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02 futureproofing manchester Internal Waste Management [project two]

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PROJECT

BOOK

JONATHAN BALLARD 4119621 project two documents volume one - project progression

farida makki

| unit 5B | project two - stent | winter 2012


BRIEF

PROJECT AIM

STENT is a [2000m2] technically competent structure precise in its relationship with its chosen site, EFFICIENT in its choice of materials INVENTIVE in its methodology.

Following on from the remediation of the Manchester & Salford Junction Canal in project one, Project two aims to revolutionise the urban waste process in Manchester UK. Emphasis on creating a closed loop city metabolism where waste is dealt with discretely underground beneath the city source.

The student will develop a keen understanding of the processes within the site _these may be geological, climatic, social, technical or mechanical. The STENT taps into the current and provides catalytic opportunities. The structure needs to provide for repair | efficiency + future proofing.

Development of a waste research and development centre incorporating public urban green space.


POPULATION INCREASE IN MANCHESTER - ‘BOOM CITY’

[19%]

Manchester Population Growth

[6%]

National Average

MANCHESTER is labelled as the UK’s boom city with the highest population growth in the last UK Census.

CITY URBANISM STATISTICS WORLDWIDE

1900 - 10% of 1.5 bil lived in cities 2012 - 50% of 6 bil live in cities 2050 - 70% of 10 bil will live in cities


PROGRAM DIAGRAMS

INEVITABLE WASTE INCREASE

[2050]

Projected city waste increase

[2012]

Current city waste production

URBAN INTERNALISATION ECOLOGICAL URBANISM EXTRACT

Previously cities have prospered by seeking out resources and waste sinks from ever more This approach however, is

distant locations.

reversed as cities seek to become more self sufficient by reducing reliance on being

international, national and regional infrastructures,

re-internalising

their

recirculating wastes.

own

resources

and


CURRENT WASTE OUTSOURCING UNSIGHTLY SUBURBAN SITES

CITY INTERNALISATION & UTILISATION OF RECYCLED MATERIAL

PROGRAM DIAGRAMS


0.0m _ GROUND LEVEL _

-6.0m _ UNDERGROUND CANAL LEVEL _


SITE LIFE CYCLE & HISTORY 1750 -1850 _Industrial period

1914 - 1945 _World War I & II

2012 + _City Waste Management


INTERIM PLANS [TOP FLOOR PLAN]


INTERIM PLANS [MIDDLE FLOOR PLAN]


INTERIM PLANS [BOTTOM FLOOR PLAN]


LINE DRAWING PERSPECTIVE


[01] PROCESS MODEL ONE Model one was the first model to be made with emphasis on exploring ideas to do with form and orientation on site. The repetitive skeleton form felt successful from initial drawings and was explored in this cardboard model. Being a simplistic model there is no representation of internal spaces.


[02] PROCESS MODEL TWO Model two continued with this form exploration working on the roof design with intent to create a less standard orientation. The repetitive skeletal structure was improved with further spines holding up the sloped roof.


[03] PROCESS MODEL THREE Process model three returned to the standardly orientated roof design with initial thoughts on shaft placement and process infrastructure beneath the building itself.


[04] PROCESS MODEL FOUR Model four worked on the creation of a stepped roof displaying in more detail the design of the roof ribs. This design looked further into the design of internal spaces as well as the buildings relationship to the site with the extended structure disappearing into the landscape. Terraced urban green spaces were also developed in order to mimic the raising internal floor spaces.


SKETCHBOOK PHOTOS


SKETCHBOOK PHOTOS


EXPLANATION DIAGRAMS

ACCESS ONTO SITE Access onto site is limited to roadside circulation routes. People arrive at the site from the north and south along Water Street.

RESOLVING SITE GEOMETRIES Resolving geometries between river hybrid location and urban planning patterns

River Irwell geometry Cityscape geometry


EXPLANATION DIAGRAMS

RAINWATER IRRIGATION & WATER STORAGE

The reuse of rainwater on site enhances the ethos of the architectural program. Rainwater is collected upon rooftops and stored within tanks set into the compost shafts. This water is released when necessary to irrigate the farming land.

ROOF LIGHTING IN SPACE

It is necessary to express the roof lights within this plan in section. Although not visible in plan, natural light enters the working space via a void between the lower and higher roof structures. This is expressed above. SOLAR GAIN Glazed southern facade allows for solar gain potential within the building minimising the reliance on heating systems. The placing of windows also allows north facing rooms to benefit from the southern aspect.


EXPLANATION DIAGRAMS

NATURAL VENTILATION

SHAFT FOR RESEARCH MATERIAL COLLECTION Within the research and development spaces there is access to a transportation shaft. This shaft lowers to the canal level conveyors in order to collect material for research and testing.

As can be seen in the sectional images, the scheme provides opportunity for natural ventilation to occur. The south west facing facade allows air entry and creates a through flow that then escapes through the top roof openings.


EXPLANATION DIAGRAMS

TRANSPORTATION OF MATERIAL

ORGANIC WASTE USAGE & SHAFTS

C A B

Raw material that is not immediately used within the city centre can be transported via the Irwell Navigation downstream to docks in Liverpool and worldwide. This material source enhances the industries green credibility with local sourcing. Not only this, but the revival of waterways for material transport reduces city congestion and greenhouse emissions by truck. A. LIVERPOOL B. RUNCORN DOCKS C. MANCHESTER SITE

Within the research and development spaces there is access to a transportation shaft. This shaft lowers to the canal level conveyors in order to collect material for research and testing.


EXPLANATION DIAGRAMS

SHAFT CLASSIFICATION

ON SITE COMPOSTING

As shown in the plan view opposite, there are six separate waste shafts that emerge from the underground processing tunnel. Below is a key to identify which materials will appear in each shaft at ground level.

Shown in the plan opposite is the large industrial composting unit that supplies fresh compost for the urban farming zone at ground level.

GLASS PLASTIC

USE ON SITE > URBAN FARMING

COMPOST

PAPER METAL LANDFILL WASTE ORGANIC WASTE

ORGANIC WASTE

MICRO ORGANISMS


SECTION


TRANSPARENCY TESTING ON MATERIAL SAMPLES Following the collection of many recycled glass samples, testing began on the materials transparency and light related behaviour. The top row aims to assess light penetration from a north facing orientation giving an indication on the volume of light within the internal spaces. The bottom row expresses how the building may appear in dark conditions with internal lights expressing the colour and beauty of the recycled material.


TRANSPARENCY TESTING ON MATERIAL SAMPLES Following the collection of many recycled glass samples, testing began on the materials transparency and light related behaviour. The top row aims to assess light penetration from a north facing orientation giving an indication on the volume of light within the internal spaces. The bottom row expresses how the building may appear in dark conditions with internal lights expressing the colour and beauty of the recycled material.


ABSORBENCY TESTING & PLANTING The above image displays SAP performance in terms of water absorbency and retainment. A small amount of beads were collected in a test tube (image one) to which water was added (Image two). Within 30 minutes a transition begin to occur with these beads expanding into gellike balls. The beads, although not fully saturated at this point, were transferred to another test tube in which a root was placed to allow plant growth within the medium. The last photo shows the successful growth of the foliage within the medium. This experimentation proves the feasibility and success of the facade and material scheme.



Y3 | 02 | STUDIO PROJECT TWO | MANCHESTER WASTE