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JON HAYWARD’s BOOK OF DESIGN


please contact me in any of your favorite ways cell phone

978 257 1191

email

jonnyhayward@me.com

twitter

twitter.com/jonnyhayward

References available upon request

Jon Hayward


Education BFA IN VISUAL DESIGN with a concentration in Graphic Design University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth class of 2007 Graduating GPA of 3.7

Experience Production Designer WGBH Interactive department. Work on the Masterpiece, NOVA, Fetch! With Ruff Ruffman, Curious George, and other major production websites. Full site design, site ‘facelift’, NOVA standalone flash interactives, iPhone app, work on kids’ games, ecards, weekly site updates and maintenances July 2008–July 2010 Internship at Corey McPherson Nash LLC. Work on diverse projects, work in branding, poster design, web design, corporate identity, and general intern tasks January 2008-May 2008 Freelance projects for Veritas Tutors in Harvard Square. Online essay layout, book layout, and identity work intermittently throughout 2008 through present Freelance projects for Beyond Indigo. Web page design for veterinary hospitals. August 2010 through present ART DIRECTOR for the first addition of the College of Visual and Performing Arts student work magazine at Umass Dartmouth. Full color, 60 page magazine, 250 copies printed 2006

Accomplishments DESIGN DEPARTMENT BOOK AWARD Winner for Excellence in Graphic Design, based on high quality of senior graphic design work 2007 BOSTON GLOBE SCHOLASTIC GOLD KEY ARTS AWARD in Graphic Design for a graphic design mixed media project 2003 GREATER WORCESTER COMMUNITY FOUNDATION Richard Pierce scholarship recipient, portfolio and interview based in the

Résumé

area of graphic design 2003–2007

Abilities FLUENCY Macintosh platform, Adobe: InDesign, Illustrator, Photoshop, FLASH CS3. Photography FAMILIARITY PC platform, Printmaking, and Bookmaking


« over there

Résumé

05

An Emerging Mind

11

Orpheum Theatre Poster

13

Misc Umass Pieces

15

Internship

17

The Boston Museum

19

BB&N

23

Emerging Mind Poster

25

Artmouth Magazine

29

WGBH

31

Masterpiece

33

Kids’ Projects

35

HCBS.org Facelift

37

NOVA

39

Beatthepress.org


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Hayward 5

an emerging mind At some point it occurred to me that during sleep, while unconscious, I am more creative and inventive than when I'm awake. While I sleep I am constantly on an adventure, I see vivid colors, designs, lights, and people. Every step I take in every dream that I have is created solely inside my mind. All the worlds, people, and plots are thought up and then explored during my dreams. I do not feel that while awake my mind thirsts for such levels of creativity—clearly I am more creative, adventurous, and interesting in my subconscious. As someone who considers himself a creative person this realization was frustrating. I began to try to figure out ways to tap into the creative pool that is only explored during sleep. I decided the best way to discover what lay hidden in my mind was to practice documenting what I could remember about my dreams. A year and half later I had created An Emerging Mind, a 134 page book exploring highlights from a year of my dreams.


From March 2006 to March 2007 I slept with a tape recorder at my bedside in an attempt to document as many dreams as I could. Every morning as I woke, I tried to focus and remember what I had just been doing in my dream. If I could remember, I hit the record button and said whatever I recollected. I found ways to sleep and wake up that helped me remember what I had dreamed. For instance, if I slept seven to eight hours and was woken by an alarm clock I found I was much more likely to remember what I had dreamed than if I had let myself wake up naturally. Early on I was very excited about the possibilities that might come out of such a practice and as a result I was focusing on dreaming, and I dreamt more often. Throughout the year I documented over eighty dreams. I did not remember many of the dreams when I first reviewed them, because much of the dreaming that happened was fairly mundane. While I was practicing remembering dreams, I even remembered the ones that had no emotional link attached to them, the ones that few people remember. In addition to the documentation of boring dreams, I was able to record fantastic dreams. Some of the plot twists, points of view, characters, emotions, and perspectives were just what I was looking for. My mind began to reveal itself, and I did my best to represent what I remembered.

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Hayward 7


The book took on the randomness of a dreamlike state, because of this I needed to step away from the single dream and look at what I had learned from the year as a whole. There were several traumatic experiences during the year that were reflected in my dreams and I needed a way to represent them. There were also some interesting trends observed during my research that involved patterns of sleeping, dreaming, and the content of dreams. My solution to this problem was to create a gatefold spread in the middle of the book that made key points and laid out the year in calendar form. I also showed the people that appeared most frequently in my dreams. Anyone who appeared four or more times was shown and their relation to me was explained.

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Hayward 9


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Orpheum Theatre poster My Junior year at Umass I created a three poster series based on a historic theatre in New Bedford, Massachusetts. This is the second poster in the group. I was responsible for discovering a location, researching it’s history, and interviewing people who knew something about it. Through my research I was able to find and meet the president of an organization dedicated to renovating and eventually reopening the theatre. This relationship later led to a photography project involving personal spaces. My goal was to accentuate the beauty and history of the building while being honest about its current state. The three posers were from three different visual perspectives: looking up, straight on (featured), and down. The visual perspectives also carried connotation in terms of editorial content. When looking down at the building, it’s raw and current state was revealed in the writing. The first poster looks towards the sky and has more optimistic content. In the early 1900’s the theatre was in it’s heyday and it boasted a Vaudeville Theatre, sharpshooters gun club, and many small businesses. As a mock campaign to bring the theatre back, I also created a series of cards that would be gifts to potential donors of the Orpheum restoration project.


Misc Umass Pieces

Thursday 9.28 9pm

Featuring DJ Brogs

Sponsored by the Graphic Design Club

These posters are examples of work that I did for our senior design club at Umass Dartmouth. In early 2007 I invited Nancy Skolos to speak to the college about her new book Type Image Message. She accepted the invitation, this >> is the poster I designed for the lecture. During the week leading up to the lecture I stuck postit notes on the posters counting down to the day of the event and promoted the event on all the chalk boards in the main classrooms. Her book inspired much of the work in my senior project.

Nancy Skolos Visiting lecturer in Graphic Design Graphic Design Professor at RISD Author/Designer of TYPE IMAGE MESSAGE 2006 www.Skolos–Wedell.com Thursday

April 26

6pm

Library browsing area

SKOLOS

UMass Dartmouth 1st Annual CVPA Holiday Sale Saturday December 2nd 9−5 Sunday December 3rd 11−5 $2 Admission at the door, Students and Children are free Artists include: Umass Students Faculty Alumni Art, Music, Refreshments, Children’s table University of Massachusetts Dartmouth main campus Woodland Commons building 285 Old Westport road North Dartmouth MA, 02747

Brought to you by Communicatus

www.umassd.edu

UMass dartmouth Hosted by the Senior Graphic Design Club


Introduction and Contents 1

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21

9

Intro

1

13

Reviews

2–4

Dancing Type and Music Videos Steven Heller

5–12

baseline international typographics magazine no 48 2005

intro

Herb Lubalin, among several others, prognosticated that typography for television screens needed a fundamental re-think. The students on Lita Talarico and Steven Heller’s course at the School of Visual Arts, New York, are attempting the re-thought-process. In this issue Heller presents the results.

13–20

Body Type Caroline Archer

21–24

The typist and her typing manual David Jury

25–32

The books that nobody sees Sue Walker

33–44

Pocket Penguins Rob Banham

49–52

Lexicon update

typography in children’s reading books

70 jackets, 70 designers, 7 days

an A–Z of type designers

Permanent body decoration, voluntary or not-so-voluntary, is nothing new. Caroline Archer chars the fascinating history of the use of the body as a message-carrier.

13

Why have typing conventions, such as the double-space, persisted in typography? David Jury traces the relationship between the typist, her typing manual and ‘real’ typesetting. To the typographic purist Mr Pitman has a lot to answer for.

29

Meanwhile, Sue Walker discusses the typography of children’s books, with charming illustrated examples from her library. Here is typography assisting in the visual didactic process, including ‘the use of sans serif in a deliberate and child-focused way’. To celebrate Penguin Books’ 70th anniversary, the company has re-published 70 popular books, each with a new cover design, commissioned from 70 leading designers and illustrators. Robert Banham chronicles the project, and its very demanding timetable. Much information to ponder then, including and updated collection of type designers in our ever-expanding lexicon. Mike Daines and Hans Dieter Reichert

29

This piece is a redesign of a table of contents from the 2005 No 48 issue of baseline, it was a school project.

19

Hayward 13


Internship


Hayward 15

Internship The winter after my graduation I was accepted as an intern at Corey McPherson Nash, a highly respected design and branding firm outside of Boston. I didn’t have any professional design experience but they accepted me a week before Christmas. I moved to Boston on New Years Eve, and started on January 2nd. It was a whirlwind. While I was an intern I did a lot of the things that interns tend to do, but I was also given amazing design opportunities and learned a great deal. They invited me to many helpful meetings and brainstorms, taught me a lot about being a professional designer, and gave me excellent opportunities to work on exciting projects.


The Boston Museum CMN had developed The Boston Museum’s identity, brand strategy, and

several promotional materials prior to my hiring. BoMu came to them once again, this time requesting a series of posters using art and research done by local middle schoolers about the history of four different stops on the MBTA’s blue line. The assignment fell into my hands and I developed a visual concept based on presentation boards and science projects made by middle school students. I sought to let the charm of the students’ drawings and my own hand written type give the posters a tangible, organic feel while also prominently representing Boston Museum and their new visual identity.

Internship


Hayward 17


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Hayward 19

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characteristics. I had the pleasure of being a part of the many brand storms as

well as a day long visit to the three campuses. We talked to students and I took

photographs, one of which is featured prominently on the current homepage. Michael McPherson, one of the partners at CMN and the art director on this

project, decided that with the new site, materials, and strategy we should try and

“sneak” a new logo in as well. A new logo was not a part of the commission, but

Michael decided that the old logo, which was prominent and iconic in the Cambridge area, was outdated and didn’t fit with the aggressive new strategy. One

morning Michael came to my cube with a smile and gave me the good news that

I would be the designer for the logo. This not only gave me a great opportunity to

design something prominent in the area, but it also allowed me to work directly

under Michael McPherson who was elected an AIGA Fellow in 2001 and has been

an influential figure in the Boston Design community for over 25 years.


Emerging Mind Poster

My senior design book, An Emerging Mind, was to be displayed at my senior show along with the work of 50 other design students. The obvious question arose, how do I get people to my book? It was an interesting design problem to make one piece of art thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sole purpose was to attract people to one pedestal during a three hour period of time. It made sense to me that this poster didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really have to communicate the way that posters usually do. It had to draw attention and interest from people at 229 Westminster street in Providence, on May 19th 2007, and that was it. I could have burned it the second the show ended if I wanted to. The conclusions that this line of thinking brought me to was that it had to be funny and huge. People would hopefully see this massive, funny figure from across the room and go towards it only to be lead right to my small book, which would hopefully grab onto them and engage their attention long enough to review the entire project. I actually had a dream that I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t remember very well, but in the dream I was looking at some sort of huge display of myself and jumping out from behind me at crazy angles were all the elements of my dreams. Early on I had tried to dream about what my project should look like and while this happened later in the semester I thought I should at least give it a go. I decided that my imagery should loosely relate to what I saw in the dream but the overall impression of the overpowering figure with elements all around should remain. In the end I decided to design a poster that was 85 inches tall and 43 inches wide where the image of myself was larger than life.

UMass dartmouth


Hayward 23


Artmouth Magazine A magazine created to highlight the talent and work coming out of the Umass Dartmouth artist community.

UMass dartmouth


Hayward 25


In 2005 the Umass Dartmouth design club decided to make a magazine showcasing work from the College of Visual and Performing Arts. At first I was going to play a small role in the creation of the magazine but when it became clear that nobody wanted to do the work necessary I volunteered to take control. In the end I single handedly designed about 50 percent of the magazine and edited the rest. I scheduled weekly critiques with all of the other designers and had to cut several of them from the design team because deadlines were not met. I was responsible for getting work from artists and arranging to have their work photographed as well as getting artist statements and information from them. I was in charge of every aspect of making this magazine. I went to the printers multiple times, I helped photograph artwork, wrote articles, completely designed or had a hand in every single spread, and I even sold many of the copies. Another interesting aspect of this magazine was that it was completely thought up, created, and funded by the club. We did all of the work outside the classroom without the guidance of our professors.

UMass dartmouth


Hayward 27


WGBH


Hayward 29

wgbh While interning at CMN, I was actively searching for my next career move. In the early spring I saw that WGBH was looking for a designer in their interactive department as well as their (print) design department. WGBH has a substantial design reputation and history in Boston because individuals like Chris Pullman and Doug Scott had worked for three decades developing lofty design standards. I applied for both positions and was offered the position in the interactive department. My experience working online was extremely limited up until this point, so I was excited to work in a more digital medium. I was also very excited to be working for a company with such a rich design history and community focus; the variety of projects was also something that I was looking forward to. By my six month mark at WGBH I had worked on several kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; sites, a news blog, NOVA, Masterpiece, and several other projects.


WGBH


Hayward 31

Masterpiece I worked on Masterpiece for almost the full two years that I was at WGBH. The brand is sophisticated, smart, and classy. The visual branding concept is based off of beautiful photographic assets from the television shoots, sophisticated typography, and the three Masterpiece genres: Classic, Mystery, and Contemporary. My duties were generally site maintenance such as a weekly ecards, streaming graphics, homepage flash slideshow images and feature highlight images. On occasion I designed features like behind-the-scenes-video, characters, hosts, and other special pages for Masterpiece, but these were not typical of my weekly duties. While working on Masterpiece I was forced to sharpen my eye for detail as my senior designer on the project had an abnormally observant eye, noticing virtually every pixel out of place. This was a difficult challenge for me because in my opinion some time was wasted measuring pixels sometimes a second and third time. Although frustrating, this accountability was helpful for me because it forced me to slow down my work process and make sure that I had complete confidence in everything I was delivering. Up until this point I was more likely to rush through an assignment, but Masterpiece helped me develop more patience in my work.


KIDS’ projects One of the really great things about working in the interactive department at WGBH was the opportunity to work on kids’ programing. The department boasts several award winning writers and producers for children’s (television) programs and independent department projects. Needless to say, the content I worked with on a daily basis was fantastic. Most of the work that I did for different kids’ projects was related to the parent and teacher areas of the different websites, however I had several opportunities to work on games as well. Meetthegreens.org is a site created and maintained entirely within the WGBH interactive department. It is a site for kids about sustainability and green living. While I didn’t work on this project consistently, I was able to work on the project’s (and department’s) first iPhone app called Light it Right. Our department had never done an app before and this was done before Apple released the iPhone 3.0 upgrade. My role in the project was mainly creating deliverables for our developer, creating the home, instructions, and high scores screens as well as figuring out the introduction screens. PBS asked our department to try a new technology for a few of our programs that creates

an interactive layer on top of streaming video. We were commissioned to experiment with existing video from the television programs, and see if we could come up with games that kids could play while the video played in the background. I worked on the show Fetch! with Ruff Ruffman. My game involved a clip in which a contestant on the show raced a dolphin in a swimming tank. The idea I came up with was based off the carnival game where you shoot water at a target and your object races across a board. In my version several animals would appear above Ruff and a dolphin, if you chose the correct animal (bird, mammal, fish etc.) Ruff would swim, if you answered enough questions correctly by the end of the clip Ruff would reach the finish line before the dolphin. We created this game and several others, but in every round of testing (one that I observed), the kids were too distracted by the video and either watched the video, or played the game and ignored the clip. The version live on PBS KIDS GO! now plays the video once through without any interactivity, then allows the player to challenge Calvin (the dolphin) to a race without the video playing. A majority of the games ended up pausing the video or waiting until the video ended before introducing any interactivity. Being a part of a new technological experiment was exciting and it was quite informative to observe the user testing.

WGBH


Hayward 33

AGENTS OF THE

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WGBH


HCBS.org Facelift While at WGBH an interesting and unique opportunity presented itself. HCBS (the clearinghouse for Home and Community Based Services) had partnered with my department several years before to create a website that provides information for and about community-based services. The site was very out of date and the navigation was extremely confusing. HCBS asked us to give the site a facelift, giving the homepage a redesign while applying only minimal changes to the inner pages. A really interesting aspect to this project was that HCBS is often used in extremely low income areas and by underfunded agencies. Therefore the site needed to be as accessible as possible. Toby (my manager) and I decided that we would try to push a quick and simple rebranding as well, in order to clarify the organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission and goals. I drew up some logo options and other members of the team refined the branding language. In the end, HCBS had a clean and clear message, brand, and homepage. There were many challenges with this project including trying to bend virtually Jurassic HTML to our will, working with slightly misinformed clients, and working almost entirely without imagery.

Hayward 35


I joined the NOVA interactive team at an interesting time. The plans for a redesign were well under way and the funding was starting to come in. The senior designer quickly started to work full time on the wireframes and architecture of the new site which would completely restructure the way content was organized. I quickly became a sort of lead designer for the ongoing work that needed to be done, with help from another designer that would fill in from time to time on large flash interactive features. NOVA was the largest team that I worked with at WGBH. NOVA had two different shows

and a couple online exclusive sites that I played a hand in. The Secret Life of Scientists site was based off of my Beat the Press video blog site (next spread). Because of the many different brands, topics, shows, styles and personalities, working on NOVA felt like a smattering of styles and standards at times. Both the senior designer and myself were new to the project and the senior designer of seven years had just left the foundation. This made it more difficult to enforce visual guidelines which seemed loosely defined and often times confusing. In some ways this worked in my favor because I was given more freedom to work on a version of the site that would soon be replaced. It was frustrating at times not having the full attention of other team members and no clear visual standards, however I feel that my time on NOVA was well spent.

WGBH


Hayward 37


Beatthepress.org At WGBH I had the opportunity to work on a video blog format site for Greater Bostonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (a nightly news show) most popular segment, Beat The Press. The goal was to create a video blog that would feature the four weekly TV segments as well as a housing ground for daily blog entries by panelists and our chief blogger Ralph. One of the major issues that needed to be resolved was that all four TV segments came out on Friday afternoons, potentially throwing off the flow of the blog and quickly sending the features down and off the homepage. Three designers (including myself) were asked to make two mockups, each including the homepage and an inner page. In the first round of designs I purposed a sort of Hulu-esk dynamic area at the top of the homepage that would house the four segments all week long (the segments would also be imbedded into individual blog posts to encourage commenting and keep them on the RSS feed). I purposed that this area serve multiple purposes such as slideshow and possible video intro. My idea and designs were chosen and the project took off at a dizzying pace. I was only allotted 16 hours a week of billable time for Beatthepress.org because I still had to keep on top of other weekly tasks, therefore I did a lot of work at night and on the weekends to bring the project to its full potential. Just one week after the design direction was chosen I was presenting our third round of designs which included seven different inner page designs. A week after that, the files were delivered to the developer and my involvement on the project was near its end. Beatthepress.org was a large step for the foundation in several ways, including being conducted interdepartmentally and entirely in-house. In the uncertain economic climate of early 2009, keeping the work within the foundation was extremely important. At the spring 2009 all-staff meeting, Jon Abbott, president of WGBH highlighted Beatthepress.org in his presentation as an example to follow and strive towards during that unsure economic period.

February 2009 FEB 9

Introduction to the wireframes

FEB 13

Round 1 of designs presented to client (3 designers)

FEB 20

Round 2, design revisions presented to client

FEB 24 FEB 17

Design direction chosen

WGBH

Round 3, final designs presented to client, included homepage and 7 secondary pages

MARCH 3

Final deliverables


Hayward 39


cell phone

978 257 1191

email

jonnyhayward@me.com

twitter

twitter.com/jonnyhayward

References available upon request


Jon Hayward's book of design  

This is my portfolio book, it should give you some insight into to the work that I do, and the processes that I use to get there.

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