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JONATHAN CAMACHO ARCHITECTURE UNIV. OF FLORIDA 2009-2012


INDEX


DESIGN 5

LAND

DESERT- ARTISTIC EXPANSION

DESIGN 7

POPULATION

NEW YORK, NY

DESIGN 5

INSTALLATION

DEFLATED VILLA

DESIGN 5

INSTALLATION

41 PAPER BOAT

39

DESIGN 5

INSTALLATION

35 ORCHID

DESIGN 5

AIR

31 SEAHORSE KEY, FL

DESIGN 5

NOISE

25 EDGE- OBSCURED BOUNDARIES

21

13

DESIGN 6

RECYCLE

09 FLORIDA LANSCAPE, FL

DESIGN 5

POPULATION

01 CHARLESTON, SC


CHARLESTON_SC CULTURAL ARTS AND MUSIC INSTITUTE SOUTH CAROLINA DESIGN 5 CRITIC: WILLIAM TILSON

the cultural arts and music institution is a nonprof it, interdisciplinary artist community. the institution was oriented in a way which invites the presence of the saint phillips church but remains comfort ably subtle on the corner of queens and church street. the facilities of the institution include public performance and exhibition spaces, a variety of studio spaces, a growing contemporary art library and media center, exterior exhibition and social spaces and common areas for eating, socializing, and events.


SITE:

queens

located in the historic downtown of charleston in south caro lina, on the corner of queens and church street. downtown charleston offers a diverse his tory in arts.

church

cultural arts historic buildings public libraries

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IDEA:

understanding the rich and cultural history of downtown charleston, a design for the institution was devel oped to cultivate those characteristics. Spaces were created to reflect the cultural arts found abundantly in this town through the ideas of massing proximity to the street edge and zones of public and private interactions.

section 2

section 1

front of institution. visual of bridge connection and main entrance.

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ORIENTATION:

north

south

FLOOR PLANS: first floor second floor third floor studios theatre

main lobby

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SECTION ONE :

the section further illustrates the layout and function of the studios. the attach ments of balconies to the studios stimulates a familiar and traditional style of typology found throughout charleston. the thought was to reiterate the function of a classic balcony to the design of the building.

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studios

balcony

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SECTION TWO:

the second section illustrates how a bridge becomes a form of social connectivity between two parts of the building. the design of a bridge also rephrases the idea of an alley way. alleys are another common design found in the traditional city layout of charleston. alleys tend to open up to private gardens, personal fountains and in this case the entrances to the performance theatre.

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studios

theater

bridge

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FLORIDA_LANDSCAPE LAKE HOUSE GAINESVILLE, FL DESIGN 6 CRITIC: STEPHEN BELTON

the lake house was designed to room and board environmental scientists. the concept of the design was oriented to facilitate a workable space that operates an open laboratory, living quarters, basic kitchen, living room, and easy access to the lake. the design of the house utilizes the natural surroundings by incorporating local building materials. An open concept design allows for the lake house to appropriately invite natural light into the facility. the final product should be self sustainable and able to adapt to the eco-friendly environment of the lake.


SITE PLAN: the trees on the existing site contributed to the layout of the lake house. manipulated by the surroundings, the design was intro duced to a unique and functional form.

main entrance

PROCESS:`

dock

existing trees

river

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SECTION: the section cut helps reveal the many level changes within the design. much like the receding shoreline of the river bed, interior levels of the lake house continues this same gesture. the changes in level help par tition the rooms in the house without the use of walls. having specific level changes allow desired functionality to certain areas of the house. having better access from the laboratory to the lake or having the bedrooms elevated for better lighting during the day.

living room

elevated bedrooms allowing more natural light to enter.

sleeping

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kitchen


ORIENTATION:

laboratory

level changes of the river bed.

outside decking

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NEW YORK SKYRIM MANHATTAN, NY DESIGN 7 CRITIC: ALFONSO PEREZ

this project deals with a variety of programs and functions talking about the possibilities of residential, commer cial, hotel, art institute with gallery space and even a daily market with restaurants and retail shopping. while introducing these programs, the primary focus was to maintain the sensibility of a manhattan city block, while controlling the occupation of inhabitants. the project has introduce six towers to this site and each of them represents a different a unique functionality.. tower 1 (beginning from east to west) is the smallest tower and introduces a purely workable facility for the occupants. being on the corner of 28th street and 10th avenue,, and in front of a four lane traffic road, this tower is ideal for regulating traffic of occupants entering in and out. tower 2 becomes more of commercial use and introduces the possibility of commercial hotels. towers 3, 4, and 5 (all residential), play the biggest role on the site with its duel functionality of occupational spacing as well as public segregation. these towers reflect the idea of having residential living on its upper levels while the lower levels engage in different kinds of programs. tower 6, ending on the west end of the site, holds the idea of an art institution program.. much like tower 1 on the east side, tower 6 sits on the corner of 29th and 11th allowing for easier access into the tower regulating the fluctuation of occupancy during a daily cycle of the institutions hours.


SITE PLAN:

6

5

4

3

2

1

west

east

1. offices 2. hotel 3. residential 4. residential 5. residential/offices 6. educational

PROGRAM:

residential educational hotel

retail public

office

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residential

the section begins to illustrate the multiple functions within the towers. the towers hold a variety of programs. each program is allowed to merge at the lower level of each tower. the concept of merging, cre ates an external connection that becomes open to the public. the art institution, hotel, and retail have the most concentration of occupants. residential and offices are more private.

educational

SECTION:

offices

art galleries

market/restaurants

upper/lower plaza

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offices

hotel

DIVIDING:

the floor plan was split according to expected occupancy load, traffic flow and daylight entering in and between each tower.

offices

FORMAT: circulation

forming units

shifting the high-line plan

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internally, the structural design of each tower shifts, creating an array of corridors, balconies, plazas, etc. this network allows for a collaboration between what is considered public versus the private areas within the towers.

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the majority of the offices are inserted and concentrated between every tower. the offices are designed to resemble a glass cube, which allows for a visible connection between the towers from any direction. the glass also helps to reveal the structural composition and language of each tower.

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19


the birds eye view of the project helps to illustrate a specific and spatial representation of a manhattan block and how its limitations are dealt within the design of the towers.

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DESERT_ARTISTIC EXPANSION ARTISTIC EXPANSION DESERT DESIGN 4 CRITIC: CHARLES HAILEY

the design behind the desert project was inspired by the natu ral formation of a fulgurite. the fulgurite is a natural glass made from the sand but forged by a lighting strike. a fulgurite can be very porous and can expand many feet in any direction. the idea was to introduce such characteristics to the design. this facility is designed for an artist who mastered the art of form ing glass. the artist has the ability to heat glass in their own furnace, mold glass in the work shop and even display the glass art work in the gallery. a second facility includes a unit that projects metal rods vertically to purposely attract a lighting strike. over time fulgurites will develop at the opposite ends of these rods, underground, where the artist can retrieve them to melt, form and shape into art. living quarters

gallery


lighting rods

fulgurite facility

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SECTION: the section cut breaks down the functionality of the facility, revealing the porosity, continu ity and versatility of the design as the facility embedded in the land.

furnace

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gallery


IDEA:

the use of water color began to inform the possible fluidity or natural gestures of a fulgurite.

workshop/fulgurite collection

FLOOR PLAN: lighting rods

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EDGE_OBSCURED BOUNDARIES MUSEUM OF LIGHT VICENZA, ITALY DESIGN 8 CRITIC: WALTERS/BELTON

located in front of the local post office and off of the main road contra mushena, the site of the museum sits on one of the busiest plazas in vicenza. the museum demonstrates an array of light conditions throughout its design as well as examine the idea of an edge condition. by introduc ing translucent materials, opaque walls, reflective walls and apertures the design of the museum begins to reiterate the various forms of an edge. a key element that contributes to many italian piazza's.

EDGE CONDITIONS: dissolving edge implied edge imaginary edge

physical scaled model to represent the visual light and transparency of the facade.


the site of the museum sits wedged between a split in the main road. this ideal location allows for a higher concentration and control of occupants entering the site.

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SECTION: A

B

C

these series of sections mimic the roof edge conditions from the sur rounding buildings above and introduce a language through light aper tures in the interventions below ground offering a direct connection to the existing context. as a person moves through this underground entrance, the apertures shift in width according to the topology of the roofs' edges implying a new edge.

A

main entrance/ lower level

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opaque material polished/ finished concrete

openings/ apertures

B

C

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CROSS SECTION: lighting

exterior wall

the interior spaces of the museum respond differently depend ing on the depth of light entering each room. light wells are used to outline an implied edge. with the use of direct lighting an occupant can visually experience an edge within the spaces without the need for a physical wall.


WALL:

the wall of the museum consist of varies layers. the idea of this opaque wall is to essentially invite, diffuse, and distort the light from outside. light accepted by a reflective outer layer is diffused by glass found within the second layer of the wall. the outcome is a blurred image for occupants inside, looking out. at night, this same concept of a blurred image becomes available for pedestrians walking outside, looking in.

LIGHTING:

the section illustrates how light would enter through the building and slowly diffuse as it descends to the lower levels.

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SEAHORSE KEY_INSTITUTION SUMMER INSTITUTION SEAHORSE KEY, FL DESIGN 6 CRITIC: STEPHEN BELTON

designed to be a summer institution, the seahorse key facilities are made to room and board a class of 20-30 students. the idea was to create a facility where scientist and students could occupy during the summer but can become self sustainable when its not utilized during a normal semester. seahorse key is on a historical island that stood as an old watch post. The altitude and access to water on either side, makes it an ideal location for scientist to study the now abundant and local sea life of the native horseshoe crab.


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FLOOR PLAN:

over head condition

mimicking the shell of a horseshoe crab, the outer structure of the facilities are designed to be light weight, semi-transparent, and act as a protective shell to the rest of the construction.

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SITE PLAN: the plan helps to understand the orientation of both the work-station and the dormitories and how they sit on the site. The primary idea was to have a visual connection between the two.

work-stations

existing lighthouse

dormitories

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ORCHID_ART BASEL MIAMI ORCHID MIAMI, FL ART BASEL_ ENVIRONMENTALL INSTALLATION

The design and creation of a whimsical and sophisticated environmental installation at the site of the entertainment venue ORCHID. The installation is an extension of the performance. A “Garden of Pleasure” starts at the initial view of the gateway location and continues to the peripheral fence. It culminates in the areas surrounding the “spiegeltent” and welcomes spectators before and after each performance. Several factors are considered in the design of the environmental installation of the Orchid venue. The aesthetics of the traditional “spiegeltent”, the iconic fences of nomadic circuses, and the essence of the venue, located in the celebrated Miami Design District, all contribute to the elegant and innovative installation.


Lattice silhouettes are used to create twelve 14-foot high orchid structures. Each structure is displayed at the exterior of the tents and each stem will hold tri-dimensional shapes of orchids, with six to seven plants of various sizes. In some cases the structures will be adorned with additional ivy, flowers, and plants.

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37


Above the garden a series of trellises creates a canopy. The trellis will consist of a parallel hanging wire system covered with flowing ethereal white fabric, allowing the structure’s skin to move kinetically with the breeze. The fabric will recreate a forest canopy and replicate the movement of leaves on trees within a forest.

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DEFLATED VILLA_ART BASEL MIAMI DEFLATED VILLA MIAMI, FL ART BASEL_ ENVIRONMENTALL INSTALLATION

The 2012 villa will be presented in the center of a vacant lot that was originally intended for development, however due to the economic meltdown of 2008 the project went inbuilt. The villa will sit within the original footprint of the planned site, suspended inside unfinished tempered steel re bar columns and will resemble an organism that is breathing rhythmically in and out. Whereas the 2005 villa was proud and floated free, the 2012 villa is humble and tangible. The fragility of the inflated material is in sharp contrast to the rigid metal structure and creates a juxtaposition of both materials and time.


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PAPER DREAMS_ART BASEL MIAMI PAPER BOAT MIAMI, FL ART BASEL_ ENVIRONMENTALL INSTALLATION

Influenced by the paper boats of children, this work is "Luis Pons" response to the individual offering in which we deposit our most pure wishes so that they may float in our imaginary water world. "I have always been fascinated with the magical world of the child's imagination right before reason takes over and consumerism takes its place." - LUIS PONS


The 30' x 15' x 15' Paper Boat will be constructed over a wood barge. It will be made of Bamboo poles, wires and sails. Within the Paper Boat there there is a small Hammam inside the rhomboidal pyramid of the sail. The floor is made of wood and Lucite. Fish water lamps will illuminate the interior of the Hammam at night. The lights will come from the water and reflect the interior surface of the sail. The Paper Boat's small Hammam would be a temporary extension of the Standard's earthbound Hammam. It will enhance the standards environment, making Biscayne Bay even more a part of visitors' experience.

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JONATHAN CAMACHO 457 NE 24TH STREET MIAMI, FL 33137 joncam88@gmail.com 786.413.2595

EDUCATION

EXPERIENCE

SKILLS/ SOFTWARE

INVOLVEMENT

BACHELORS DEGREE

LUISPONS DESIGN LAB

PROFICIENT

VICENZA, ITALY

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA GAINESVILLE, FL MAY 2012

ASSOCIATES DEGREE

DAYTONA BEACH COMMUNITY COLLEGE DAYTONA BEACH, FL MAY 2009

DIPLOMA

FOREST LAKE ACADEMY APOPKA, FL MAY 2006

4040 NE 2ND AVENUE MIAMI, FL 33137

JUNIOR ARCHITECT/DESIGNER 2012-CURRENT

PHOTOSHOP INDESIGN AUTOCAD SKETCH-UP RHINO WORD EXCELL

FAMILIAR

GRASSHOPPER 3D MAX REVIT

VIA STUDY ABROAD 2012

AIAS

AMERICAN INSTITUTION OF ARCHITECTE STUDENTS 2010


THANK YOU

Jonathan Camacho_UF Architecture Portfolio  
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