Page 1

PORTFOLIO: works of process

Jonathan Hammett Chesley | e: jonhammettchesley@gmail.com t: 541.743.3551 | a: #3-652 W. 10th Ave., Eugene, Or., 97401


CONTENTS:


i. design ii. draft iii. build ix. research x. sketch xi. cv


DESIGN:


PLATFORMS FOR HISTORIES AND FUTURES urban interventions in contemporary rome

Jonathan Chesley | Terminal Studio 2011 | Professor James Tice


How can the relationship between urban watercourses and urban fabric refresh biological processes, nourish vibrant social connections and stabilize economic interactions?


T A BLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION:

movement in six acts SITES (I):

the ancient ferry crossings SITES (II):

the contemporary context ELEMENTS:

of the river ATLAS:

of experience ACT ONE:

float

ACT TWO:

perch

ACT THREE:

eddy

ACT FOUR:

sink

ACT FIVE:

meander

ACT SIX:

drift


A MUSEUM THAT WALKS THE RIVER movement in six acts

Introduction Rome is a city rich with historic walking processionals (or vias) weaving through monuments and relics in reverence of the cities traditions and cultures. Strangely, the Tiber River has consistently been ignored within the catalogue of honorary routes. Even with the profound role it has played in Rome’s cultural, ecological and economic evolution--supplying goods and services to sustain its urban infrastructures--the Tiber has, in many ways, been treated with apathy and disrespect. Over time the Tiber River’s seasonal fluctuations have attacked the urban fabric of the city. In the mid-19th century a variety of proposals were offered as protection from these floods. The Italian government settled on the more economical strategy, focused solely on physical protection, of constructing high walls along the course of the river within the city’s limits; as flood mitigation these embankment walls work well. However, this solution lacked the robustness necessary to synergies the complex relationships between urban water courses, a cities spatial evolution and the social, ecological and economic effects associated.


(i) SITES OF INTERVENTION: ancient ferry crossings

I

II

III

IV

V

VI


I

II III IV V

By creating this hard and fast ‘edge’ of impenetrably stacked travertine the experience of the Tiber water course was severed from Rome’s urban fabric. This act catalyzed a decisions to further fragment the river from the city when, in response to congestion and traffic, the state constructed two grand automobile highways flanking the embankment’s edge. These layers of material and abstract barriers--from building edge, to highway edge, to embankment edge, down 50ft to river edge--have constrained the productive role the river could play for Rome and its people. The first steps in changing how cities interact with their ecological amenities--forming symbiotic partnerships between built form and natural growth--is to create awareness and manifest worth in order to inspire conscientious activities by citizens and visitors.

VI

The goal of this project is to establish the Tiber River within the catalogue of Rome’s significant urban artifacts by expanding the complexity and scales of interactions between waters, edges, people and greater urban flows. The Walking Museum envisions how this neglected path becomes the Museum of the Tiber River. In a city so restricted by existing building density the river emerges as the most dynamic plane of architectural imagination. Assuming the cities urban fabric to be


(ii) SITES OF INTERVENTION: contemporary context

I

II

III

IV

V

VI


I II III

IV V

VI

an innate connective tissue, a network of architectural focal lenses--considered architectural follies--are placed in the river. The idea of the follie is derived from the structures of 18th century English garden design: they contrasted against the botanical aesthetic while functioning as respite and shelter. Along the Tiber River, the program of gallery is added to the concept of the follie while it is combined with six distilled river experiences: meander, float, eddy, sink, perch, drift. These fantastical structure of elemental phenomena will illuminate the mind as well as engage the senses, acting as catalysts for Romans and other visitors to participate more regularly and directly with the river. Rather than acting as mechanisms of transportation across and along the river, like existing bridges and highways, the Follies will be mechanisms of attraction that seduce citizens by inviting creative participation with its waters. Sensitively placed at the locations of historic Traghettos--ancient cable ferries that acted as secondary bridges-the follies will be stages upon which a dialogue of the future evolutionary possibilities speak to the history of the river. By punctuating significant moments in the city, these vessels of meaning will transform the river’s status to one of prominence and respect. This is the first


ELEMENTS: of the river

edges

mills + wares

ferries


step in any true consideration of the kind of ecological harmony possible between Rome and the Tiber. In contrast to the heavy-handedness shown by the engineers of the Tiber’s embankments, the follies are subtle moves driven by the ethic that simple interventions can breed extensive and complex results.


Act Three: eddy in order to re-invigorate the rivers edge, this follie offers market stalls for seasonal vendors. when the river is too high to walk along the lower embankment wall, three islands rise individually to the height of three of the rivers most famous flood elevationsheights. jump on in and swim!


Act Four: sink This old ferry crossing was so valuable that a bridge was now sits near its location. This follie can act as a relaxation point in which the museum goer can escape the city and descend into the river—becoming part of a world that consists only of water and sky


DRAFT:


Following is a series of detail plans, sections and axonometrics illustrating both my technical drawing skills as well as my understanding of structural and eclosure systems.

6"

1/4"

6 3/8" x 8" Column

steel plate attachment j-bolts f lush with plate

concrete column base

foundation

8" 63

/4"

8

Column Base

Scale: 3" = 1'-0"


sill

stool

double pane glazing jamb

stop

backing rod + seal 6 3/4" x 8" column

moisture barrier

8"

insulation 2" x furing f inish grade ply casing

air cavity

6 3/4"

7

Corner J

Scale: 3" =


air-space stainless steel (ss) standing-seam coping 1/2" treated plywood

2x shim drift clip

parapet membrame laped over roof membrane

filter fabric reservior

1/2" gypsum sheathing roof moisture barier sealant brick ties every 8th coarse

representation of plant 6" minimum soil

continuous ss cleat

planter box

2x6 ss parapet stud wall supported by 2x6 ss brace mounting plate pre-welded to ss brace

2" free drainage space

EPDM roofing membrane wraps over rigid ins.

moisture barier

treated ply

1/2" treated ply for continuous cant strip spray insulation fill

3" rigid insulation brick veneer (2 1/4" x 3 5/8" x 7 5/8" brick dimension)

6" rigid insulation

5" post-tensioned concrete slab embedded steel angle lag bolt connecting cont. steel shelf angle weep/vent holes 24" o.c. 2 piece ss flashing

sealant METALFORM Man. 6" deep plane blade model MFL-29 mechanical louver assy

mullion (Kawneer 1600 glazing system wall assemy)

PPG SolarBan Starphire High V.T.

3" steel decking wind load mounting clip

18" castellated beams 10' o.c.

pre-welded column mounting plate

6" cylindrical steel column

PPG SolarBan 60 (2) Auria + clear Low V.T.

jon.hammett.chesley enclosures.project:2

1

Brick Wall: head to parapet Scale: 1 1/2" = 1'-0"


double pane glazing

6 3/4" x 8" column double pane glazing

sill

f lashing moisture barrier f lashing

stool backing rod + seal

blocking 2" x bottom plate j-bolt

10" exposed concrete foundation wall

1. place


1x blocking windo sill assmy Kawneer 1600 series

moisture barrier backing rod

metal sill w/ end dams and counter clshing at brick return

sealant stool 2x fir trim nailed to drift clip

flashing detail connect with window sill 1/2" gypsum sheathing

brick ties every 8th coarse

2" free drainage space

moisture barier

3" rigid insulation drip angle at sill

brick veneer (2 1/4" x 3 5/8" x 7 5/8" brick dimension)

drift clip drilled anchor

flashing anchor

moisture barrier lapping flashing

2x fir trim

embedded steel angle

lag bolt connecting cont. steel shelf angle

weep/vent holes 24" o.c.

2 piece ss flashing

sealant METALFORM Man. 6" deep plane blade model MFL-29 mechanical louver assy

2 jon.hammett.chesley enclosure.project:2

Brick Wall: sill Scale: 3" = 1'-0"


rigid insulation standing seam metal moisture barrier blocking 3" car deck

f la shing f la shing/gutter attachment

6 3/4" x 8" column interior f inish ply

2" x 6" blocking f inish grade ply

insulation

moisture barrier 1/2" ply f la shing

sheet metal fascia

air barrier

stainless fastener sheet metal cap

gutter downspout

6 3/4" x 8" column window stop

5

Roof Overhang Scale: 3" = 1'-0"

double pain glazing


Kawneer 1600 Wall System 1 1/2' fixed veritcal sunshades

METALFORM Man. 6" deep plane blade model MFL-29 mechanical louver assy

curtain wall attachment bolts

1 1/2' fixed veritcal sunshades

combination curtain wall anchor and sunshade mounting strip (welded to embedded shelf angle)

hole cut in mullion grout sealing around sunshade attachment

PPG SolarBan Starphire High V.T.

PPG SolarBan 60 (2) Auria + clear Low V.T. mullion (Kawneer 1600 glazing system wall assemy)

jon.hammett.chesley enclosure.project:2

3

Window Wall: Axon Scale: 1" = 1'-0"


BUILD:


poject zero:

1000 ISLANDS BOAT HOLE

Six hours from Manhattan there lies a property on which a series of cottages are set against the St. Lawrence River. Built fifty years ago for city dwellers fleeing dense metropoli, this vacation spot has evolved into a family’s dwelling. The main cabin is their home; three of the original buildings surround it, half gutted or filled with old furniture. One of these remnant structures is a boathouse with guest quarters. Preserving the existing footprint of the boathouse, the Jo(h)n’s will re-establish it as a destination. The vision of the Boat Hole project is focused on intimate interactions with the river: hearing the waves, seeing the wildlife, touching the ripples, feeling the energy. Driven by an ethic of material and historic perpetuation these two sensitive cats will source materials through onsite deconstruction and fallen tree milling.


RESEARCH:


the FOOD that FOOD carts FEED:

how can carts fertilize a nourishing and productive economics of food? (an abstract) How can we transform cities into resilient and adaptable urban landscapes that are able to sustain themselves during this, and ensuing economic, ecological and social climates? To build this durability, cities must become self-reliant for their resources: energy, water and food along with varieties of processing and production must be manifested at the local level. This research is focused on Portland’s food-cart culture and structure. It examines what role they play towards invigorating local and informal networks of food growth, production and consumption at the magnitude of household, block and neighborhood. It brings to light the ways in which food-cart owners, source, purchase, transport, prepare and exchange food. From this data, a series of maps were drawn demonstrating the relationships between foodcarts and food-cart clusters (referred to as pods) and the greater urban forms of Portland; roads, buildings, farms, commerce, production, culture, etc‌ The pods not only have an effect on the greater urban fabric of the city but also create distinct spatial experiences in their locales. Three typologies arise from these physical arrangements: the storefront, the food-courtyard and the corner market. Here we see the trans-scalar capacity of food-carts in their ability to construct localized hubs of activity as well as thriving connective urban tissue.

The interest behind this research is to inspire individuals to take direct action in the animation of productive cities that incorporate a holistic ethic of resource use. How can the carts be only one example of how small scale, interwoven productive units contribute to the stimulation of robust cycles in cities, directly cultivating vibrant, imaginative, playful and self-sustaining urban environments.


the food that food carts fe how can carts fertilize a nourishing and productive economics of food? how do food carts source their food?  are they members of large distribution networks along  with restaurants and grocery stores or are they nurturing and complimenting smaller scale, less  formal systems of food growth and trade.  “everyone who was in an unsuccessful band  5 years ago now runs a food cart. it’s everything  that’s portland; local, indie, do it yourself…”            -owner of whiffies fried pies marash meats

farmer’s markets (vancouver, wa)

earthly gourmet distribution (nw germantown rd.) a b

provvista specialty foods

dae han  tofu company

c

sp provisions cash & carry

9th + alder newman’s fish co.

the institution:

nicky usa

along these roadways the food carts act like storefronts, facing  the streets and enlivening the sidewalk so that those looking for a meal  or snack linearly experience the eclectic mix of sights and smells. some  owners have tables and chairs encouraging a café setting while others  are simply trying to get through the lengthy lines of hungry lunch-time fans. 

gatto & sons

a.turkish kitchen hayden meats restaurant depot nicky usa columbia   b. savor soups fsa cash n’ carry c. altengartz gardeners country meat cash n’ carry d. smokin’ pig cash n’ carry local grocers e. the shack restaurant depot local grocers newman’s fish company otto’s sausage d

gaining ground farms (yamhill, or) e

carlton farms (carlton, or)

5th + stark dave;s bread (eugene, or.)

serrata tofu (eugene, or)

gathering together farms highland oak farms (philomath, or) (scio, or)


eed

mississipi + skidmore the pre-designed: unlike the other two cart pods in this study, in which a  component of existing urban fabric (parking lots) is annexed, the area behind the brew house PROST! has  been designed as a cart space first (complete with  individual water and electrical hook-ups) and as a  possible parking lot second. located within a neighborhood  characterized more by small buildings and houses rather  than wide streets and traffic (such as the other two corners)  the carts no longer line the sidewalk but rather create a  partition along the interior edge of the back property line.  now the carts act as buffer between the houses behind  them and the bustling energy of the food courtyard and  brew house patio. 

a b cd e

a. garden state gaining ground farms  gathering together farms  highland Oak Farms  farmer’s market sheridan market b. sushi tree dae han sprouters nw  uncle paul’s united pacific  earthly gourmet  c. the ruby dragon dae han  serrata  jorinji miso dave’s bread  uncle paul’s produce stand  earthly gourmet 

fsa

d. magic beans cherry sprout market  cash n’ carry restaurant depot earthly gourmet   e. southwest pizza local markets (vancouver, wa) cash n’ carry 

restaurant depot

courier coffee

12th + hawthorne jorinji miso company (se portland)

the new model: a

berry processing plant (boring, or)

b

people say that this corner was the beginning of a new  model for food cart pods in the metro area. rather than  offering their fare along the street front they focused  inward, turning their backs to the flow of cars. the bustling now happens within a courtyard of long wooden picnic  benches and temporary canvas canopies. as it is at the  scale of refitted trailers, this barrier between interior and  exterior space is quite porous allowing the energy within  the food-courtyard to seep out onto the streets. 

c

otto’s sausage  kitchen & meat

a. potato champion gatto & sons wisconsin

legend carts smaller/local suppliers

duration of activity

outlet suppliers delivery pick-up

(line-weight denotes  number users of supplier)

high medium low

b. perierra creperie  provista  gatto & sons  sp provisions  carlton  courier coffee    c. whiffies fried pies berry processing plant cash n’ carry restaurant depot  


demountable: the ecology of building permanence (an abstract) What does it mean for the profession of architecture to be ‘sustainable,’ ‘green’ or ‘eco’? To truly embody these terms monumental sweeping changes must be enacted upon a wasteful building culture that placates cities with tacked-on technologies like solar panels, trum walls, exterior sun-shading, bio-swales, etc. Buildings are not designed to last long so sourcing materials with low embodied energy, minimizing their use and utilizing alternative energy techniques are good starts rendered rather mute when these same materials are quickly junked – studies show that “70% of buildings were only 51-100 years old at demolition and that 30%...were less than 50 years.” (Moore, 1). As architects and architectural thinkers, the first question we need to ask for any design problem is whether the construction of a building is the appropriate response. Since the profession necessitates construction at some level, however, we must scrupulously seek a comprehensive design process that imagines a renewing cycle for a building’s materials – the productive re-use of space, materials and energy. This research is a result of my collaboration with Erin Moore as groundwork for a manuscript compiling contemporary examples of design creativity within this unsustainable building culture. For example, some loose categories have emerged: real-estate bottom liners who are interested in the marketing power of ‘sustainability,’ un-boltable structures from which generic members can be re-used in a variety of projects (turned back into piles of lumber) and un-boltable structures with hyper-specific parts that lack any re-usable variety.

It is the intent of this research to contribute to strategies for tackling the following question: How can this profession of consumptive and superficial environmental practices infuse its designs with robust logics akin to ecological systems: allowing a building to grow and shrink, to learn and change?


demountable:

the ecology of building permanence

What does it mean for the profession of architecture to be ‘sustainable,’ ‘green’ or ‘eco’? To truly embody these terms monumental sweeping changes must be enacted upon a wasteful building culture that placates cities with tacked-on technologies like solar panels, trum walls, exterior sun-shading, bio-swales, etc. Buildings are not designed to last long so sourcing materials with low embodied energy, minimizing their use and utilizing alternative energy techniques are good starts rendered rather mute when these same materials are quickly junked – studies show that “70% of buildings were only 51-100 years old at demolition and that 30%... were less than 50 years.” (Moore, 1). As architects and architectural thinkers, the first question we need to ask for any design problem is whether the construction of a building is the appropriate response. Since the profession necessitates construction at some level, however, we must scrupulously seek a comprehensive design process that imagines a renewing cycle for a building’s materials – the productive re-use of space, materials and energy. This research is a result of my collaboration with Erin Moore as groundwork for a manuscript compiling contemporary examples of design creativity within this unsustainable building culture. For example, some loose categories have emerged: real-estate bottom liners who are interested in the marketing power of ‘sustainability,’ un-boltable structures from which generic members can be re-used in a variety of projects (turned back into piles of lumber) and unboltable structures with hyper-specific parts that lack any re-usable variety.

sm med lrg xl Jonathan Chesley | M.Arch candidate ‘11 in collaboration with Erin Moore | Assistant Professor Department of Architecture

t it le: loc at ion : s t at us : d at e:

Swiss Sound Box Hanover, Germany built and deconstructed 2000

Chengdu Hualin Elementary Chengdu, China built 2008

Factor 10 House Chicago, IL built 2004

Loblolly House Taylor’s Island, Maryland built 2007

BIP Computers Santiago, Chile built 2006/2007

Arup Campus West Midlands, England built 2002

HVDN ARCHITECTEN

HVDN ARCHITECTEN

School tij49 Ijburg, Netherlands built 2006

HVDN ARCHITECTEN

WERNER SOBEK ENGINEERING + DESIGN

the 4th gymnasium Amsterdam, Netherlands built 2008

ARUP ASSOCIATES

MILLER HULL PARTNERSHIP

ALBERTO MOZO

LIFE

R128 Stuttgart, Germany built 1999-2000

SMITH CARTER ARCHITECTS

South Lake Union Seattle Washington completed 2007

EHDD ARCHITECTURE

ATELIER PETER ZUMTHOR + PARTNER

CONSTRUCT

SHIGERU BAN ARCHITECTS

Lifecycle Impact Timeline This timeline is a critical diagram that investigate what the most significant factors involved in these projects are and how a building can truly engage its full lifecycle.

New Headquarters Winnipeg, Manitoba built 2004

KIEREN TIMBERLAKE

Bernheim Arboretum Clermont, Kentucky built 2005

Low Impact Foundations anywhere used n/a

MCDONOUGH + PARTNERS

t it le: loc at ion : s t at us : d at e:

PLINY FISK

It is the intent of this research to contribute to strategies for tackling the following question: How can this profession of consumptive and superficial environmental practices infuse its designs with robust logics akin to ecological systems: allowing a building to grow and shrink, to learn and change?

qubic amsterdam, netherland built 2003-2005


1

5

10

15

B101

B140

B140

B101

B180

B141

B180

BIO[da]TA Competition conceptual 2008

Ground Proving Water MoMA ‘Rising Tides Ex.’ completed 2010

Search Building Kantoor Amsterdam completed 2008

project xx Netherlands completed

CR Green Technology Showroom Beijing, China built 2008

Pavilion 21 - mini opera Munich, Germany in planning 2008-2010

Cellophane House New York, NY MoMA exhibition 2008

Bike Institute (previously The Cyan Blg. showroom) Portland, Or built 2008, rebuilt 2010 2008-2010-?

Paper Church reconstructed as Paper Dome Kobe to Taiwan built 1995, rebuilt 2008 1995-2008-?

KENGO KUMA + ASSOCIATES

MAE LLP ARCHITECTS

DAVID FLETCHER STUDIO

SHIGERU BAN ARCHITECTS

ADAPTIVE CONSTRUCTION

KIEREN TIMBERLAKE

COOP HIMMELB(L)AU

VECTOR ARCHITECTS

XX ARCHITECTEN

WITTEVEEN ARCHITECTEN

CYCLE

ds

Casa Umbrella ‘casa per tuti’ Milan Tri built 2008

inter/section ‘High Performance: Evolution and Innovation in Canadian Design’ completed 2010

CAMPOS LECKIE STUDIO

LTL ARCHITECTURE

ZERO PLUS ARCHITECTS

RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP

FOSTER + PARTNERS

Thomson Optronics Factory St.-Quentin-en-Yveline, FR completed 1988-1990

KENGO KUMA + ASSOCIATES

Flat Pack Shack anywhere conceptual

UAE Pavilion Shanghai Shanghai, China completed 2008-2010

EDGE DESIGN WORKSHOP

Flat Pack Stadium London, England in progress est. compl. 2012

POPULOUS ARCHITECTS

KIRNU Finland Pavilion in Shanghai built 2010

JKMM ARCHITECTS

CLAUS EN KAAN ARCHITECTEN

NIOO-KNAW Wageingen, Netherlands under construction 2007-2010

CONSTRUCT

Artificial Reefs

Compost Architecture

conceptual 2010

conceptual 2008

Water Branch MoMA Exhibition built 2007


SKETCH:


JONATHAN HAMMETT CHESLEY CV t: 541-743-3551 e: jonhammettchesley@gmail.com b1: hammett-henry.tumblr.com b2: 2b-pencil-paper.tumblr.com

EDUCATION July 2008-July 2011 Sept. 2006-June 2007 Sept. 2002-June 2008

Master of Architecture, University of Oregon, Eugene, NY/ Paris Architecture Program, Columbia Universit Bachelor of Fine Arts with Distinction, University of

EMPLOYMENT Aug. 2011-Nov. 2011 June 2009-Sept. 2009 June 2010-Sept. 2010 June 2007-Aug. 2008

Design/Build Co-Project Manager: re-design/renovati management, client contact, permitting coordination, complete Freelance Draftsman. Victoria, BC. An entrepreneurial codes, stamping drawings and invoicing clients Website Designer. JohnGould.ca, designer of layout, hier KMP Architects. Victoria, BC. Site assessment, design w

DESIGN COMPETITIONS March 2011 February 2010 September 2009 May 2009

Gerald D. Hines Competition, Urban Design Comp Warneck (MArch), Joseph Sadoski (MArch), Ryan Fioren environmental studies) HB/BX: Building Cultural Infrastructure, The High Works, Portland, Or), Tyler Polich (BArch) WPA 2.0: Working Public Architecture Design Com (MArch) TOGS: Temporary Outdoor Gallery Space Compet

ART INSTALLATIONS Feb. 2010 May 2009

The Triple Point. An art instillation in which a gallery w fourth quadrant was the nexus of overlap where the individu String Fling. Explorations concerned with the disorientatio


Or. ty (Manhattan, NY. and Paris, Fr.) Victoria, Victoria, BC.

ion of ecologically sensitive landscape and boat house. Watertown, NY. Collaboration of: design, project ed construction with Hank Warneck l endeavor consisting of: site assessment, design work, construction drawings, working with city officials and city

rarchical structure and user interface of website. Some html and css work work, construction drawings, presentation layout, client contact

petition. “ALLEY AS ARMATURE: enabling stability through flexibility” Collaborators: Hank ntino (MS: business, psychology, architecture), Justin Overdevest (MS: landscape architecture, business,

h Bridge International Design Competition (Bronx, NY). Collaborators: Elliot Meier (designer, Allied

mpetition. Collaborators: Nicolaus Wright (MArch), William Krzymowski (MArch), Nicholas Venezia

tition (Austin, TX). Collaborator: Nicolaus Wright (MArch)

was divided into quadrants, three of which the artists sculpted with their own specific construction methods. The ual cultures, crafts and sensibilities of the artists’ coalesced. Collaborators: Tyler Polich, Nicolous Wright on and reformation of habitual interior and exterior spaces within a city.


JHC CV COURSEWORK Jan. 2010-June 2010 April 2010-June 2010 Sept. 2009-Dec. 2009

What If ? Thesis Studio Project. “PLATFORMS re-imagination and recreation of the banks of the Rome’ be an urban amenity—enriching the future by respecting Urban Farm, Landscape Architecture 507. Learni Building Enclosures. Architecture 571. Learning t including curtain walls, brick veneer systems, window and Water and the Urban Environment, Public Policy while being exposed to current and possible urban water s

TEACHING/RESEARCH June 2010-Aug. 2010 March 2010-June 2010 Sept. 2010 Jan. 2010-March 2011

Graduate Teaching Fellow. 20th Century Architectural Graduate Research Fellow. “DEMOUNTABLE: th collaboration with Professor Erin Moore (continued after fell Resilient Urban Morphology Research Team, Guan and the role that urban morphology plays with regards to ind Portland Food Cart Research. “THE FOOD THAT towards forming self-sustaining, urban food systems within ci

PUBLICATIONS Sept. 2008-Feb. 2009 April 2010-June 2011

DesignBridge. Portfolios for the student -established, stude KTISMAjournal. Co-creator, managing editor, publisher, . http://ktismajournal.com

CONFERENCES March 2011 April 2011 Oct. 2010

ACSA Poster Presentation. The Food that Food Carts F U of O Graduate Research Forum. Demountable: the research for book) U of O Graduate Research Symposium. The Food th

COMMITTEES/BOARDS Jan. 2010-May 2010 Oct. 2010

Hiring Committee for the Department of Architect Structures and Interior Design History and Theory KTISMAjournal. Selection committee and editorial board


FOR HISTORIES AND FUTURES: urban interventions in contemporary Rome” Focused on the ’s Tiber River. How can the river overcome the monumental embankments that disconnect from the city and once again the past. ing about the requirements and scales with which food growth can occur within cities. the layering and details of wall, roof and floor systems. This course covered most subject pertinent to the northwest d door casings and flat and peaked roof details. y and Planning Management 507. Learning about water infrastructure and management and its effects on cities strategies.

History with Professor Jim Tice he ecology of building permanence” Research for a book on notable design for disassembly projects in lowship as independent study) ngzhou, China. Research looking at the relationship between living and working within a major metropolitan city dividuals ability for economic upward mobility with Professor Howard Davis T FOOD CARTS FEED” A personal research endeavor investigating the catalytic abilities of food carts ities.

ent-run design/build program co-designer, article contributor for the new graduate student architectural publication out of the university of oregon

Feed (Portland food cart research) ecology of building permanence (presentation of preliminary

hat Food Carts Feed (Portland food cart research)

ture & Allied Arts. University of Oregon. Graduate student representative for selecting new professors in

d

Jon Hammett Chesley  

the first iteration of my ever evolving portfolio