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September•October•2008

September•October•2008 Annual Military Special Issue

ANNUAL MILITARY ISSUE

Navy Divers In Action

Hurricane Aftermath • Bridge Inspections • ADCI News & Notes

SPECIAL REPORT THE AFTERMATH OF HURRICANES GUSTAV AND IKE

Official Journal of the Association of Diving Contractors International and Underwater Intervention 2009

BRIDGE INSPECTIONS HOW SAFE ARE WE?


THE ASSOCIATION OF DIVING CONTRACTORS INTERNATIONAL

The Official Publication of The Association of Diving Contractors International, Inc.

September•October•2008 Volume XX Number V

Publisher: William H. Doyle, III hdoyle@doylepublishing.com Executive Editorial Committee: Bill Crowley, bcrowley@caldive.com Phil Newsum, pnewsum@adc-int.org Rebecca Roberts, rroberts@adc-int.org Managing Editor: Daron Jones editor@doylepublishing.com Director of Advertising: Jo Anne Hudson jhudson@doylepublishing.com Business Manager: William H. Doyle, Jr. bdoyle@doylepublishing.com

UnderWater Magazine (ISSN 10726098) is published bi-monthly by Doyle Publishing Company, Inc., 607 Mason #2, Tomball, TX 77375, 281-516-0350, on behalf of the Association of Diving Contractors International, Inc., 5206 FM 1960 West, Suite 202, Houston, TX 77069. Periodical postage paid at Tomball, TX, and additional offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to UnderWater Magazine, 607 Mason #2, Tomball, TX 77375.

Our international certifications qualify you to work worldwide and year-round. Offshore diving opportunities include the inspection, installation, and repair of offshore oil drilling platforms and pipelines. Inland opportunities include construction, repair and inspection of bridges, water towers, nuclear power facilities and countless other infrastructure. Our graduates are in high demand. All training is conducted in open water.

Financial aid for those who qualify. Use your VA benefits with us.

Entire contents ©2008, all rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part, without written permission of Doyle Publishing Company, Inc., is prohibited. The publisher and the Association of Diving Contractors International accept no responsibility for content of any advertisements solicited and/or printed herein, including any liability arising out of any claims for infringement of any intellectual property rights, patents, trademarks, trade dress and/or copyrights; nor any liability for the text, misrepresentations, false or misleading statements, illustrations, such being the sole responsibility of the advertisers. All advertisers agree to defend, indemnify and hold the publisher and ADCI harmless from all claims or suits regarding any advertisements. Due to printing and ink variances, the publisher does not guarantee exact color matching. Opinions expressed by writers are not necessarily those of the publisher or the ADCI. Readers’ views are solicited. Publisher reserves the right to publish, in whole or in part, letters received. Publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material.

Doyle Publishing Company, Inc.

607 Mason #2, Tomball, TX 77375 T: 281-516-0350 • F: 281-516-0391

www.UnderWater.com ADCI MEMBERSHIP INQUIRIES: Association of Diving Contractors International 5206 FM 1960 West, Suite 202 Houston, TX 77069 Phone: (281) 893-8388 Fax: (281) 893-5118 Email: pnewsum@adc-int.org

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MAGAZINE

The Official Journal of the Association of Diving Contractors International and Underwater Intervention 2009

Vol. XX, Number V

September•October•2008

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ADCI & UW Salute the Gulf Coast in the Wake of Hurricanes Gustav & Ike

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We’ve been through them before; we’ll go through them again. And we will bounce back better then ever, every single time.

Dive Equipment Maintenance & Repair Answering Your Gear Questions By Chris Gabel, of Ocean Eye, Inc.

I-35 – A Year Later What Have We Learned?

UW interviews Boswell Underwater Engineering’s Michael Ganas, PE; Nevada DOT’s Dave Severns, PE; and Infrastructure Engineer’s David Reser, PE, to gauge the current status of US subsea bridge inspections one year after the Minnesota tragedy.

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COMMERCIAL DIVING PHYSIOLOGY Cardiovascular Disease & Fitness to Dive

By Dr. Tony Alleman, MD MPH, of Occupational Medicine Clinics of South Louisiana

MILITARYSPECIALSECTIONMILITARYSPECIALSECTIONMILITARYSPECIALSECTION

38 44 55 57 77 79

US Navy Launches the USNS Carl Brashear By Dave Heaney

Sunken Russian Sub Raised in Rhode Island

Interview with Subsalve’s Richard Fryburg

By LTJG John C. Ortiz, USNSCC, COTC EOD Diving Ops

UW’s Annual Military Marketplace The number of companies that allow the Good Guys to take the fight to the Bad Guys underwater grows every year. Here’s a sampling of the latest and greatest designed to keep you safe.

Military Notebook

Industry News & Notes

September•October•2008

September•October•2008

ANNUAL MILITARY ISSUE

Annual Military Special Issue •

Navy Divers In Action

Hurricane Aftermath •

SPECIAL REPORT THE AFTERMATH OF HURRICANES GUSTAV AND IKE

Bridge Inspections

BRIDGE INSPECTIONS HOW SAFE ARE WE?

• ADCI News & Notes Official Journal of the Association of Diving Contractors International and Underwater Intervention 2009

DEPARTMENTS

2008 Sea Cadets Train with US Army Divers

On The Cover US Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Julius Mcmanus, of Mobile Diving Salvage Unit 1, plants an American flag on the site where an American WWII military aircraft crashed into the Pacific Ocean. Deep sea divers are assigned to Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC), to account for all Americans missing as a result of past conflicts. US Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Christopher Perez.

10 ADCI Board of Directors 11 A Letter from ADCI’s President Bill Crowley 32 A Letter from the Executive Director Phil Newsum 34 ADCI News & Notes 34 New ADCI Members 82 New Gear 83 Advertiser Index 84 ADCI Member Listing 85 UW Currents 90 The Last Word Briant Dozar, Morgan City Rentals

Contribute to our November•December•2008 issue: Advertising Deadline: November 3, 2008 Email: jhudson@doylepublishing.com Marketplace - Navigation & Positioning Pictorial - Commercial Dive Teams Case Studies - Survey Projects

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Subscribe at www.underwater.com Free in the USA, $50 per year abroad


Board of Directors

Mike Brown Epic Companies 1st Vice President General Member BOD Gulf Coast Chapter

Bill Crowley Cal Dive International ADCI President General Member BOD

Robbie Mistretta Divers Supply Assoc. Mem. BOD Executive Committee

Tim Beaver Global Diving & Slvg. Gen. Mem. BOD Executive Committee

Claudio Castro STS Chilean Chapter Executive Committee

Phil Newsum ADCI Executive Director Executive Committee

Mike Willis Global Industries Gen. Mem. BOD

William Castle WJ Castle & Assoc. Gen. Mem. BOD

Mike Erinakes US Underwater Svc. General Mem. BOD

Bruce Trader Madcon Gen. Mem. BOD

David Reser Infrastructure Eng. Gen. Mem. BOD

Robert Crofton Crofton Diving Gen. Mem. BOD

Steve Sanfilippo Integra Assoc. Mem. BOD

Connie Morgan KMDSI Assoc. Mem. BOD

Gary Maines Broco Assoc. Mem. BOD

Tom Eason Eason Diving East Coast Chapter

Luis Giampietri Lufesa Divers Latin Am. Chapter

Richard Riley, Jr. Marion Hill Assoc. Midwest Chapter

Tom Ulrich American Marine Western Chapter

Doug Truxillo Onebane Law Firm Legal Advisor

Randy Davis Borneo Subsea Asia Pacific Chapter

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Craig Fortenbery Mainstream C.D. 2nd Vice President General Member BOD

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September•October 2008


A Message from the ADCI President

BILL CROWLEY Quite a Hurricane Season

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urricanes are terrifying. I absolutely wish them on no other being, terrifying! You see them reported on the news and you might empathize with the victims. But if you have never experienced the hours of fear and the sounds of the wind, let me try to describe them. The wind is unbelievably loud and it builds in intensity to a point where near panic runs through your every nerve ending. Nighttime or pre-dawn makes it even more of an accelerator for your fears and nerves. For me, day or night, it is always nighttime when the storm has peaked, you sit there in the dark near your “safe area” with a flashlight and a radio or portable 12-volt DC television so you can get local updates about where “tornadic activity” is evident on the radar screens. The rain begins to fly horizontally, and trees and parts of houses are flying through the air then, just to make things even more dramatic. You have to deal with the storm surge and 20 miles inland the rising water because there isn’t any place for the water to drain. Then the survival mode kicks in. “Hooray we are safe!” And if you are lucky, the house is intact, damaged but not destroyed. Electricity is off for days or weeks, water is only available at “Official” distribution points, along with MRE food and maybe some ice. If you were smart and obeyed the warnings and orders to evacuate to a shelter or lucky enough to have a hotel, you cannot go home until the authorities determine it is safe. Not a pleasant experience to live through, but it certainly beats the alternative. Therefore, when a hurricane or typhoon is bearing down on some unfortunate place, take a moment to consider the victims. There are always victims in the path of a storm. Now, (not to change the subject) how about some words of safety directly related to diving? Underwater burning and welding are important tools and skills some of us use on a daily basis. I believe the time has come for the association to take a new critical, unbiased look at the process and determine the following: What are we doing right? What can we do to be better, and, of course, safer at it? The answers lie with a clear understanding of what is physically happening, what amounts and makeup of the gases are generated during the process, how many amperes and volts are necessary. How much oxygen pressure do we need and at what percent? Rods are different, the welding machines are different and the required training is different from when I first started. And although the skill sets are similar, I think that technology may have passed our knowledge base. I know there are those of you out there who will relate to this because you, too, have been there and experienced the changes, which have become acceptable because it is a skill and the tool fits the need. I may be wrong, but the only studies I have read on this subject focused on productivity. Yes, safety and the in-date use of tools are important in our day-today underwater trade. Safety and procedures should be the prime directive in every phase of our underwater operations. Do the right thing, and be safe. Bill Crowley September•October 2008

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ADCI and UW Salute the Gulf Coast in the Wake of Hurricanes Gustav and Ike We’ve been through it before; we’ll go through it again. And no matter how many times Mother Nature blows her winds and rains our way, we will bounce back better than before. Here are just a sampling of scenes following the latest hurricanes to strike the Gulf Coast, home to more than a few ADCI members.

(Above) Damaged boats are seen at a boatyard on the Bolivar Peninsula in Galveston, Texas, following Hurricane Ike, which struck the Texas Gulf Coast as a strong category 2 storm September 13, causing wide-spread damage to the region. (US Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Chris Hoffpauir)

(Right) A GOES-12 infrared satellite image provided by the US Naval Research Laboratory, Monterey, Calif., showing Hurricane Gustav on September 1, 2008, at approximately 4 am CST. Gustav made landfall as a category 3 hurricane in Louisiana with maximum sustained winds near 115 mph, moving north by northwest at 14 mph.

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September•October 2008


A capsized boat is seen adrift in Galveston Bay following Hurricane Ike. (US Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Chris Hoffpauir)

(Left) Chief Boswain’s Mate Charles Dalton prepares to throw off the last line to Engineman 1st Class John Ne’ Smith as he and Boswain’s Mate 1st Class Jennifer Smith disembark from a landing craft utility from the amphibious assault ship, USS Nassau. The vessel was anchored offshore Galveston to render disaster response and aid to civil authorities in the wake of Hurricane Ike. (US Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Elizabeth Merriam)

A landing craft utility assigned to Assault Craft Unit 2 departs the amphibious assault ship USS Nassau during disaster response duties after Hurricane Ike. (US Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Mary Popejoy)

September•October 2008

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MMS, Contractors Lead the Way After Hurricanes Hit Gulf of Mexico

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s this issue of UW went to press, offshore oil and gas operators and their associated subsea contractors were reboarding Gulf of Mexico platforms and rigs, quickly restoring production following both Hurricane Gustav and Hurricane Ike. The US Minerals Management Service (MMS) continuously monitored activities for both hurricanes through its Continuity of Operations Plan team, which will stay in place until operations return to normal. At press time, 23 manned platforms were confirmed destroyed from Hurricane

Ike. Personnel had been evacuated from a total of 203 production platforms, equivalent to 29.3 % of the 694 manned platforms in the Gulf of Mexico. There were 116 rigs operational at that time. Personnel from four rigs had been evacuated. From the operators’ reports, it is estimated that approximately 67% of the oil production in the Gulf remained shut-in as UW went to press. As of June 2008, estimated oil production from the Gulf was 1.3 million barrels of oil per day. It was also estimated that approximately 62% of the natural gas production in the Gulf was shut-in. Estimated natural gas production from the Gulf of Mexico was 7.4 billion cubic feet of gas per day. As part of the evacuation process, personnel activated the shut-in procedure, which can also be accomplished from a remote location. This involves closing the safety valves located below the surface of the ocean to prevent the release of oil or gas. During Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, the shut-in valves functioned 100% of the time, efficiently closing in production from wells and resulting in no major spills from the Outer Continental Shelf. Shutting-in oil and gas production is a standard procedure conducted by industry for safety and environmental reasons. After the hurricane had passed, officials began facility inspections. Once all standard checks have been completed, production from undamaged facilities will be brought back online immediately. Contractors Back to Work Like most subsea contractors, equipment manufacturers, and distributors (many of which are ADCI member companies), Louisiana-based Fugro Chance quickly began utilizing its technology to reposition oil rigs and pipelines and inspect platforms. Fugro was using its proprietary Gulf of Mexico database to track the location of structures and potential hazards. The multilayered database contains vast volumes of geographic information and has been recognized as the most comprehensive database of wells, pipelines, and hazards in the Gulf. The MMS, with Fugro’s permission, is currently using maps generated from Fugro’s database as a basis for their constant updates on which platforms still need to be inspected. Fugro also incorporates its navigation tools such as Starfix.Nav when helping to position the rigs. This graphic positioning and navigation system incorporates realtime positioning in a graphic display of the physical survey depicted on screen. UW

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September•October 2008


Answering Your Gear Questions

DIVING EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE

By Ocean Eye, Inc.’s Chris Gabel This time around, I thought I would comment on some questions that seem to repeatedly come up in conversation around the shop and in the field. These have come up often enough that I thought it would be a worthwhile idea to share them with you. I want to repair my own drysuit seals. Does it matter what glue that I use? Let’s face it, we live in a do it yourself (DIY) world. More people want to be able to build and repair things themselves. The challenge is getting all of the facts in one place so that the consumer is fully informed on the process. This is one of those cases. The answer is a resounding YES. The material you are trying to bond together is going to require an adhesive that was designed for that purpose. Elmer’s Glue will not bond vulcanized rubber. It may taste great, but it won’t seal that drysuit ring system in place. I’m going to cover this in more detail in a future article here in UW, but I think it’s also important to note here. There are a lot of variables to consider. For instance, if you use standard Viking glue on an HDS suit and want to dive in contaminated water, you just turned your HDS suit in to a Viking Pro 1000/1500 (depending on the material thickness). What do I mean? Well, the components are only as good as the adhesive. If you don’t use the glue that was designed to conform to the materials and/or environments that you are going to use the equipment in, it’s not going to perform as designed. I’m using the glue that was recommended but my seals won’t stick, why? Okay, this is a two-parter. The first part is material preparation. For instance, did you appropriately prepare both the sleeve and the cuff so that the adhesive will adhere itself to both materials? If at this point you ask yourself “What in the @#$% is he talking about, preparation?” Please put it in a box and send it to a trained authorized repair facility. If you don’t, at best you will be cursing like a sailor for days. Or worse, you’ll have a substandard repair that will come apart when you least want it to (like at 50 feet in cold contaminated water). 16

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September•October 2008


Remember that the components are only as good as the adhesive. If you don’t use the glue that was designed to conform to the materials and environments that you are going to use the equipment in, it’s not going to perform as designed.

September•October 2008

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thoroughly clean the area you’re working on with an appropriate cleaning agent.

Here is the second part, if you know how to do the repair and have done it before successfully. You did the preparation as you did before. You are using the right glue and still everything has gone sideways. This is when bad things happen to good people, right? I ran into this situation a few times myself. Often, the culprit is what is on the suit. What do I mean? Well, I’ve had issues with people doing things like using ArmorAll on their drysuit. The issue may not be that overt. It also depends on what the diver was submerged in – especially when it comes to petroleum. The resolution to this issue is to thoroughly clean the area you’re working on with an appropriate cleaning agent. For instance, Heptane on a Viking Pro 1000. Why is my Gorski helmet breathing harder than it should? As one size does not fit all, neither does one pressure. Some people have a habit of thinking that if one hat requires a certain pressure, then all hats will use the same pressure. For instance, in the past, the Kirby Morgan Dive Systems 17B helmet had a pressure requirement of at least 90 PSI over bottom pressure for anything from zero to 60 feet (18m) of salt water. (There have been some revisions to these calculations. For a more complete explanation, see: Surface Supply Breathing Requirements and Recommendations for Kirby Morgan Helmets and Band Masks, written by Mike Ward of Dive Lab). Perfectly valid. That said, it’s not valid for the Gorski. That manual dictates that the minimum over bottom pressure for the second stage regulator is 130 to 160 PSI over bottom pressure (more than 160 PSI over bottom pressure could cause the regulator to free flow). Since it uses a balanced Poseidon Cyklon 5000 second stage, the requirement is the same as if you mated 18

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September•October 2008


As one size does not fit all, and neither does one pressure. Some people have a habit of thinking that if one hat requires a certain pressure, then all hats will use the same pressure. Not so. This Gorski is a completely different animal than a Kirby Morgan hat. Read your manual!

the Poseidon Cyklon second stage with an appropriate scuba first stage. The intermediate pressure needs to be at least 130 PSI. I’ve seen people using smaller compressors that only put out 110 PSI on the surface and trying to throw on a Gorski hat and dive it to 20 or 30 feet. Basically, at 20 feet (6m), you have a pressure to the hat of about 90 PSI. That’s at least 40 PSI less than what the minimum requirement is. All of this is covered in the manual. You can actually download a full copy at www. GorskiHat.com. Manuals for any of the Kirby Morgan product line can be downloaded and viewed at www.KMDSI.com.

100 feet (30m) should not carry one (for instance, confined spaces). The applicable OSHA notes are: • 29 CFR 1910.425(c)(4)(i), (c)(4)(ii), and (c)(4)(iii). For dives deeper than 100

fsw or outside the no-decompression limits, each diver must: be tended by a separate dive-team member; have a standby diver available at the dive location while the diver is in the water; and have a diver-carried

Why bother with the additional “hassle” of an EGS bottle? If you’re wearing enough weight to nail you to the bottom, 10 feet (3m) might as well be 100 feet (30m) when you’re trying to get to the surface.

I’m doing shallow dive. Why should I be bothered buying and maintaining an EGS bottle with my demand hat? Frighteningly enough, I’ve had this discussion more than once. The scenario is this: the diver/company is only doing shallow work, perhaps a bone crushing eight or ten feet. The normal comment is that they can swim to the surface in an out-of-air emergency. Why bother with the additional equipment and hassle? Here is my answer. If you’re wearing enough weight to nail you to the bottom, 10 feet (3m) might as well be 100 feet (30m) when you’re trying to get to the surface. Although OSHA talks about the following four items requiring the use of a “divercarried reserve breathing-gas supply,” it’s an extremely rare exception that safety would be compromised where a diver above 20

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September•October 2008


reserve breathing-gas supply, except when heavy gear is worn. • 29 CFR 1910.425(c)(4)(iv). A reserve breathing-gas supply is required at the dive location for dives deeper than 100 fsw or outside the no-decompression limits. • 29 CFR 1910.425(c)(5)(i) and (c)(5) (ii). For surface-supplied air diving with heavy gear, deeper than 100 fsw, or outside the no-decompression limits, an extra breathing-gas hose must be available to the standby diver, and the hose must be capable of supplying breathing gas to the diver in an emergency. Also, an inwater stage must be provided for the diver(s) in the water. • 29 CFR 1910.425(c)(6). A diver-carried reserve breathing-gas supply must be provided to a diver in the water when the diver is prevented by the configuration of the dive area from ascending directly to the surface (i.e., when the diver does not have “free access to the surface”), except when the diver wears heavy gear or when the physical space does not permit the use of such a breathinggas supply. The diver-carried reserve must be sufficient under operating conditions to allow the diver to reach the surface, or another source of breathing gas, or to be reached by a standby diver. Heavy-gear diving is exempted from these provisions because the gear carries its own reserve. So the bottom line is that a bottle, first stage regulator, pressure gauge, overpressure relief valve, and a low pressure whip are cheap insurance. Maintaining this additional gear is simple and minimally invasive to your annual budget. Okay? Simply put, just use it. (I do need to note here that this does not count for heavy gear. I included 29 CFR 1910.425(c)(5)(i) and (c)(5)(ii) to cover part of this. The rest is a different story.)

University of Central Florida Students Win at AUVSI A team from the University of Central Florida Robotics Laboratory took first prize at AUVSI and the U.S. Office of Naval Research’s First International Autonomous Surface Vehicle Competition (ASVC), held Aug. 7-9 in San Diego, Calif. The first competition of its kind brought together students teams from the U.S. and Canada. Six undergraduate student teams competed for three days at the U.S. Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center’s TRANSDEC Facility, where they were challenged to navigate a surface-water course with autonomous vehicles built with off-the-shelf components. The ASVC is a student competition based on unmanned boats operating under rules of the waterway including littoral area navigation, channel following and autonomous docking. This is typically done with computer vision, multi-sensor fusion techniques, proactive and reactive path planning, and machine learning approaches. UW

Until Next Time From time to time in future issues, I would like to continue addressing your questions. Send in the diving equipment maintenance or repair questions that you want to have answered. You’re the reason that these articles are written, so I want to work on subject matter that you are interested in. Email your questions to me at CGabel@Ocean-Eye.net or snail mail them to me at: Ocean Eye, Inc. C/O Chris Gabel 210 Crossings Blvd. PMB 277 Elverson, PA 19520 Let me know if it’s alright to add your name and company name on the credit for the question when we use it in UW. If your question is chosen, we’ll send you a $5 gift card to Starbucks so that you can get properly caffeinated. Dive safe. UW September•October 2008

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I-35

A Year Later

What Have We Learned?


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t’s been a year since the nation was stunned by the sudden collapse of the I-35 bridge in Minneapolis, Minnesota. That tragic event put the focus of the public and the media squarely on bridge inspections, the competence of the companies that perform them, and the public agencies entrusted with acting on inspection results. UW decided to go directly to the source to find out if the general situation has improved. Our thanks go out to the professionals who agreed to answer our questions. They, and those like them, are part of the solution, rather than being part of the problem.

Michael J. Ganas, PE Managing Director Boswell Underwater Engineering Dave Severns, PE Assistant Chief Structures Engineer Nevada Department of Transportation David R. Reser, PE President Infrastructure Engineers, Inc.

(Opposite) US Navy Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit 2 aids recovery following the I-35 bridge collapse in Minneapolis on August 1, 2007. Photo by Senior Chief Mass Communication Specialist Andrew McKaskle.

The media reports following the I-35 tragedy focused on the inadequate overall state of US bridges. In your experience, was that an accurate representation of the state of bridges in the country? Was the Minnesota event just a tragedy waiting to happen, regardless of when or where? Michael Ganas: It would be hard to provide an accurate overall evaluation regarding the state of U.S. bridges based on the recent collapse of one bridge. Bridge inspection programs vary by state, with some being far superior to others. Based on what I’ve seen, I’d say the New York State Department of Transportation has the best, most comprehensive and thorough program in the country, while other states have huge flaws in their approach to bridge inspection that might potentially lead to tragedies such as the I-35 bridge collapse in Minnesota. For instance, the New Jersey DOT considers the inspection of a bridge’s superstructure to fall under a professional engineering service while it deems the inspection of the substructure on a waterspanning bridge to be a non-professional service subject to low bid price, and although it has established prequalification criteria which must be met by a firm upon its bid submission, I am left to wonder just how much oversight is actually applied in enforcing it. There are other states that bid out the underwater inspection of their bridges, and if I were a betting man I’d wager 10-to-1 we will see the next bridge collapse in one of those states. But I should point out that the Minnesota calamity had nothing to do with underwater inspection since the I-35 bridge had no substructure supports located in the water. According to forensics, the actual cause of the collapse resided in a failed steel September•October 2008

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What Have We Learned? (This page) Boswell Engineering divers performing inspection work.

gusset plate in the superstructure. After months of investigation, it was determined that the plate was too thin to support the loads imposed on it. A photograph in a precollapse inspection report of the superstructure indicated a deformity in this structural member, a tell-tale sign that over-stressing existed, but unfortunately this somehow got overlooked.

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David Severns: I believe the numerical data representations were accurate, with the understanding that this data was/is often presented in terms of “Functionally Obsolete” and “Structurally Deficient” structures. It is important to note that neither of these terms means that a bridge is in danger of collapse, and perhaps some of the media reports did not adequately define these terms. I have no comment on the Minneapolis bridge, as I was not personally involved. David RESER: A significant number of our nation’s bridges were constructed during the 1950s and 1960s, and are reaching the end of their planned design lives. This does not mean they are in danger of collapse, but it does highlight the fact that our infrastructure system is aging, and is in

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need of significant capital investment if our nation is to remain competitive in the global economy. Approximately 14% of the nation’s bridges are structurally deficient, which is to say that either their load carrying elements are in poor or worse condition, or that the waterway opening under the bridge is extremely insufficient. Structurally deficient DOES NOT mean a bridge is in danger of collapse or is unsafe. Approximately 15% of the nation’s bridges are functionally obsolete, which means their geometric characteristics (i.e., narrow bridge lane width) or their load carrying capacity no longer meets the current criteria for the system of which they are a part of. I believe it would be irresponsible for me to comment on the Minnesota bridge failure specifically, as I was not involved in the investigation of the failure. What do you think are the factors that got us to this point? Michael Ganas: Probably the most ostensible underlying factor that will continue to be at the heart of most bridge failures is the money allocated to maintenance. This

September•October 2008


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September•October 2008


is not to imply a lack of funding caused the I-35 collapse, for other factors completely unrelated to funding may have led to this tragedy, such as a lapse in judgement or oversight on the part of one key individual. But there still exists agencies out there that need to consider revamping their selection protocol regarding the award of inspection contracts. As the old saying goes, you get what you pay for, and bridge owners that continue to award inspection contracts based on low bid are potentially setting the stage for future structural failures and the enormous liabilities that are sure to accompany them. Bureaucratic complacency is another underlying factor that adds fuel to potential collapses. Failing to act immediately to brewing problems is like throwing dice, only to come up with snake eyes. I’m sure we all remember the way FEMA reacted to Hurricane Katrina. David Severns: The overall lack of funding from state and federal sources dedicated to asset preservation, due to the total number of dollars available, many different needs competing for those dollars, and the structuring of those funding sources available. David RESER: Federal bridge inspection and maintenance funding formally began in 1968 after the Silver Bridge collapsed in Point Pleasant, West Virginia. This funding has continued ever since, with over $55 billion dollars spent between 1978 and 2003 to ensure the safety and continuing functionality of the bridge network in the United States. This being said, there are competing priorities for this finite pot of money. Unfortunately, when faced with scarce resources, routine maintenance activities, which typically do not increase capacity, are often a lower priority.

the need to re-examine their inspection procedures, but this boiled down to nothing more than political posturing without any intention of increasing budgets, particularly since many public agencies are far too encumbered by employee entitlements. And satisfying them, it seems, trumps funds going toward the upkeep of their infrastructures, something these agencies are entrusted with. Generally speaking, my firm shies away from bidding out this type of work and tends to steer clear of those agencies with inadequate budgets and inferior programs in place, knowing there are always “garage enterprises” lurking in the background

What Have We Learned?

looking to make a fast buck while providing little substance in their reporting. Qualification-based contract awards are our primary focus because we’ve invested substantial sums of money in our diver support equipment and the training of our staff. David Severns: I know that the State of Nevada, as well as the federal governmental representatives with whom I regularly correspond, have always taken bridge safety seriously, and have always worked with a high degree of integrity and professionalism. This has not changed. David RESER: I have noticed a significant increase in state accountability and compliance with the National Bridge

And now, a year later, have you seen a change in either the attitudes or practices of the governmental agencies that hire you to inspect the bridges in various regions of the country? Michael Ganas: Strangely enough, I haven’t really noticed a change in either the attitudes or practices of governmental agencies responsible for awarding bridge inspection contracts subsequent to the Minnesota tragedy. This is probably because the agencies my firm works for generally have both excellent oversight and formidable protocol governing their inspection programs. I’ve heard several state governors spout September•October 2008

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What Have We Learned?

Inspection Standards. Of significant note is the increased emphasis on inspector continuing education and quality assurance in the bridge inspection process. I hope this trend continues. UW: Did the Minnesota tragedy expose the importance of hiring an ADCI company to do this type of work? Or are you still finding that some agencies think that “two guys with a scuba tank” can do the job just fine? Michael Ganas: To be honest, I don’t think any one organization can claim superiority when it comes to underwater inspection because this boils down to experience, relevant knowledge, schooling, training, and the physical abilities and skills of the individuals performing the inspection. This distills to meeting the requirements of the agency you are serving. Agencies must enact regulations that bring bridge inspection protocols to a consistent level nationwide, increasing qualifications for bridge inspectors, including mandated detailed structural integrity evaluations and load capacity assessments. In spite of the Minnesota collapse, there are still some agencies out there that think two guys with a scuba tank working cheap will be sufficient to perform an adequate inspection of their water-based facilities, and these are the ones we avoid. David Severns: I can only speak for Nevada, and we have always required that all underwater operations be conducted in compliance with both OSHA and the current ADCI Consensus Standards. David RESER: The Minnesota failure did not have a direct impact on the underwater bridge inspection industry. However, I think we have benefited from the improved focus on bridge safety inspection, in general. I think most agencies now recognize the importance of hiring professional commercial divers to perform underwater inspections. There are a few agencies that do not comply with OSHA for their internal underwater inspection teams, which is a real tragedy because the employees are put at a greater risk. We still have work to do on the education side.

“The Minnesota failure did not have a direct impact on the underwater bridge inspection industry. However, I think we have benefited from the improved focus on bridge safety inspection, in general.” –David Reser, Infrastructure Engineers

UW: On the bridge inspection jobs you’ve encountered, do you find that the various agencies actually heed your inspection results and warnings, and act on prescribed maintenance and repair programs? Or have you encountered instances of “Thanks, see you later,” where nothing is actually done post-inspection? Michael Ganas: Because my firm caters 28

www.adc-int.org • www.underwater.com

September•October 2008


Underwater bridge inspection... get the full picture! The MS 1000 Scanning Sonar: Sonar images so clear you’ll think they’re photographs

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To address the need of seeing the complete underwater picture, Kongsberg Mesotech has led research into the use of mechanically scanned sonar for the application of underwater structure inspection. The MS 1000 Scanning Sonar system, fitted with a fan cone transducer, provides the user with both imaging and highly accurate profiling capabilities. Easy deployment arrangements now make it possible to scan and profile both the bottom and vertical structures and produce the kind of incredibly accurate images you see here. Typical MS 1000 applications include: • Riverbed scans for plan-view mosaics • Vertical scans for pier visualization

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1. MS 1000 vertical visualization of a timber crib structure, outfall pipes, and unknown pipe in the wall. The structure was built in 1927 with a concrete retaining wall placed on top of the wooden crib structure. Image courtesy Nautilus Marine Group, Lansing, MI

• Pier and riverbed profiles to accurately determine scour and water depths To find out how the Kongsberg MS 1000 Scanning Sonar system can take the guesswork out of your inspection tasks, e-mail or call our technical specialists for product and application information.

2. MS 1000 vertical visualization of a severely scoured bridge pier. Image courtesy Peter Diving, Russia

3. MS 1000 plan view mosaic of a bridge pier showing well-placed armour rock. Image courtesy Nautilus Marine Group, Lansing, MI 4. MS 1000 vertical visualization of bridge pier showing minor scour exposing the tremie seal but not undermining the bridge pier. Image courtesy Nautilus Marine Group, Lansing, MI

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What Have We Learned?

to the more responsible agencies, the ones that deem public trust important, I’ve found that our repair recommendations are always heeded. Rarely do clients question our judgement about a yellow or red flag condition, or those concerning bridge closures when we assess a condition to be unsafe. Over the years I can recall but two cases in which I was asked to reconsider a closure, and each time I refused to cave to the client’s pressure because in the end it will be the professional engineer who suffers the consequences, and not the client, should a failure occur. David Severns: In Nevada, the results of underwater inspections are always reviewed, and acted upon, in accordance with the severity of the findings. Severe deficiencies are dealt with immediately. David RESER: I think most agencies take the recommendations seriously. We as inspectors need to ensure our reports provide meaningful recommendations, realistic recommendations, if we want to be taken seriously. UW: In your experience, are certain regions of the country more on top of these problems than others? Why do you think this is the case? Michael Ganas: Over the last two decades I’ve noticed subtle changes in the way business is conducted by many public agencies, some good, some bad. Corruption of politicians and bureaucrats these days seems to have reached an all-time high, and it is almost a certainty that bureaucratic malfeasance will exist wherever you find public officials breaking the public trust. Flourishing within the midst of such corruption is an atmosphere of complacency and incompetence, almost always accompanied by a lack of proper oversight, where the guys at the top of these agencies are more fixated on serving themselves than serving the public. Such tarnished administrators are the ones that spend most of their time coming up with new ways to justify higher bonuses, more perks, larger pensions, increased health insurance and pay raises for themselves and other upper echelon managers, rather than do the job they were hired to perform. These are the culprits that are constantly dipping into the public till, incessantly lured by greed, and the more they take for themselves, the more maintenance of infrastructure will suffer. With available funds for inspection and repair inexorably being depleted by benefits, the agencies these individuals head are rapidly going bankrupt, crushed by the insufferable burden of runaway entitlements, yet incessantly looking for a bailout through the implementation of Federal intervention, increased tolls, and increased taxation. Over the years I’ve had the opportunity to meet with some of these high ranking officials and I’ve learned that they rarely have a clue about what’s going on under them. Such ineptness and misconduct has a way of trickling down through the ranks of these agencies, and if an investigation were ever to be carried out within these cultures of complacency, it would be discovered that they were far too bloated, overstaffed to the point of frighteningly wasteful inefficiency, with the average employee putting in less than four hours each work day where eight hours is required, with some of them not to be found anywhere. It is within these environments where responsible oversight is most lacking and where problems are sure to erupt in the future. After all, it is the taxpayer who ultimately pays for this wastefulness. 30

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September•October 2008


What Have We Learned?

David RESER: We have performed work nationwide, and I have noticed no significant variation between the states.

A Boswell diver hard at work.

September•October 2008

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UW: As we go forward, do you see the overall situation improving, or will the “Let’s just hope nothing happens” attitude be a perpetual problem? Michael Ganas: As I’ve already pointed out, while there are many bridge-owning agencies out there that act responsibly by performing the job they were entrusted with, there will continue to exist those that perpetuate the problem of poor oversight, severely mismanaged and hampered by a culture of complacency and greed, all at taxpayers expense. In the face of this, public safety is put at risk. David Severns: I do not believe that this is anywhere near the common attitude today among bridge inspection professionals, and I know no one who maintains this type of attitude. We all want the safest bridges possible (our families drive across them too), and we constantly strive to preserve our assets to the best of our ability, operating within the various constraints with which we are faced. David RESER: I think most agencies are sincere in the desire to protect public safety and preserve our infrastructure. I have seen frustration by some agencies when lack of funding or political agendas impact the decision making process. It will take constant effort by all of us to keep bridge maintenance and inspection in focus. UW

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DCINEWS&NOTESADCINEWS&NOTESADCINEWS&NOTESADCINEWS&NOTESADCINEWS&NOTESADCINEWS&NOTESADCIN

A Message from the Executive Director

USN Diving Manual Revisions • OGP Meeting

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here are two items that I want to focus on for this edition of UnderWater Magazine. The first item is the United States Navy Diving Manual, Revision 6, Chapter 9. Since the current Revision has hit the streets, I have been asked the ADCI’s position on the new changes. The Association has never formally endorsed any organization or company’s diving tables. Our position has always been that companies or entities electing to use a particular table should perform a proper pre-job safety meeting to determine: 1. If the tables and schedules can accommodate the projected volume of diving that will take place; and 2. If they are suitable for the task to be performed. In addition to this, if a particular table and schedule are chosen, they should be followed to the letter. With that being said, it should be noted that, historically, the United States Navy Diving Tables, and the USN Diving Manual as a whole, have been regarded worldwide as an acceptable standard for commercial diving and underwater operations. The Navy’s diving and treatment tables have historically stood up in courts of law as being both acceptable and safe. Are there elements of the USN Diving Manual that might not be suitable for certain commercial underwater operations? Some would argue that there are aspects that shouldn’t be employed commercially. Bear in mind, the USN Diving Tables and Schedules are tested and utilized by navy divers, who for the most part, fit a physical profile that is not consistent with the physical 32

greater level of understanding about the current revisions to the USN Diving Manual for industry personnel. Hopefully, with time permitting, it will also provide an opportunity for attendees to present any questions.

Phil Newsum diversity of personnel in the commercial industry. It is also important to note that commercial divers typically perform a greater volume of dives during the course of any week, month, or year. A greater volume of dives and, in some cases, an older and less fit diver would warrant a more conservative table to ensure a greater level of safety for personnel. So what are the changes outlined in Revision 6? All you need to do is log onto www.supsalve.org to find out. The changes are accessible to all, and I strongly recommend to those who utilize the USN Dive Tables or refer to the USN Diving Manual to perform a detailed review to gain an understanding of the manual’s theories, procedures, and tables before use on any commercial operation. So what’s the rationale behind the changes outlined in Revision 6? Well, the only folks that should be addressing that question are the authors of the document itself. The Association of Diving Contractors International will offer a technical session at Underwater Intervention 2009, (March 3-5), facilitated by the USN. The goal of this technical session will be to provide a

OGP Meeting The second item that I want to mention is the upcoming meeting by the Oil and Gas Producers (OGP) Diving Operations Subcommittee (DOSC) meeting, taking place in late October in Italy. Many of you are not familiar with the OGP. It is comprised of such majors as Shell, BP, ENI, ExxonMobil, PETRONAS, Statoil Hydro, Total, and Talisman Energy. These operators are some of the movers and shakers that have a definite impact on how things look worldwide from an offshore diving and underwater operations standpoint. The OGP Diving Operations Sub-Committee is comprised of representation from each of the above named operators, as well as other industry stakeholders as ADAS, ADCI, DNV, and IMCA. The purpose and focus of the meeting will be to help come up with strategies for addressing the manpower shortages of qualified diving personnel worldwide. Ironically, many of these listed operators are directly responsible for creating the very climate that contributed to this perceived “personnel shortage.” Nonetheless, that was then and this is NOW. Hopefully, some of the walls and roadblocks which were put into place that prevented divers from working in different parts

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of the world will be removed. I’m optimistic that the wind is blowing in that direction, but I remain cautious about stating any definitive timeline for when major change will take place. We as an Association are looking at how we can do things better and safer to address some of the concerns that have come from these operators. At the Canadian Underwater Conference in Halifax, Nova Scotia (September 2008), the ADCI, ADAS, DCBC, and IMCA took part in a panel which had each association present its certification matrix. This session also allowed members of the audience to direct questions and concerns to the panel. It was a first of what I think will be several opportunities for industry stakeholders to take part in an activity of this type. The exchanges were healthy, and all in attendance agreed that more dialogue and cooperation between the associations needs to occur. I personally walked away very optimistic about the future. I also came away from the experience with a greater realization that, despite the different approaches and philosophies regarding the certification of diving personnel, each association wants the same thing; safe underwater operations and to provide a greater level of service and support to their members. It is my hope that a similar activity can be held between the different Associations at Underwater Intervention 2009. Be Safe. –Phil Newsum

September•October 2008


DCINEWS&NOTESADCINEWS&NOTESADCINEWS&NOTESADCINEWS&NOTESADCINEWS&NOTESADCINEWS&NOTESADCIN East Coast Chapter Report Tom Eason, Chair The East Coast Chapter will hold officers’ elections at our next scheduled meeting on Sunday, March 2, 2009, at Underwater Intervention 2009. If you need help with any chapter-specific or ADCI general business, that is what I am here for so please just give me a call or drop me an email. I encourage you to visit www.adc-int.org and check out the Safety Notice link and learn from others. If you have not been receiving chapter information via email, please forward your updated email address and contact information, and don’t forget that ADCI Headquarters also needs this to communicate with the members. For chapter information, assistance or comments please don’t hesitate to contact our Vice Chairman, Wendell Swilley, at info@hullcleaning.com or 352-3736301, or me at tom@easondiving.com or 843-7470548. Western Chapter Report Tom Ulrich, Chair The level of diving projects and associated work throughout the Western Chapter continues to remain at a high level throughout the region. Planning has begun for next year’s Western Chapter Annual Meeting, to be held October 2009 in Portland, Oregon. Karen Martinez will be requesting input from members for the specific dates, agenda, and speakers. I would like to thank members in advance for their input and participation. Please feel free to contact any of us at anytime with issues regarding the ADCI or the Western Chapter. You can email your questions to me at thomas@amarinecorp.com. Midwest Chapter Report Rich Riley, Chair The Association has been very busy working hard on the behalf of its members. I am proud to be a part of all of the progress. I would like to extend an invitation our valued Midwest Chapter Members to call or email me at any time to with any concerns or issues that you would like to discuss. My number is 724847-3390 or my email is rriley@marionhilldivers.com. Thank you for your continued support. UW

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NEW ADCI MEMBERS

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SeaQuest Diving, LLC Harry C. Tate 6602 Petro Park Dr. Houston, TX 77041 281-598-4920; fax 281-598-4921 htate@seaquestdivingllc.com www.seaquestdivingllc.com Specialty Underwater Services, LLC Brad Long 1000 John Roebling Way Saxonburg, PA 16056 724-443-1533; fax 724-443-8733 b_long@specialtyunderwaterservices. com www.specialtyunderwaterservices.com Underwater Services S.A. Marvin Castillo B. Arnulfo Arias Madrid Diablo Bldg 42D Panama 0830-03186 REPUBLIC OF PANAMA 507-314-0179; fax 507-314-0180 uwaterserv@cwpanama.net

September•October 2008


Commercial Diving Physiology

Cardiovascular Disease & Fitness to Dive

The heart and blood vessels comprise an organ system known as the cardiovascular system. Since the heart is such an important organ, diseases that affect it may render a diver unfit for diving. Dr. Tony Alleman, MD MPH, of Occupational Medicine Clinics of South Louisiana, outlines some of the most common cardiovascular conditions that may affect commercial divers.

US Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Christopher Perez

Hypertension While hypertension, or high blood pressure as it is commonly called, may sometimes be caused by organs other than the heart, it is typically referred to as a cardiovascular disease. Hypertension is one of the most common findings in the general population and may be found in relatively young individuals. Hypertension is not disqualifying unless it is uncontrolled. Currently the maximum blood pressure recommended for commercial diving is 140/90. Individuals who have hypertension may be controlled on medication and subsequently cleared to dive. Medications used to control hypertension that would be disqualifying for diving would include diuretics and beta blockers. Any medications prescribed to a diver should be cleared by the diving medical examiner.

Cardiomyopathy The heart is a pump and as with any pump it may weaken for several reasons. Diseases that may involve the heart to weaken it include infections, diseases that affect other organs (metabolic diseases), diseases that infiltrate the muscle of the heart, and disease of the body that may directly attack the heart muscle. The ability of the heart to pump is measured by the ejection fraction that is the portion of the blood that is pumped from the heart after each beat. When the ejection fraction drops below 50% the heart may be susceptible to secondary problems such as congestive heart failure, a condition worsened by exercise. Consequently, commercial divers that have ejection fractions below 50% should be disqualified from

Coronary Artery Disease The heart is supplied by relatively small blood vessels that have a tendency to narrowing and becoming blocked by atherosclerotic plaques usually composed of cholesterol. Doctors refer to this disease as coronary artery disease. Common symptoms include chest pain, especially with exercise, shortness of breath, nausea or indigestion. Unfortunately, symptoms of coronary artery disease are usually absent or go unnoticed until the disease is fairly severe with a high risk of sudden death. Risk factors of coronary artery disease include smoking, high cholesterol, diabetes, hypertension, and advanced age (above 40), and a history of coronary artery disease in family members. Coronary artery disease may lead to sudden death and any significant degree of disease should be disqualifying for commercial divers. September•October 2008

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Commercial Diving Physiology diving. Also, certain types of cardiomyopathies may increase the risk for sudden cardiac death. Arrythmias Normally the heart beats very regularly with the electrical stimulus starting in the atrium of the heart, the smaller chamber that sits on top. Sometimes the electrical stimulus that begins the heartbeat starts from an abnormal focus. When the focus is from another part of the atrium it is called supraventricular and is not necessarily considered disqualifying unless it is chronic atrial fibrillation. Occasionally the heart may start beating from the ventricles, the larger chambers in the bottom of the heart. These are call ventricular arrhythmias and can be potentially fatal and are therefore disqualifying. Other types of heart rhythm disturbances are heart blocks where there is either a slowing or an abnormal path of the electrical current passing through the heart. First degree heart blocks and type I second degree heart blocks are acceptable for commercial diving as long as the heart rhythm disturbance is not from some other disqualifying heart condition.

Navy Second Class Petty Officer Marion Lorde prepares to dive on a WWII crash site to search for remains of fallen service members. Navy divers are some of the most fit in the world, but every diver should be aware of the dangers associated with these heart diseases. Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Christopher Perez.

Valvular Heart Disease There are three main valves in the heart situated between the main chambers and one between the left ventricle and the aorta. Valves may become narrowed or may become less compliant and will cause abnormal sounds that are known as heart murmurs. This occurs when there is an abnormal flow of blood across one or more of the valves. Valves that become narrowed are called stenotic and valves that leak are call regurgitant. In general, leaking valves of a mild nature do not raise the risk of sudden death during diving. Stenotic valves, those that are narrowed, may cause the heart to weaken (heart failure) and should be considered disqualifying. Congenital Heart Disease The most common congenital heart problem that may be of concern to the diver is the patent foramen ovale and deserves a separate discussion in the future. In general any congenital heart disease that may result in a left to right shunting of blood (movement of blood from the left side of the heart to the right) may be disqualifying. Any suspected congenital heart abnormality should be investigated by a cardiologist prior to diving clearance. Recurrent unexplained decompression sickness may be the only signs of congenital heart disease that would otherwise go unnoticed. UW 36

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September•October 2008


CIALSECTIONSPECIALSECTIONSPECIALSECTIONSPECIALSECTIONSPECIALSECTIONSPECIALSECTIONSPECIALSECTIONSPECIALSECTIONS

UW’s Annual Salute to

The Military

FEATURING

The Launch of The USNS Carl Brashear The Raising of the Juliette Sea Cadets and Army Divers The Military Marketplace


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Honoring a Man of Honor

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US Navy Launches the USNS Carl Brashear

HONORING A Legend Carl Maxie Brashear joined the Navy in 1948 and retired in 1979. He was an enlisted sailor who became intrigued with the work being performed by Navy divers. He was determined to join their ranks and accomplish useful work underwater. Brashear put his efforts into making a diving career a reality, becoming a Salvage Diver in 1953, Second Class Diver in 1960, First Class Diver in 1964, and both Saturation Diver and Master Diver in 1970. During the salvage of a hydrogen bomb off of Palomares, Spain, a towing cable broke under strain and whipped across the deck, causing

By Dave Heaney

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September 18th ceremony in San Diego, California, saw the US Navy honor a great man with the launch of the USNS Carl Brashear (T-AKE 7), its newest supply ship. Brashear made history as the first African-American to qualify and serve as a Master Diver while on active duty, as well as becoming the first Navy diver to be restored to active duty as an amputee. Brashear, who died in 2006, was the subject of the movie, Men of Honor, starring Cuba Gooding Jr. and Robert De Niro, who attended the ceremony.

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September•October 2008


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multiple compound fractures and near amputation of Brashear’s left leg. Because of difficulties with the healing process, he chose to have his leg amputated so he could start the recovery process and regain his diving qualifications. That process included acts of unbelievable individual courage in overcoming his disability, including requiring him to climb a 13-rung diving ladder in a 280-pound MK V diving rig, a feat not accomplished by the author nor by many other First Class Diving school students. Because working divers are rarely observed at work, recognition is uncommon. Brashear’s courage brought recognition to the working diver’s world in a book, then in a movie, and now in a US Navy vessel. Brashear’s tale has become legend, and more detail can be found at a number of internet sites, including www.divingheritage.com/brshearkern. htm or at www.usni.org/navalinstitutepress/brashear.asp.

The Brashear sets out to sea following launch ceremonies.

A STAR-STUDDED EVENT The ceremony provided an opportunity to celebrate Brashear’s life and his beneficial impact upon the worldwide

September•October 2008

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diving community. This recognition was celebrated by a large number of both active and retired US Navy divers at the vessel launch. The bulk of Brashear’s family was on hand, including his sons and daughters. Lauren Brashear, his eldest granddaughter, served as the ship’s sponsor and broke the champagne bottle across the strike-plate on the bow. There were at least 10 Navy flag rank officers in attendance, including the Chief of Naval Operations, along with Marine and Air Force generals. A large number of diving officers were on hand, including Captain Bert Marsh, the salvor of the Japanese fishing vessel, Ehime Maru. The largest and most raucous contingent of Neptune’s pride was that of the active and retired Navy divers, including a huge number of Master Divers. Also on hand were the director and writer of the movie, as well as Di Nero, who were pleased to be on hand for this big day in the working divers’ community. VESSEL SPECS The primary mission of the USNS Carl Brashear is to provide a steady stream of ammunition, spare parts, and provisions (dry, refrigerated and frozen) to naval forces at sea in its role as a shuttle ship. This class vessel can supply an aircraft carrier crew of 65,000 all of its supply needs for a duration of 70 days. The Carl Brashear is 689 feet in length and

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Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy, Joe R. Campa, Jr., speaks with actor Robert De Niro (from the movie, Men of Honor) following the christening ceremony. (US Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jennifer A. Villalovos.)

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September•October 2008


105.6 feet in beam, with a design draft of 29.9 feet and a displacement of 41,000 metric tons. She has a sustained speed of 20 knots and an endurance of 11,535 nautical miles without dipping into her cargo fuel. This vessel has two sendCarl’s eldest granddaughter, Lauren Brashear, ing and receiving fueling at sea was the ship’s sponsor. Here she holds stations and five replenishment the ceremonial bottle of champagne before at sea stations. The new design christening the ship. (US Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jennifer also includes a bow thruster for A. Villalovos.) pulling into and out of ports without having to rely on tugs. Four FM/MAN B&W 9L and 8L 48/60 diesel generators, with a total installed power of 35.7 MW, drive her single fixed-pitch propeller. These are large powerplants – in fact, one of the 200-ton engines fell off a flatbed truck during delivery, crushing three cars and penetrating six feet into the roadway, breaking water pipes and utility lines. The designers from Lewis and Clark did not forget about the crew who will call this ship home, either. The ship’s living accommodations are substantial. Each crew member, from the entry-level supply utility to the master, will have an individual stateroom. Most will also have their own private bath. High-speed internet, cable TV, and phone outlets will be installed in every room. The ship also boasts four lounges, a library, a workout facility and a hobby shop, among other things. The crew will travel in a style befitting the great man for which the vessel was named. UW

September•October 2008

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Dave Heaney’s camera captures the beauty just prior to launch.

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Sunken Russian Submarine Raised in Providence River


Subsalve USA helps US Navy and US Army divers get the Juliett 484, a Russian sub-turned-museum, back to the surface

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he US Navy’s Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit 2, a US Army Dive Company, and a Naval Sea Systems Command support unit combined to successfully raise the Juliett 484, a sunken Russian submarine-turned-museum, to the surface of Rhode Island’s Providence River in July. The sub sank at its mooring during a storm in April 2007. The US Coast Guard (USCG) responded when the Juliett 484 initially sank, assessing any possible pollution or navigational hazard and ensuring the vessel did not block the channel. The Navy and Army used the raising of the sub as a training opportunity, as part of the Department of Defense Innovative Readiness Training (IRT) program, and have been working on site since late May of this year. Through IRT, military divers receive training by taking part in real-world, community-based projects. IRT and civil-military projects improve military readiness and benefit the local communities. The Coast Guard will continue monitoring the situation while the sub’s owners, the Saratoga Museum Foundation, decide on the next course of action. The foundation is required to provide a safety plan to the Coast Guard that addresses matters of safety related to people working on and around the submarine, and a tow plan if the owners wish to move the submarine from its present position.


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Both plans require Coast Guard approval. “At this point it is important for the Saratoga Museum Foundation to make a prompt and deliberate decision regarding the final disposition of the Juliett 484 in accordance with federal requirements issued by the Coast Guard,” said Capt. Ray Perry, commander of Coast Guard Sector Southeastern New England. “We are very fortunate that the Navy took on this salvage operation,” Perry said. “Salvage of this type requires a lot of resources and a high level of expertise. The Navy not only provided what was needed, they have passed on much of what they have learned to the local Coast Guard and the Coast Guard’s Shipboard Emergency Response Team, a component of the Coast Guard that specializes in supporting vessel casualty mitigation. The information the Navy has provided will aid the Coast Guard and local officials with their responsibility to make sure Juliett 484’s future includes protection of the public and the port of Providence.”

September•October 2008

US Navy Diver 1st Class Nick Holmes returns to the surface with tools used for salvage operations on Juliett 484. US Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Christopher Perez.

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Q&A WITH SUBSALVE’S RICHARD FRYBURG The Juliett 484 was raised using Subsalve USA lift bags and pontoons, in combination with eight dewatering pumps. UW contacted Subsalve’s Richard Fryburg to get the inside scoop on the project. How did Subsalve come to be involved in the Juliette project? Subsalve’s headquarters has been in Rhode Island for 31 years. I was aware of the sub as a museum, and knew it had sunk in Providence after a storm. I attended an International Salvage conference about a year ago in Washington, DC, where I met and spoke with Lt. Robert Williams, of the U.S. Navy Supervisor of Salvage Office, about the project. We communicated over the next several months, discussing the approach and techniques to raise the submarine using internal buoyancy generated by pumping out the pressure hull, in combination with external flotation provided with Subsalve USA lift bags. It was ultimately decided by the Navy to use our 45-ton Enclosed Salvage Pontoons.

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September•October 2008


US Army Sgt. Chaise Turner, assigned to the 544th Engineering Dive Team, of Fort Eustis, Virginia, operates a cargo strap attached to the sunken former Soviet submarine, Juliett 484. Note Subslave lift bag in the background. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Eric Lippmann.

US Navy Diver 1st Class Jason Potts swims onto the stern of the Juliett 484 to conduct salvage operations. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Christopher Perez.

September•October 2008

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How much equipment did Subsalve eventually supply to the effort? Subsalve was initially contracted to supply 15 of our 45-ton Enclosed Salvage Pontoons to provide stability during the raising, in addition to buoyancy that would be necessary to raise the sub to an adequate level to reduce the draft of the sub to tow or haul. During the process, Subsalve ultimately supplied over 27 lift bags and rigging, ranging in size and configuration and totaling over 790 tons of buoyancy. This was used in combination with the pumps that dewatered the Juliett. Did you provide manpower and expertise, as well as equipment, to the project? During the planning process, as well as during the actual lifting operations, our staff provided technical support, design solutions and interacted with Navy staff almost on a daily basis. Were there any unique challenges, or special difficulties, during the job that your equipment had to overcome to get it done? Yes. The challenges were more implementation of our products with nearly

Twilight falls on the former Soviet submarine-turned museum, Juliett 484, and Landing Craft Utility 1647 at Collier Point Park. The submarine sank at her mooring point in about 30 feet of water after a nor’easter struck Providence in April 2007. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class RJ Stratchko.

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September•October 2008


Give Your Survey the POWER of 3 C3D from

Three Technologies One Solution

Teledyne Benthos Finally, sidescan imagery, sub-bottom profiling and bathymetry all in one survey system! The C3D from Teledyne Benthos takes the Power of 3 to new heights by combining three technologies (Bathymetry, Side Scan and Sub-bottom profiling) to give you a powerful 3-dimensional look at the sea floor. The data sets are collected from the same instrument, maximize efficiency and precision, and making it easier to merge the data sets in post processing.

Bathymetry

Applications � Coastal Mapping

� Port & Harbor Clearance

� Shallow Water Surveys

� Rapid Environment Assessment

� Dredging Surveys

� Small Object Detection

� Erosion Monitoring

Side Scan

TELEDYNE BENTHOS � A MEMBER OF TELEDYNE MARINE 49 Edgerton Drive, North Falmouth, MA 02556 USA T: +1 508-563-1000 � F: +1 508-563-6444 � E: benthos@teledyne.com

Sub-Bottom Profile

www.benthos.com

C3D, with Sub-Bottom Profiling, shown above.

September•October 2008

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MILITARYSPECIALSECTION

zero visibility, and requiring precision rigging and horizontal attitude to be safe and effective. Did Subsalve have to customize any lift bags or equipment to get the job done, or was this your standard range? Yes, after all of the initial lift bags were rigged and inflated, additional buoyancy was required at the stern of the sub to achieve the necessary lift. I was traveling and at the airport when I got a call from Lt. Williams, who explained the problem. We came up with the solution during my layover. We custom-built two 25-ton Salvage Pontoons that had to fit and rig to the rear dive planes of the sub. We produced them in just two days and they were rigged to the dive planes, as planned. Unfortunately, it was still not enough buoyancy. So we provided four more 3-ton Enclosed Flotation bags that were rigged to the propulsion shafts of the sub. In addition to the Subsalve bags used to assist in raising the sub, many other Subsalve bags were used to support pump discharge hoses at the surface, and other support equipment throughout the project. So you were familiar with the Juliett sub museum prior to the project? Yes, it was a well-known and well-visited local attraction in Providence. In fact, its location was only 1,000 feet from Subsalve’s first location, back when we started in 1977. UW

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September•October 2008


2008 Sea Cadets Train with Army Units T

By LTJG John C. Ortiz, USNSCC, COTC EOD Diving Ops

September•October 2008

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he Sea Cadet program is the only program of its type in the US or Europe that introduces EOD or Deep Sea Diver training to high school students searching for careers. And today, the program is stronger than ever. The Sea Cadet training is conducted under the absolute control of USN personnel, with the assistance of USNSCC escort Officers, and the sponsorship of USN EOD Training Unit 2, EOD Operational Support Unit 10, Mobile Diving & Salvage Unit 2, stationed in Little Creek and Ft. Story, Virginia. This year we were sponsored by the US Army Dive Company. The 2008 Sea Cadets had the privilege of training with the US Army 74th, 86th, 511th, 544th, and 569th Engineer Dive Teams, stationed in Ft. Eustis, Virginia.

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These cadets not only have the desire, but have already decided on an active duty military career. This program lets them experience what the USN EOD Technicians and Divers are all about. Cadets are trained in a multitude of skills, which they will use later on final Field Exercises. Participants are screened prior to the training by the USNSCC Commanding Officer in charge. In the selection process, the cadet must be in good physical and mental condition. This training demands the cadet’s physical strength, attention to detail, leadership qualities, teamwork, and total participation. Failure to comply results in automatic dismissal from training. Cadets are encouraged to condition themselves for this training beforehand. The

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current USN EOD/Diver Category I and II Workout Programs are sent to them as part of a packet including all necessary forms and waivers. It is advantageous for the US Navy, and the Armed Forces in general, to have cadets that already have experienced a small taste of the traditions and way of life, prior to signing up. They have military knowledge of how things are done ahead of time. EOD Diving Ops training has proven to be a successful recruitment tool, bringing cadets interested in attaining a military career into the USNSCC Program. In turn, the USNSCC prepares cadets through the various training programs offered, to become committed team players in the US Armed Forces. A great many Sea Cadets choose to remain

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in the US Armed forces as a career. Since 2003, the active duty list of cadets shows: • US Navy: five Seals, two Medics, one Aircrew, one EOD, and 38 Sailors or Airmen • US Marine Corps: three Marines, one Recon • US Air Force: one Airman • US Coast Guard: one Coastguardsman • US Army: one Ranger, two Soldiers. The Sea Cadets program is always in need of diving equipment. If you’d like to offer assistance or equipment of any type to the Sea Cadet program, contact LTJG John C. Ortiz at eoddivingops@comcast.net. For more info, visit these sites: eod-diving-ops.org seacadets.org compass.seacadets.org. UW

September•October 2008


THE MILITARY MARKETPLACE

A Danish Navy Diver prepares to dive with the Applied Acoustics transponder attached to his back.

Homeland security, port & harbor security, mine countermeasures, swimmer delivery vehicles, threat detection – Our subsea vocabulary has certainly grown over the past decade, has it not? The number of companies that allow the Good Guys to take the fight to the Bad Guys underwater grows every year. Here’s a sampling of the latest and greatest designed to keep you safe.

APPLIED ACOUSTICS After supplying Easytrak underwater tracking systems to both the UK Royal Navy and Royal Danish Navy, Applied Acoustics announced a similar order for three Easytrak systems for the Estonian Navy, to be used in their mine countermeasure (MCM) operations. The militarized version of the Easytrak Lite will be used by the Estonians with Ultra Electronics’ Seafox mine disposal system, an expendable remotely-operated vehicle (ROV) containing an explosive warhead designed to neutralize the mine. Easytrak, along with the vehicle’s own onboard sonar, will guide Seafox to the target. Easytrak is an Ultra Short Baseline (USBL) tracking system that uses a multi-element single transducer to send and receive acoustic signals to and from multiple underwater targets from which range, bearing and depth information can be determined. Available as both a specialist militarized product or a commercial off-the-shelf system, Easytrak is acclaimed for accuracy and stability during a multitude of subsea tracking tasks in which divers, ROVs, or AUVs are involved. The Applied Acoustics transponder communicates via acoustic signals to another part of the Easytrak system on the harbor side or vessel, so that his path through the water can be followed in terms of his range, bearing and depth on a small computer screen above. ATLAS ELEKTRONIK Atlas Elektronik’s recent NATO Harbor Protection Trials were extremely successful. Atlas took part in the event at Eckernförde with two autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), their SeaOtter Mk II and SeaWolf, both of which passed their test runs under the eyes of a critical assessment team without any errors.

September•October 2008

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THEMILITARYMARKETPLACE The SeaOtter Mk II is a 3.5m programmable AUV for surveillance, reconnaissance or minehunting tasks. Thanks to its modular system structure, it is able to carry a large number of different sensor packages. Within the scope of the NATO event, the vehicle successfully performed missions lasting several hours. Its navigational accuracy at the end of the missions lay between 1.3 and 3.6m.

The ATLAS SeaWolf AUV

The SeaWolf was originally developed as an ROV for operations against sedimented mines and was then advanced by Atlas to become a fully-fledged autonomous platform offering high performance. It is especially well suited for the surveillance and inspection of confined spaces, such as harbors. With its capability of hovering in the water, it is able to inspect particularly critical areas in great detail. It has a highly-precise navigation system, is programd accordingly before operations, and then travels along the predefined path autonomously. With its new Lexxwar system, Atlas is providing a console with special software to generate a tactical situation display similar to that of the combat management system on the new F125 frigate for the German Navy. As part of the presentations, Lexxwar was also

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able to process the data transferred from the SeaWolf via an optical fiber cable. TELEDYNE BENTHOS Teledyne Benthos manufactures a wide array of oceanographic instrumentation and equipment solutions for use in military environments. Products include acoustic modems, acoustic releases, seafloor mapping systems, ROVs, and glass flotation products. This sophisticated undersea equipment is used to observe, research, explore, and carry out a variety of tasks critical for the underwater military community in shallow and deep water environments. Some examples of this technology at work include acoustic modems used in underwater wireless networking. Teledyne Benthos manufactures portable underwater tracking ranges used by the submarine community and special forces. The company’s acoustic modem technology has been the core for many special programs for the military such as SEAWEB, which is an underwater wireless network based on the Teledyne Benthos acoustic modems. The SonarModem, also based on this technology, can monitor underwater sound and transmit an alarm acoustically to the surface, or clandestinely monitor acoustic noise of interest and record it for post-processing at a later date. Acoustic modems with directionality are often added to AUV units to provide positioning for underwater military vehicle operation. Acoustic locating devices are used to mark underwater targets, making them easily retrievable by divers, marine mammals, and other platforms. Acoustic releases are used to retrieve special underwater equipment after long deployments in harsh environments. Hydrophones are used in towed arrays

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Teledyne Benthos C3D-SBP survey system with sub-bottom profiler

for military applications. ROVs are used for port and harbor security operations such as ship hull inspection. The newly combined C3D-SBP survey system with sub-bottom profiling provides military users with quick and efficient multitasking results in one survey. The units provide side scan sonar imagery, bathymetry and sub bottom profiling all in one pass. This can be used to quickly scan ports and harbors, here and abroad. BOLLINGER SHIPYARDS Bollinger Shipyards has been selected to design and construct up to 34 Fast Response Cutters “Sentinel” Class (FRC) for the US Coast Guard (USCG). The FRC, a new generation of USCG patrol boats, is a replacement for the Coast Guard Island Class cutters that Bollinger built almost a quarter century ago. The FRC contract was competed nationally, with many of the major shipyards vying for the award. The winning Bollinger design is based on a parent craft concept using a modern hull form that was originally developed by Damen Shipyards in the Netherlands. The Bollinger FRC measures 153’-5” x 25’-5” x 8’5” and is powered by two Tier II diesel engines rated at 5,760Hp. The vessel will accommodate a crew of 22 for up to five

September•October 2008


Concept drawing of Bollinger’s Fast Response Cutter Sentinel Class for the USCG.

days at sea. The cutter’s missions will include search and rescue, drug and illegal migrant interdiction, homeland security and maritime defense. It will have a top speed over 28 knots. Operational capabilities and crew comfort are features that have been designed into the cutter. It has an extensive electronics suite to provide command and control along with sophisticated communications systems. The first cutter will be delivered two years from today to its homeport in Miami, Florida. At the peak of production Bollinger will be delivering a new cutter every eight weeks. Bollinger has built USCG patrol boats for going on 25 years. During this time Bollinger has built 124 patrol craft for the USCG, addressing the ever challenging missions that the Coast Guard has been assigned. The Coast Guard’s stated mission is to protect the public, the environment, and the United States economic and security interests in any maritime region in which those interests may be at risk, including international waters and America’s coasts, ports, and inland waterways. The USCG has continued to meet and exceed these expectations through the use of resources including their knowledgeable staff and leadership. CODAOCTOPUS CodaOctopus’ Coda Underwater Inspection System (UIS), developed in cooperation with the US Coast Guard, has been purchased by the Sheriff’s Office of Contra Costa County, California. The authority will be the first on the US West Coast to permanently deploy the UIS, developed after the 9/11 attacks to address the need for a new generation of port security technology to respond to underwater threats. “The UIS will play the key role in enhancing our underwater security capability and assisting our efforts to secure shore side critical infrastructure in the California Bay and Delta regions. Having seen this unique technology in action when the MLB All-Star Game was held in San Francisco, we are very excited to add this powerful 3D real time sonar technology to our counter terrorism efforts. This is the only system of its kind that can produce the sort of detailed information we need and in real time, which significantly improves our capability to protect the public,” said Lieutenant Will Duke of the Contra Costa County Office of the Sheriff. Jason Reid, Coda Octopus President and CEO, said he viewed the Contra Costa order as a significant milestone for the Company. “We have always envisaged the ports and local law enforcement agencies of the United States as a very large and important market for these devices. The orders in recent months by Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office and now Contra Costa confirm our belief in the uniqueness and importance of the technology and of the products we have to offer.” The Coda UIS utilizes Coda’s patented real time 3D sonar technology, the Coda Echoscope, to identify and classify objects underwater, enabling much more rapid and effective searches of ports and waterways. The system has already been deployed by the US Coast Guard and in the Middle East and Asia; it has also been preSeptember•October 2008

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THEMILITARYMARKETPLACE

(Left) The Divex Shadow chestmounted rebreather unit.

(Above and right) Divex’s CDLSE rebreather unit.

viously purchased by the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office for use on their small patrol vessels. DIVEX With over 11,000 products in its inventory, Divex is one of the world’s leading manufacturers of commercial and military diving equipment. Two important factors that keep Divex at the forefront of diving equipment technology, apart from its extensive design and manufacturing capabilities, are the long term client and product support and training the company provides, as well as ongoing extensive development programs. Divex currently employs more than 500 people worldwide. A major percentage of the company’s turnover is attributed to activity within the international defence markets. Recent developments include a significant long term contract awarded to Divex by the UK’s Ministry of Defence (MOD) to supply the Royal Navy with a large quantity of Stealth CDLSE (Clearance Divers Life Support Equipment) diving sets, as well as providing training, maintenance and support services. A state-of-the-art compact and highly sophisticated electronically controlled rebreather, the CDLSE is capable of being used in multi-mission diving profiles. It has been developed utilizing modern materials and new technologies. Its extremely low work of breathing surpasses international standards, and crucially to mine clearance diving operations, surpasses all NATO non-magnetic and low acoustic standards. CDLSE provides the diver with increased levels of safety incorporating a secondary contingency breathing system for emergency use. It has an extended duration of up to four hours use and is capable of operating using different gases depending on the type of operation. Uniquely, for deep diving operations it can be linked to a surface safety support team so the diving supervisor can monitor the diver and his life support system. CDLSE is the most advanced underwater life support system in the world today and will enable Royal Navy Clearance Divers to con60

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September•October 2008


THEMILITARYMARKETPLACE duct their full range of tasks worldwide including the provision of a specialist underwater response in the fight against terrorism. Divex’s secondary life support equipment (SLS) is an emergency breathing apparatus intended for use in the event of a fundamental failure of a diver’s primary life support umbilical. The SLS deep diving bailout system was designed in response to the acknowledged need to enhance diver safety. The company recognized the shortcomings of conventional open circuit bailout systems which lack endurance, thermal protection and adequate work of breathing. In June this year the Japanese Maritime Self Defence Force successfully completed a series of dives using the Divex SLS to a depth of 1,500 feet (450m). The dives were carried out onboard the submarine rescue vessel, Chihiya. Divex has also been supplying rebreathers to the defence and commercial diving markets for over 20 years: they are in-service with Navies worldwide having evolved in response to ongoing test and development efforts by the company and increasing customer operational requirements. Divex Shadow is a long endurance chest mounted oxygen rebreather with a potential duration exceeding 6hrs dependent upon the divers oxygen consumption. Surprisingly this significant increase in performance has not resulted in an increase in size or weight when compared to other systems on the market. This has been achieved through careful design and the use of modern high technology lightweight materials that provide strength and ruggedness. Shadow offers significant operational and logistic benefits and is easily interfaced with the Divex Digicom 3000m Diver Through Water Communications system and / or Divex Stealth Full Face Dual Mode Mask

September•October 2008

(DMM) enabling the diver to access on-board gas supplies such as Swimmer Delivery Vehicle (SDV) auxiliary live support systems. A contract to supply, and support Transportable Recompression Chambers (pictured) to the Norwegian Navy was awarded to Divex earlier in the year. Delivery and training on the systems took place during September. The two man Recompression Chambers – known as the TC1150 – have an ergonomic design that allows the Chamber to be interfaced with the Divex heater-chiller environmental control system permitting its use in extreme climatic conditions. The Chamber, used for hyperbaric treatment or surface decompression activities, will be deployed on worldwide operations by the Norwegian Navy. It will be used for the transportation of a casualty by air, road, or sea when necessary to larger hyperbaric facilities where it can be locked on to the larger system and enable the diver to be transferred safely under pressure. The system is already being used by the New Zealand, Croatian and Indian navies, and impressively forms part of the NATO Submarine Rescue System hyperbaric complex designed and built by Divex. As for submarine projects, since 2004, Divex has been working closely with Rolls-Royce and the Ministry of Defence on decompression chambers to form part of a rescue system known as the NSRS (NATO Submarine Rescue System). NSRS is a 3-nation collaborative program providing France, Norway and the UK with equal shares in a submarine rescue capability handling submariners who’ve been operating in depths of 600m below sea level. The TUP System transfers up to 72 rescuees in twodouble lock chambers and one transfer lock. It is equipped with decontamination and life support systems for careful decompression.

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EDGETECH EdgeTech designs and develops sonar systems, and has been considered a leader in the field for over 35 years. The company offers a wide range of side scan sonar and sub-bottom profiling systems to fit almost any military or commercial subsea survey application. EdgeTech’s systems are available in standard towed configurations, as well as for hosted platforms (AUV, ROV, etc.) and custom installations. EdgeTech Multi-Pulse image of mine-like target at 100m range, taken at 7 knots

EdgeTech has recently developed a new 900 kHz sidescan sonar frequency which utilizes the company’s Full Spectrum CHIRP technology to produce very high resolution imagery at longer range when compared to conventional side scan systems. With this 900 kHz frequency customers will be able to achieve a range of 75 meters per side in saltwater and considerably longer ranges can be expected when used in fresh water. This new high frequency offering is ideal for military applications such as mine countermeasures (MCM) where very high resolution imagery is required in order to accurately detect small objects. The 900 kHz frequency can be paired with any of EdgeTech’s lower frequencies (100, 300, 400, 600 kHz) for

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longer range search capability and can be installed on a variety of platforms for added versatility. In addition to high frequency systems, EdgeTech also offers their proprietary MultiPulse sidescan sonar technology, which was designed specifically for military survey applications. EdgeTech’s Multi-Pulse technology places up to four sound pulses in the water simultaneously as compared to one pulse for conventional side scan systems. This allows for survey speeds of up to four times faster than these conventional systems while still maintain ing 100% coverage. This also translates into four times the number of hits on a target for greatly increased resolution at standard survey speeds. The combination of high speed and high resolution data capability make Multi-Pulse an ideal tool for MCM and other military target identification applications. JW FISHERS When the Russian submarine museum K-77 Juliett sank in Providence, RI, authorities knew it would be a hazard to divers that were needed to seal and secure the sub for raising. Before starting any salvage work, an underwater survey would be performed. The best tool for the job was an ROV.

The Russian Submarine Museum, with the SeaOtter ROV inset.

Officials contacted the environmental services company, Clean Harbors, which had purchased a SeaOtter ROV from the Massachusetts firm, JW Fishers Manufacturing, to expand the marine services arm of its business. The survey of the K-77 presented several challenges to the Clean Harbors team. It would be difficult to navigate the ROV in the low visibility water of the Providence River, and the mooring lines and chains that were an entanglement hazard to divers, also posed a threat to the ROV. The team spent two days at the site carefully maneuvering the vehicle around obstacles while viewing and recording images in the comfort of their control van. When it was over they had successfully performed a complete survey 64

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of the crippled vessel and gathered enough information to allow divers to safely enter the water, and ensure there was no risk of pollution from leaking fuel oil. With the survey completed, a team of US Army and Navy divers along with a contingent of Federal, State, and local authorities descended on the site and went to work on raising the sub. The K-77 is now on the surface, back on her berth, and undergoing a thorough cleanup. Museum officials hope the restoration can be completed soon and the sub will once again be opened to the public. They are confident she will enjoy some renewed interest as a tourist attraction with anothe r interesting page added to her long and fascinating history. HYDROID Navies around the world are discovering that Hydroid’s REMUS AUV is the right tool to accomplish their missions. Over 150 REMUS systems are in use by the U.S. Navy, Royal Navy, Royal Netherlands Navy, Republic of Singapore Navy, NATO Undersea Research Centre, Royal New Zealand Navy, Belgian Navy, the German Navy Test Lab, as well as several civil and academic institutions, with orders for more on the way. The REMUS AUV can search shallow or deep, and be fitted with a number of sensors and cameras for use in Mine Countermeasures (MCM), Littoral Battlespace Preparation, debris field mapping and oceanographic data collection. The value of REMUS systems was recently demonstrated during the Rim of the Pacific Exercise, RIMPAC 2008, and the Honolulu HARBOREX, when the U.S., Royal Australian, and Dutch Navies brought their REMUS vehicles to Honolulu, Hawaii. The REMUS systems completed several missions such as swimming in from outside of the mine field, “looking for” mines, thereby removing men from the minefield. These vehicles also played a secondary role, to test the lines of communications between the navies and the harbor’s port captain. In addition to removing the human from the mine field, AUVs such as the REMUS system, are superior to traditional surface towed systems because they are more stable and can achieve tighter turns. This allows improved sensor performance and tighter spacing of a coverage area. REMUS systems can also be specifically designed to meet mission requirements such as SearchClassify-Map (SCM) for Very Shallow Water (VSW) to deep water Mine Countermeasures operations and water mass characteristics to full ocean depth. The need for all of these capabilities is apparent; and REMUS systems are pioneering new ways to safely and effectively patrol environments. In June, the acquisition of Hydroid, LLC by Kongsberg Maritime was completed. “The acquisition of Hydroid is within Kongsberg Maritime strategy to expand in the September•October 2008


THEMILITARYMARKETPLACE Aerographer’s Mate Ryan Thuecks, assigned to the Naval Oceanography Mine Warfare Center, and Australian Navy 1st Class Sean Huron carry a Hydroid REMUS AUV during the Honolulu Harbor experiment. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class John Ciccarelli, Jr.

rapidly growing market for AUV – based operations through a broader portfolio of products, wider presence in the market and focused R&D efforts,” stated Rolf Arne Klepaker, Kongsberg Maritime Subsea Executive Vice President. Hydroid’s REMUS vehicles will comple-

September•October 2008

ment Kongsberg Maritime’s HUGIN AUV activity. Mr. Christopher von Alt, President of the newly formed Hydroid Inc, a Kongsberg company, commented, “This synergy of products and dedication to customer satisfaction will guarantee the highest levels of quality and support to our AUV customers. The

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Hydroid-Kongsberg team will raise the bar in autonomous underwater vehicle technology and thus exceed our customers demanding requirements to have the right tool. INTERNATIONAL INDUSTRIES AND ODOM International Industries supplies equipment to many governmental and military agencies. They recently sold four Odom Echotrac CV 3 echosounder systems to the US Army Corps of Engineers in Detroit, Michigan. USACE Detroit procured the CV3 (dual Frequency) systems for use on their Survey Fleet throughout the District. The Echotrac CV is a new hydrographic echosounder design incorporating the cuttingedge technology, features and reliability of the Echotrac MKIII, plus the ease and flexibility of operation of a networked Windows interface. The transceiver unit is supplied in a compact rack mount package that is ideally suited to many shipboard installations. The Echotrac CV offers “Charts” in two formats, a full size color LCD “electronic chart” or a high-resolution thermal paper recorder. Both are supplied in flexible modular enclosures complete with swivel mounting hardware. The third option,of operating the unit and collecting data on a networked PC, is also possible. The color LCD module offers internal data storage (in .XTF format) and playback

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THEMILITARYMARKETPLACE of the analog return signal digitized to full 16-bit resolution. In addition, the CV 3 offers the possibility of adding a third acoustic channel (X3) to the standard dual frequency (X2) configuration. INTERNATIONAL SUBMARINE ENGINEERING (ISE) Canada’s International Submarine Engineering (ISE) designs and develops AUVs, ROVs, Unmanned Surface Vehicles (USVs) and manned submersibles suitable for many defence operations. While the primary focus is on vehicle platforms, ISE also builds and supplies manipulators, hydraulic components and tools for use with ROVs and other robotics systems. Notable product achievements include the HYSUB series of ROVs, the Theseus AUV,

which holds the endurance record ISE’s Explorer AUV for AUVs, the Explorer Class of AUVs, Shell SmartPump refuelling robot and the STM Crew training robot for the Canadian Space Agency. ISE’s equipment is found in all sectors of the underwater activity including offshore, cable maintenance, marine science and oceanography and naval mine countermeasures. ISE’s experience is represented by the 210 underwater vehicles ISE has built and delivered Complementing design and manufacture, to clients in 20 countries. Of these vehicles, ISE has built a framework for control systems over 25 are AUVs. These range from a 25 kg that span a wide range of remotely controlled suitcase size vehicles known as SeaSquirt to applications. ACE, short for Automated ConTheseus, the longest-range AUV that currently trol Engine, is a unified control system design exists in the world. that is used across all unmanned vehicles based on common core software for command and control. Since cost is becoming a greater factor in capital purchase, ISE’s aim is to provide vehicles with longevity. Many of ISE’s underwater vehicles have been used for over 15 years. As an example, recently one of ISE’s ROVs completed its 3000th dive after 18 years of service. IXSEA Ixsea’s state-of-the-art Fiber Optic Gyroscope (FOG) technology has proven ideal for naval applications. Designed to meet the demands of the navy for more accurate inertial navigation systems, MARINS is Ixsea’s state-of-the-art naval inertial navigation system based on the solid state FOG technology. Currently the US Department of Defence is investing millions of dollars to develop military grade inertial systems based on FOG technology for its navy. However, Ixsea is already producing systems with this technology. Earlier this year, Ixsea delivered several MARINS to the Dutch-based Imtech Marine & Offshore. These systems, perfect for naval applications, will be used on ocean patrol vessels. Ixsea also provides full route survey

Ixsea’s Gradiomagis

systems, consisting of a full suite of sensors (sonars, multibeam echosounder, gradiometer and an acoustic position system) as well as software which allows survey management, display and interpretation of all collected data. Recently, the Belgian Navy commissioned such a portable route survey system to be used on its fleet of mine-hunters. Recently launched, Gradiomagis is a truly omnidirectional gradiometer designed to map unexploded ordnance or other metallic objects. Its real-time magnetic gradient computa66

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September•October 2008


THEMILITARYMARKETPLACE tion allows for superior spatial resolution and sensitivity to detection features. Ixsea has equipped more than 350 naval vessels with OCTANS, PHINS and MARINS Navigation Systems. KONGSBERG MARITIME Kongsberg Maritime, a world leader in underwater diver detection technology, announced that its Lynnwood, Washingtonbased division, Kongsberg Underwater Technology recently delivered a $2 million equipment re-order from the US Coast Guard for the USCG’s Integrated Anti-swimmer Systems (IAS) program. The equipment contract follows an initial IAS contract worth $3 million and is administered through a continuous contract with the US federal government’s General Services Administration. Following 9/11, the US Coast Guard was charged with assessing the level of threat, and the capability to deal with it, within every US port. A large concern was the threat of malicious swimmers and divers to commercial piers, government and military vessels, cruise ships, terminals and other highvalue assets. The IAS program was developed in response to this threat. Kongsberg underwater surveillance system technology forms the basis of the IAS system and combined with software enables the IAS teams to detect, track, classify, localize, notify and respond to potential underwa-

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ter threats. Odim Brooke Ocean, a subsidiary of The system’s processor captures a Odim ASA, offers a variety of hardware lines wide acoustic swath and then classifies to the military/naval sector. Their specialty is the acquired contacts and alerts system the development of equipment and systems to operators to their presence. Sonar images operate in harsh marine environments, incorpositively identify whether the detection is porating simple, yet innovative designs. a swimmer (threat) and not Odim Brooke Ocean just debris, marine life or manufactures advanced data some other object. collection systems for the deThe system design is mofense market. Products includbile and is deployed when ing the Moving Vessel Profiler necessary to protect high(MVP), SeaHorse wave-powvalued assets and events. ered profiler, Free Fall Cone The additional components Penetrometer (FFCPT), Laser supplied by Kongsberg Optical Plankton Counter will further enhance the US (LOPC). They also supply Coast Guard’s IAS program launch/recovery systems for and its future success. payloads including unmanned Kongsberg Underwater vehicles, oceanographic Technology is a leading sensors, towed bodies, and supplier to the US Navy, manned submersibles as well academic institutions and as engineering services; all Odim Brooke Ocean’s MVP commercial markets for of which can be used in the underwater acoustic systems defense market given the right and solutions. application. Kongsberg Mesotech, based in Port CoThe Odim Moving Vessel Profiler (MVP) quitlam, Canada, is the manufacturer of these is a multi-purpose instrument for aiding in the diver detection sonar systems. KML supplies collection of both shallow and deep water a worldwide customer base with a range data sets. The MVP’s primary function is to of products for defence, fisheries, oilfield, allow accurate data collection without the scientific and other underwater acoustic apneed to stop the vessel. The system includes a plications. computer-controlled smart winch and deployODIM BROOKE OCEAN ment system that allows the Free Fall Fish to

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September•October 2008


be deployed while the vessel is underway. The system is completely autonomous and can be controlled by computer without the requirement for personnel on deck. This serves the purpose of extending operations by not relying on deck crew after normal working hours and also through the expanded environmental operating envelope. The company has supplied MVP systems to the United States Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO) for multibeam calibration and scientific data collection aboard the HMS SCOTT, as well as, the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) and the Canadian Navy (Defense Research Development Canada – Atlantic). Odim’s Free Fall Cone Penetrometer (FFCPT) was developed to collect geotechnical and geophysical data during route location surveys for seabed cable and pipeline installations, for bottom classification and acoustic ground-truthing, as well as for mine countermeasures and geo-environmental studies. FFCPT is a very robust device designed to free fall through the water column, and then impact the seabed. Onboard acceleration and pressure sensors monitor the sediment penetration response, producing continuous profiles similar to a conventional piezocone penetrometer. The FFCPT can be installed on the MVP’s tow cable and deployed in place of the Free Fall Fish, allowing multiple, automated drops either on station or from a variety of drop points. Also, the FFCPT can be deployed while underway, utilizing the MVP’s native functionality. Odim has supplied the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) with an FFCPT to work in conjunction with their MVP200’s. Odim Brooke Ocean was recently awarded a contract by Lockheed Martin to provide a launch and recovery subsystem in support of their System Development and Demonstration Phase of the Expendable Mine Neutralization System (EMNS). The EMNS is a mine identification and neutralization system for support of mine neutralization operations from MCM-1 Class ships. ORE OFFSHORE Ore Offshore is a leading manufacturer of acoustic underwater tracking systems, ideal for military applications. For more than 20 years, the ORE Trackpoint USBL system has been the industry standard for medium range underwater tracking. Accurate acoustic underwater positioning is a vital component in port and harbor security today. Side scanning sonars, ROVs, AUVs, and divers are all used in threat detection and classification. Determining the surveillance equipment’s location beneath the surface of the water can be almost as important as the data they provide. One of the most versatile methods of underwater tracking is the Ultra Short Baseline (USBL) technique. A basic USBL system consists of a transceiver unit and PC, a hydrophone that is lowered into the water and a small transponder that is affixed to the target. The hydrophone acoustically interrogates the transponder which replies back to the hydrophone at a slightly different frequency. The transceiver unit can then calculate the range, bearing, and in some cases depth to the target. This technique lends itself well to deployment from ORE Offshore’s BATS vessels of almost any size as well as fixed structures. The Ore Trackpoint USBL system is used extensively in Mine Countermeasure Operations by the US Navy, as well as Canada, Japan, United Kingdom, Italy, Finland, Sweden, Egypt, and South Korea. Trackpoint Systems are used by the FBI and Department of Homeland Security for tracking ROV’s for Port Security Operations. This year, Ore Offshore launched their new BATS (Broadband Acoustic Tracking System) USBL Acoustic Tracking System. BATS combines ORE’s latest Broadband ‘Chirp’ based acoustic signal process70

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THEMILITARYMARKETPLACE ing technology with their vast USBL tracking knowledge to produce and intuitive MiniROV system. their most accurate and noise tolerant underwater positioning system Adding the crawler skid attachment furthers the capability by ento date. With the processing gains delivered by using Broadband abling the LBV150SE-5 to adhere to a ship hull by use of the patented acoustic technology, BATS is capable of tracking underwater objects Vortex generator and four-wheel drive mechanism. By attaching to the from a moving vessel at significantly longer ranges than the legacy ship hull the inherent instability found in small ROVs is removed. Trackpoint products. Tritech Micron Nav USBL Positioning – A requirement BATS and Trackpoint are both well suited to tracking towfish, of the systems was the ability to accurately track the position of the ROVs, divers, AUVs, and almost anything else that requires accurate LBV150SE-5 with a system that is easy to setup, operate and interpret. underwater positioning. Either system is capable of tracking up to four SeaBotix has a very close relationship with Tritech International and targets at the same time. When with the LBV150SE-5 systems beSeaBotix and the Swedish Defence combined with ORE’s Integrated ing already fitted with the impresMateriel Administration collaborated Positioning Software (IPS) and a sive little Micron sonar the new on a custom ROV system for the GPS system, the latitude and longi- Swedish Armed Forces’ EOD unit. system was the perfect fit. tude of a submerged target can be Tritech hinted at their new calculated with a high degree of positioning system as being a precision. simple, intuitive and cost effective For users who have desolution. The use of the Micron cided that their older Trackpoint modem that is daisy chained II systems could benefit from an to the Micron sonar acts as a upgrade, they will be pleased responder. At the surface the to learn that their existing hydrodunking transducer is tied to the phone, deck cable, and accesSeaHub, which in turn is consories will mate seamlessly with the nected to the SeaBotix Navigation Trackpoint 3. Ore offers both the Control Console. The tracking, Trackpoint 3 and BATS in several sonar and video are all inteversions: As a stand-alone desktop grated into the Tritech Seanet Pro unit, as a rack mounted unit, or in software. During operations all a portable water resistant enclodata is recorded to the navigasure that interfaces to a PC or laption control console hard drive for top computer. For users that want archive and post review. real flexibility in a portable system, the Trackpoint and BATS portable Lyyn Video Enhancer – Swedish company Lyyn introduced a units are available with a WiFi feature for communication between the new device that processes live video and enhances color and contrast. signal processor and the host computer. This amazing little device coupled with the LBV150SE-5 and LED lighting helps to provide operators with the best possible picture in SeaBotix the worst possible conditions. Unique technology enables the Lyyn to The relationship between SeaBotix and the Swedish Armed Forces increase visibility in turbid water for close range identification. In the began several years ago when an airplane wreck was discovered. An example you can see the corrected video in the center with vibrant effort was put forth to conduct a survey of the wreck both externally color enabling easier recognition of detailed features. The enhanced and internally. Research into small ROVs suitable for internal penetraarea can be sized by a small knob on the integrated console from tions led the Swedish government to SeaBotix, and they acquired a small to full screen. LBV150SE system. The systems delivered to the Swedish EOD were the first in the Over the years SeaBotix and Swedish Defence Materiel Adminisworld to have the Lyyn video enhancement device integrated into the tration (FMV) collaborated on the design and development of a set of control system. Typical systems are offered as a standalone box, but systems that were in need by the Swedish Armed Forces’ EOD unit. the Swedish EOD requested a more seamless system that is also more The requirement for the systems was the need to have a ROV ability to prepared for harsh operating conditions. survey underwater environments in order to localize explosive charges Navigation Control Console (NCC) – A PC-compatible comon ship hulls, quays, bridge foundations and other areas. Use of a puter is required to process the software for sonar, tracking and video small ROV was deemed preferable to divers from a personal safety capture. Rather than use a consumer laptop that is not fit for harsh point of view and the more enduring method of survey. environments or the expensive and limited rugged laptops SeaBotix There were many requirements set forth in the development of a developed a ruggedized PC solution. solution including portability, ease of operation, capability, versatility Repackaged into an Underwater Kinetics case matching that of the and integration. SeaBotix already had most of the system as part of LBV integrated control console, the NCC is a powerful Intel Duo Core the successful LBV line of MiniROVs. The development saw the deliv2 PC. Equipped with the NCC is a video capture device that when ery of several firsts. LBV150SE-5 with Crawler skid, Tritech Micron coupled with the Tritech Seanet Pro software enables the operator/ Nav USBL positioning system, navigation control console and the navigator to record video, sonar, tracking and GPS directly to the integrated Lyyn video enhancer. hard drive. The included GPS antenna can be mounted on the NCC LBV150SE-5 with Crawler Skid – Originally the Swedish or remotely if the operator has obstructed sight to satellites. EOD were interested in the LBV150SE system as it represented the The complete system for the Swedish EOD is a totally integrated characteristics they were looking for. However, the introduction of the solution that can be rapidly setup, is portable, intuitive, capable hybrid ROV/Crawler system altered their perception on the ideal sysand easy to maintain. With the four systems acquired response time tem. With ship hull surveys as part of the requirement the Crawler ofaround Sweden and other pats of the world is reduced as well as havfers the greatest stability, capability and precision of any system on the ing full redundancy for mission critical operations. market. With most intended use of the systems being traditional ROV As part of the package the Swedish EOD requested full training operations the easily added crawler skid to the LBV150SE-5 had great to be able to operate, maintain and service the equipment locally. A appeal for those missions requiring greater precision and stability. week long training program was provided on site at the amphibious In ROV mode the LBV150SE-5 is highly stable and with the dual base outside Stockholm During the week eight trainees from various vertical thrusters it also offers greater vertical control. Fitted with a host parts of Sweden undertook operator pilot training, basic service/ of features the LBV150SE-5 provides the Swedish EOD with a capable maintenance, sonar and tracking as well as practical tests. In water 72

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operations were conducted in the testing facility as well as in the harbor. Trainees learned to pilot the LBV150SE-5 system in both ROV mode and Crawler mode. The fast combat boats provided an excellent trial platform for attaching the crawler to a vessel as well as a barge for flat bottom attachments. The systems are scheduled for various tasks throughout Sweden as well as those that come up at short notice. With the close working relationship between SeaBotix and the Swedish Armed Forces it is envisaged that more developments are on the horizon as the EOD puts the LBV150SE-5 systems through their real world paces. SHARK MARINE Shark Marine Technologies (Canada) and its French representative, ITER, announced that the GESMA, France, has just completed training on their new SeaWolf ROV and LARS System. The small but powerful SeaWolf ROV is complimented by a unique LARS, capable of unfolding itself, raising the ROV and launching itself, all in one smooth motion. Upon completion of the dive the LARS recovers the ROV using the tether, loads into the LARS storage area and completely stores the A-frame into a compact package; again in one single operation. This system is completely self-sufficient making it operational from any of GESMA ‘s vessels with enough deck space for the small footprint. The unit is controlled from Shark Marine’s state of the art

The Atlantic Underwater Research Group (GESMA) takes delivery of a Shark Marine SeaWolf and LARS System.

control system, eliminating the need for a separate control container. The system was supplied with two 2,000 foot (600m) tethers, for quick change out in the case of an emergency. The ROV was fitted with extreme low light and colour cameras, multi-beam and altimeter sonars, and a dual manipulator. In addition an ROV mounted recovery reel equipped with 1,000 feet (300m) of line for attaching to a target for recovery. This system eliminates the possibility of fouling the recovery line with the ROV tether. SeeByte SeeByte recently announced the award of a twelve month contract extension through the Office of Naval Research (ONR). PATT is a Performance Analysis & Training Tool developed by SeeByte which can be used to effectively evaluate Mine Countermeasure (MCM) capabilities. The current ONR funded project was tasked with integrating the NSWC PC CAD/CAC software into SeeByte’s PATT module and with the SeeTrack Military product. This contract extension to the current ONR funded project follows feedback from ONR and users of SeeTrack Military, and aims to target improvements to the current product. The contract extension includes improvements to the current sonar rendering and mine simulator modules integrated into the PATT system to enable near real time PATT evaluation results to be obtained September•October 2008

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THEMILITARYMARKETPLACE while carrying out PATT Post Mission Analysis (PMA). complex total domain awareness solution working in conjunction with PATT will also be enhanced to enable better feedback and reportradar, cameras and other above water security systems. Furthermore, ing to the user in all modes of operation Sentinel can be expanded to include a Deployment of the Sentinel sonar array during and provide automated ship route planning facility for tracking friendly divers, often a recent demonstration at Sonardyne’s Sea through the safest transit area, based on referred to as ‘Blue Force’ divers, who Trials Centre in Plymouth. performance and clearance predictions from can be equipped with small, lightweight PATT. personal transponders. These enable them SeeTrack Military Product Manager, to be clearly identified and their positions Alastair Cormack, said, “The overall PATT tracked within a wide radius of the Sentinel system will provide Explosives Ordinance sonar head. Disposal (EOD) personnel with a tool to Sonardyne is based at Yateley in southevaluate the performance of existing systems. ern England and supports its equipment The PATT system will also enable the predicand customers through operating subsidiartion of expected performance of the various ies in Houston, Aberdeen, Singapore and systems operating in complex environments Brazil. The company is also widely recogand will advise of possible survey routes and nized as a leading manufacturer of subsea transit plans based upon key performance acoustic positioning, communications and requirement metrics.” navigation products that are used by the ONR Program Manager, Tom Swean hydrographic, offshore energy and marine said “ONR has long been involved with the industries throughout the world. development of advanced technology for MCM. SeeByte’s PATT work forms a key part Sonar Research & Development of a greater body of work undertaken by Following its successful launch earlier several expert teams through our office, to this year by Sonar Research & Developprovide military personnel with greater situment (SRD), the Eclipse system has been ational awareness in their EOD missions.” demonstrated and tested for various clients in a number of different defence scenarios. SONARDYNE Eclipse is a compact ROV-mountable 2D The United States Naval Undersea WarMultibeam Profiler. Its innovative transmit fare Center (NUWC) chose the Sonardyne beam-shaping capability allows the addiSentinel diver detection sonar as a major tional functionality of forward-looking mode component of its Integrated Swimmer Defence system (ISD). Sentinel and 3D Volume Visualisation and measurement. was chosen after extensive competitive trials and was found to provide The system has a range of 120m and a beamwidth of 120°, and the performance and technology needed by the US Navy for this operates at 240kHz. Even at long range, it can acquire a 3D Volume demanding role. Its compact size and simplicity of operation were imimage in seconds, using electronic scanning of the transmit beam. portant factors in its favor, as Sentinel was also judged ideal for rapid deployment by expeditionary forces needing to protect themselves in hostile environments. Despite the widespread use of sophisticated perimeter protection systems above water and on land, underwater security has been acknowledged as the weakest link in the defence of ships and onshore facilities. Because of this, applications for Sentinel range from the protection of vessels at anchor or in harbor, underwater perimeter security for sensitive coastal assets, oil and gas facilities and ports and harbors. Non-military applications for Sentinel are equally extensive and can include the underwater protection of luxury yachts and passenger ships plus strategic civil infrastructure such as bridges and power plants. Forward-looking SRD Unlike other diver detection systems, Sentinel is a not a hybrid view of pilings structure of an existing sonar design. It has been specifically designed by beneath dockside quay. Sonardyne to meet the challenge of tracking underwater targets cost-effectively. It combines state-of-the-art sonar technology with commercial off-the-shelf (COTS)-based processing units and automated The image volume is 120° x 45° in either “landscape” or “portrait” detection and classification software that has been proved in extensive format, appropriate to the target. evaluations. Whereas Eclipse was originally aimed at customers in the subsea Successful trials have included operations in tropical and temperindustry, there has been considerable interest from port and harbor ate sea water. These have included crowded acoustic environments authorities and from users in the defence realm. and locations where Sentinel’s ability to differentiate between intruders and large fish has been an important benefit. This capability reduces TELEDYNE RDI workload for monitoring crews and minimises the likelihood of danSince 1982, Teledyne RD Instruments has offered a wide range of gerous false alarms. Acoustic Doppler solutions for the measurement of water currents, and With a compact sonar head, the Sentinel array is considerably more recently, for precision navigation applications. Over the years, smaller than alternative systems yet it provides 360 degrees of uninterthis technology has been consistently and effectively applied to US rupted coverage. It is considered ideal for expeditionary operation as military applications. it is easily transported and rapidly deployed. It can be operated on Teledyne RDI’s Workhorse Navigator Doppler Velocity Log (DVL) a stand-alone basis or networked in a multiple head configuration for is a multi-function COTS acoustic sensor that provides precise velocity coverage of large areas. and altitude updates. The unit can be used as a stand-alone velocity Sonardyne’s Sentinel may also may be integrated into a more sensor, or can be integrated with existing navigation systems includ74

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ing LBL, USBL and inertial systems. RDI’s Workhorse Navigator DVL currently provides precision navigation capability to a variety of advanced military surface and underwater platforms including Mine Countermeasure (MCM) vessels, Swimmer Delivery Vehicles (SDVs), Towed Bodies, Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs), and Diver Navigation systems. Patented bottom detection algorithms in the Workhorse Navigator, combined with single ping bottom location, relocate the ocean floor on a ping-by-ping basis allowing robust and reliable bottom tracking

HDS USS Squalus Commorative Mark V Helium Helmet

Teledyne RDI’s family of navigation units

even in changing seabed conditions and uneven terrain. Teledyne RDI’s DVL has been applied to a wide variety of military uses including: • Navigation of military manned and unmanned submersibles • Mine Countermeasure vessel navigation • Positioning assets and personnel in MCM environments • Diver navigation and reconnaissance systems • Special forces insertion/extraction operations • Hydrographic survey operations in the littoral zone • Battle space environmental data acquisition Teledyne RDI also applies its proven Doppler technology to a line of diver products, including the CobraTac and MapTac diver navigation and mapping systems. The CobraTac is a comprehensive, independent, underwater navigation and mapping system designed for diver operation. CobraTac enables divers to navigate pre-planned routes, waypoints, and search patterns, while simultaneously mapping the sea floor beneath the diver and recording the diver’s actual track. The MapTac, Teledyne RDI’s newest diver product; builds on the CobraTac, but incorporates an internal GPS receiver, a highperformance compass, and other sensors that provide more accurate navigation results, which are displayed on a full color display with heads-up positioning and dive route guidance.

www.usssqualusheo2.net

TritecH INTERNATIONAL Tritech’s new Micron Mini Modem consumes very little power, yet provides robust, long range, spread spectrum data transmission with an exceptionally low error rate all from an extremely compact and low cost unit. The Micron Mini Modem can also be integrated into the MicronNav USBL tracking system. It is quick and easy to mobilise as a tracking navigation sensor for ROVs and AUVs of all sizes, as well as a data transmission system. MicronNav is designed to provide 180 degree hemispherical coverage below the transducer, allowing vehicle tracking in very deep or shallow water. Tritech anticipates the new telemetry products will be a superb solution for many through-water navigation and data communications. Tritech’s MicronNav, a new miniature acoustic modem capable of 40bps data transmission up to range of 1km is now ready for release. This extremely compact, low power system is ideal for a variety of subsea acoustic telemetry applications. They are also continuing our work with Wireless Fiber Systems on their exciting underwater September•October 2008

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THEMILITARYMARKETPLACE electromagnetic technology, such as the combined Radio Acoustic Modem (RAM-300). Last year, Tritech received recognition for its high-tech capability with the award of a substantial contract for the Royal Navy to provide sonars for The SeaFox, a remotely controlled underwater vehicle used to destroy sea mines. The SeaFox system is used for training, inspection and identifying the different locations of underwater mines, whether positioned at ground level, long and short tethered or floating mines. The all new P-Sea subsea computer from Tritech offers unrivalled versatility for a vast number of military diving applications. The innovative and compact P-Sea provides a simple platform for customer third party sensors and software. P-Sea may also be integrated with the full range of Tritech Micron and SeaKing sonars for survey and condition monitoring tasks As with desktop PCs the flexible nature of P-Sea provides divers with a platform for underwater data collection, display and mission management. The Eclipse is a 3D Imaging Sonar with 3-dimensional measurement capability. It Is Ideally suited for all but the smallest subsea vehicles. A single housing incorporates an orthogonal pair of dual transmit and receive multi-beam arrays, operating at 240kHz with a range of up to 120m. By electronically steering the horizontal or

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vertical transmit beam, a volume is illumiimpractical or uneconomic with larger, more nated ahead of the sonar. This is converted, expensive systems. With a range of up to in real time, Into a full 3-dimenslonal image. 1km from its omni-directional transducer, and 3D Volume Visualization provides a realistic the ability to network multiple units subsea, graphical representation of scanned objects, the Micron Modem is a superb solution for ideal for ROV and AUV deployment in many many data through-water communication subsea applications. applications. It may also If the new generation be integrated into the new of very small and low cost MicronNav tracking system, ROVs are to develop their full as a single subsea tracking Tritech’s SeaKing potential it is essential they sensor for ROV and AUV of are equipped with the vital all sizes or again as part of a tools and sensors expected network. on larger ROVs. Along with the camera, the The SeaKing Towfish Sonar System is an most important sensor for any vehicle is its extremely compact and cost effective, high obstacle avoidance sonar. definition sidescan sonar system. It is deThe Tritech Micron DST (Digital Sonar signed for a wide range of coastal and seaTechnology) sets new standards in compact bed surveys and inspection duties including sonar technology. It is the smallest digital military mine countermeasures. The 325kHz CHIRP sonar in the world. CHIRP technology frequency has a useful range in excess of dramatically improves the range resolution 200 meters either side. compared with conventional sonars - it is The SK150 combines the very latest a feature normally associated with much Tritech DST (Digital Sonar Technology) larger, more expensive systems. Micron Data electronics with industry leading transducer Modem design and digital CHIRP signal processing The Micron Modem is an exciting new techniques to dramatically improve range development in the field of through-water resolution and generate sonar images of communications. It provides robust spread unprecedented clarity. UW spectrum data transmission from an extremely compact and low cost unit. Due to its miniature size and low weight, the Micron Modem is suitable for a host of potential subsea data transfer applications that were previously

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US Navy Confirms Grunion Found The USS Grunion was reported lost on August 16, 1942, after firing on an enemy destroyer, sinking three destroyer-type vessels, and attacking unidentified enemy ships during her first war patrol. She has been found off the coast of the Aleutian Islands by the sons of the boat’s commanding officer, who was lost with the ship in World War II.

T

he U.S. Navy has confirmed the wreckage of a sunken vessel found last year off the Aleutians Islands is that of the USS Grunion, which disappeared during World War II. Underwater video footage and pictures captured by an expedition hired by sons of the commanding officer, Lt. Cmdr. Mannert L. Abele, allowed the Navy to confirm the discovery, Rear Adm. Douglas McAneny said Thursday in a news release. The Grunion was last heard from July 30, 1942. The submarine reported heavy anti-submarine activity at the entrance to Kiska, and that it had 10 torpedoes remaining forward. On the same day, the Grunion was directed to return to Dutch Harbor Naval Operating Base. The submarine was reported lost Aug. 16, 1942. Japanese anti-submarine attack data recorded no attack in the Aleutian area at the time of the Grunion’s disappearance, so the submarine’s fate remained an unsolved mystery for more than 60 years, the Navy said.

Mark V Diver Monument

The unveiling of the Mark V Diver Monument is now estimated to be mid-2009. It will mark a significant date in US diving history. The 300 Limited Edition statuettes made of bronze on a granite base weigh a fraction below 40 lbs. Each face of the pentagon shaped base of the statue has the insignia of each of the US Armed forces and a dedication plaque is placed between the boots. Visit www.markvmonument.org.

4OTH SEALAB III REUNION IN SAN DIEGO After much discussion, and a polling of many, it has been decided that there will be a Reunion of the people involved with SEALAB III. This includes all the people who made up the whole SEALAB program since the last project could never have occurred without the help and leadership of those who paved the way before. While the details are still being worked out, the Reunion will be held April 17-19, 2009 at the Holiday Inn Bayside, San Diego. There will be a Hospitality Suite, dinner, speakers, and a great opportunity to tell those sea stories once again! Of course, many of the guys who were in those sea stories will be there to make sure they are really true! And, of course there will be a remembrance of those shipmates who have died over the course of years since our program was created. More information will be sent as the details are worked out. For now, mark your calendar and start saving your dollars to make this special get together! If you have any questions, please contact me, josborn846@aol. com, or Bob Bornholdt, bornhlt@aol.com.

September•October 2008

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Industry News & Notes FISHERS AIDS SEARCH On May 10, 1999, the salvage boat, Restless M, was making a routine survey off the coast of Java. Suddenly a small anomaly registered on the magnetometer and a small debris field was spotted with the side scan sonar. What they found was the wreck of the Tek Sing. Excavation of the site yielded the largest and most varied cargo of porcelain ever salvaged, with pieces dating from the 15th through the 19th century. More than 360,000 pieces were recovered.

Captain Mike Hatcher and part of $50 million in recovered treasure.

The man who found the wreck was Captain Mike Hatcher, nicknamed Wreck Salvage King. He was catapulted to fame after locating Tek Sing, the last of the great ocean-going junks.

September•October 2008

Captain Hatcher recently visited JW Fishers’ factory in East Taunton, Massachusetts to consult with underwater search specialists about the best equipment to use for his latest project. Hatcher and his associates selected the Pulse 12 boat-towed metal detector and Pulse 8X hand-held metal detector with interchangeable coils to add to their search operations. Both detectors have the ability to find all types of metal targets including cannons, anchors, gold bars, silver ingots, and precious coins and jewelry. Visit jwfishers.com

Dr. James McFarlane, President of ISE. with the MTS Compass International Award.

Marine Technology Society Names Six Fellows Six members of the Marine Technology Society were named Fellows at the annual MTS Awards Luncheon during the OCEANS’08 MTS/IEEE Quebec City Conference in Canada. Designation as a Marine Technology Fellow is awarded to MTS members who have made outstanding contributions to the advancement of the society’s objectives and who have distinguished accomplishments and experience in their professional fields. The Honorees were: • Dr. Richard W. Spinrad, assistant administrator for research at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; • Ted Brockett, president of Sound Ocean Systems, Inc., of Redmond, Wash.;

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• Dietmar R. Deter, owner of Nautex, Inc., of Houston, Texas; • Sandor A. Karpathy, senior project manager at Stress Subsea, Inc., of Houston, Texas; • Capt. Daniel S. Schwartz, manager of marine operations at the University Of Washington’s School of Oceanography in Seattle, Wash.; • Mark S. Olsson, president of DeepSea Power and Light of San Diego, California. International Submarine Engineering (ISE) received the MTS Compass International Award, which was accepted by Dr. James McFarlane, President of ISE. LINKQUEST FlowQuest Sales GROWING The sale of LinkQuest’s FlowQuest line of acoustic current profilers has grown rapidly since its introduction. An extensive line of models has been used for a large number of diverse applications worldwide. LinkQuest recently provided Columbia University with a FlowQuest 600 system with WaveQuest directional wave measurement option, bottom tracking option, and Data Fusion function interfacing to a third party sensor and a FlowQuest 300 system with bottom tracking option and Data Fusion function. For more informa-

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tion, visit link-quest.com. L-3 Klein in Museums L-3 Klein’s Side Scan Sonar is featured as an integral part of the Sant Ocean Hall exhibitat the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, DC. L-3 Klein is honored with a permanent display of the System 3000 and the benefits of side scan sonar technology as a tool for ocean research. L-3 Klein is also featured in the MIT Museum in an exhibit entitled: Klein Side Scan Sonar: A World Leader in Ocean Exploration. The exhibit chronicles the history of Klein Side Scan Sonar from founder, Marty Klein’s, early years at MIT. It takes us through the beginnings of side scan sonar, how it works and key historic discoveries. It continues through the formation of Klein Associates, Inc. and the development of a commercial product and market up through its current value as an important tool in Ocean Exploration. The MIT Museum is located in Cambridge Massachusetts where the exhibit may be viewed. To see more about the exhibit, please visit: http://web.mit.edu/museum/exhibitions/kleinsidescansonar. To learn more about L-3 Communications Klein Associates, Inc., please visit the company’s web site

L-3 Klein Associates is featured in both the MIT and Smithsonian (below) museums.

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September•October 2008


new The Girl Who Rode Dolphins Michael Ganas, Managing Director of ADCI member Boswell Underwater Engineering, has written a novel, The Girl Who Rode Dolphins. In writing this thriller, Ganas merged fact with fiction to produce a fantasy of nail-biting suspense and high adventure. The action is fast-paced and thunderous and involves a pod of mutated albino bottlenose dolphins possessing fold-up prehensile forelimbs with hands, super-intelligence, and the ability to heal injuries and sickness. “One of the reasons I wrote this book was to honor my wife, who has been afflicted with chronic myloid leukemia for the past nine years,” says Ganas. “As you probably know, bottlenose dolphins have the ability to detect illness in humans, and I’ve created a fantasy in which a pod of mutated albino dolphins are able to focus their supernatural energies through a girl named Destiny in order to heal people. The novel was also created to bring attention to the plight of dolphins and how they are often killed or injured by modern fishing fleets and ships’ sonar. Anyone who enjoys the thrill of diving is going to love this book, which is available at authorhouse.com, amazon.com, barnes&noble.com, borders.com, and can be ordered at most bookstores.”

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ADJUSTABLE ROPE STOP Stafford Manufacturing has introduced a patentpending adjustable stop for rope that creates a knot using a simple twist motion, for gripping line and adding a spacer or locator, to free up a cleat, and for hanging fenders and other maritime tasks. Stafford’s SlipKnot is molded from weatherresistant nylon in three sizes for use with braided or stranded lines to create a secure, but adjustable knot where you want it. Featuring ribbed construction for a sure grip, this clever egg-shaped device fits the palm of your hand and is easy to use. Simply feed a line through Stafford’s SlipKnot and by holding one side and twisting the other, an internal mechanism grips the line with up to 200 lbs. holding power. Stafford’s SlipKnot is available in a three-pack of one size or an assortment of three sizes for $24.95. Distributor and dealer inquiries are invited.

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OCEAN PRESENCE CAMERA LIGHTING Ocean Presence’s powerful underwater lighting system provides night illumination for their three camera models. This unique lighting array has been designed to work with the AquariCam, the 180-foot OceanCam, and the 490-foot Ultra-deep OceanCam. The LED lighting system includes an enhanced controller that provides remote switching, high/low intensity controls, and motion detection switching. SABOTAGE IN THE ARCTIC For those who like tales of grand adventure and daring, Stewart Nelson’s Sabotage in the Arctic is perfect reading! Set in the early 1930s, the story of Australian-born Sir Hubert Wilkins and the Nautilus is usually a brief footnote, if mentioned at all, of Arctic exploration history. However, it is a tale of daring enterprise and of men captivated by the pursuit of noble deeds. Having leased and extensively modified a decommissioned vintage World War I U.S. Navy submarine, the WilkinsEllsworth Trans Arctic Submarine Expedition of 1931 was marked by controversy from its inception. Many considered it a huge publicity stunt, especially the planned rendezvous at the North Pole with the German airship Graf Zeppelin. The Nautilus did make it into the Arctic, but suspected sabotage ended Sir Hubert’s quest to be the first to use a submarine to cross the Arctic Ocean by way of the North Pole. Order online at Xlibris.com.

September•October 2008


advertiser index 18 Airgas Gas & Equipment

airgas.com

91 Imagenex Technology Corporation imagenex.com

76 Quest Offshore Resources, Inc. questoffshore.com

86 Association Commercial Diving Educators acde.us

52 International Special Risks, Inc. isr-insurance.com

21 Redfish Rental redfishrental.com

88 American Marine Corp amarinecorp.com

49 Jack Vilas & Associates jackvilas.com

53 Reson A/S reson.com

25 Amron International Diving Supply, Inc. amronintl.com

67 John W. Fisk Co. Insurance divinginsurance.com

30 Rockwater Manufacturing Corp. rockwateruw.com

11 Aqua-Air Industries Inc. aquaairind.com

26 JW Fishers Manufacturing Inc. jwfishers.com

87 Armada Systems, Inc. armadahull.com

19 Kirby Morgan Dive Systems, Int’l kirbymorgan.com

66 Bay-Tech Equipment Rentals baytechrentals.com

88 KME Diving Suits, Inc. kmedrysuits.com

59 Broco, Inc. brocoinc.com

29 Kongsberg Mesotech Ltd. kongsberg-mesotech.com

65 DeepSea Power & Light deepsea.com

50 L-3 Communications - Klein Associates L-3com.com

30 Deepwater Corrosion Services

56 Lesser & Associates divelaw.com

stoprust.com

15 SAAB Seaeye Ltd seaeye.com 61 SeaBotix seabotix.com 31 SEACON Brantner & Associates seaconusa.com 39 Shark Marine sharkmarine.com 36 Sidus Solutions sidus-solutions.com 55 Steffen, Inc. steffeninc.com

75 Delta Wave Communications deltawavecomm.com

54 Lexmar Engineering Pte Ltd. lexmar.com.sg

4

46 LinkQuest, Inc. link-quest.com

34 Subac subac.com

63 Dive Commercial International, Inc. divecommercial.com

64 LYYN AB lyyn.com

43 SubConn subconn.com

6

69 MADCON Corp. madconcorp.com

70 Subsalve USA subsalve.com

26 Marine Sonic Technology, Ltd. marinesonic.com

27 Tecnadyne tecnadyne.com

85 Marshall Underwater Industries marshallunderwater.com

51 Teledyne Benthos benthos.com

40 Epic Divers, Inc. epiccompanies.com

86 Miller Diving millerdiving.com

7

82 Flange Skillets Intl. Inc. flangeskillets.com

88 MN Diver Training minnesotacommercialdiving.com

70 The Ocean Corporation oceancorp.com

73 Focal Moog Components moog.com/components

79 Monterey Peninsula College MATE Center marinetech.org

28 Fox Industries foxind.com

33 Morgan City Rentals morgancityrentals.com

2

88 Nuvair nuvair.com

Denso North America, Inc. densona.com Divers Institute of Technology diversinstitute.com

14 Divers Supply, Inc.

diverssupplyinc.com

92 E.H. Wachs Company

wachsco.com

Global Industries, Ltd. globalind.com

Teledyne RDI

rdinstruments.com

16 Trelleborg Viking, Inc. vikingdiving.com 42 U.S. Underwater Services usunderwaterservices.com 17 Umbilicals International umbilicals.com

88 High-Tech Diving & Safety hightechdiving.com

82 Ocean Eye Inc. Ocean-Eye.net

75 Historical Diving Society hds.org

9

35 Hull Support Services Limited hullsupport.com

87 Outland Technology Inc. outlandtech.com

23 Hunter Diving

71 Perry Slingsby Systems perryslingsbysystems.com

58 Upstream Marketing upstreammarketing.net

82 Petrogen International Ltd. petrogen.com

5

Veolia veoilaes.com

10 Praxair, Inc. praxair.com/divinggases

3

VideoRay, Inc. videoray.com

47 Princetel, Inc. princetel.com

77 Webtool webtool-subsea.com

hunter-diving.com

41 Hydroid, Inc. hydroidinc.com 48 Hydroweld USA

hydroweld.com

68 Hyperbaric Technology BV hytech.nl

Oceaneering International, Inc. oceaneering.com

78 Underwater Intervention underwaterintervention.com 62 Underwatertools.net newdraulictools.com

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September•October•2008

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BRIDGE INSPECTIONS HOW SAFE ARE WE?

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ADCI Member Company Listing Supporting Members AMERICAN ELECTRIC POWER HYDRO DIVISION BP AMERICA INC. BUCEO Y SALVAMENTO DIAL CORDY & ASSOCIATES INC. DIVERS ALERT NETWORK GRUPO DE SALVAMENTO KD DUYONG (Royal Malaysian Navy) KRAFT GATZ LANE BENJAMINE, LLC MARINE BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY MCGRIFF, SEIBELS & WILLIAMS OF TEXAS, INC. PREFECTURA NAVAL ARGENTINA US ARMY CORP OF ENGINEERS US COAST GUARD WASHINGTON STATE D.O.T.

General Members 2-W DIVING ABLE DIVING CO. ABOVE & BELOW THE H20 ACI MARINE- ANDERS CONSTRUCTION ADVANCED AMERICAN CONSTRUCTION ADVANCED DIVING SERVICES ALAM MARITIM (M) SDN BHD ALASKA COMMERCIAL DIVERS ALBWARDY DIVING SERVICES ALLEN MARINE SERVICES ALLIED UNDERWATER SERVICES AMERICAN INSHORE DIVERS AMERICAN MARINE CORPORATION AMERICAN UNDERWATER CONTRACTORS AMERICAN UNDERWATER SERVICES AMI CONSULTING ENGINEERS APPLEDORE MARINE ENGINEERING APPLIED DIVING SERVICES AQUATECH NDT SERVICES AQUATIC ROBOTICS LLC ASIAN DIVERS & EQUIPMENT SDN. BHD. ASOCIACION DE BUZOS TECNICOS ASSOCIATED DIVING AND MARINE CONTRACTORS ASSOCIATED MARINE SALVAGE ASSOCIATED UNDERWATER SERVICES ATLANTIS DIVING CONTRACTORS INC. AVIMAR C.A. BAHRAIN MAINTENANCE & DIVING SERVICES BALLARD DIVING & SALVAGE INC. BEKK SOLUTIONS LIMITED BIDCO MARINE GROUP BIG VALLEY DIVERS BIN NOWIRAN ESTABLISHMENT BISSO MARINE CO. BLACK DOG DIVERS BLACKLEDGE DIVING BLACKWATER DIVING BLACKWATER MARINE BLUE WATER MARINE SERVICES BOLT UNDERWATER SERVICES BORNEO SUBSEA SERVICES (MALAYSIA) SDN BHD BOSARGE DIVING INC. BOSWELL ENGINEERING INC. BOWMAN DIVING CORP. BUZCA SOLUCIONES DE INGENIERIA S.A. - BUZCA C.R.C. COMPANY C&W DIVING SERVICES CABO DIVING SERVICES CAL DIVE INTERNATIONAL CALDWELL MARINE INTERNATIONAL CENTRAL STATES U/W CONTRACTING CHAPMAN MARINE CHESAPEAKE BAY DIVING CHET MORRISON CONTRACTORS CHILDS ENGINEERING CORP. CHUBASCO MARINE SERVICES COASTAL INSPECTION SERVICES COLLINS ENGINEERS COMMERCE CONSTRUCTION CORP. COMMERCIAL DIVERS COMMERCIAL DIVING COMPANY COMMERCIAL DIVING INC. COMMERCIAL DIVING & MARINE SERVICES COMMERCIAL DIVING SERVICES INC. COMMERCIAL DIVING SERVICES (SINGAPORE) CON-DIVE CONSTRUCTION SOLUTIONS INTERNATIONAL CONSTRUCTORA SUBACUATICA DIAVAZ S.A. DE C.V. CROFTON DIVING CORP. DANFORTH PETROLEUM INDUSTRIES SDN. BHD DEEP MARINE TECHNOLOGY DEEP OFFSHORE MARINE CONSULTANTS & CONTRACTORS DENIZENS OF THE DEEP CO. DIV DIVING ENGINEERING CO. DIVCON DIVE-TECH INTERNATIONAL DIVECON SERVICES INC. DIVECON SERVICES INC. GULF OF MEXICO OFFICE DIVER DOWN UNDERWATER SERVICES DIVING DEL PERU S.A.C. DRS MARINE DULAM INTERNATIONAL LTD EASON DIVING & MARINE CONTRACTORS ECOLOGICAL SPECIALISTS INC. EL SAFWA GROUP FOR MARINE WORKS ENGINEERING & DIVERS CONTRACTORS ENVIROSCIENCE EPIC DIVERS

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FATHOM RESEARCH FATHOM SOLUTIONS LLC FRED DEVINE DIVING & SALVAGE CO. GENERAL CONSTRUCTION COMPANY GLENN UNDERWATER SERVICES GLOBAL DIVING & SALVAGE GLOBAL INDUSTRIES GLOBAL INDUSTRIES OFFSHORE (MALAYSIA) LTD. GLOBAL INSHORE GUS COMMERCIAL DIVERS H. C. NUTTING / TERRACON H. J. MERRIHUE COMMERCIAL DIVING HARBOR OFFSHORE HIBBARD INSHORE HORIZON OFFSHORE CONTRACTORS HPA HT MARINE SERVICES HULL SUPPORT SERVICES LIMITED HYDRO-MARINE CONSTRUCTION CO. INDUSTRIAL DIVERS CORPORATION INFRASTRUCTURE ENGINEERS INNER TECH COMMERCIAL DIVING INSPECTRONIC CORPORATION INSTALACIONES SUBMARINAS BARCELONA INTERCOASTAL DIVING INTERNATIONAL MARINE WORKS INVERSIONES J. CATALDI J. C. MARINE SERVICE CO. J.F. BRENNAN CO. J. F. WHITE CONTRACTING COMPANY J & J DIVING CORPORATION J.S. MARINE COMMERCIAL DIVING JMS Naval Architects & Salvage Engineers JPS INDUSTRIES K-T MARINE KCI TECHNOLOGIES KOREA OCEAN ENGINEERING & CONSULTANTS CO. KRECH OJARD & ASSOCIATES L-3 COMMUNICATIONS MARIPRO LAKE ERIE DIVING LAKES & RIVERS CONTRACTING LARES UNDERSEA CONTRACTING LEA DIVING & SALVAGE CO. LEGACY OFFSHORE LEWIS DIVING & SALVAGE LIGHTHOUSE MARINE CORP. LIQUID ENGINEERING CORPORATION LOGAN DIVING LOUISIANA OILFIELD DIVERS LUCAYA ENGINEERING SERVICES LTD. LUFESA DIVER’S S.C.R.L. M & N ENGINEERING AND DIVING SERVICES MADCON CORPORATION MAGONE MARINE SERVICE INC. MAINSTREAM COMMERCIAL DIVERS INC. MAKO DIVING & SALVAGE MARINE DIVING CONTRACTORS MARINE SOLUTIONS MARINE TECHNOLOGIES INC. MARION HILL ASSOCIATES MARISCOPE CHILENA LTDA. MARITECH CONTRACTING & TRADING INTNERNATIONAL S.A.A MARITIME MECHANIC LIMITED MARLIN DIVING INSPECTION MASTER-TECH DIVING SERVICES PTE LTD McCALL BROTHERS DIVING MCLAREN ENGINEERING GROUP MEDITERRANEO SERVICIOS MARINOS S.L. MEXSSUB INTERNATIONAL INC. MIAMI DIVER MIDCO DIVING & MARINE SERVICES MIDWEST DIVING SERVICES INC. MITCHELL MARINE INC. dba Sea Tow MM DIVING MOSCOW DIVE CENTER LTD. MRS. G DIVING SPECIALISTS MULDOON MARINE SERVICES NAUTILUS SERVICIOS MARINOS NE SUBSURFACE SURVEY NORTH COAST DIVERS INC. NORTHEAST DIVING SERVICES NORTHERN UNDERWATER SYSTEMS (N.U.S.) L.P. NORTHWEST UNDERWATER CONSTRUCTION OCEANEERING INTERNATIONAL OFFSHORE DIVERS OFFSHORE OIL ENGINERING CO. OFFSHORE SUBSEA WORKS SDN. BHD. OK-ANMARIN GENERAL UNDERWATER SERVICES ORIENTE MARINE GROUP ORION DIVING & SALVAGE PACIFIC DIVING INDUSTRIES PACIFIC UNDERWATER CONSTRUCTION PARKER DIVING SERVICE PENNONI ASSOCIATES INC. PEPPERRELL COVE MARINE SERVICE PHOENIX INTERNATIONAL PRO MARINE TECHNOLOGY PRO-DIVE PRO-DIVE MARINE SERVICES PROFESSIONAL MARINE CONSULTING PT. ALLIED OFFSHORE CONTRACTORS PT BHAKTI PATRA MANDIRI PT. INTI SEGARA SERVICES PT. LANCAR REJEKI BERKAT JAYA PT. PATRA DINAMIKA PT. PRIMA MITRANATA QINGDAO PACIFIC OCEANEERING CO.

R. CHRISTOPHER GOODWIN & ASSOCIATES RANDIVE REDS CARIBBEAN LIMITED REDWOOD SHORE DIVING RESOLVE TOWING & SALVAGE RME-DIVER COMMERCIAL DIVING LLC RVE INC. S & J DIVING SAIPEM AMERICA INC. SALMONS DREDGING CORP. SEA ENGINEERING SEA SUB SYSTEMS SEAMAR DIVERS SEAMAR DIVERS MEXICO S. de RRL SEAPRO Diving & Hydrographic Survey SEAQUEST DIVING SEATTLE DIVING CORPORATION SEBUTE SA UNDERWATER SERVICES SEMCO PTE. LTD. SERPORT S.A. SERVICIOS TECNICOS MARITIMOS SERVICIOS TECNICOS SUBACUATICOS SERVISUB INGENIEROS LTDA. SHANGHAI JINHU OFFSHORE ENGINEERING CO. SHANYE MARINE SERVICES CO. SHENZHEN ZHONGHAI DIVE ENGINEERING CO. SMIT SINGAPORE PTE LTD SMIT TERMINALS MIDDLE EAST LLC SOUTHEASTERN UNDERWATER SERVICES SPARTAN UNDERWATER TECHNOLOGIES SPECIALTY DIVING OF LOUISIANA SPECIALTY DIVING SERVICES SPECIALTY UNDERWATER SERVICES STEARNS ENGINEERING COMPANY STROUD DIVING & HYDROGRAPHY STS CHILE SUBSTRUCTURE SUBTEK MARINE & CONSTRUCTION SUPERIOR OFFSHORE INTERNATIONAL SUPREME HYDRO ENGINEERING PVT. LTD. T.N.J. MARINE INC. T & T MARINE SALVAGE TALLERES INDUSTRIALES TEDA GREAT WALL UNDERWATER ENGINEERING CO. TEDA SEA STAR SHIPPING ENGINEERING CO. THE WORLD-WIDE DIVING CONTRACTOR COMPANY TIANJIN ANDA OFFSHORE SERVICE ENGINEERING TIANJIN NANJIANG UNDERWATER ENGINEERING CO. TIBURON DIVERS TITAN SALVAGE TRAB-SUB S.R.L. TRASUB S.R.L. - PERU TRINDIVE UNDERWATER SERVICES TRITON DIVING SERVICES U.S. UNDERWATER SERVICES UNDERWATER CONSTRUCTION CORPORATION UNDERWATER CONSULTANTS INTERNATIONAL UNDERWATER ENGINEERING SERVICES UNDERWATER MARINE CONTRACTORS UNDERWATER & MARINE SERVICES UNDERWATER RESOURCES UNDERWATER SERVICES UNDERWATER SERVICES UNDERWATER SERVICES UNDERWATER SERVICES INTERNATIONAL UNDINE MARINE INDUSTRIES UNIDIVE MARINE SERVICES PTE LTD UNITED DIVING & MARINE LLC UTILITY DIVING SERVICES VARVARA MANAGOU SA VENEZUELA DIVERS C.A. VEOLIA ES SPECIAL SERVICES W.J. CASTLE WALKER DIVING UNDERWATER CONSTRUCTION WATERSHED SERVICES WATERWORKS DIVING SERVICE WEST DIVING SERVICES WORKS OF DIVING (HONG KONG) CO. LTD. YANTAI SHUNDA OCEAN ENGINEERING SERVICE CO.

Associate Members ADVANCED MARINE PTE. LTD. ALF LEA & CO. AMRON INTERNATIONAL AQUA-AIR INDUSTRIES, INC. B & B PUMP & EQUIPMENT RENTALS BAYNHAM BEST, LLC BAY-TECH EQUIPMENT RENTALS, INC. BOURGEOIS MEDICAL CLINIC BROCO, INC. CASCO ANTIGUO CAVIDYNE, LLC CHOW ENGINEERING INC. COMMERCIAL DIVING ACADEMY COMMERCIAL DIVING SCHOOL, INC. COMMERCIAL DIVING SUPPLY, LLC COMMERCIAL UNDERWATER SAFETY PROJECTS, INC. COX, WOOTTON, GRIFFIN, HANSEN & POULOS LLP CYGNUS INSTRUMENTS, INC. DCL MOORING & RIGGING DECA DIVING DELTA WAVE COMMUNICATIONS, INC. DESCO CORPORATION Director of Diving Safety Dept of National Defence - Canada DIVE COMMERCIAL INTERNATIONAL, INC.

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DIVE LAB INC. DIVERS ACADEMY INTERNATIONAL DIVERS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY DIVERS SUPPLY, INC DIVERS UNIVERSITY ESPORTE AQUATICO LTDA DIVEX LTD. DIVING UNLIMITED INTERNATIONAL, INC. DOYLE PUBLISHING COMPANY [UW Magazine] E.H. WACHS COMPANY FASTORQ BOLTING SYSTEMS, INC. FIVE STAR ROCKWATER FLANGE SKILLETS INTERNATIONAL, INC. FOX INDUSTRIES, INC. FUGRO CHANCE INC. G & M RENTALS GANGNEUNG CAMPUS OF KOREA POLYTECHNIC III GARY HERMAN COMPANIES/dba Alpha Rentals GAS & EQUIPMENT/ AIRGAS-GULF STATES, INC. HOLLAND COLLEGE COMMERCIAL DIVING HONG KONG COMMERCIAL DIVING CONSULTANTS INSHORE INC. INTEGRA TECHNOLOGIES, INC. INTERNATIONAL DIVING INSTITUTE INTERNATIONAL SPECIAL RISKS INTERNATIONAL SUBMARINE ENGINEERING LTD. J. W. FISHERS MANUFACTURING COMPANY JACK VILAS & ASSOCIATES, INC. JCM INDUSTRIES, INC. JOHN W. FISK CO. KIRBY MORGAN DIVE SYSTEMS INTERNATIONAL, INC. KME DIVING SUITS, INC. KONGSBERG MARITIME, INC. LEONARD GREENSTONE MARINE TECHNOLOGY TRAINING CENTER LESSER & ASSOCIATES, PLC LEXMAR ENGINEERING PTE LTD LOUISIANA TECH COLLEGE--YOUNG MEMORIAL CAMPU MAGELLAN MARINE INTERNATIONAL, LLC MAKO TECHNOLOGIES, INC. MILLER DIVING EQUIPMENT INC. MINNESOTA COMMERCIAL DIVER TRAINING CENTER MOCEAN VIDEO MORGAN CITY RENTALS NATIONAL POLYTECHNIC COLLEGE OF SCIENCE NCS SUBSEA, INC. NUVAIR OCEAN EYE, INC. ONEBANE LAW FIRM OUTLAND TECHNOLOGY INC. OXYLANCE, INC. PACIFIC COMMERCIAL DIVING SUPPLY PTY LTD PCCI, INC. PILE DRIVERS Local Union #56 PNEUMATIC AND HYDRAULIC COMPANY, LLC PORT RENTALS, SALES & SERVICES, LLC PRAXAIR INC. PRIME TIME TRAINING INC. PRINCETEL, INC REDFISH RENTAL OF MORGAN CITY, INC. ROPER RESOURCES, LTD. ROS INC. SANTA BARBARA CITY COLLEGE MARINE DIVING TECHNOLOGY SCIENCE DIVING & ENVIRONMENTAL CO. SEA AND LAND TECHNOLOGIES PTE LTD SEABOTIX, INC. SEATRONICS, INC. SENECA COLLEGE OF APPLIED ARTS & TECHNOLOGY SIDUS SOLUTIONS, INC. SOURCES W. EQUIPMENT STEFFEN, INC. SUBAC UNDERWATER CEMENT SUBSALVE USA THE INSTITUTE OF ROBOTICS THE OCEAN CORPORATION TIDAL CONSOLIDATED SDN BHD TOTALMAT INDUSTRIA & COMERCIO DE EQUIP. HIPERBARICOS LTDA TRELLEBORG VIKING, INC. TRIM SYSTEMS PTE. LTD. UMBILICALS INTERNATIONAL, INC. UNDERSEA BREATHING SYSTEMS, INC. UNDERWATERTOOLS.NET UNIQUE SYSTEMS LLC. UNITED STERLING (FE) LTD. VIDEORAY LLC WATER WEIGHTS WELCH SALES & SERVICE, INC. WFT, INC. WILLIAMSON MARINE SERVICES LIMITED LLC

Affiliate Members ADC(NZ) INC. AMERICAN SALVAGE ASSOCIATION ASOCIACION CHILENA DE EMPRESA DE BUCEO COMERCIAL COMMERCIAL DIVING ASSOCIATION OF HONG KONG HISTORICAL DIVING SOCIETY USA MARINE ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION (MATE) CENTER NATIONAL OCEAN INDUSTRIES ASSOCIATION (NOIA) OFFSHORE MARINE SERVICES ASSOCIATION (OMSA) OFFSHORE OPERATORS COMMITTEE THE MUSEUM OF MAN IN THE SEA

September•October 2008


UWCurrents DIVING Deep Marine Technology named Bruce Gilman Interim Chief Executive Officer. A successful businessman with CEO level management expertise, Gilman’s four-decade subsea career is highlighted with professional accomplishments such as President of both Perry Offshore & Oceaneering International, Inc.; President and Founder of Sonat Subsea Services; President, CEO, & Director of Sonsub Inc.; and Chairman and President of Saipem, Inc., the US Subsidiary of Saipem SpA. He is a graduate of the Polytechnic University of Brooklyn in Aeronautical Engineering; a registered Professional Engineer (PE); and Marine Technology Society President and Fellow. The US DOT has granted FIBA Technologies special permit DOT-SP 14661, which authorizes a 10-year requalification cycle on certain compressed gas tube trailers and ISO skid containers. This special permit requires acoustic emission testing (AET) to assess the integrity of the cylinders and tubes. AET provides a superior test method while the extended retest cycles reduce the cost of fleet operations. Visit fibatech.com. UW VEHICLES SeaTrepid Louisiana has been named US Distributor and Service Center for Inuktun Services LTD. SeaTrepid will direct the marketing and sales efforts of Inuktun and its dealer network in the US, and serve as the US service center for all robotic equipment manufactured by Inuktun. Inuktun produces land-based and subsea robotic equipment along with robotic tooling. SeaTrepid’s robotics staff will upgrade, repair and test the equipment in their facility in Robert, LA. September•October 2008

Following the successful introduction of LYYN T38 to VideoRay users, there have been many witnesses to its usefulness. However, since one of the strong points of the VideoRay ROV is its portability, users found it added extra equipment to carry around. “We have had several requests from users to have LYYN inside our products, and with the LYYN Hawk Board, I am happy to say that this is now available.” says Chris Gibson. VideoRay demonstrated the LYYN Inside solution at the Micro-ROV Conference - VideoRay International Partner Symposium at the end of October. Increased activity in the submarine telecom and offshore renewables sectors has seen a dramatic rise in the usage of IHC Engineering Business’s (EB) Sea Stallion cable plows. Sea Stallions that have been resting since the collapse of the submarine telecoms industry in 2001 have been brought back into service as this industry expands once more. EB plows are also being used at the majority of new offshore windfarm projects to install and protect submarine power cables.

developed AUV capable of diving as deep as 5,000 meters (3.1 miles) into the ocean. The vehicle surveyed and helped pinpoint several proposed deepwater sites for seafloor instruments that will be deployed in the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI). The Sentry is pre-programmed with guidance for deepwater surveying, but it can also make its own decisions about navigation on the mountainous volcanic terrain of the seafloor. Working in tandem with sonar instruments on the UW-operated research vessel Thomas G. Thompson and with photo-mapping by WHOI’s TowCam seafloor imaging system, Sentry gathered

the most precise maps to date of seafloor features known as Hydrate Ridge and Axial Volcano, around the edges of the Juan de Fuca tectonic plate off the coast of Oregon and Washington. Two nodes of a pioneering deep-ocean observatory are being planned for those locations. “We are changing the way ocean science is done, launching a new era in which an ensemble of technologies will provide us with an increasing capacity for exploring and interacting with the global oceans,” said John Delaney, chief scientist of the expedition and principal investigator for the UW-led regional observatory in the OOI. “Robot mappers are helping design the new and transformational infrastructure to accomplish that change. That new infrastructure will empower the next generation of robots to go far beyond the current autonomous mappers.” The one-of-a-kind, WHOIbuilt-AUV, which was largely funded by NSF, made six dives during the July 22 to August 5 expedition. Sentry surveyed 212 linear kilometers of sea-

Deep Ocean Engineering named Dr. Kortney N. Leabourne as a principal engineer, for development of new technology that will further strengthen DOE’s Vector ROV platform. Dr. Leabourne holds a B.S. and M.S. in Aeronautics and Astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. in Aeronautics and Astronautics from Stanford University. Scientists and engineers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and the University of Washington (UW) have successfully completed the first scientific mission with Sentry, a newly www.adc-int.org • www.underwater.com

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floor, or about 53 square kilometers, as it traced parallel lines like a lawn-mower across a yard. OFFSHORE ENERGY Maersk Oil looks forward to welcoming all the attendees to MCE Deepwater Development 2009 show on March 31, 2009, in Copenhagen. To date, over two-thirds of the Exhibit Floor has been spoken for. Due to high regional interest, 2009 will feature dedicated Danish, French and Norwegian pavilions. Aberdeen-based DOF Subsea UK has appointed Garry Millard as its new Managing Director. Formerly Commercial Manager with Saipem UK Ltd, Sonsub Division, Millard joined DOF Subsea UK at the beginning of September and is responsible for managing the company’s day to day operations which are focused on supporting developments in the UK, Mediterranean Sea and Africa. He will also play a key role in developing the business into a strong contracting, project management and engineering entity. Subsea 7 has won the first contract for its new fabrication and spoolbase facility at Port Isabel, Texas. The subsea pipelay fabrication and installation contract has been awarded by Marathon Oil Corporation and is valued at over US$ 45 million. The

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supply agreement is part of Marathon’s previously disclosed procurement activities related to long lead time items associated with the company’s Droshky discovery in the Gulf of Mexico. Marathon anticipates sanctioning the Droshky development in the fourth quarter of this year. MARINE TECHNOLOGY Teledyne Benthos was presented with a “Key Partner Award” from the IceCube Research Center at University of WisconsinMadison. Teledyne Benthos was selected because of the company’s collaboration with scientists to design and manufacture over 5,500 specialized glass housings for their equipment. The glass spheres house scientific monitoring equipment that is buried in strings up to 1.5 miles deep in the Antarctic ice at the South Pole. The glass spheres are designed to withstand severe temperature and pressure conditions in the ice, meet very specific optical requirements, and safely house the equipment for many years. Project IceCube, supported through funding from the National Science Foundation, is currently under construction at the South Pole. When it is complete in January 2011, it is designed to be the world’s largest scientific instrument detecting high-energy neutrinos that originate from colliding black holes, galaxies with super violent cores, and other cataclysmic galactic events. Neutrinos hold many an-

www.adc-int.org • www.underwater.com

swers to the origins of the universe and the big bang theory, according to experts. Kongsberg Maritime has signed an agreement to purchase GeoAcoustics Ltd. GeoAcoustics has 30 years of experience in underwater acoustics, with an excellent reputation in the market, especially for side scan sonars and sub-bottom profiling. GeoAcoustics’ main product within side-scan sonars is the GeoSwath that includes bathymetric dataprocessing. EdgeTech recently appointed Mohammed Sanhaji as Technical Sales Manager. In this new role Sanhaji will be responsible for sales of sub-bottom profiling and side scan sonar systems mounted on hosted platforms (AUV/ROV/UUV/ROTV) as well as all custom built systems. Sanhaji will also assume the lead for sales of all EdgeTech products in the Middle East and North Africa. Seatronics recently purchased 14 new Teledyne RD Instruments (RDI) Doppler products to enhance the organization’s existing lease pool. Seatronics is one of the world’s largest rental and sales organization for marine survey electronic equipment including hydrographic, geophysical and inspection operations. Recent product purchases include a Teledyne RDI Doppler Velocity Log (DVL) for precision navigation onboard underwater platforms, and

September•October 2008


13 Teledyne RDI Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCPs) ranging from 150 to 1200 kHz, bringing the total number of Teledyne RDI ADCPs available for lease to over 100 units. BlueView Technologies announced the appointment of Robert “Blake” Douglas as Sales Manager for the Gulf of Mexico Region. Before joining BlueView, Blake worked for Schilling Robotics Inc. as a field service engineer where he provided ROV support and training for some of the top ROV operators in the industry. BlueView also named Harvey-Lynch as its new sales and support representative in the Gulf of Mexico. Falmouth Scientific recently delivered 30 deepwater positioning buoys worth almost half-a-million dollars to the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP). These beacons will be employed by IODP’s drilling vessel for deepwater positioning. FSI’s instruments will be used to accurately position IODP’s drilling ships in order to extract cores of the Earth’s crust at the bottom of the ocean. The mission of the IODP is to explore Earth’s history and structure recorded in seafloor sediments and rocks, and to monitor sub-seafloor environments. Their efforts are part of a global team from the US, Japan, China, Korea and Europe. The Houston Section of the Marine Tech-

September•October 2008

nology Society (MTS) was honored with the Outstanding Section Award during the OCEANS’08 MTS/IEEE Quebec City Conference in Canada. The Houston Section is the largest and most active section of MTS. Through the individual and collective efforts of its members, it offers an avenue for professionals in the marine industries to network, to learn and to educate the next generation of engineers and technologists. It hosts well-attended monthly meetings, as well as other events that raise $30,000 a year for scholarships. Its Young Professionals networking program is aimed at individuals new to the oil and gas business. Aberdeen-based Nautronix received a contract from Acergy in Norway for chamber communications onboard the Acergy Discovery. In the last six months the company state they have received orders worth just under $4 million for their diver communications systems. A large proportion of these are bound for Norwegian waters, including contracts from Divex for the Subsea 7 vessel, the Seven Atlantic and the Technip vessel, the Skandi Arctic. Nautronix DSP Unscramblers are designed and built to meet the stringent NORSOK Standards for Manned Underwater Operations. As such the company is continuing to see an upsurge in sales following the resurgence of the Diver Communications market, with a current global market share of over 90% of all operational deepwater systems. UW

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STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT, AND CIRCULATION 1.  Publication Title 2. Publication No. 3. Filing Date     UnderWater Magazine    1072-6098    10/1/2008 4.   Issue Frequency 5.  No. of Issues Published Annually 6.  Annual Subscription Price     Bimonthly    6    0 USA, $50 Foreign 7.   Complete Mailing Address of Known Office Publication (Street, City, County, State, and ZIP+4) (Not Printer)      Association of Diving Contractors International     5206 FM 1960 W., Ste. 202     Houston, TX 77069 8.   Complete Mailing Address or Headquarters or General Office of Publisher (Not Printer)     Doyle Publishing Company on behalf of      Association of Diving Contractors International     607 Mason #2, Tomball, TX 77375 9.   Full Names and Complete Mailing Addresses of Publisher, Editor, and Managing Editor (Do Not Leave Blank)     Publisher (Name and Complete Mailing Address)     William H. Doyle     Doyle Publishing Company     607 Mason #2, Tomball, TX 77375     Editor (Name and Complete Mailing Address)     Rebecca Roberts     Association of Diving Contractors International     5206 FM 1960 W., Ste. 202, Houston, TX 77069     Managing Editor (Name and Complete Mailing Address)     Daron Jones     Doyle Publishing Company     607 Mason #2, Tomball, TX 77375 10. Owner (If owned by a corporation, its name and address must be stated and also immediately thereafter the names and addresses of stockholders owning or holding one percent or more of the total amount of stock. If not owned by a corpora tion, the names and addresses of the individual owners must be given. If owned by a partnership or other unincorporated firm, its name and address, as well as that of each individual, must be given. If the publication is published by a noprofit organization, its name and address must be stated). (Do Not Leave Blank.) Full Name Complete Mailing Address Association of Diving Contractors Int’l. (non profit org.) 5206 FM 1960 W., Ste. 202, Houston, TX 77069 11.  Known Bondholders, Mortgages, and Other Security Holders Owning or Holding 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages, or Other Securities. If none, check here.    x ■  None 12.  For completion by nonprofit organizations authorized to mail at special rates. The purpose, function, and nonprofit status of this organization and the exempt status for federal income tax purposes: x ■  Has Not Changed During Preceding 12 Months ■  Has Changed During Preceding 12 Months (If changed, publisher must submit explanation of change with thisstatement) 13. Publication Name 14. Issue Date for Circulation Data Below    UnderWater Magazine    September/October 2008 15. Extent and Nature of Circulation Average No. Copies Each Issue Actual No. Copies of Single Issue During Preceding 12 Months Published Nearest to Filing Date a. Total No. Copies (Net Press Run) 15,600 15,000 b. Paid and/or Requested Circulation (1) Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors,     and Cournter Sales (Not Mailed) (2) Paid or Requested Mail Subscriptions    (Include Advertisers’ Proof Copies/Exchange Copies) 14,399 14,031 c. Total Paid and/or Requested Circulation (Sum of 15b(1) and 15b(2)) 14,399 14,031 d. Free Distribution by Mail (Samples, Complimentary, and Other Free) 123 128 e. Free Distribution Outside the Mail (Carriers or Other Means) 0 0 f. Total Free Distribution (Sum of 15d and 15e) 123 128 g. Total Distribution (Sum of 15c and 15f) 14,522 14,159 h. Copies Not Distributed (1) Office Use, Leftovers, Spoiled 1,078 841 (2) Return from News Agents i. Total (Sum of 15g, 15h(1), and 15h(2) 15,600 15,000 Percent Paid and/or Requested Circulation 93% 94% (15c/15g x 100) 16.  Statement of Ownership will be printed in the Sep/Oct issue of this publication. x   Check box if not required to publish. 17. Signature and Title of Editor, Publisher, Business Manager, or Owner                  Date 10/1/2008 Rebecca Roberts, Executive Editor

I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits material or information requested on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil sanctions (including multiple damages and civil penalties).

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Getting to Know Industry Leaders

Briant Dozar VP of Sales

Morgan City Rentals When did you first become interested in the underwater world? Give us a brief overview of your career. In 1981, while working my first job out of college as a salesman for Cummins Sales and Service, I stopped by Morgan City Rentals and saw all these diesel engines in their yard. As an engine salesman, I thought I had found a “gold mine.” The owner, Joe Sanford, Sr., convinced me that I was going to work for him and be there for a long time. Here I am, some 27-plus years later, still working for Morgan City Rentals. In the early days with the company, I learned about the early days of the diving industry. Most of the guys I met then were the pioneers of diving in the Gulf of Mexico and shared great stories about the early working conditions, much different than the underwater work going on now. UW: Where did you grow up? I grew up in Morgan City, Louisiana, and spent most of my childhood and high school playing football, basketball, and baseball, 24/7. Went to Nicholls State University in 1976 on a baseball scholarship and graduated in 1981 with a degree in marketing. I have been married to my wife, Laura, for 26 years and have three children, Lauren (23), Allison (21), and Grant (18). UW: Tell us something no one knows about you. I really enjoy cooking. I like watching cooking shows and making my own special dishes to share with friends over a couple (and a couple more) bottles of wine. UW: If you could go back and tell your teenage self one thing, what would that be? Whenever you get a chance to travel, go with the wind, and meet as many people as you can and keep the friendships you have alive, no matter what direction each of your lives may go.

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UW: What accomplishments, professional and personal, are you most proud of? When I went to work for Morgan City Rentals, we were a very small rental company with 12-15 employees. Over the years, being part of the growth of Morgan City Rentals (now with 100 employees), and working with the diving contractors (all the mergers and acquisitions), I would say I am proud of the longevity of working in an industry with the same company. My loyalty to Morgan City Rentals and the guys that I work with – yep, that is what I am most proud of. UW: What do you want to be when you grow up? Same as it was when I was 10 years old: pitching in the major leagues, bases loaded, two out, A-Rod at the plate. UW: What was your favorite project or assignment? In this industry, people from all over the world come to work in the Gulf of Mexico. You get the chance to meet new people every day. I have met some wonderful people through the years who have become some of my dearest friends. UW: What was your least favorite? Dealing with assumptions; trying to address problems and issues with equipment when most of the information you are getting is not measuring up to the problem you are trying to solve or assist in solving. UW: Without naming names, what is the single most unbelievable thing you have seen on a diving job in your career? Though I have never been on a diving job, I have heard some great stories over time. I guess the most amazing one is when a diver was trapped in a barge, had his air supply cut, and was following an air bubble while the barge rocked in the seas. Running out

of air and ready to give up in the dark, pitch black barge, he saw a diver that came to rescue him. He said that he jumped and grabbed onto the diver and scared the living daylights out of him, almost giving him a heart attack. He always talked about the feeling at the end right before he saw his new best friend. UW: You have worked with several generations of commercial divers. What has been the biggest change you have noticed with the divers of today versus those of the past – physically, mentally, and even attitude-wise? This one is difficult. I think all divers, old and young, are of a different breed and my hat is off to them all. With all of the recent hurricane work that has come over the last couple of years, an ex-diver stated that it takes thousands of men to design, build, and set offshore platforms, but when it comes to taking them out of the water, it takes ONE DIVER at a time, in the water, working. UW: What are the three the most important things commercial divers should know, from your point of view? I don’t know about three of them, but from my point of view the most important is to never, never, never run out of air. It would be like a soldier, in the middle of an ambush, running out of bullets. UW: What is the most significant piece of gear you have seen come along during your career? The Hot Water Unit. I could not imagine getting into cold water and trying to do some of the tasks that divers are asked to do. UW: What piece of gear has not been invented yet, but will revolutionize the industry when it is? A piece of equipment that never breaks down; never needs servicing; never needs on-the-job maintenance; can do the task even though it was not designed to,

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efficiently and effectively; does not need fueling up; and costs $5-a-day day to operate. That would be it. UW: If you could make the divers in the field understand one thing about their equipment, what would it be? All equipment is important to your job. Take time to learn about the equipment that is being used, and schedule and perform on-the-job maintenance to prevent down time. UW: What is your favorite movie, book, TV show, CD, sport? Favorite movie; Bond, James Bond, any and all of them, can’t wait till the next one. I enjoy reading James Patterson novels, whenever they come out. I buy it and read it, non-stop until am finished. I’m an old-school classic rock and roll junkie – just listened to “War Pigs” by Black Sabbath and some Grand Funk Railroad. Tells you about how old I am. UW: You win the lottery. What are the first three things you would do? 1. Make sure the kids can’t spend it all; 2. Off to the Mediterranean for a few months; 3. Spend time to “really” become a scratch golfer. UW: If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be? Be more patient. UW: Give us your thoughts on the ADCI: where it has been, and where it is going. I feel that the current ADCI leadership is addressing important issues that affect divers and diving operations every day. It has become a great source for diving information and takes on the greater responsibility: to gather information and share with all. The industry is changing every day and lets’ not make the same mistakes over and over again. We must take care of September•October 2008



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