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JON BROOKE

ASLA, PLA, LEED AP BD+C

Landscape Architect, Educator

Work Samples

7/6/2012

Contact: M 312 404 7935 jm.brooke@sbcglobal.net 62


Design Experience

7/6/2012

Hermann Park Centennial Garden, Houston, TX HOERR SCHAUDT LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS $30M 17-acre monumental scale public garden facility, currently under construction. Completion Fall 2014.

View from Garden Mount, showing main lawn and pavilion

Hoerr Schaudt as design landscape architect was responsible for developing a design that explored 7/6/2012creation of a monumental scale public garden. While contemporarily styled, designs draw historic influence from public gardens in antiquity. The garden demonstrates unique, bold horticultural approaches and plant combinations that draw on the common thread of Houston as a melting 41 pot of cultural influences. Key features include a striking 30-foot tall garden mount, family vegetable garden, arid garden, and gardens that draw inspiration from Houston’s oak and pine forests. Hoerr Schaudt was instrumental in selecting Peter Bohlin of Bohlin Cywinski Jackson as a key collaborator and designer for the garden pavilion building. My responsibilities as Principal-in-Charge included overall project management and coordination with client group and local landscape architect-of-record, White Oak Studio.

Arid Garden Jon Brooke, Work Samples 62

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FRONT ELEVATION

GARDEN MOUNT SECTION

Top Center and Top Left: Garden Mount and cascade water feature Right: Detail planting study of Arid Garden Below: Pine Hill garden Bottom Left and Right: Perennial Walk and pergolas GARDEN MOUNT SECTION – WATER CASCADE ON FRONT

ARID GARDEN PLANTING

PINE HILL WALK – SECTION B Jon Brooke, Work Samples

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Design Experience

Brennan Entry Pavilion, Rush Medical Center, Chicago, IL HOERR SCHAUDT LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS Multi-level healthcare landscape over structure. Hoerr Schaudt developed designs for the new hospital entry pavilion in collaboration with Perkins+Will Architects. Features include a Level 4 courtyard roof garden, designed to provide calm respite to patients and medical staff alike. Most visually striking is a novel “terrarium” space, in effect a micro-courtyard light well, within the main lobby space. The project’s apparent simple graphic composition belie many significant challenges over and above those of designing lush landscape over structure. For instance, the project’s LEED targets demanded only recycled graywater could be used for irrigation, and the client mandated that all plant materials should be hypoallergenic. In addition, in both courtyard and terrarium light and shade were constraints requiring special consideration of plant materials. The lobby in which the terrarium site is a daylit space, but based on Jon Brooke, Work Samples

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daylighting studies by the architects during design, it was apparent that the relatively high level of natural light from a human perspective (100 footcandles average) would not be sufficient to support typical plant materials. As technical lead in the project team I researched natural low light condition systems and devised a palette of several types of mosses and ferns based on deep forest floor environments. These are combined with early flowering bulbs, and understory trees with rich fall color. This combination upholds a key tenet of Hoerr Schaudt’s design philosophy: that of providing year-long seasonal interest. While hardly a natural system, the terrarium, which evokes a sense of the primordial, strives to bring elements of nature into a largely sterile healthcare environment.

EDGE OF GLAZING CRUSHED AGGREGATE STRIP

THREE MULTI-STEM TREES AT VARYING HEIGHTS +42”

+18”

+6”

4’

FALL

8 FEET

0’

EDGE OF GLAZING

4’

8 FEET

WOODLAND GROUND COVER PLANTING

+30”

TERRARIUM PLAN

0’

4’

8 FEET

SUMMER

0’

4’

8 FEET

WINTER

0’

4’

8 FEET

FALL

EDGE OF GLAZING

GROUND PLANE PLANTING

CRUSHED AGGREGATECRUSHED STRIP AGGREGATE STRIP

Polystichum acrostichoides

Athyrium filix-femina

Osmunda cinnamomea Carex morrowii ‘Silver Sceptre’

Carex pensylvanica

Crocus species

Galanthus

TREE OPTIONS

THREE MULTI-STEM TREES THREE ATMULTI-STEM TREES AT VARYING HEIGHTS VARYING HEIGHTS +42”

+18”

+6”

+6”+30”

AN RARIUM PLAN 4’

8 FEET

UND LANTING PLANE PLANTING

+18”

+42”

+30”

SPRING

WOODLAND GROUNDWOODLAND GROUND COVER PLANTING COVER PLANTING

Fagus grandifolia

Acer saccharum

0’

4’

8 FEET 0’

4’ 0’

8 FEET 4’

SUMMER SUMMER 8 FEET

Ostrya virginiana 0’

4’

Betula papyrifera 80’FEET

4’

8 FEET

FALL

FALL

0’

4’

80’FEET

4’

8 FEET

LEVEL 01: TERRARIUMJon Brooke, Work Samples RUSH MEDICAL CENTER 17 SEPTEMBER 2009

4

SPRING


Design Experience

Hull Court Garden, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL HOERR SCHAUDT LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS, 2007 “Jewelbox” University Courtyard

Photo Linda Oyama Brien

Douglas Hoerr Landscape Architecture was commissioned by U of C to create a second phase of its successful landscape renovation of the “Botany Pond” in the historic 1900’s Olmsted brothers Hull Court Quad. The previous design brought and extremely rich horticultural experience to a space that had lain in benign neglect for many years. As a second phase Hull court garden sought to bring a similar horticultural richness to the West side of the quad. A steering group comprised largely of Botany Department Faculty required the plants used to be primarily native, which resulted in a different, but compatible aesthetic. The design also sought to create a quiet, reflective place with mounded lawn panels and stone benches among significant historical features and large existing trees. The plant palette is devised to provide heightened seasonal interest in the Spring and Fall when students are present and many

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Extend existing sumac planting

Existing railing

Large sweeps of ornamental grasses and sedges

Future ramp (by others)

Loggia

Frontage Planting to match Botany Pond

Specimen tree

Stone edging

Seat wall

Expand Planted area

Bike parking 30+ spaces

Reduced paved area

ath nite p d gra ose p m co De

Relocate memorial tree

Oxford light

Loading dock

Replace tree to Maintain allee’

PHASE 2 CONCEPT NTS

Mounded lawn Loading dock Temporary concrete dumpster pad

Boxwood hedge edging

Mix of flowering shrubs and perennials to complement Botany Pond FULL SHADE

SUN

PARTIAL SHADE

UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO HULL COURT GARDEN: GARDEN CONCEPT DESIGN

NORTH

January 2006

tours of the campus take place, and also to look its best for Convocation, which is held in June. A series of grass-based mixes placed according to changing shade conditions across the space provide structure. These incorporate mostly native, or improved native perennials, bulbs and annuals that spectacularly appear at various times through the seasons. Careful attention is given to juxtaposing colors and textures. I acted as project manager, design and technical lead for the project. Together with two other projects in the U of C Quad, the project was the recipient of a 2012 Society of College and University Planners (SCUP) Excellence in Landscape Award.

Jon Brooke, Work Samples

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Design Experience

900 N. Michigan Rooftops Chicago, IL HOERR SCHAUDT LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS, 2006–2009 Commercial-residential and corporate roof terraces on iconic Chicago skyscraper Hoerr Schaudt was responsible for designing a series of three roof terraces at 900 N Michigan as part of renovations related to conversion of parts of the building to highend condominiums, and renovation of the Owner’s own office space. The three roof spaces are all based about a similar graphic concept, the layout of planting and structures are inspired by aerial views of the Midwest’s agricultural landscape but also relate to the modular green roof systems used for each terrace. The block pattern is expressed with alternating blocks of different sedum, grass and perennial mixes. Each roof installation was a complex system requiring extensive structural coordination to design structural improvements to enable occupancy. As project manager, I was responsible technical development and coordination for two of the roofs.

Photos this page: Scott Shigley

The three spaces were awarded the ASLA Illinois Chapter’s President’s Award for constructed commercial projects in 2011. Jon Brooke, Work Samples

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Above, Right and Below Right: Seasonal color and views from above, which are the primary way most people experience the roofs, were extremely important considerations. Below and Bottom Left: Structures including shade structures, planters and decks in ipe, steel and composite stone, are characterized by an intense attention to detail.

Photo: Scott Shigley

Photo: Scott Shigley

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Teaching Experience LA503: Advanced Contemporary Theory, Case Studies ASSOCIATE ADJUNCT PROFESSOR, ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE LA503 is a three credit hour required class in the MLA program open to Graduate MLA students as well as graduate, post-graduate and undergraduate students in the School’s Architecture programs. I taught the class first in Spring 2009, basing it upon a syllabus written by a former professor, but adapting it to my areas of expertise. Primary teaching goals are to: 1. Explore the relationships between landscape architecture projects and their details. 2. Understand detail design as a series of interrelated systems. 3. Understand detail design as intrinsic to the overall design process. 4. Provide instruction on technical decisionmaking processes based on real world case studies. 5. Develop student research and presentation skills. Sessions include lectures, discussion and tutorials, and include two major student assignment deliverables.

Prececent (Landworks) Above: Selection of images from an analytical drawing study of a precedent design (work by Landworks). Students are required to redraw from photographs using a number of techniques including negative space drawing. Annotations were also required and students are encouraged to include deduced quantitative information as well as qualitative.

The focus during the first part of the term is on lectures and precedent analysis, as well as techniques of analysis. Lectures explore various aspects of the major class themes, including relationship between philosophy and detail, details as systems, as well as focusing on the influence of materiality on design morphology. Students are given a three-part assignment to research the work of two designers, one a landscape architect, and one a designer in another field. In each case, study is focused on the designer’s approach to detail as it relates to his or her overall philosophy.

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In many cases, the designer’s approach to detail is not well documented and so students are encouraged to rigorously study the work of the designer and generate their own analyses, with emphasis being given to the use of drawings and diagrams to do this. After two initial verbal/slideshow presentations, students are asked to draw comparisons between the approaches of both designers in the form of an illustrated paper. In the second part of the term classes are largely tutorial-based, with students sharing research, discussing progress and receiving feedback on the second assignment. The assignment incorporates further research and also applies the knowledge obtained to a small scale design exercise. Based on an “inside-out” approach, students study small-scale details and systems, studying at first small scale properties. As the weeks progress, study broadens in scale to encompass the relationships and application of the detail, and how the detail could generate a conceptual approach. Students gain understanding of the material properties and fabrication techniques associated with the detail through modeling. Finally, students generate conceptual ideas generated to develop a small scale design feature.

Above and below: Image studies based on student-selected project study sites. Students are required to research the design context of the site and expose detail design approaches.

Each year I have taught the class, classwork and class structure have been refined in response to student evaluation, discussion with colleagues and personal experiences in the prior year. Therefore the work shown here may relate only indirectly to the current program.

Right: Diagram study of curve radii used in Ken Smith’s MOMA rooftop project in New York, an example of extracting higher levels of information from existing imagery. The student also conducted in-person interviews with Ken Smith’s office. Jon Brooke, Work Samples

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Teaching Experience 120˚ 120˚

100˚ 60˚ 60˚

120˚ 120˚ 120˚

138˚

120˚

160˚

124˚

The City Deck

The Plaza at Harvard

Erie Street Plaza

The Plaza at Harvard

Erie Street Plaza

The City Deck One directional One material (primarily) Tied to ground plane Light

The Plaza at Harvard One directional One material Distinct from ground plane No light

Erie Street Plaza One directional One material Distint from ground plane Light

The City Deck

Extract from student research project presentation showing a diagram illustrating the detail approach of an assigned landscape architect. In this case the student’s diagram compares the same designer’s approach to three similar projects. Jon Brooke, Work Samples

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Martha Stewart

Wylie DuFresne

EGGS BENEDICT PROBLEM 1

SOLUTION

GELATIN

(

(

DEEP FRIED HOLLANDAISE Extract from student research project presentation showing a diagram study of the detail approach of a designer outside the field of landscape architecture, in this case modernist Chef, Wylie Dufresne, whose approach is contrasted with a more traditional approach to the same dish. Jon Brooke, Work Samples

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Poured plaster-filled moulds

MODEL SCALE: 1/32� = 1’

CAST CONCRETE STORMWATER FILTER MODULE

Assembled mould forms showing interior structure Laser cut chipboard forms

Rhino Model

Glued and sealed with foldover tabs

Unfolded Model Cast Form (actual size)

Foldover Tabs

Fold Lines

Pour Hole

20 Module Set

Completed plaster model of module

Teaching Experience

Student detail study. In this case the student focused on a specific system of details, in this case modular precast concrete as a material. Students were required to explore relationships between morphology and materiality in their selected systems, including methods of fabrication. A modelmaking component required students to use similar processes and materials to the actual material. This student created molds and cast them in plaster, emulating the processes of precasting.

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Students created a series of details based on a similar conceptual approach Jon Brooke, Work Samples

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Academic Research The Earth Centre Project RESEARCH ASSISTANT, LEEDS METROPOLITAN UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF DESIGN AND THE ENVIRONMENT, LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE GROUP

Above: Denaby Main and Cadeby Main Pits located on the site were both closed by 1987, leaving high unemployment in the area and a devastated landscape

The Earth Centre was an ambitious project located near Doncaster in South Yorkshire, UK, to establish an environmental visitor attraction and education center. In 1992 The Landscape Architecture Group at LMU received funding from the non-profit group to provide research and design support for the project. The academic group compiled an environmental survey and assessment and based on these, led in the efforts to create a master plan for the 200-acre site, despoiled in large part by over 100 years of coal mining and industry. The group produced detail design of the pilot phase of the development that was instrumental in winning a prestigious $90M award of UK Government Millennium funding. In support of institutional goals to further real-world learning, the group was able to use the project to support pedagogical activities. Several academic papers and publications have been produced based on the project. Major foci of the research included: 1. Inventory of historical and archaeological sites in the area. 2. Ecological inventory of the communities on and surrounding the site. 3. Inventory of other physical site features including access, geology, and topography. 4. Creation of the site master plan including core attractions and greater site known as “the Ecological Parklands.�

Above Right and Right: Analysis diagram and two strategy plans, which were elements of The Earth Centre master plan

5. Establishment of restoration goals for the site, and exploration of various methods of landscape restoration on despoiled land. These included use of forestry and livestock grazing as soil restoration processes, and reed bed filtration systems to support water purification. 6. Planning and design core visitor attraction, including buildings, aquaculture facility and organic farm.

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7. Development of design details for Phase 1a. This work included collaboration with design architects such as Will Alsop and Fielden Clegg.

Left: Prior site condition Below: The same view after forestry planting, a significant part of which was carried out with the assistance of LMU landscape architecture student volunteers

8. Participation in development of standards for green building on site, a novel concept at the time. Design efforts sought to reuse on-site materials such as mine soils, and salvage building materials. The project also served as a work training program to offset high unemployment in the area resulting from closure of the coal mines in the late 1980s. In partnership with local organizations, LMU was involved in these efforts, oversaw installation and trained crews in native landscape installation. LMU students also participated in volunteer efforts to establish forestry on large areas of the site. While The Earth Centre ultimately failed as an attraction, the greater site exists as a park dedicated to the local community. Papers, Reports and Articles: “Site Form, Context and General Characteristics”, J. Brooke, Report to The Earth Centre. “Searching for Sustainability: The Design Development of the Earth Centre Landscape...”, C. Royffe, C. Treen, A. Millard, J. Brooke. CELA Conference 1995 “The Earth Centre Landscape: Sustainability on all Levels”, J. Brooke. EcoDesign Magazine, October 1995

Above Right: Extract from construction drawings prepared for The Earth Center Phase 1a Right: The site area in 2013, showing large areas of woodland and native grassland, identified in the master plan that have been established since the project’s inception in 1994

Jon Brooke, Work Samples

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Work Samples  

Jon Brooke, Landscape Architect

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