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1.

2.

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a) Contemporary Art gallery b) Precedents c) Initial site analysis d) AGNSW History

a) Abstract b) Extended site analysis c) Time vs art d) Art as Pleasure e) Forms of pleasure

a) Parti revisited b) Structural intervention c) The panoramic reference d) The art ‘band’ e) Drawings f) Smart illustration g) Model photos h) Perspectives

Br ief & Res e arch

T h e Re ver s a l of t he G a l ler y

Fi na l S c hem e

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1 Br ie f & R es earch a) Contemporary Art gallery b) Precedents c) Initial site analysis d) History Contemporary Art Galleries perceived within the framework of Klonk’s Spaces of Experience and Bourriaud’s Postproduction. Taking precendent from Bernard Tschumi and Julius Buch and finding inspiration from how their transformative architecture creates new interdisclipinary spatial experiences. A brief history of the Art GAllery of New South Wales.

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1.

On Art Museums, Experience & Non-Places

T

he notion of the Contemporary Art Museum must first be discussed within the wider definitions of ‘art’ and how it has been experienced throughout history. This report will explore how the very nature of ‘art’ has changed, and how concepts of identity, culture and ‘pvlace’ have evolved in the constantly shifting, amorphous landscape of supermodernity. In her book Spaces of Experience, Charlotte Klonk writes on evolving attitudes to the Art Gallery ‘experience’. The European conception of the Art Gallery in the 18th to 19th centuries stemmed from a desire to use art as tool to instil certain values and morals to its viewers.1 The ‘experience’ of art was as a prescribed curation of artworks sorted by historical chronology, country and school of painting. The viewer is immersed within an athropological place, where historicity, and national culture are intrinsically linked.

Studio Themes

The turn of the 20th century brought with it the first truly modern mechanics of a capitalist economy and with it, the adaption of experience as a commodity. The latest material advancements of the time – steel and glass facades – began blurring the distinction between the interior and exterior. Klonk draws parallels between museums and the development of the shopping mall, in which art’s moralising intent fell away in favour of indulging in spectacle. Artworks hung on a wall became no different to the wares displayed on new shopfront windows; they arouse within the viewer a want; a “visual stimuli, titillating [one’s] desire for possession while remaining forever elusive in their promise of fulfillment”.2

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and all cultures and objects, the curated museum can be seen as restrictive as a result of its self-prescribed genres. Art becomes a matter of creating singularity from an already existing, chaotic mass of content from all periods and histories. As Bourriaud writes, “The artistic question is no longer “what can we make that is new”? But “how can we make do with what we have”.4

The Contemporary Art Gallery

a

As the definition of art has changed, so must the architecture of the place that contains it. How does one remix a building? In a post-postmodern era of Auge’s ‘Supermodernity’ such buildings with no historicising elements define themselves as non-places; that which have no sense of ‘anthropological place’.5 The building itself becomes purely transitionary: its architecture transcends the physical realm to one concerning abstract interactions between the ‘average person’ and semiotics. Where the ‘white-box’ has become the standard convention for the contemporary art museum, one can argue that the works display become ‘siteless’; They are forcibly removed from context, viewed in vacuum in which contextual and historical relationships exist only with the other works beside it. The remixed building of today is a chance to create a new singularity of histories and meanings; an aesthetic and architectural collage of history and art.

Nicolas Bourriaud in his essay ‘Postproduction’ notes how the appropriation of, re-use and re-mixing of pre-existing art has proliferated since the early nineties. Catalysed through the Internet, the onset of a truly global culture comes with it an overwhelming volume of commercial and artistic content.3 As pluralism becomes the zeitgeist, the role of the museum as a historicising, curatorial entity becomes irrelevant. A discourse emerges between the eclectic and the anti-eclectic on what can or cannot be considered ‘canon’ in the realm of art and cultural history. Where eclecticism welcomes any

1. Charlotte Klonk, Spaces of Experience: Art Gallery Interiors from 1800 to 2000, (London: Yale University Press, 2009). 2. Klonk, Space of Experience, 28. 3. Nicolas Bourriaud, Postproduction, (New York: Lukas & Sternberg, 2002). 4. Bourriaud, Postproduction, 17. 5. Marc Auge, Non-Places, (London: Verso, 1995).

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Precedents

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Le Fresnoy Precedent

Le Fresnoy, located in Northern France, was originally a derelict leisure complex of the 1920s—a bizarre combination of movie houses, an ice skating rink, horseback riding, and ballroom dancing just to name a few. Tasked with designing a national contemporary art studio, Tschumi proposed a counterproject to the traditional partitioning of artistic disciplines in order to support an increasingly fluid art scene. Rather than follow Modernist methodologies of substitution (replacing the old with the new) the buildings were restored, and sheathed by a new roof.

old plane

01

The roof hovers above as “a new plane of reference”6 that delineates a blurred space of interiority and exteriority —the in-between. Suspended from it are new circulation paths that haphazardly stitch the disparate disciplines together whilst simultaneously carving into the thickness of this residual, indeterminate space.

Fig. 01 (left) Bernard Tschumi, Le Fresnoy : architecture in/between, (New York : Monacelli Press, 1999), 98. Photograph. Fig. 02 (below) Ibid., 97. Photograph. Fig. 03 (below) Ibid., 154-155. Photograph.

Tschumi’s deconstructivist techniques not only dismantles the status quo of design and program but becomes a site of production through multiplicity of meanings. He utilises artistic lens outside architecture (cinema, photography, montage) to design without preconceived Formalist notions of the past and ultimately results in “an exploded image…a series of deliberately contradictory elements.”7

Bernard Tschumi

Purposeful collisions between forms and spaces spark new conditions. New dialogue and charged events awaken between the redoubling of roofs, and “in the interstices of these boxes, the unexpected can occur.”8

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02

new plane

new circulat

6. Bernard Tschumi, Le Fresnoy: architecture in/between, (New York: Monacelli, 1999), 13. 7. Tschumi, Le Fresnoy, 40. 8. Tschumi, Le Fresnoy, 110.

ion

old plane

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1.

new ‘electronic’ roof generates an inbetween space with the roofs below

plane of the new

Le Fresnoy

b cutouts highlight important circulation nodes and bring light below

interections of axes generates leftover space and dead ends

in-between space

paths become ampitheates, blurring between circulation and event, active and passive

circulation suspended from the roof, floating in the in-between space

plane of the old

original surfaces recontextualised

student housing cinema

ampitheatre photo department

live performances workshops media centre exhibitions

electronic image department sound department film studio

rental space terrace

school bar/restaurant admin

Exploded Axonometric Fig. 04 (right) Ibid., 59. Illustration.

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Bibliography Tschumi, B. (1999). Le Fresnoy: architecture in/between. New York: Monacelli Press.

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machine scale

1.

b

Fig. 05 (left). Ostrava, Colours of Ostrava, 2014. Photograph. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Colours_of_Ostrava.jpg

Völklinger Hütte Precedent

new circulat

human

ion

scale

Julius Buch

Volklinger Hutte is an old ironworks complex in Germany that ran continuously from 1873 to 1986. It enjoys provenance as one of the last remaining examples of early European pig-iron foundries and 19th century state-of-the-art achievements in iron production.9 For those reasons, Volkinger Hutte was added to the UNESCO world heritage list10 in 1994 and now functions as a museum and event location.

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Fig. 06 (ottom). mbell1975, Völklingen Hütte Ironworks Blast Furnaces, 2010. Photograph. https://www.flickr.com/ photos/99117185@ N00/5130178992

Designed by engineer Julius Buch, Volklinger Hutte is a compelling atmosphere resulting from the pragmatic requirements of iron production. Towering blast furnaces, smoke stacks and sinter plants exist beyond human scale, dominating the surrounding landscape in a brutal fashion. Walkways and conveyor belts that once serviced these giants weave between the giant pipes and plants, and now serve as circulation for the new museum inside.

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An example of conservation and re-use, music festivals are now held in the courtyards between the old coal bunkers. Sounds of music now echoe off the towering stacks, pipes and machinery, whose obsolescence transforms them from industrial machines to ornaments and artefacts. They replace the clanking din of industry and breath new life into the old complex.

9. “World Cultural Heritage Site Völklingen Ironworks”, Weltkulturerbe Völklinger Hütte, accessed March 5, 2019, https://www.voelklinger-huette. org/en/world-cultural-heritage-site-voelklingen-ironworks/ 10. “Völklingen Ironworks”, UNESCO World Heritage Convention, accessed March 5, 2019, https://whc.unesco.org/en/list/687?fbclid=IwAR1brm0baSyS16xYEaAHhskBea98Akc2ziORv8ADw1fPnczc0ZKS1BhuW3Q 06


1.

b Völklinger Hütte

Fig. 07 (eft). UrbanArt Biennale, Völklingen Ironworks Night View, 2015. Photograph. http://newsroom.itb-berlin.de/sites/ newsroom.itb-berlin.de/files/field/image/gesamtansicht_ nacht_totale.jpg Fig. 08 (below). Weltkulturerbe Völklinger Hütte, WVH Plan Flyer, 2017. Illustration. https://www.voelklinger-huette.org/fileadmin/ allgemein_huette/Flyer_und_PDFs/2017/Allgemein/ WVH_PlanFlyer_2017_deutsch_Screen05.pdf

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4. Blast furnaces: Re-adapted walkway

6. Ferrodrom and Coal Track: Working space for the Hochschule für Bildende Künste Saar School

7. Blower hall: Exhibiton and event space

3. Burden Shed: Exhibition Space

5. The Paradise: Adapted garden space and outdoor art installations

ath

ted p cura

a curated journey

1. Sintering plant: Multi-media tour

2. Ore Shed: Exhibition Space 08

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Riverview

1.

cX

Cremorne

Longueville

X

Galleries / Museums

Greenwich

1:100000

Initial Site Analysis

Mosman

Crows Nest

Lane Cove River

X

Train Stops

Neutral Bay

Ferry Stops

X North Sydney

X Woolwich

Proposed Light Rail Cremorne Point

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

McMahons Point

X

Existing Light Rail

X

X X

X

X

Birchgrove

moyne

X X

X

Balmain

X

Pyrmont

Th

Sydney

e

Sit

e

X

X

X

Millers Point

Rozelle

Sydney Harbour

X

Potts Point

X

Point Piper

X

Lilyfield

X

Rose

Seap

Bellevue Hill

Forest Lodge

Haymarket

Leichhardt

Paddington Chippendale Centennial Square

etersham

Site Analysis

Camperdown Redfern

Centennial Park

Macdonaldtown Enmore

Waverley

Erskineville

Zetland

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arrickville

Beaconsfield

Kensington

Clove


1.

garden palace (1879-1882)

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AGNSW History

d

Fig. 09 (above).Clark’s Assembly Hall, Art Gallery of New South Wales, 1875, Drawing on paper. https:// www.flickr.com/photos/artgalleryofnsw/3075947672/in/album-72157610561797005/ Fig. 10 (left).New South Wales. Surveyor-General cartographer lithographer, The International Exhibition of 1879. Lithograph, 45cm x 53cm, accessed March 7, 2019, https://www.sl.nsw.gov.au/collection-items/ international-exhibition-1879-sydney-new-south-wales-lithographed-surveyor-generals.

Site History From 1875 to 1879 the first home of Sydney’s Art Collection was a rented room in Clark’s Assembly Hall on Elizabeth Street (fig. 09). Once used for dance, the architecture was deemed unfit and thus was re-established within the gates of the picturesque Botanical Gardens.11

fine arts annexe (1879-1885)

Initially, it was to be housed inside the Garden Palace. However the unsatisfactory lighting and display conditions demanded a different alternative. The ‘Fine Arts Annexe’ by William Wardell was proposed, and became the first ‘Architecture’ solely dedicated to Sydney’s Art collection. The wooden ‘Fine Arts Annexe’ was eventually dismantled in favour of a more permanent and secure location (fig. 10), especially in the wake of the fires that ravaged the timber Garden Palace. This secured the final location of the gallery in the Domain, executed with more rigorous construction.

art barn (1885-1972) agnsw (1885 - current)

The Domain

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11. “History of the building”, Art Gallery of New South Wales, accessed March 7, 2019, https://www.artgallery.nsw.gov.au/about-us/history/history-of-the-building/

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1.

d

The first architectural identity for the AGNSW sited on the domain was designed by architect John Horbury Hunt in 1885 (fig. 11). Temporary in its function, the thick walled sawtooth building acclaimed negative critisicm, and was ultimately nicknamed the ‘Art Barn’.12 The strategy implemented by the Academy of Art trustees was for Hunt’s design to be the beginning foundations for the future scheme. When the time came in 1889 for Hunt’s three schemes to be reviewed, it was apparant an architecture that diverged from ornamentation was sought after; the Trustees desired a “classical temple to art”, simple and unrestrained.13

12a

Proposed Schemes

Architectural Identity

12b

Although there is no concrete evidence, it is interesting to note that Hunt’s tainted reputation may have been considered a factor when his schemes were judged. If so, the architecture of the AGNSW could have pivoted to three completely different directions (fig.12 - rejected Hunt schemes).

12c Fig. 11 (below). Henry King, New Galleries, 1889. Photograph, https://www.flickr.com/ photos/artgalleryofnsw/3075939348/in/album-721576105617970 Fig. 12a - c (above) John Horbury Hunt, Three rejected schemes by John Horbury Hunt, 18801890, Drawings on Paper (from left to right), https://architectureau.com/articles/history-2/ Fig. 13 Philip Thalis & Peter John Cantrill, Public Sydney: drawing the city, 2013. Art Gallery of New South Wales, Drawings, Walter Liberty Vernon, 137.

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12. “History of the building”, Art Gallery of New South Wales, accessed March 7, 2019, https://www.artgallery.nsw. gov.au/about-us/history/history-of-the-building/ 13. Ibid.

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1.

d Gallery Alterations With a large remnant of Hunt’s Art Barn still present, Vernon’s architectural concealment sufficiently inaugurates AGNSW’s perception as a “rich promise for a future beauty”. Completed in 1909, this new front facade encompasses the architectural strategy planned by the Trustees as it currently remains unchanged. With new additions respecting the now historically embedded icon of AGNSW, Andrew Anderson’s east addition and redevelopment of Hunt’s Art Barn from 1972 - 1988 introduced the first contemporary blank canvas interiors to the AGNSW. Doubling the space for expanded collections, temporary exhibits and a new asian art gallery, cultures from afar compelled every one of its rooms. It was not until 1994 that the indigeneous culture the AGNSW stood on was acknowledged and provided with devoted space.

4. Bicentennial Wing Fig. 16d 1988 - Andrew Andersons (Addition)

As art veered away from storage of historical pieces to temporary vistas of mobile international artworks, another extension was completed in 2003 by Richard Johnson, featuring multi-function areas and another temporary exhibition space. Architecture of the AGNSW is not an articulation of one master architect, rather, it is reflective of society’s changing engagement and consumption with art. It began as a ‘vault’ of precious European art, but each addition/alteration is in line with an art scene that is no longer confined to Western borders. The definition of art has changed overtime, yet the model of the gallery has not. AGNSW flaunts a remixed facade. However, inside, it still follows the typology of a classic ‘white box’. How can a new gallery space support a changing art scene, and how can architecture foster the experience of architecture and invigorate new ones?

3. Captain Cook Wing Fig. 16c 1970 - Andrew Andersons (Addition and Demolition)

5. Asian Wing Fig. 16e 2012 Richard Johnson, JPW (Alterations and Additions)

1. ‘Art Barn’

2. Vernon Wing

Fig. 16a 1885 - John Horbury Hunt

Fig. 16b 1909 Walter Liberty Vernon (Addition)

Fig. 14a-e (above) Philip Thalis & Peter John Cantrill, Public Sydney: drawing the city, 2013. Art Gallery of New South Wales, Drawings (from top to bottom) 1895 - Hunt, 1904 - Vernon, 1970 - Andersons, 1988 - Andersons, 2012 - JPW, 137.

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2 A Re v e r s al of the C onte mporar y Ar t G alle r y a) Abstract b) Extended site analysis c) Time vs art d) Art as Pleasure e) Forms of pleasure

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2.

W

hen Klonk draws parallels between museums and the development of the shopping mall, the artworks hung on wall becoming no different to wares of desire/want of shopfronts; the artwork becomes a spectacle. It is the idea that the pursuit for pleasure is motivated by the spectacle - Forms of pleasure which attract desire and attention. The Gallery of Structured Pleasures is a tongue and cheek reversal of the current contemporary art gallery using pleasure as a medium. An escape from the city, the Gallery of Structured Pleasures is a retreat where you shall indulge in Art whilst simultaneousley Dining, Bathing and Reading. Three program - Restaurants, a Bath House and a Garden Library are chosen purposely to prolong an audiences exposure to an artwork as a means to enrich and heighten their experience. Prompted by a 2015 study where million dollar artworks of Gerhard Richter where on display, each painting was viewed for an average of 33 seconds – A gaze, a stare nothing more or nothing less. The three programs - Restaurants, a Bath House and a Garden Library are chosen to purposely as a means to prolong an audience’s exposure to an artwork. To have an extended time with an art piece enables the potential for an enriched experience of that artwork.

With each program contained beneath the vast plane of the existing Domain carpark rooftop, the idea of attraction and desire to the site emerges through the use of architectural follies.

ABSTRACT

a

Taking inspiration from Bernard Tschumi’s Parc de la Villette, the deconstructivist techniques frame structure as ornamentation - A folly. The architectural follies of structured pleasures take use of existing waffle slabs, entrances, lifts, columns, beams and materials as a means for pure decoration – forms which appeaer to provide no function. The once blank canvas of the domain carpark rooftop has been transformed as curated paint strokes of architectural follies. Laying curiously amongst the flat plane, some act as portals into the Gallery as their form takes on wholly different spatial and materialistic qualities once a threshold has been passed. To experience the Gallery of Structured Pleasures is about more than experiencing forms pleasure, let that be through food or hot baths - it is about indulging in forms of pleasure whilst concurrently being exposed to pleasurable vistas of Art. Reversing the model of the modern contemporary Art Gallery is the enables a wholly different approach to experrience art, whereby induging in simultaneous forms of pleasure, the audience is provided an enriched and intimate experience.

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2.

Extended Site Analysis

b

SYDNEY CBD

AGNSW

DOMAIN

(The Dip)

WOOLAMALOO

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2.

b

Public Art Vehicular Access Pedestrian Access Railway Bus Stops

B

Public car parking - to be obsolete

X

Museums/Galleries Restaurants Workshops

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2.

b

Key Moments of Experience

The Flatness, The Entrances, The Horizontality and The Unexpected

a) Approaching the Domain Carpark from the AGNSW, a large flat plane reveals itself, exposed for all the urban and city structures to gaze down on - the vast flat plane acts as a blank canvas from above. b, c) Entering the carpark via two sculptured entrances, the initial attractions are in complete contrast to the program it functions for- beautiful leafy timber cladd entrances which lead to the concrete carpark dungeon. The reverse experience coming from the carpark to the domain is comical in a sense that loking behind where we came from, the existence of a dark underground and artifically lit carpark is questioned upon its two extravagant exits.

a)

b)

d) The carpark is for pure function. The long efficient corridors go as far as the eye can see - the horizontality in a sense seems endless.

c)

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d)

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2. W

hat we often find is that people depict artworks as ‘magnificent or ‘ingenious’, as if the art had deeply pleasured the observer/s. Results of a detailed 2015 study in Chicago exhibiting the famous works of Gerhard Richter found that the mean viewing time for 6 studied artworks was 33.9 seconds.1 In the gallery space, artworks are stationary. We often curate our own paths according to what artworks may pleasure us the most. We view an artwork for seconds or maybe skip it entirely, potentially missing out on the arworks underlying intent or detai

Decke, 1988 View time - 41 seconds

Abstraktes Bild, 1988 View time - 39.2 seconds Abstraktes Bild, 1989 View time - 29.6 seconds

Blumen, 1994 View time - 36.1 seconds

Time vs Art

c

Krems, 1986 View time - 30 seconds Abstraktes Bild, 1999 View time - 25.7 seconds

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2.

Art as Pleasure

d

20

Curated or the Curator?

How we experience Art in the Contemporary Art Gallery The curating of artworks in Galleries where art lays stationary and the audience determines their own path according what pleasures their gaze. We are in a Gallery for artworks and also a Gallery for Pleasure. Art = Pleasure


Pleasure by Architectural Follies Veering away from Galleries, we come to other forms of literal pleasures - dining in expensive restaurants and hot bath houses. To come to terms to an architectural sense we look at pleasures witnessed in landscapes - Architectural Follies.

2. e

Forms of Pleasure

Forms of Pleasure

It is not just about having a pleasurable bathing experience, but more so to have pleasurable view whilst doing so.

Architectural Follies We now look towards architectural follies - a building on the purpose of pure pleasure and no appearing function. Taking inspiration from Tschumi’s deconstructive techniques of applying ornamentation to structural elements - making structure as non-functional but built for visual pleasure.

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3 Final S che me a) Parti diagrams b) The panoramic reference c) The art ‘band’ d) Materials e) Drawings f) Smart illustration g) Model photos h) Perspectives -

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GALL E RY

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STRUCTUR ED

PLEASUR ES 23


3.

Parti Diagrams

a

Form to Site

1

1. Retain Top Slab 2. Above and Below Threshold 3. Art Band inbetween

Remove Existing Level 1 and Level 2 Slabs. Retain roof slab - forest of columns revealed.

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2

The existing Domain Park acts as a threshold. Above is a playful curatiion of Follies. Below lays unexpected function or functionless forms.

3

Follies now define the inbetween space. Follies below threshold are used to guide the Art ‘Band’

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b

Precedent Inspiration

The Panoramic Reference

3.

Lyme Smiths idea of a double-act, where “mimicry and diversion, of appearing and dissapearing, of being part of a building and part of a landscape. It is to celebrate and reveal the built forms as part of the park and city infastructure.

Lyme Smith - Chimneys, Prince Alfred Park Pool

To explore these sets of dualalities the use of an existing simple yet strong gesture of the flat rooftop plane of the domain carpark will be ised as a threshold between these dualalities.

North

South

26

West


3.

Folly’ing the Cityscape

b

A Dip in the urban fabric

The Domain carpark grass roof acts as an un-natural setting admist its surrounding context. The vast plane of this grass field acts against its towering neighbours from Sydney central business district from the North/West and Woolomaloo’s densifyied apartment blocks from the East. Looking from the Domain outwards to these neighbours, a panoramic view demonstrates the urban contextiering towards us. Flatness as a relief from the city, but simultaneousley create a proposal which also responds to its urban-scape. Flatness is juxtposed by structures of desire - Architectural Follies. The height of these built forms are reciprocals to their urban backdrop. They provide a sense of direction on the flatness of the site and act as forms of navigation through the use of directional signage and waypoints.

‘Panoramic’ overlooking from site. The Domain dip in urban fabric.

‘Panoramic’ urban skyline used to create drape over site. Establishing new datum.

Woolamaloo

building skyline

Perspective from Domain Carpark centre Showing Follies referencing ‘Panoramic’ urban context

Follies of random heights

Trimmed Follies

Sydney CBD

East

eye level from centre of domain rooftop

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28 White fyrecheck plasterboard panels

Artwork Mounted on hooks

Frameless double-glazed window system

Concrete off form tile wall

The Art Band and its Contruction and Materials

Artwork Mounted on hooks

Steel interlocking hooks with in-built wheels for movement.

Steel I-beam as hanging rail for mechanical ‘art-band’.

13mm white plasterboard ceiling finish. Double glazed alumnium frame skylight exit.

110mm foam insualtion screwed to underside of slab

300mm steel reinforced Concrete slab with white powdercoated alumnium panels angled for directing skylight.

Weather and insulation barrier stainless steel sheet.

50mm Gravel bed.

150mm Soil depth for low height landscaping.

c

35mm Trimmed grass. White powdercoated aluminium frame with single glazed 15mm toughened glass for skylight entry.

The Art ‘Band’

3.

Exploded Detail Axonometric


Polycarbonate Sheet - Facade and Art Band

2

Red Aluminium Panels - Folly Exterir

3

Concrete Off form Tile pattern - Art Band

4

Polished Concrete - Existing Flooring Cleaned

Materials

3m height x 1.5m width Polycarbonate sheets

Aluminium framing channels for polycabonate sheets

White fyrecheck plasterboard panels

d

1

Concrete Slab

Concrete footing

Concrete column and arch

Steel I-Beams with 6m span

Structural triple-glazed toughened glass flooring system

Main Art-Band mechanical Rail system

Steel I-Beam mounted fibre cement tile for sculptures

Steel furring channels for artwork to hook onto

3.

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3.

Roof Plan (Level 2) 1:750

Drrawings

e

a3

a2 f2

b1

a4

402 LEVEL 1 FLO OR PL AN a1

30

f1

b2


f3 c2

b3 f5 f4

f5

c1

f6 f5

c3

31


3. e

Level 1 Plan 1:750

Reception Office / Admin M Restrooms Art ‘Band’

M Powder R

Services

M Locker & Change room

Obersvation Deck New Entry from Travelator

a3

a2 f2

b2

b1

a4

f1

a1

32

Bath C


F Restrooms F Powder Room

Art ‘Band’ Collects and rotates works from AGNSW

F Locker & Changeroom

Obersvation Deck

c2

f3 Restaurant A

b3

c1 Bath A

f4

Bath B f5

L oading Z one

f5

b3 f6

f5 Restaurant B

c3

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3. e

Ground Level Plan 1:750

Art ‘Band’

Private Exhibition

Female Restroom

Male Restroom

Library Shelving Book store

Lib Boo

a2 f2 b2

Bath H

b1

Garden Library

f1 Function Hire Area

a1

E N T RY

Ar t Storage

Wate r f iltrati sy ste m

S i r J o h n Yo u n g

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brary Shelving ok store

Storage

Art Store

Art Store

AGNSW Extended Office

Art ‘Band’ Services

Gallery A

f3 c2

House Storage

L oading Z one

c1 f4

Bath House Services

c3

Gallery B Gallery C

B ee r & Wine C ellars

ion ms

g Cres

35


3. e

Long Section 1:750 Facade Elevation (To scale)

Garden Library

36


Bath House

Restaurants

37


3. e

Garden Gallery 1:375 a3

a2

f2

a4

f1

a1

38


3. Follies

e

a3 E xhibit i on Sky lig ht

a1 Indoor G ard e n G all e r y

a2 Pr iv ate Librar y

a4 C our t y ard Sky lig ht

f1 Main Ent r y f rom St reet / R ece pt ion

f2 Sky lig ht

39


3. e

Bath House 1:375

f3

b2 Bath A b3 b1 Bath B

Bath C f5

40

f6


3. Follies

e

b3 Wa shing Area

b1 B ath Hou s e Ent r y

b1 Pr ivate B ath Hou s e

f5 Waf f le Sky lig ht s

f6 W HI T E HOU SE

f3 S ky lig ht

f6 D irec ted S c ulpt ure Sky lig ht s

41


3. e

Restaurants 1:375

c2

f5 f4

c1

b3 f5 c3

42


3. Follies

e

c1 S ky lig ht for R estaurant Ent r y c2 Sp ec i alit y C of fee C afe

c3 F OL LY ME A ROU ND - BA R

f3 Sky lig ht

43


Bath house Entry Art Band

44

Foyer

Art Band Above

Storage

Reception Services

Wash Area

Bath House A


3. Bath House - Short Section

e

Art Band

45


Cellar Gallery A

46

Art Band

Dining

Bar Kitchens


3. Restaurant - Short Section

e

Cellar Restaurant A

Art Band

47


3. Smart Illustrations

f

A Material Deconstruction Existing Follies

Stair core

North park entrance

North park entrance

East park entrance

Glass brick

Glass pitched roof

Glass awning

Glass awning

Concrete wall

Timber battens

Timber battens

Timber battens

Concrete stairs

Green Wall

The Domain rooftop park has two carpark

entry structures purposely designed to enchance the parks large, flat uninspiring field . With the domain carpark to potentially become obselete, the external park entrances and its dissasociation to the carpark will become an ornamental structure existing only for aesthetic pleasure. With these considerations the carpark entrances act as Architectural Follies. Inspiration will be taken from examining the materials of these existing follies and used to create new follies along the site.

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Steel capping

Rendered wall

Greenwall

Steel capping

Rendered wall

Signage

Mechanical riser

Signage

Steel cage


Smart Drawing

3. f

Follies above and below the Threshold. An abstract illustration deconstructing Follies, the Art Band and the facade.

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3. Model Photos

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Folles, Thresholds and the Subterranean - A Puzzle Physical Model (For ages 5 and above)


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Garden Gallery

h

A place for lounging and prolonged relaxation, the Garden Gallery functions as a Library, Zen Garden and Art Gallery. A Zen Rock Garden acts as a central courtyard space for Library and Gallery. With existing columns clad in red, they house books for a public Library’s shelving space.

Perspectives

3.

Lighting Strategy 3

There are two main souces of light in the Garden Gallery - The Folly Skylight and the Art Band. With the Folly skylight acting as the main source of direcct sunlight, its central location s surrounded by library lounges. Wrapping around these spaces of relaxation is the Art band. With its artificial soft diffused white light, it frames moments of art to gaze upon and pockets of light towards the Library.

1 Waffle Skylight Direct Light softened by depth of waffle and timber material choice 2 Art ‘Band’ Soft Diffused light for even ditribution. 3 Sliver Skylight Long Streaks of Direct Daylight which are used at corners to guide people

Plan Legend

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3.

Bath House A

h

Taking the idea of the subterranean, the Bath House provides opportunity to gaze upon artworks whilst submerged in a heated body of water. The Art Band is fully exposed as to showcase all artworks without obstruction - with the exception of structure. Polished concrete walls and floors establish consistent lighting reflections and illumination, allowing water to be the ever-changing reflective and illuminating element.

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Lighting Strategy The Bath Houses are intended to be dark intimate areas allowing the art band to be the major lightsource. The purposeful juxtoposition of light and darkness creates an almost ‘movie’ environment, where people observe a film of moving artworks.

1 Waffle Skylight Direct Light softened by depth of waffle.

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2 Art ‘Band’ Soft Diffused light for even ditribution. 3 Sliver Skylight Long Streaks of Direct Daylight which are used at corners to guide people 4 Steam Clouds Naturally occuring fog creates areas of ‘fading’ art. Drifting slowly above the waters horizon, the movement of people in the bath passively creates different areas of fading.

Plan Legend

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3.

Folly Me Around - Bar and Gallery 2

h

A private Jazz Bar tucked away in the corner of the site, Folly Me Around is is a place to drink, chat and watch. With purposely framed art band windows, customers are enouraged to stay and spend a little on cocktails. Unlike the contemporary art gallery, conversations are encouraged by alcohol and music is turned up in Bar Folly Me Around,

Lighting Strategy A dim environment where portals of framed art act as a main source of light. During the day, the spiral staircase entrance is lit highlighting the red folly above the ceiling (threshold) and emanating a red hue to the interior.

1 Red Tile Cladding Reflections Direct Light from above is reflected and given an atmospheric red hue. 2 Art ‘Band’ Soft Diffused light for even ditribution. 3 Sliver Skylight Long Streaks of Direct Daylight which are used at corners to guide people

Plan Legend

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3.

Foyer to Exhibition Spaces

h

The main circulation space is guided by the Art Band’s lighting. Outside the Garden gallery, Bath house and Restaurants, the Art band showcases its wrapping of rooms and follies. The removal of existing level 1 and 2 carpark slabs reveals moments of verticality and a new observation deck level.

Lighting Strategy 2

Brightly lit is the Art Band. It provides an orientation and an axes in which guides people to program spaces. Lit from underneath in certain areas, they allow people to obersve the movement of art in a multiplicity of viewing angles.

1 LED Strip Lighting Essential lighting to areas which lead to other programs such as the Art Shop and Restrooms. 2 Art ‘Band’ Soft Diffused light for even ditribution.

Plan Legend

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3.

White House - A Mini Gallery

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Walking down the stairs of a Folly called the White House, a small and intimate gallery showcases a panoramic display of moving white canvases filled with art. A moment where the observer is stationary once again, but in this space artworks are moving all around in 360 degrees. It is taking the idea of oberserver now being the observed to the ultimate.

Lighting Strategy Only the Artband and its illuminating walls act as lightsource. Here the light and a sense of being within a void is explored.

1 Art ‘Band’ Soft Diffused light for even ditribution.

Plan Legend

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Gallery of Structured Pleasures  

Gallery of Structured Pleasures  

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