms the meaning of having the right attitude and liberty to define your own creative space. Thus when people view the brand, they will embrace the notion of free-will & liberty to live a merrier life with a positive set of moral ethics and responsibilities. On top of that, the words have spaces on some of the letters to emphasise strongly on the space theory.

135


K 01 - WEEKREALISATION 11 WEE BRAINSTORM FOR IDEAS

Process Chart

K 01 - WEEK 11 WEE

DESIGN PROCESS DESIGN PROCESS

MINDMAP. THINGS THAT I LIKE

BRAINSTORM FOR IDEAS

Week 11: October 21, 2012

MINDMAP. THINGS THAT I LIKE

BAD IDEAS. START OVER

D AT E : 2 2 . 1 0 . 2 0 1 2

CLOSER LOOK

PROLOGUE

START D ATE: 2 2 .HERE 10.2012

WEEK 02

2 a list of To comeChose up with design issues potential issues to work on

READ BO SOCIAL ISSUES

WEEK 04

To develop on both topics, defining the area of study

Chose 2 design issues

To develop on both topics, defining the area of study YOUR ROOM = YOUR PERSONALITY

MOMENTS OF DISTRACTIONS

DESIGN ISSUE #1

DESIGN ISSUE #2

MOMENTS OF DISTRACTIONS

AREA OF STUDY YOUR ROOM = YOUR PERSONALITY COLLECTING THINGS

To u environm effec

WEEK 04

DESIGN ISSUE #2

DESIGN ISSUE #1

Change direction to

To un environmen effects

AREA OF STUDY DEFINE YOUR WORKSPACE

REA “WHE

CONSULATION WITH YASSER

TIME TO CATCH UP ON CPJ!

Change AREA OF STUDY direction to To find out the specific COLLECTING THINGS problems that students faced CONSULATION when working in school WITH YASSER SURVEYS To find out the specific problems that students faced when working in school

SURVEYS

FEEDBACK

WEEK 06

Yasser: “Lack of analytical skills.”

To conceptualise on chosen topic

WEEK 08

To conceptualise on chosen topic DESIGN ISSUE #2

WEEK 08

Presentation of chosen topic Space ‘Bound’

FEEDBACK

AREA OF STUDY

Ground research on WORKSPACE DEFINE YOUR school studio - H503

READ “WHERE CASE STUDY Co i

Ground research on school studio - H503

WEEK 06

JUST LEARN TIME Yasser: “Lack of analytical skills. ” TO CATCH TO ANALYSE UP ON CPJ!

CASE STUDY

To produce design responds for studio

Presentation of chosen topic Space ‘Bound’

WEEK 10

Refine Design Research Proposal

“Impre

“It was quite an ex

SURVEYS

SPACE ‘BOUND’

Understanding my topic better

MORE READINGS

MORE READINGS

CASE STUDY

CASE STUDY

Refine Design Research Proposal Confirm on the area of study

The Miner Confirm on the And A Major area of study Brooklyn VanMiner Bo The Le-mentzel: And A Major One Sqm House Brooklyn

To master how to draft SURVEYS interview questions PLAN DELIVERABLES FOR SEM 1 & SEM 2

PLAN DELIVERABLES FOR SEM 1 & SEM 2

To work on the To outcomes better suport for W.I.P. Show Hypothesis my Deisgn

Van Bo Lu: Yi-Cong Le-mentzel: Wohnwerkzeuge One SqmTools) House (Living

Easier to conceptualise To work on theoutcomes outcomes for design for W.I.P. Show

Yi-Cong Lu: Wohnwerkzeuge (Living Tools)

Easier to conceptualise for design outcomes

PROCESS CHART

W.I.P DELIVERABLES

To master how to draft To better suport interview questions my Deisgn Hypothesis

A CHART THAT TELLS THE PLAN OF MY PROCESS TO ACHIEVING MYCHART OUTCOMES. PROCESS A CHART THAT TELLS THE

136

WEEK 10

2nd round of survey with a list of refined interview questions

READ ON BOOK: “DEVELOPING QUESTIONNAIRS” BY BILL GILLHAM

WEEK 11

WEEK 11 INFOGRAPHICS

A POSTER THAT GIVES A SUMMARY OF MY PROJECT & PROJECT BRAND GUIDELINES. OVERVIEW

A POSTER THAT REFLECTS MY RESEARCH TO BETTER SUPPORT MY DESIGN ISSUE. INFOGRAPHICS A POSTER THAT REFLECTS

“Extend on your “Impressi

“I am very c topic. Looki “Extend on your de studio outco

“I am very con topic. Looking studio outcome

READ ON BOOK: “HUMA BRANDS THROUGH EMO DESIGN” BY MARC G

READ ON BOOK: “HUMAN BRANDS THROUGH EMOTI DESIGN” BY MARC GOB

CREATED MY BRAND VALUES

CREATED MY BRAND VALUES

PROJECT OVERVIEW

A POSTER THAT GIVES A

FEEDBACK

2nd round of survey with a list of refined interview questions

READ ON BOOK: “DEVELOPING QUESTIONNAIRS” BY BILL GILLHAM

Comp int

“It was quite an

To produce design responds for studio

FEEDBACK

DESIGN ISSUE #2 Understanding my topic better SPACE ‘BOUND’

READ BOO

SOCIAL ISSUES

DESIGN ISSUES

IT’S OK! ANDY & ELSA BEACH APARTAMENTO ISSUE #07

JUST LEARN TO ANALYSE

TO GAIN INSPIRATIONS

TO GAIN INSPIRATIONS

DESIGN ISSUES

IT’S OK!

TAKE A N

WEEK 02

To come up with a list of potential issues to work on

INSPIRATION STRIKES! “A home sweet home is not curated or produced by acquiring a perfect arrangement of chairs, lamps and friends. A real living space is made from living, not decorating. A bored materialist can’t understand that a “A home sweet home is not curated house has to become a home. It or produced by acquiring a perfect happens, not through perfection but arrangement of chairs, lamps and by participation.” friends. A real living space is made from living, not decorating. A bored materialist can’t understand that a ANDY & ELSA BEACH house has to become a home. It APARTAMENTO ISSUE #07 but happens, not through perfection by participation.”

BAD IDEAS. START OVER

PROLOGUE

START HERE

INSPIRATION STRIKES!

TAKE A

WEEK

W.I.P. S 1 WEEK

(to be contin


REALISATION

OVERVIEW K 01 - WEEK 11 WEE

Muji BRAINSTORM FOR IDEAS

MINDMAP. THINGS THAT I LIKE

Ikea

DESIGN PROCESS

Quality Of Living

BAD IDEAS. START OVER

DAT E: 22. 10. 2012

TAKE A NAP

PROLOGUE

START HERE

WATCH TV

TO GAIN INSPIRATIONS

WEEK 02

To come up with a list of potential issues to work on

INSPIRATION STRIKES!

Chose 2 design issues

READ BOOKS SOCIAL ISSUES

DESIGN ISSUES

WEEK 04

To develop on both topics, defining the area of study

“A home sweet home is not curated or produced by acquiring a perfect arrangement of chairs, lamps and friends. A real living space is made from living, not decorating. A bored materialist can’t understand that a house has to become a home. It happens, not through perfection but by participation.”

DESIGN ISSUE #1

DESIGN ISSUE #2

MOMENTS OF DISTRACTIONS

YOUR ROOM = YOUR PERSONALITY

ANDY & ELSA BEACH APARTAMENTO ISSUE #07

To understand the environmental psychological effects of workspace

Change direction to

AREA OF STUDY COLLECTING THINGS

AREA OF STUDY DEFINE YOUR WORKSPACE

READ ON BOOK: “WHERE THEY CREATE”

CONSULATION WITH YASSER

IT’S OK!

To find out the specific problems that students faced when working in school JUST LEARN TO ANALYSE

Ground research on school studio - H503 CASE STUDY

SURVEYS

TIME TO CATCH UP ON CPJ!

WEEK 06

Yasser: “Lack of analytical skills.”

To produce design responds for studio

FEEDBACK

To conceptualise on chosen topic

WEEK 08

“It was quite an experience for us.”

Presentation of chosen topic Space ‘Bound’

WEEK 10

“Impressive presentation.” FEEDBACK

DESIGN ISSUE #2

Refine Design Research Proposal SURVEYS

SPACE ‘BOUND’

Understanding my topic better

Confirm on the area of study

The Miner And A Major Brooklyn

CASE STUDY

Yi-Cong Lu: Wohnwerkzeuge (Living Tools)

PROCESS CHART

W.I.P DELIVERABLES

2nd round of survey with a list of refined interview questions

“Extend on your design hypothesis.”

“I am very convinced by your topic. Looking forward to your studio outcomes.”

To master how to draft interview questions PLAN DELIVERABLES FOR SEM 1 & SEM 2

Van Bo Le-mentzel: One Sqm House MORE READINGS

Compiled research into a booklet

A CHART THAT TELLS THE PLAN OF MY PROCESS TO ACHIEVING MY OUTCOMES.

To better suport my Deisgn Hypothesis

To work on the outcomes for W.I.P. Show

READ ON BOOK: “DEVELOPING QUESTIONNAIRS” BY BILL GILLHAM

WEEK 11

Easier to conceptualise for design outcomes

VISUAL RESEARCH

CREATED MY BRAND VALUES

PROJECT OVERVIEW

INFOGRAPHICS

A POSTER THAT GIVES A SUMMARY OF MY PROJECT & BRAND GUIDELINES.

A POSTER THAT REFLECTS MY RESEARCH TO BETTER SUPPORT MY DESIGN ISSUE.

137

READ ON BOOK: “HUMANISING BRANDS THROUGH EMOTIONAL DESIGN” BY MARC GOBÉ.

WEEK 12 W.I.P. Show (to be continued...)


DEFINING YOUR SPACE REALISATION

DESIGN ISSUE DESIGN ISSUE

PROBLEM ANAYLSED FROM CASE STUDY & READINGS

Survey Infographics

PROBLEM ANAYLSED FROM CASE STUDY & READINGS

When an organisation fails to manage the workspace properly, this could lead to an increased flow of distractions, i.e. noise levels within the work environment. thisfails is beyond thethe worker’s control as thethis workspace When an However, organisation to manage workspace properly, could lead problems by the physical space constraints stems from an external to ancaused increased flow of distractions, i.e. noise levels within the work factor.environment. We are limited to the which are control alreadyasdefined and However, thisworkspaces is beyond the worker’s the workspace controlled by organisations. problems caused by the physical space constraints stems from an external

As a result, design students are affected in their thinking potential as they are required to expand more energy to function and focus better at workplace. Subsequently, this influences negatively ontheir their creativepotential thoughts, design As a result, design students are affected in thinking as they are process and their output. In turn, affecting work required to expand more energy to function and their focus morale better at and workplace. performance. With long hours that design spendthoughts, on their design Subsequently, thisthe influences negatively on students their creative design process, get their physically drained too. affecting their morale and work processthey and output. In turn,

factor. We are limited to the workspaces which are already defined and controlled by organisations.

performance. With the long hours that design students spend on their design process, they get physically drained too.

Week 11: October 21, 2012

83 % OF STUDENTS FIND IT HARD TO CONCENTRATE WHEN WORKING SCHOOL % OF STUDENTS FIND IT INHARD TO 83 %

CONCENTRATE WHEN WORKING IN SCHOOL

%

Distractions, i.e noise & verbal interruptions

Lack of space to do work

Distractions, i.e noise & verbal interruptions

CLOSER LOOK

4 % Lack of individual space to store our research & ongoing work 4 % Lack of individual space to store our research & ongoing work

SPACE THEORY SPACE THEORY

15 % 15 %

Unconducive environment

9% 9%

Lack of privacy to do work

Unconducive environment

Lack of privacy to do work

Our working potential is affected too as we cannot Our working potential is perform to the fullest affected too as we cannot perform to the fullest

ABILITY ABILITY

HOW SPACE AFFECTS US?

We can improve our work performance We can improve our through motivation work performance through motivation

We can be easily motivated by our interests & preferences We can be easily motivated by

POTENTIAL POTENTIAL

If space is poorly designed, workspace problems, i.e. If space is poorly designed, distraction occurs i.e. workspace problems,

our interests & preferences

distraction occurs

INTEREST INTEREST

LIKES LIKES

22 % 22 %

HOW SPACE AFFECTS US?

MOTIVATION MOTIVATION

START START

Lack of space to do work

49 % 49 %

SPACE SPACE

More energy is required to perform the tasks More energy is required to perform the tasks

MENTAL CAPACITY MENTAL CAPACITY

Space affects our our thinking Space affectsability our our thinking ability

DISLIKES DISLIKES Space affects us Space affects us

PHYSICAL PHYSICAL

These preferences are determined These preferences by our personality, on are thedetermined things by our wepersonality, like/dislike on the things we like/dislike

This affects our thinking ability, taking time This affects our more thinking to think creatively ability, taking more time to think creatively

Our inner world is reflected Our inner world is world reflected by our outer by our outer world

PSYCHOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGICAL

CHARACTER CHARACTER

It is shaped by our It is shaped by our character & attitude character & attitude

PERSONALITY PERSONALITY

SURVEYS SURVEYSRESULTS RESULTS

CONSTRAINTS CONSTRAINTS OF OFPHYSICAL PHYSICAL WORKSPACE WORKSPACE

The constrains of The constrains of physical space stems from physical space stems from an external factor, already an external factor, already controlled by the controlled by the organisation organisation

ENVIRONMENT ENVIRONMENT

This affects our decision in This affects our decision in coping with the constraints of coping with the constraints of our physical workspace our physical workspace

OUR DECISION OUR DECISION

RESEARCH CONDUCTED OVER 5050 STUDENTS RESEARCH CONDUCTED OVER STUDENTS

WHAT DODO PEOPLE LOOK WHAT PEOPLE LOOKFOR FORMOST MOSTININA AWORKSPACE? WORKSPACE? 18PAX PAX 18

PRIVATE & PERSONALIZED PRIVATE & PERSONALIZED CLEAN & ORGANIZED CLEAN & ORGANIZED

PAX 5 5PAX

PAX 1515PAX

QUIET & PEACEFUL QUIET & PEACEFUL WELL-EQUIPPED FACILITIES WELL-EQUIPPED FACILITIES

PERSONALISETHEIR THEIRWORKSPACE WORKSPACE 90 % WILL PERSONALISE

PAX 1010PAX

SPACIOUS & CLUTTER SPACIOUS & CLUTTER FREEFREE

94 94%%

AGREE AGREETHAT THATA APERSONALISED PERSONALISED WORKSPACE WORKSPACECAN CANHELP HELPININCREATIVE CREATIVETHINKING THINKING

2 PAX 2 PAX

138

78 %%

AGREE AGREETHAT THATWORKSPACE WORKSPACEDEFINES DEFINES THE THEVISUAL VISUALAESTHETIC AESTHETIC&&CONCEPTUAL CONCEPTUAL APPROACH APPROACHOFOFTHEIR THEIRWORK WORK


REALISATION

OVERVIEW

DEFINING YOUR SPACE DESIGN ISSUE

PROBLEM ANAYLSED FROM CASE STUDY & READINGS

When an organisation fails to manage the workspace properly, this could lead to an increased flow of distractions, i.e. noise levels within the work environment. However, this is beyond the worker’s control as the workspace problems caused by the physical space constraints stems from an external factor. We are limited to the workspaces which are already defined and controlled by organisations.

As a result, design students are affected in their thinking potential as they are required to expand more energy to function and focus better at workplace. Subsequently, this influences negatively on their creative thoughts, design process and their output. In turn, affecting their morale and work performance. With the long hours that design students spend on their design process, they get physically drained too.

83 %

OF STUDENTS FIND IT HARD TO CONCENTRATE WHEN WORKING IN SCHOOL

%

Distractions, i.e noise & verbal interruptions

Lack of space to do work

49 % 4%

SPACE THEORY

Lack of individual space to store our research & ongoing work

15 %

9%

Lack of privacy to do work

HOW SPACE AFFECTS US?

MOTIVATION

START

22 % Unconducive environment

We can improve our work performance through motivation

We can be easily motivated by our interests & preferences

POTENTIAL

If space is poorly designed, workspace problems, i.e. distraction occurs

SPACE INTEREST

LIKES

Our working potential is affected too as we cannot perform to the fullest

ABILITY This affects our thinking ability, taking more time to think creatively

More energy is required to perform the tasks

MENTAL CAPACITY

Space affects our our thinking ability

DISLIKES Space affects us

PHYSICAL

These preferences are determined by our personality, on the things we like/dislike

Our inner world is reflected by our outer world

PSYCHOLOGICAL

CHARACTER The constrains of physical space stems from an external factor, already controlled by the organisation

It is shaped by our character & attitude

PERSONALITY

SURVEYS RESULTS

CONSTRAINTS OF PHYSICAL WORKSPACE

ENVIRONMENT

This affects our decision in coping with the constraints of our physical workspace

OUR DECISION

RESEARCH CONDUCTED OVER 50 STUDENTS

WHAT DO PEOPLE LOOK FOR MOST IN A WORKSPACE? 18 PAX

PRIVATE & PERSONALIZED CLEAN & ORGANIZED

5 PAX

15 PAX

QUIET & PEACEFUL WELL-EQUIPPED FACILITIES

90 % WILL PERSONALISE THEIR WORKSPACE

10 PAX

SPACIOUS & CLUTTER FREE

94 %

AGREE THAT A PERSONALISED WORKSPACE CAN HELP IN CREATIVE THINKING

78 %

2 PAX

139

AGREE THAT WORKSPACE DEFINES THE VISUAL AESTHETIC & CONCEPTUAL APPROACH OF THEIR WORK


REALISATION

Project Overview Week 11: October 21, 2012

OVERVIEW

An investigative exploration of how individuals can break free from the constriction of space, through the redefinition of our creative workspace. BACKGROUND B R EA K

We are often constrained and limited to the space that surrounds us. This ‘fixed’ space curbs our ability to roam free, to take risks and explore hidden potentials. Mentally and physically, we feel bounded by this sense of space. Is the space around us controlling how we think, act and live? How a workspace is designed and occupied can affect: People feelings, work performance, commitment to the organisation and the creation of new knowledge in the organisation

FREE

L’ ATTITUDE

[Pronounced as ‘lit-litude’]

L’ attitude when translated to french means “The Attitude”. However, latitude in English refers to space, region and freedom of action. With the conjoined name, it forms the meaning of having the right attitude and liberty to define your own creative space. This brand name clearly reflects the brand values and aspires the consumer with a sense of freedom. Thus when people view the brand, they will be inspired to embrace the notion of free-will & liberty to live a merrier life with a positive set of moral ethics and responsibilities. The bird is a symbol of free-will. With the 5 triangles forming the symbolic bird, each represents a brand value: FREEDOM. WARM. COMMUNITY. JOY. INSPIRING.

BREAKING FREE FROM THE CONSTRICTION OF SPACE SPACE CONSTRAINTS

FREEDOM. NOT BOUNDED

L’ATTITUDE BREAK FREE

THE CONCEPT Understanding that space could affect the ability of designers both physically and psychologically, this project seeks to use visual identity, to promoting the right attitude and principles to inspire design students to define their own workspace. This brand of attitude could be translate into a logo and applied to various novelties as an attempt to carry the impacts and voice of the brand to a higher level. By redefining their own creative workspace, this could help individuals to break free from this constriction of space, to set forth in new and promising directions that are shaped and moulded by our attitudes.

140

OBJECTIVES MAIN OBJECTIVE To help design students to create a conducive and inspiring work environment so they can better perform in their creative thinking and design process.

SPECIFIC OBJECTIVE To design a visual identity that could inspire students to define their own workspace, as a mental state of ‘attitude’ that they could carry around and occupy at different work environments in regardless of the physical space constraints. However, it should be abided with a set of rules so that the act of defining workspace would not pose as an inconvenience to others. Thus this brand of attitude helps influencing and encouraging other students to follow subsequently, building a better workspace for everyone.

“SPACE DEFINES OUR IDEAS, WHICH ULTIMATELY DEFINE THE VISUAL AESTHETIC & CONCEPTUAL APPROACH OF OUR WORK.” QUOTED BY PANDAROAL [ AN ART & DESIGN STUDIO IN BERLIN ]


REALISATION

Brand Overview Week 11: October 21, 2012

OVERVIEW

L’ ATTITUDE

BRAND LOGO

SMALLEST SIZE

[Pronounced as ‘lit-litude’]

BLACK & WHITE

COLOUR

Proposition: To encourage the notion of free-will & liberty to live a merrier life with a positive set of moral ethics and responsibilities.

2 cm

1.8 cm

BRAND SLOGAN Break free from the constriction of space, that are already defined and controlled by organisations.

COLOUR PALETTE BRAND VALUES

FREEDOM

WARM

COMMUNITY

JOY

INSPIRING

To encourage the notion of free-will & liberty to live a merrier life with a positive set of moral ethics and responsibilities.

To create a brand that is friendly and warm which is uplifting and positive.

To create a brand that can ignite a sense of zeal and passion for creativity by encouraging collaboration of interests and ideas.

To be a source of contentment that would constantly make people glee with pleasure.

Design that is supportive, functional and inspiring.

C = 63 M=0 Y = 18 K=0

C = 83 M=0 Y = 21 K=0

C = 83 M=0 Y = 21 K = 50

141

TARGET AUDIENCE PRIMARY Design Students Age: 17- 25 years old Gender: Male & Female

SECONDARY

C=0 M = 79 Y =100 K = 11

CHOSEN TYPEFACE HEADLINE Futura Ltd

SECONDARY

C=0 M = 75 Y = 90 K=0

1.8 cm

Tertiary Students & Young Working Adults Age: 15 - 30 years old Gender: Male & Female

PRIMARY

FREEDOM. WARM. COMMUNITY. JOY. INSPIRING.

2 cm

C = 11 M = 01 Y=0 K = 90

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore. Minion Pro


EVALUATION (WEEK 12)


REALISATION

W.I.P Show Week 12: October 22 to October 28, 2012

PROCESS CHART

SURVEY INFOGRAPHICS

K 01 - WEEK 11 WEE MINDMAP. THINGS THAT I LIKE

Ikea

DESIGN PROCESS

Quality Of Living

DESIGN ISSUE BAD IDEAS. START OVER

D AT E : 2 2 . 1 0 . 2 0 1 2

TAKE A NAP

SOCIAL ISSUES

YOUR ROOM = YOUR PERSONALITY

ANDY & ELSA BEACH APARTAMENTO ISSUE #07

To understand the environmental psychological effects of workspace

Change direction to

AREA OF STUDY

We can be easily motivated by our interests & preferences

AREA OF STUDY DEFINE YOUR WORKSPACE

COLLECTING THINGS

To find out the specific problems that students faced when working in school

Ground research on school studio - H503 CASE STUDY

WEEK 06

Yasser: “Lack of analytical skills.”

WEEK 08

To conceptualise on chosen topic

WEEK 10

Presentation of chosen topic Space ‘Bound’

The Miner And A Major Brooklyn Van Bo Le-mentzel: One Sqm House CASE STUDY

Yi-Cong Lu: Wohnwerkzeuge (Living Tools)

PROCESS CHART

W.I.P DELIVERABLES

A CHART THAT TELLS THE PLAN OF MY PROCESS TO ACHIEVING MY OUTCOMES.

To better suport my Deisgn Hypothesis

READ ON BOOK: “DEVELOPING QUESTIONNAIRS” BY BILL GILLHAM

Easier to conceptualise for design outcomes

SURVEYS RESULTS READ ON BOOK: “HUMANISING BRANDS THROUGH EMOTIONAL DESIGN” BY MARC GOBÉ.

PROJECT OVERVIEW

INFOGRAPHICS

A POSTER THAT GIVES A SUMMARY OF MY PROJECT & BRAND GUIDELINES.

A POSTER THAT REFLECTS MY RESEARCH TO BETTER SUPPORT MY DESIGN ISSUE.

ENVIRONMENT

This affects our decision in coping with the constraints of our physical workspace

CONSTRAINTS OF PHYSICAL WORKSPACE

OUR DECISION

RESEARCH CONDUCTED OVER 50 STUDENTS

WHAT DO PEOPLE LOOK FOR MOST IN A WORKSPACE?

CLEAN & ORGANIZED

(to be continued...)

WELL-EQUIPPED FACILITIES

PROJECT OVERVIEW

90 % WILL PERSONALISE THEIR WORKSPACE

10 PAX 15 PAX

QUIET & PEACEFUL

W.I.P. Show

AGREE THAT A PERSONALISED WORKSPACE CAN HELP IN CREATIVE THINKING

5 PAX

SPACIOUS & CLUTTER FREE

WEEK 12

94 %

18 PAX

PRIVATE & PERSONALIZED VISUAL RESEARCH

CREATED MY BRAND VALUES

Our inner world is reflected by our outer world

PSYCHOLOGICAL

The constrains of physical space stems from an external factor, already controlled by the organisation

It is shaped by our character & attitude

PERSONALITY

“I am very convinced by your topic. Looking forward to your studio outcomes.”

WEEK 11

To work on the outcomes for W.I.P. Show

PHYSICAL CHARACTER

To master how to draft interview questions PLAN DELIVERABLES FOR SEM 1 & SEM 2

MENTAL CAPACITY

DISLIKES

These preferences are determined by our personality, on the things we like/dislike

“Extend on your design hypothesis.”

2nd round of survey with a list of refined interview questions

SURVEYS

Confirm on the area of study

Understanding my topic better

More energy is required to perform the tasks

Space affects our our thinking ability

“Impressive presentation.” FEEDBACK

SPACE ‘BOUND’

ABILITY This affects our thinking ability, taking more time to think creatively

Space affects us

“It was quite an experience for us.”

Refine Design Research Proposal

If space is poorly designed, workspace problems, i.e. distraction occurs

INTEREST

LIKES

Compiled research into a booklet

To produce design responds for studio

FEEDBACK

DESIGN ISSUE #2

78 %

2 PAX

AGREE THAT WORKSPACE DEFINES THE VISUAL AESTHETIC & CONCEPTUAL APPROACH OF THEIR WORK

PROCESS CHART

An investigative exploration of how individuals can break free from the constriction of space, through the redefinition of our creative workspace.

L’ ATTITUDE

BRAND LOGO

SMALLEST SIZE

[Pronounced as ‘lit-litude’]

BLACK & WHITE

COLOUR

Proposition: To encourage the notion of free-will & liberty to live a merrier life with a positive set of moral ethics and responsibilities.

2 cm

1.8 cm

BACKGROUND BREAK

We are often constrained and limited to the space that surrounds us. This ‘fixed’ space curbs our ability to roam free, to take risks and explore hidden potentials. Mentally and physically, we feel bounded by this sense of space. Is the space around us controlling how we think, act and live? How a workspace is designed and occupied can affect: People feelings, work performance, commitment to the organisation and the creation of new knowledge in the organisation

FREE

L’ ATTITUDE

[Pronounced as ‘lit-litude’]

L’ attitude when translated to french means “The Attitude”. However, latitude in English refers to space, region and freedom of action. With the conjoined name, it forms the meaning of having the right attitude and liberty to define your own creative space. This brand name clearly reflects the brand values and aspires the consumer with a sense of freedom. Thus when people view the brand, they will be inspired to embrace the notion of free-will & liberty to live a merrier life with a positive set of moral ethics and responsibilities. The bird is a symbol of free-will. With the 5 triangles forming the symbolic bird, each represents a brand value: FREEDOM. WARM. COMMUNITY. JOY. INSPIRING.

BREAKING FREE FROM THE CONSTRICTION OF SPACE SPACE CONSTRAINTS

FREEDOM. NOT BOUNDED

L’ATTITUDE BREAK FREE

THE CONCEPT Understanding that space could affect the ability of designers both physically and psychologically, this project seeks to use visual identity, to promoting the right attitude and principles to inspire design students to define their own workspace. This brand of attitude could be translate into a logo and applied to various novelties as an attempt to carry the impacts and voice of the brand to a higher level. By redefining their own creative workspace, this could help individuals to break free from this constriction of space, to set forth in new and promising directions that are shaped and moulded by our attitudes.

9%

Lack of privacy to do work

Our working potential is affected too as we cannot perform to the fullest

POTENTIAL

SPACE

SURVEYS

TIME TO CATCH UP ON CPJ!

15 %

Unconducive environment

READ ON BOOK: “WHERE THEY CREATE”

CONSULATION WITH YASSER

JUST LEARN TO ANALYSE

We can improve our work performance through motivation

MOTIVATION

START

MOMENTS OF DISTRACTIONS

22 %

Lack of individual space to store our research & ongoing work

HOW SPACE AFFECTS US?

WEEK 04

To develop on both topics, defining the area of study

DESIGN ISSUE #2

IT’S OK!

MORE READINGS

SPACE THEORY

READ BOOKS DESIGN ISSUES

%

Lack of space to do work

49 % 4%

Chose 2 design issues

DESIGN ISSUE #1

83 %

OF STUDENTS FIND IT HARD TO CONCENTRATE WHEN WORKING IN SCHOOL

Distractions, i.e noise & verbal interruptions

WEEK 02

To come up with a list of potential issues to work on

As a result, design students are affected in their thinking potential as they are required to expand more energy to function and focus better at workplace. Subsequently, this influences negatively on their creative thoughts, design process and their output. In turn, affecting their morale and work performance. With the long hours that design students spend on their design process, they get physically drained too.

WATCH TV

TO GAIN INSPIRATIONS

“A home sweet home is not curated or produced by acquiring a perfect arrangement of chairs, lamps and friends. A real living space is made from living, not decorating. A bored materialist can’t understand that a house has to become a home. It happens, not through perfection but by participation.”

PROBLEM ANAYLSED FROM CASE STUDY & READINGS

When an organisation fails to manage the workspace properly, this could lead to an increased flow of distractions, i.e. noise levels within the work environment. However, this is beyond the worker’s control as the workspace problems caused by the physical space constraints stems from an external factor. We are limited to the workspaces which are already defined and controlled by organisations.

PROLOGUE

START HERE

INSPIRATION STRIKES!

DEFINING YOUR SPACE

Muji BRAINSTORM FOR IDEAS

BRAND SLOGAN

OBJECTIVES

Break free from the constriction of space, that are already defined and controlled by organisations.

MAIN OBJECTIVE To help design students to create a conducive and inspiring work environment so they can better perform in their creative thinking and design process.

COLOUR PALETTE

SPECIFIC OBJECTIVE To design a visual identity that could inspire students to define their own workspace, as a mental state of ‘attitude’ that they could carry around and occupy at different work environments in regardless of the physical space constraints. However, it should be abided with a set of rules so that the act of defining workspace would not pose as an inconvenience to others. Thus this brand of attitude helps influencing and encouraging other students to follow subsequently, building a better workspace for everyone.

BRAND VALUES

QUOTED BY PANDAROAL [ AN ART & DESIGN STUDIO IN BERLIN ]

144

FREEDOM

WARM

COMMUNITY

JOY

INSPIRING

To encourage the notion of free-will & liberty to live a merrier life with a positive set of moral ethics and responsibilities.

To create a brand that is friendly and warm which is uplifting and positive.

To create a brand that can ignite a sense of zeal and passion for creativity by encouraging collaboration of interests and ideas.

To be a source of contentment that would constantly make people glee with pleasure.

Design that is supportive, functional and inspiring.

C = 63 M=0 Y = 18 K=0

C = 83 M=0 Y = 21 K=0

C = 83 M=0 Y = 21 K = 50

Design Students Age: 17- 25 years old Gender: Male & Female

SECONDARY

C=0 M = 79 Y =100 K = 11

CHOSEN TYPEFACE HEADLINE Futura Ltd

SECONDARY

C=0 M = 75 Y = 90 K=0

TARGET AUDIENCE PRIMARY

Tertiary Students & Young Working Adults Age: 15 - 30 years old Gender: Male & Female

PRIMARY

FREEDOM. WARM. COMMUNITY. JOY. INSPIRING.

“SPACE DEFINES OUR IDEAS, WHICH ULTIMATELY DEFINE THE VISUAL AESTHETIC & CONCEPTUAL APPROACH OF OUR WORK.”

2 cm

1.8 cm

C = 11 M = 01 Y=0 K = 90

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore. Minion Pro


EVALUATION

W.I.P Feedback Week 12: October 22 to October 28, 2012

145


CONCEPTUALISATION (WEEK 13)


EVALUATION

Consultation Week 13: November 01, 2012

FEEDBACK FOR W.I.P

AFTERTHOUGHT

Yasser’s Comments: Please rationalize your brand with clarity, what’s the purpose of L’attitude? Is it a goto set-up that aids to “liberate the workspace” or has an interior design agenda ? It is imperative for it to be distinct as it needs to link directly to your specialism. Good work on the CPJ, cohesive and methodological.

It was an initial attempt to address the design issue through visual identify. However after talking to a few other lecturers, I realised that visual identify may not be an appropriate strategy to help students in workspace personalisation. It was proposed that with the use of participatory methods, this could inspire students to personalise their workspace by being involved in the process. By being engaged in the experience, students could then learn from the process. Furthermore, case studies from design studio would be documented as a book, whereby students could adapt and apply the principles they learn or inspired from the book itself to help in the workspace personalisation.

148


CONCEPTUALISATION

Revised Direction Week 13: October 29 to November 04, 2012

REVISED DESIGN HYPOTHESIS In order to address the identified Design Issue, the Design Hypothesis of this research is: Understanding that workspace could affect the thinking and working ability of designers, this research paper seeks to encourage design students to personalise their workspaces through the means of collaborative participation. Using collaborative participation, this help design students to understand the process better in personalising their workspaces by being engaged in the process of doing it. In addition with relevant findings concluded from the case studies of several design studios, these provide more insights for design students in which they could take the principles and apply in their redefinition of workspaces.

REVISED KEY RESEARCH QUESTIONS 1. How does poorly designed workspace affect people thinking and working ability? 2. How does workspace define and influence creative thoughts process and work performance? 3. How does collaborative participation help to inspire students in the redefinition of their workspaces?

Through the form of collaborative participation, this help design students to learn and discover new ways in personalising their workspaces. Subsequently, design students are able to create a more conducive and inspiring work environment for themselves, without being bounded by the physical constraints of space. This helps to support their creative thought and design process. As a result, improving their overall morale and work performance.

149


CONCEPTUALISATION

Revised Key Issues Week 13: October 29 to November 04, 2012

KEY AREA 1

POORLY DESIGNED WORKSPACE AFFECTS PEOPLE THINKING AND WORKING ABILITY - The shift in workplace design and different type of office buildings’ floor plans - Factors that contribute to the cause of poorly designed workspace - Poorly designed workspace and it impacts on its occupants, especially designers

KEY AREA 2

WORKSPACE DEFINES & INFLUENCES CREATIVE THOUGHTS PROCESS & WORK PERFORMANCE? - Environmental psychological effects of workspace - Theory of psychological comfort applied in workspace (personalising your creative workspace) - Benefits on personalising your creative workspace, particularly for designers

KEY AREA 3

REDEFINITION OF CREATIVE WORKSPACE THOUGH COLLABORATIVE PARTICIPATION - Understand what is participatory; its approaches and methods - Understand how collaborative participation could support the personalisation of workspace - Collaborative participation as the most effective method to reach out to target audience

150


CONCEPTUALISATION

Overview of FYP Week 13: October 29 to November 04, 2012

151


CONCEPTUALISATION

Strategised Plan for Studio Week 13: October 29 to November 04, 2012

THE BIG PLAN

TO-DO LIST

After revising a new direction and clarification of my research questions, I begin to plan for my Studio outcome that is due in Week 17.

Step 1. Analyse other relevant books

I have decided to create an editorial book for this first semester. It would be an editorial that documents and features various design studios’ culture and personality. Hopefully, this could inspire design students to personalise their workspace through the principles they learn and apply from the book.

Step 3. Plan the content for book

But before conducting interviews with the design studios, I need to first plan the content for my book.

Step 6. Interview the Design Studios

Step 2. Pick out relevant or useful materials

Step 4. Prepare the moodboard for photography art direction Step 5. Prepared the interview questions

152


CONCEPTUALISATION

EDITORIAL YES, I AM GOING TO CREATE AN EDITORIAL BOOK. IT WOULD BE MY STUDIO OUTCOME FOR THIS SEMESTER ONE!

153


VISUALISATION (WEEK 13 - WEEK 14)


VISUALISATION

Artist References Week 13: October 29 to November 04, 2012

THE SELBY IS IN YOUR PLACE The Selby Is in Your Place was conceived when fashion and interiors photographer Todd Selby began taking portraits of dynamic and creative people—authors, musicians, artists, and designers—in their home environments and posting them on his web site. Each profile is accompanied by Selby’s watercolor portraits of the subjects and objects from their homes, and illustrated questionnaires, which Selby asks each sitter to fill out. This book consists of over thirty profiles, many of which have never-before-seen, selected exclusively for the book. The result is a collection of unique spaces bursting with energy and personality that together create a colorful hodgepodge of inspirational interiors.

156


VISUALISATION

157


VISUALISATION

158


VISUALISATION

Visual Research Analysis Week 13: October 29 to November 04, 2012

159


VISUALISATION

The Book Content Week 13: October 29 to November 04, 2012

160


VISUALISATION

THE CONTENT Section 1. Introduction: The shift in workplace design The different type of offices’ plans Section 2. Introduction: The definition of creative workspaces The 4 different type of creative spaces Section 3. Did you know? Interesting facts on workspace personalisation Survey statistic results on workspace personalisation Benefits of workspace personalisation Section 4. Case Studies of various Design Studios which include: - Quote - Photos of workspace - Photos of design works - Interview - The description of their workspace - My interpretation of their studio culture

OBJECTIVE SPECIFIC AIM To inspire design students to redefine their workspace through personalisation

MAIN AIM To create a conductive & inspiring work environment (culturally) since the phsyical space constraints is controlled by exteranl factor.

RESULTS - To improve students’ morale & work performance - To provide better support to their design process - To improve their creative thought process

161


VISUALISATION

Photography’s Moodboard Week 14: November 05 to November 11 , 2012

162


VISUALISATION

163


RESEARCH (WEEK 14)


RESEARCH

Featured Design Studio Week 14: November 05 to November 11 , 2012

ROOTS Roots is an interdisciplinary graphic design studio based in Singapore. They produce captivating, intelligent and beautifully crafted design with forward thinking ideas and executions. Creative Director, Jonathan Yuen http://www.whererootsare.com/

ABOUT Design is about being honest in the communication. Often it requires no more than simple approach in creativity and being forward thinking in the execution to relate to the right people. Good design touches people’s heart, something we love to connect with. We strive to stay true to these roots in every design project that we do. Their strength lies in producing captivating, intelligent and forward thinking communication with effective design and art direction. They work on a diverse range of design projects, across boundary of media with clients, big and small. Disciplines Brand & Identity Print & Publication Retail & Environment Packaging Posters Digital Interactive Website

166


RESEARCH

WORKS

Roots was invited as one of the designers to customise / reimagine a Transformers model kit in commemoration of the world first Cybertron Conference held in Singapore.

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A self-promotion and portfolio website for Jonathan Yuen, a multidiscplinary graphic designer based in Singapore

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RESEARCH

A series of posters designed for “Makanlah Buah-Buahan Tempatan�, an exhibition celebrating Malaysia local fruits through art and design curated by the B-Team.

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RESEARCH

Featured Design Studio Week 14: November 05 to November 11 , 2012

BEAUTIFUL Beautiful is a design studio set up by creative director, Roy Poh. Nominated by Institute of Advertising Singapore as 15 most influential Creative Directors in Singapore for 2006, 2007, 2010 and 2011, Roy was one of the founders and creative directors of Kinetic, one of the most highly-awarded agencies in the region, for 8 years. He has since left to start Beautiful on his own. Creative Director, Roy Poh http://www.abeautifuldesign.com.sg/

ABOUT Beautiful is about looking at things differently. It’s about perception. It’s about beauty in imperfection, beauty in the ordinary, beauty in everything. Most of all, it’s about finding silver linings, living a happy life. Roy, together with 6 other industry creative leaders, founded The Design Society. A Singapore registered, non-profit organization dedicated to the goals of raising the general standard of design in Singapore, and growing its reach internationally. The focused on Applied Graphic Design and its contributions to Singapore visual culture and society in general. Seeking to inspire local designers and engage the public through greater understanding and appreciation for good design. He constantly devote his personal time to the industry by tutoring students, contributing his services to design councils and associations, on various advisory panels for local art schools, participating in charity events through his designs and supporting the Singapore Design Festivals.

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WORKS

Packaging for Milk&Me fresh milk

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Contribution for The Underscore Magazine Issue 03: Flight

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Sony USM Christmas Pack

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Featured Design Studio Week 14: November 05 to November 11 , 2012

RELAY ROOM Relay Room is a typography-led branding and creative consultancy. Their vision is to create beautiful experiences which are both elegant and enabling. They help businesses build their brands & products through design marked by a careful attention to typography. They work across branding, print and digital platforms. Creative Director, Mark De Winne Business Development Director, Sarah Cheng-De Winne http://www.relayroom.com/

ABOUT They are also community builders, being the founders of Creative Mixer, a platform that brings creative professionals, developers / hackers and entrepreneurs together to redefine creativity. They specialise in many disciplines such as BRANDING & CORPORATE COMMUNICATIONS Brand Positioning, Strategy & Naming Brand Identity Design & Brand Adaptation Brand Manual / Style Guide Corporate Communication Collaterals Environmental Branding CUSTOM TYPOGRAPHY Typeface Design Font Creation EDITORIAL & EXHIBITION DESIGN Commemorative Book Design, Coffee Table Book Design Magazine Design, Editorial Design & Production Illustration & Infographic Design Exhibition Design WEB & MOBILE APP DESIGN Information Architecture & User Interface Design Front-End Graphic Interface Design, HTML/CSS Coding Wordpress CMS Customization

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WORKS

Currency of Love: Concept & Design

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RESEARCH

2012 Calender Design

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Luxola One Stop Shopping Portal (Identity and web design)

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RESEARCH

Featured Design Studio Week 14: November 05 to November 11 , 2012

THE PRESS ROOM Kelley Cheng is a pop culture junkie who abandoned her honours degree in architecture to make a pretty cool magazine called ish. 10 years on in 2009, she abandoned her magazine to do soul searching by the poolside with pina coladas. One afternoon by pool as she was sipping her cocktail, a sudden glare appeared before her and it was the goddess Guan Yin. After the sagely encounter, she was enlightened into quitting smoking and drinking, converting to organic food and embracing a healthy life altogether. She also became an invincible designer suddenly and developed a supernatural power to use Indesign, Photoshop, Autocad and various software without touching the keyboard and simply by using mind power. In her free time now, she engages in activities that saves the earth and promotes human rights. So if you want her to take time off from saving the world to do your design, be prepared to pay very well. Very very well, please – it is for the better of mankind.

ABOUT

Founder/Creative Director, Kelly Cheng http://www.thepressroom.com.sg

The Press Room is a young publishing and design consultancy that seeks to find new dimensions and language in publishing and design. As with most young firms, we will like to proclaim that we are quite dynamic, in fact, our dynamism has often been compared to that of President Barack Obama. With the philosophy that design is about good ideas, we are fully confident in designing anything and is hence multi-disciplinary in nature, as with most design firms in this century. We make big and small things like books, objects and spaces and we are attempting to make a Dolly sheep too. So you can really trust us to make anything for you, we have to refuse quite flatly though if you want any one of our good-looking team members to make a baby for you, unless you are extremely goodlooking, clever, and rich, and is fully capable of making sheep too. These days common interest is underrated in relationships. Talking about relationships, in our free time when we are not changing the world, we provide counseling for distraught couples too.

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WORKS

The Dubai Mall Book Project

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RESEARCH

Singapore Pavilion at the Expo Yeosu Korea 2012 (Website design)

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RESEARCH

Singapore Pavilion at the Expo Yeosu Korea 2012 (Identity and environmental design)

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REALISATION (WEEK 14)


REALISATION

The Interview Week 14: November 05 to November 11 , 2012

INTERVIEW WITH ROY FROM BEAUTIFUL Background of the Design Studio

Culture & Personality of your Design Studio

1. Tell us a little about your studio. How many people work at the studio?

4. What is the first thing you’ll do when you enter the studio; to kick start your day?

Beautiful is a design studio, a thinking space, a store room, a play room and a gallery. Beautiful is about looking at things differently. It’s about perception. It’s about beauty in imperfection, beauty in the ordinary, beauty in everything. Most of all, it’s about finding silver linings, living a happy life. Most of the time it’s me alone. My other working partners are the writer and web designer. We meet up only for briefing or discussion, otherwise we communicated via emails/phone calls.

Switch on the air-con. The weather in Singapore is too hot. A cool room makes the place more workable and the body more relax.

2. What type of work do you do? Eg. branding, illustration, etc.

5. What is your average day like? I only spend about a few hours a day on the computer, very early in the morning and late at night. The rest of the time I’m doing thinking work, drawing ideas on papers or typing notes on the phone if I can’t find any paper. My day activities involve fetching the kids, lunching with them, going for meetings and maybe a swim in the evening.

TO BE CONTINUE...

Anything graphic design, from branding to publication to advertising to TVCs to web solutions... 3. What is your studio size? About half the size of a badminton court.

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REALISATION

SNEAK PEEK

CATCH THE REST OF THE INTERVIEWS IN MY EDITORIALS ISSUE 2 & 3!

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REALISATION

Photo Ethnography Week 14: November 05 to November 11 , 2012

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REALISATION

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VISUALISATION (WEEK 15)


VISUALISATION

Book’s Moodboard Week 15: November 12 to November 18 , 2012

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VISUALISATION

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VISUALISATION

Book Art Direction Week 15: November 12 to November 18 , 2012

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VISUALISATION

THE IDEA The editorial would be published in 3 separate issues. Each issue would be covering 3 different themes. Issue 1: Introduction of workspace personalisation The basic things you should know about workspace Issue 2: Design Studios (Private - 1 man) Eg. Beautiful, Roots Issue 3: Design Studios (Cluttered - 6 men) Eg. The Press Room, Relay Room I would continue to expand this project to include overseas designers/illustrators. Their design studios would be featured and grouped accordingly to my different themes’ issues. Hence, there may be more issues coming up or the issues would grow thicker!

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VISUALISATION

Book’s Sketches Week 15: November 12 to November 18 , 2012

BOOK ISSUE 1

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VISUALISATION

BOOK ISSUE 2

BOOK ISSUE 3

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REALISATION (WEEK 16- WEEK 17)


REALISATION

Publication Design Week 16: November 19 to November 25 , 2012

MAGAZINE ISSUE #01

L I M I T M AGA Z I N E I S S U E #01 AC E P E R S O N A L I S AT I O N

L I M I T I S A S E R I E S O F P U B L I CAT I O N S , B O R N TO C A P T U R E THE PERSONAL EXPERIENCES AND INSIGHTS OF D E S I G N E R S T H R O U G H T H E I R C R E AT I V E WO R K S PAC E S .

Printing on luminous paper, 250gsm

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REALISATION

RATIONALE Limit is a series of publications, born to capture the personal experiences and insights of designers through their creative workspaces. Our hope is that through this we will get to share our inquisitive fascination and enthusiasm for workspaces with other like-minded individuals, who in turn can be inspired to personalise their work environment. The magazine will be featuring creative workspaces of designers, both established and emerging, from different parts of the world. We understand that how a workspace is being defined can affect not only how people feel, but also their work performance; the commitment to their employee, and the creation of new knowledge in the organisation. A workspace is dictated foremost by the culture of the studio and people working there. In this inaugural issue, we thought it appropriate to look first into the private workspace of designers who run their design studios alone; and analysed how their workspace has been personalised to reflect and support their work process. The theme we’re kicking things off with thus is ‘workspace personalisation’, understanding the notion of workspace personalisation. We have also include a few trivia and benefits of workspace personalisation.

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REALISATION

INSIDE PAGES

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REALISATION

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REALISATION

Publication Design Week 16: November 19 to November 25 , 2012

MAGAZINE ISSUE #02

L I M I T M AGA Z I N E I S S U E #02 GA N I S AT I O N A L C U LT U R E

L I M I T I S A S E R I E S O F P U B L I CAT I O N S , B O R N TO CA P T U R E THE PERSONAL EXPERIENCES AND INSIGHTS OF D E S I G N E R S T H R O U G H T H E I R C R E AT I V E WO R K S PAC E S .

Printing on luminous paper, 250gsm

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REALISATION

RATIONALE Limit is a series of publications, born to capture the personal experiences and insights of designers through their creative workspaces. Our hope is that through this we will get to share our inquisitive fascination and enthusiasm for workspaces with other like-minded individuals, who in turn can be inspired to personalise their work environment. The magazine will be featuring creative workspaces of designers, both established and emerging, from different parts of the world. We understand that how a workspace is being defined can affect not only how people feel, but also their work performance; the commitment to their employee, and the creation of new knowledge in the organisation. A workspace is dictated foremost by the culture of the studio and people working there. In this second issue, we would be looking into the workspaces of various design studios, understanding their studio cultures;. Also to analyse how their workpace has been defined to support the studios’ culture. The theme for this issue is ‘organisational culture’, identifying the different type of studio cultures.

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REALISATION

INSIDE PAGES

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REALISATION

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REALISATION

Revised Logo Design #2 Week 16: November 19 to November 25 , 2012

VERSIONS OF LOGO

LOGO 1.

LOGO 2.

LOGO 3.

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REALISATION

FINALISED LOGO DESIGN

RATIONALE Limit refers to a terminal point or boundary of an area or movement. With the white space in between the letters, it echoes a break away from the word’s pertaining meaning. Thus, forming the idea of liberty, as one of our brand’s main objective. The brand aspires to encourage individuals to explore the endless possibilities without being mentally bounded by any constraints.

THE REASON The brand name is changed to LIMIT in order to suit the studio outcome: the series of publication. The previous brand, L’ATTITUDE has been commented with it multilayered meaning and may not be direct enough for target audience to understand. Thus the revision of logo and the change of brand name. The idea of breaking away is still encompassed in this current logo, with the white space in between the letters as displayed.

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REALISATION

Revised Process Chart Week 16: November 19 to November 25 , 2012

CLOSER LOOK

Printing on luminous paper

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REALISATION

OVERVIEW

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REALISATION

Final Deliverables Week 17: November 25 to December 02 , 2012

LIMIT - PORTFOLIO SHOOT

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REALISATION

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REFERENCES (WEEK 01 - WEEK 17)


EXTRAS

References List Week 01-15: August 06 to November 18, 2012

BOOKS Barbera, P., 2011. Where They create. Amsterdam: Frame Publishers. Jansdotter, L., 2011. Open Studios. San Francisco: Chronicle Books LLC. Selby, T., 2010. The Selby Is in Your Place. New York: Abrams. Groves, K. and Knight. Will., 2010. I Wished I Worked There. New York: Wiley. Mccallam. I., 2010. Where We Work. New York: Collins Design Vischer, J.C., 1989. Environmental Quality in Offices. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold Grech, C. and Walters, D., 2008. Future Office: Design, Practice and Applied Research. New York: Talyor & Francis Pogade, D., 2008. Inspiration Office: How to Design Workspaces. Berlin: DOM Publishers

JOURNALS INTERVIEWS Rian, J., 2012. Lucky liking where you live. Apartamento. Issue #09, p.52. Donlon, C., 2012. From above the shop Interviewed by Adam Saletti. [magazine] Apartamento. Issue #09, p.76. Valaoritis, N., 2012. A modern Hellenist Interviewed by Evangelia Koutsouvolou. [magazine] Apartamento. Issue #09, p.102. Kukkapuro, Y., 2012. One family, one room Interviewed by Ida Kukkapuro. [magazine] Apartamento. Issue #09, p.158. The Harrisons, 2012. Potter & weaver Interviewed by Max Lamb. [magazine] Apartamento. Issue #09, p.188. Fallowell, D., 2012. Book Cornered Interviewed by Johnathan Openshaw. [magazine] Apartamento. Issue #09, p.243.

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EXTRAS

JOURNALS ARTICLES Lee, S.Y. and Brand, J., 2005. Effects of control over office workspace on perceptions of the work environment and work outcomes. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 25(3), pp.323-333. Wells, M. and Thelen, L., 2002. What does your workspace say about you? The influence of personality, status and workspace on personalization. Environment and Behavior, 34(3), pp.300-321. Klitzman, S. and Stellman, J., 1989. The impact of the physical environment on the psychological well-being of office workers. Social Science of Medicine, 29(6), pp.733-742. Wells, M., Thelen, L. and Ruark, J., 2007. Workspace Personalization and Organizational Culture: Does Your Workspace Reflect You or Your Company?. Environment and Behavior, 39 (5), pp.616-634. Wells, M., 2000. Office clutter or meaningful personal displays: The role of office personalization in employee and organizational well-being. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 20, pp.239-255. Hansen, W. B. and Altman, I., 1976. Decorating personal places: A descriptive analysis. Environment and Behavior, 8, pp.491-504. Congdon, G. J. and Congdon, S., 2011. Engaging students in a simulated collaborative action research project: an evaluation of a participatory approach to learning. Journal of Further and Higher Education, 35(2), pp.221-231 Harris, M. and Cullen, R., 2008. Renovation as Innovation: Transforming a Campus Symbol and a Campus Culture, Perspectives: Policy and Practice in Higher Education, 12(2), pp.47-51 McGill, I. and Brockbank, A., 2004. The action learning handbook: Powerful techniques for education, professional development and training. London: Routledge Vischer, J.C., 2008. Towards an Environmental Psychology of Workspace: How People are Affected by Environments for Work. Architectural Science Review, 51(2), pp.97-108.

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EXTRAS

WEBSITES Malik, O., 2012. You are what you curate: why Pinterest is hawt. [online] Available at: <http://gigaom. com/2012/01/04/you-are-what-you-curate-why-pinterest-is-hawt/> [Accessed 26 Aug 2012]. Poh, M., 2012. 6 Ways To Unleash Creativity In The Workplace. [online] Available at: <http://www.hongkiat.com/ blog/unleash-creativity-workplace/> [Accessed 03 Sept 2012]. The International Workplace, 2011. How Your Workspace Affects How You Feel. [online] Available at: <http:// intentionalworkplace.com/2011/09/15/how-your-workspace-affects-how-you-feel/> [Accessed 03 Sept 2012]. University of Exeter, 2010. Designing your own workspace improves health, happiness and productivity. [online] Available at: <http://psychology.exeter.ac.uk/latestnews/researchnews/title_98638_en.html> [Accessed 03 Sept 2012]. Lanks, B., 2012. Hate Your Office? Take A Look At Some Of The Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Most Creative Work Spaces. [online] Available at: <http://www.fastcodesign.com/1670557/hate-your-office-take-a-look-at-some-of-the-worlds-mostcreative-work-spaces#1> [Accessed 03 Sept 2012]. Where They Create, n. d. Index. [online] Available at: <http://www.wheretheycreate.com/> [Accessed 03 Sept 2012]. Coyler, C., n.d. Quotes On Design. [online] Available at: <http://quotesondesign.com/ellen-lupton/> [Accessed 07 Sept 2012]. Microsoft, 2004. Nine Out of 10 Employees Link Workspace Design to Their Productivity. [online] Available at: <http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/news/press/2004/jun04/06-28workplacedesignpr.aspx> [Accessed 07 Sept 2012]. AIGA, 2011. What is graphic design. [online] Available at: <http://www.aiga.org/guide-whatisgraphicdesign/> [Accessed 09 Sept 2012]. The Princeton Review, 2012. Career: Graphic Designer. [online] Available at: <http://www.princetonreview.com/ careers.aspx?cid=74> [Accessed 09 Sept 2012]. Design Council, n.d. A career in graphic design. [online] Available at: <http://www.designcouncil.org.uk/aboutdesign/types-of-design/graphic-design/a-career-in-graphic-design/> [Accessed 09 Sept 2012]. Oktavilla. 2012. Oktavilla.[online] Available at: <http://oktavilla.se/> [Accessed 09 Sept 2012]. The Wall Street Journal, 2011. Designs to Make You Work Harder. [online] Available at: <http://www.fastcodesign. com/1669856/herman-miller-taps-students-to-rethink-our-workplaces#1> [Accessed 24 Sept 2012]. Labarre, S., 2012. Herman Miller Taps Students To Rethink Our Workplaces. [online] Available at: <http://www. fastcodesign.com/1669856/herman-miller-taps-students-to-rethink-our-workplaces#1> [Accessed 24 Sept 2012]. Arieff, A., 2011. Beyond the Cubicle. [online] Available at: <http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/07/18/ beyond-the-cubicle/> [Accessed 24 Sept 2012].

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EXTRAS

Design Boom, 2012. Van Bo Le-mentzel: One Sqm House. [online] Available at: <http://www.designboom.com/ weblog/cat/9/view/22965/van-bo-le-mentzel-one-sqm-house.html> [Accessed 24 Sept 2012]. Serban Ionescu, 2012. The Miner And A Major, Brooklyn 2009. [online] Available at: <http://serbanionescu.com/ index.php?/project/the-miner-and-a-major-brooklyn-2009/> [Accessed 24 Sept 2012]. Fast Company, 2011. Redesigning: Cubicles. [online] Available at: <http://www.fastcompany.com/1757037/ redesigning-cubicles> [Accessed 24 Sept 2012]. Herman Miller, 2012. Cranbrook for Herman Miller. [online] Available at: <http://www. cranbrookforhermanmiller.com/> [Accessed 28 Sept 2012]. The HUB Singapore, 2012. Where Change Goes to Work. [online] Available at: <http://singapore.the-hub.net/> [Accessed 28 Sept 2012]. Yi Cong Lu, 2012. News. [online] Available at: <http://www.yiconglu.com//> [Accessed 01 Oct 2012].

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EXTRAS

ONLINE ARTICLES Sun, D., 2012. LaSalle College of the Arts students upset over lessons held in tents. The New Paper, [online] (Last updated 1:16AM on 27th August 2012) Available at: <http://www.tnp.sg/content/lasalle-college-arts-studentsupset-over-lessons-held-tents> [Accessed 09 Sept 2012]. Pretty, J.N. and VodouhĂŞ, S.D., 1997. Improving agricultural extension. A reference manual. [online] Natural Resources Management and Environment Department. Available at: <http://www.fao.org/docrep/W5830E/ W5830E00.htm> [Accessed 8 Nov 2012] Herman Miller, 2008. Forming Places That Form Ideas: Creating informal learning spaces. [online] Herman Miller Solution Essay. Available at: <http://www.hermanmiller.com/research/solution-essays/forming-places-that-formideas.html> [Accessed 08 Nov 2012]. Herman Miller, 2012. Home Sweet Office: Comfort in the Workplace. [online] Available at: <http://www. hermanmiller.com/research/research-summaries/home-sweet-office-comfort-in-the-workplace.html> [Accessed 07 Sept 2012].

VIDEOS TED, 2009. Don Norman: 3 ways good design makes you happy. [video online] Available at: <http://www.ted.com/ talks/don_norman_on_design_and_emotion.html> [Accessed 21 Aug 2012]. Vimeo, 2010. Wohnwerkzeuge. [video online] Available at: <https://vimeo.com/12874618> [Accessed 24 Sept 2012].

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Wonderful_CPJ Sem 1  

A creative process journal of semester one, born to capture the process and insights of my project: Wonderful.

Wonderful_CPJ Sem 1  

A creative process journal of semester one, born to capture the process and insights of my project: Wonderful.

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