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The Honorable Michael B. Donley Secretary of the Air Force Department of the Air Force 1670 Air Force Pentagon Washington D.C.20330-1670 Dear Secretary Donley, Staff Sergeant Ingles DosReis died at the age of 22 in an auto accident on August 28, 2009. He was stationed at Aviano Air force Base in Aviano, Italy. At the time of his death, his 2 year old son and young wife were preparing to enjoy their evening meal at their home in Italy. Across the ocean in New Jersey, his parent's, sister and 3 year old nephew were enjoying the afternoon. Upon hearing this horrifYing news Staff Sergeant DosReis's parents immediately flew to Italy to be with their son and family. Ed and Liz DosReis first viewed their son within 24 hours of their arrival, and when summoned to identifY their son a second time 2 days later (48 hours from their first viewing), they were horrified to find Ingles had been kept in an unrefrigerated environment. Their utter disbelief turned into profound anguish when they discovered, and witnessed, their son's deterioration and lack of postmortem care. The lack of a mortuary affairs provision in our current SOFA(Status of Forces Agreement) with Italy forced the United States to turn over legal and medical custody of Staff Sergeant DosReis to the Italian Military Police at the time of his death. The United States Military was not permitted to intervene and provide proper preservation. Proper handling of a United States Serviceman was denied. What was not denied this proud soldier was the beginning of his family's anguish that will be felt for life in their hearts and viewed for life in their minds. So many unanswerable questions have been raised since that horrifYing moment, but the one that brings the greatest consternation is how could the United States Military allow this to happen? Why was only a Mother's despair the impetus for intervention? On his journey back to the United States, Staff Sergeant DosReis was afforded true military respect. Where was this respect at the time of his death?


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The Honorable Michael B. Donley Secretary of the Air Force Department of the Air Force 1670 Air Force Pentagon Washington D.C.20330-1670 Dear Secretary Donley, Staff Sergeant Ingles DosReis died at the age of 22 in an auto accident on August 28, 2009. He was stationed at Aviano Air force Base in Aviano, Italy. At the time of his death, his 2 year old son and young wife were preparing to enjoy their evening meal at their home in Italy. Across the ocean in New Jersey, his parent's, sister and 3 year old nephew were enjoying the afternoon. Upon hearing this horrifYing news Staff Sergeant DosReis's parents immediately flew to Italy to be with their son and family. Ed and Liz DosReis first viewed their son within 24 hours of their arrival, and when summoned to identifY their son a second time 2 days later (48 hours from their first viewing), they were horrified to find Ingles had been kept in an unrefrigerated environment. Their utter disbelief turned into profound anguish when they discovered, and witnessed, their son's deterioration and lack of postmortem care. The lack of a mortuary affairs provision in our current SOFA(Status of Forces Agreement) with Italy forced the United States to turn over legal and medical custody of Staff Sergeant DosReis to the Italian Military Police at the time of his death. The United States Military was not permitted to intervene and provide proper preservation. Proper handling of a United States Serviceman was denied. What was not denied this proud soldier was the beginning of his family's anguish that will be felt for life in their hearts and viewed for life in their minds. So many unanswerable questions have been raised since that horrifYing moment, but the one that brings the greatest consternation is how could the United States Military allow this to happen? Why was only a Mother's despair the impetus for intervention? On his journey back to the United States, Staff Sergeant DosReis was afforded true military respect. Where was this respect at the time of his death?


Dr. Robert M.Gates Secretary of Defense 1000 Defense Pentagon Washington D.C.20301-1000 Dear Dr. Gates, Staff Sergeant Ingles DosReis died at the age of 22 in an auto accident On August 28, 2009. He was stationed at Aviano Air force Base in Aviano, Italy. At the time of his death, his 2 year old son and young wife were preparing to enjoy their evening meal at their home in Italy. Across the ocean in New Jersey, his parent's, sister and 3 year old nephew were enjoying the afternoon. Upon hearing this horrifYing news Staff Sergeant DosReis's parents immediately flew to Italy to be with their son and family. Ed and Liz DosReis first viewed their son within 24 hours of their arrival, and when summoned to identify their son a second time 2 days later (48 hours from their first viewing), they were horrified to find Ingles had been kept in an unrefrigerated environment Their utter disbelief turned into profound anguish when they discovered, and witnessed, their son's deterioration and lack of postmortem care. The lack of a mortuary affairs provision in our current SOFA(Status of Forces Agreement) with Italy forced the United States to turn over legal and medical custody of Staff Sergeant DosReis to the Italian Military Police at the time of his death. The United States Military was not permitted to intervene and provide proper preservation. Proper handling of a United States Serviceman was denied. What was not denied this proud soldier was the beginning of his family's anguish that will be felt for life in their hearts and viewed for life in their minds. So many unanswerable questions have been raised since that horrifYing moment, but the one that brings the greatest consternation is how could the United States Military allow this to happen? Why was only a Mother's despair the impetus for intervention? On his journey back to the United States, Staff Sergeant DosReis was afforded true military respect. Where was this respect at the time of his death?


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