Page 1

JONATHAN TOMKO DESIGN PORTFOLIO

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE / BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ARCHITECTURE


[ii] Resume

University of Cincinnati EDUCATION The Master of Architecture

College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning (DAAP)

Aug 2015 - Aug 2018 Cincinnati, Ohio

Graduate Certificate, Business Foundations Linder College of Business

Jan 2018 - Aug 2018 Cincinnati, Ohio

Kent State University Bachelor of Science in Architecture College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED)

Aug 2009 - Aug 2014 Kent, OH

Kent State Florence Study Abroad Study Abroad Experience

Jan 2013 - May 2013 Florence, Italy

Linsteadt Architects EXPERIENCE Ken Intern Architect

May 2017 - Aug 2017 San Francisco, CA

Bohlin Cywinksi Jackson Project Designer

Aug 2016 - Dec 2016 Philadelphia, PA

Designed the preliminary cladding scheme for a cantilevered superstructure. This process included creating digital models and construction details. Worked as a team on construction documents and digital models for multiple residential projects.

Planned and built presentation models for a residential project. This process included creating digital models, operating the laser cutter, and constructing many iterations through schematic design.

Renfro Design Group Lighting Design Intern

Jan - May 2016 New York, NY

Constructed lighting mock-ups, created technical drawings, renderings, presentations, lighting fixture layouts, control zone layouts, site surveys, 3D digital models, and other tasks, as required. Collaborated with architects to help support their visions of spaces with light. Learned to identify and articulate how light will move through a space, analyze quality and quantity of light, calculate power density, and specify lighting equipment that meets the needs of the project’s ASHRAE, LEED, budget, and maintenance constraints, while receiving hands-on experience at all stages of design.

Loysen + Kreuthmeier Architects Intern Architect

Aug 2014 - Aug 2015 Pittsburgh, PA

Acted as a member of a collaborative team by producing various design schemes, design development, creating construction documents, interacting in client and CCA meetings, completing punch lists, documenting existing conditions, and observing and directing on-site construction.

Art Museum Student Competition AWARDS Akron Finalist

Dec 2012 Akron, OH

A competition held by the Akron Art Museum for the design of their outdoor sculpture gallery, finalists' presentation materials were selected for a four-month display within the Akron Art Museum. The presentation included a physical model and presentation boards.


About

JONATHAN TOMKO

Master of Architecture

I am passionate about creating places that let people thrive. What motivates me in this profession is a deep care for people, the health, safety and welfare of society, and cultural development. The works presented in this portfolio would not have been possible without the guidance, numerous discissions and critiques of the many colleagues and mentors that I have had the blessing of working with throughout my educational and professional careers.

[iii]


[iv] TABLE OF CONTENTS

08

I.T.S.C. DESIGN/ BUILD ACADEMIC

28 NEW PHILADELPHIA

MASTER PLAN

46

ROBOTIC CRAFTING

60

EASTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH PROFESSIONAL


66

74

CITY OF ASYLUM ALEXANDERCULTURAL CENTER BONIN GALLERY

80

NORTH SALEM HOUSE

86

FINE ARTS OTHER WORK

[i]


ACADEMIC WORK


I.T. SOLUTIONS CENTER

CINCINNATI, OHIO - METROLAB DESIGN-BUILD The information technology solutions center (ITSC) sought an upgrade of their office space design to brand their office to reflect their dedication to innovation.


R

D STUDIO - 2016

INDEX

to better reflect their mission of innovation. This goal of this graduate design/build was to renovate the on-campus ITSC, utilizing parametric


[6] Academic Work

Piano Hinges

Plywood

EXISTING CONDITIONS The project began with a analysis of the needs and wants of the ITSC and their employees. The nature of the work requires the students to sit behind a desk for hours at a time, with no other options for modes of working. The office also lacks any central gathering space for team meetings, and nowhere to have their lunch. Many students were concerned for their health, and wanted to be able to work with a laptop while standing up.


Information Technology Solutions Center

Concept Plan A) Panel Walls

B) Partitions C) Standing Desk

[7]

D) Conference Table

The office is housed in a trailer. The materiality of the environment features vinyl walls and carpet and steel furniture and very little views to the outside. There was also no sense of brand identity for the ITSC, an office that is dedicated to innovation, and sought to create an environment that the office could identify with and resonate with visiting clients.


8[8] Academic Work

Concept Diagram

CONCEPTUAL DESIGN The project began with an analysis of the needs and wants of the ITSC and their employees. The nature of the work requires the students to sit behind a desk for hours at a time. The office lacks any central gathering space for team meetings, and nowhere to have their lunch. Many students were concerned for their health, and wanted to be able to work with a laptop while standing up.


Information Technology Solutions Center

[9]

The office is housed in a trailer. The materiality of the environment features vinyl walls and carpet and steel furniture and very little views to the outside. There was also no sense of brand identity for the ITSC, an office that is dedicated to innovation, and sought to create an environment that the office could identify with and resonate with visiting clients.


[10] Academic Work

Grasshopper Script

Paper Concept Model

Digital Model

PROTOTYPING Prototyping enabled the team to test the concept and uncover issues that had not beenconsidered during the concept phase. It also forced us to think realistically about how the standing desk was going to be constructed. The prototype took one weekend to build, and another week add, remove, cut, and paint different finishes on the plywood. Using the prototype revealed that the initial height that we


Information Technology Solutions Center

[11]

Full-Scale Prototype

chose was uncomfortable for some people, which led us to adjust the height. The initial prototype was also extremely unstable, and would wobble when writing, typing, or operating a wireless mouse.


12 [12] Academic Work

DETAILS Limited by the standard 4’x8’ size of plywood board, the long table was bound to have joints. Rather than try to conceal the joints, the team decided to embrace them as a design feature. The layers of the table were designed in such a way as to overlap and bolt together.


Information Technology Solutions Center

Hardware was left exposed through milled holes, and a 1/4� CNC Route around the perimeter of the table celebrated the edge and the hardware that held the two layers together.

[13]


[14] Academic Work

Standing Desk Foot Detail Conceptual Sketch

Threaded Rod Top Bolt Washer CNC Plywood Panels Layered Plywood Foot Screw Wood Glue Bottom Bolt

Standing Desk Foot Final Detail

DETAILS Due to the limitations of the CNC mill, the feet of the standing desk were milled out in two separate layers, and then glued together. The feet of the initial prototype were held together by piano hinges. This was one reason for the instability, and something stronger was


Information Technology Solutions Center

Construction

Foot Final Detail

needed to keep the plywood panels from twisting around. Screws were drilled into the plywood feet which allowed for greater stability.

[15]


16 [16] Academic Work

DETAILS The initial concept was to allow the plywood panels to also be the structure of the table. This concept was not going to work if the table was to be structurally sound. Metal rods were cut to fasten to the feet and hold the top of the table in place. During the prototype phase, the rods acted in compression, holding the top of the table up. The table could not bear on the pkywood walls of the legs without


Information Technology Solutions Center

Interior Construction

them buckling. To fix this, the team designed inner plywood rings that would reinforce the walls of the plywood table. With this, we were able to have the rods act in tension, holding the table top down into the plywood legs and the laminated feet. This method also tied all components of the table together and made transportation easier.

[17]


18 [18] Academic Work

CONSTRUCTION The CNC Router was used to mill the plywood to the desired dimensions and shape. Digital files were prepared in Rhino that specified the dimensions of the raw material, and the final dimensions of the different layers of the standing desk. Hardware was chosen after


Information Technology Solutions Center

[19]

experiencing the prototype. Holes were milled out to hold the nuts and bolts, and a carved line around the border to “celebrate� the edge.


20 [20] Academic Work

CONSTRUCTION Construction also involved the use of the wood and metal shops. In order to cut the threaded rods down to size, the circular saw was used. The wood shop was used to finish the wooden components of the standing desk. To achieve the desired thickness of the top surface, two panels were laminated together using wood glue and clamps. Careful craftsmanship was required to line up all of the edges and holes. The surface of the tabletops were sanded using fine grit sandpaper and an orbital sander.


Information Technology Solutions Center

[21]

Bowing of the wood made laminating the middle of the large surface a challenge. Drilling short screws into the bottom kept the two wooden surfaces in contact while the wood glue dried. Careful consideration was given to the size of the screw used so that it would not poke through to the finished side. This was an unplanned modification.


22 [22] Academic Work

COMPLETION Final installation took one week.. Working in the office outside of the operating hours of the ITSC, the wall team worked to assemble and install the different clusters of the tesselated panel wall, while the furniture team carried and assembled the various components over to the ITSC.


Information Technology Solutions Center

The final design was unveiled to the ITSC office on the last day of the summer semester. They thoroughly enjoy their new standing desk. The final photographs were lit using a combination of direct and diffuse lighting to enhance the topography of the panel wall.

[23]


NEW PHILADELPHIA M NEW PHILADELPHIA, OHIO

MASTERS TH

There has always been a historic relationship between cities and their hinterlands. Today, citi consmption and trendy lifestyles. It is forecasted that by 2050, 70% of the world’s population will b This thesis explores the current challenges and opportunities experienced by small town America, a


MASTER PLAN

HESIS

2017-2018

INDEX

ies around the world are changing and growing. What used to be places of industrial production and economic might are becoming places of be living in cities, yet in the words of Rem Koolhaas, “[the] changes taking place in the countryside are more profound than those in urban area.� and how can design can help bring reinvigorate the communal, entrepreneurial lifestyle of small town america.


26 [26] Academic Work

Regional Analysis Lake Erie Watershed

Ohio River Watershed

Lakes

Ohio-Erie Canal Coridor

HISTORICAL AND REGIONAL ANALYSIS

Ohio Drainage Divide

Rivers

Counties

Ohio-Erie Canal

Major cities used to be the economic and industrial engines of the United States due to a centralization of people, wealth, and resources. Proximity to a dense urban environment used to mean more economic opportunity. The regional context of which a small town is situated gives important clues to how the town functions. Historically, the size of a developing city was a function of how powerful the settlement could become in the national and international economies. Predominent industries were often, and continue to be considered the economic driver of urban growth. In actuality, it was, and continues to be a city’s ability to participate in national and international trade. Cities that started earlier or were situated on bodies of water that enabled them to trade have generally had some greater stimulus for


New Philadelphia Master Plan

[27]

Located on a small tributary River, New Philadelphia relied on the Ohio-Erie Canal for trade and Industry.

economic growth. Centralization of wealth acted as an attractor, reinforcing the growth cycle of a select few places within any given region. These places grew to dominate and exert power over the smaller towns and cities around them. In the case of New Philadelphia, we find a small town of 17,000 people located in the center of a region defined by three big cities: Pittsburgh, Cleveland and Columbus. Pittsburgh, located at the confluence of three large rivers, was well suited for trade and got a jumpstart on New Philadlelphia. While New Philadelphia was just being settled In 1803, Pittsburgh was already manufacturing steam boats, enhacning their trade capabilities and becoming an industry in itself. Cleveland was a big player in great lakes trade, and Columbus developed


28 [28] Academic Work

Existing Elevation

DEATH OF MAINSTREET Over time, there have been several assaults on historic downtown neighborhoods ranging from the character of the buildings to the zoning codes that made public-serving venues all but disappear. New-Deal era government subsidies encouraged small towns to tackle the challenges of regional shopping malls and big box stores by “modernizing� their storefronts with cheap materials and labor. This approach backfired, with the modern materials not aging well, and inconsistent execution, with some storefronts being updated while others were not. This degrading of the architectual identity weakens the sense of place in historic downtowns.


New Philadelphia Master Plan

Auto-oriented development was also embraced in New Philadelphia’s downtown, with many historic structures being razed for multiple parking lots, sidewalks being narrowed to accomodate more automobile traffic, and rezoning the district to the single use of “business.�

[29]


30 [30] Academic Work

RESTORED STOREFRONTS: SELLING THE DREAM OF MAIN STREET Restoring historic storefronts can be used to sell a lifestyle. Across the United States, suburban “lifestyle centers,” mixed-use commercial developments in the image of historic downtowns, are already selling the “dream” of the urban center. However, these “lifestyle centers” are not truly the centers of anything, meanwhile genuine downtowns such as New Philadelphia’s are suffering from a lack of a consistent image.


New Philadelphia Master Plan

[31]

In addition to selling a lifestyle, restoring consistency to the historic architecture can create a shopping experience that sets stores up for success against regional malls and big box stores. By conceiving of the storefronts as a “horizontal department store,� where each storefront is a specialty shop as opposed to a variety store, the downtown can collectively be taken as a viable competitor with larger stores. Also, reintriducing residential living downtown can make these stores as convenient to access by proximity. In low-density areas, a larger store will always attract more business. However, in a higher-density area, proximity will attract customers.


32 [32] Academic Work

RESTORED STREOFRONTS: SELLING THE DREAM OF MAIN STREET Restoring the historic storefronts of downtown buildings will unify the hodge podge of buildings that have been modified over the years. Restoring the storefronts will create a consistent image and sell the warm nostalgia of life on main street. Large storefront windows will create a dialogue between the insides and the outsides of the buildings, fostering life in the public realm of the sidewalk. A variety of locally owned specialty shops, restaurants, cafes, bars and clubs will be stronger considered together to compete against


New Philadelphia Master Plan

[33]

automobile oriented commercial centers. In harnessing the communal spirit of small town life, the more “specialty� departments that are filled, the stronger the effect will be.


[34] Academic Work

‘AD-HOC’ VERNACULAR OF BACK ADDITIONS Most of the buildings in downtown New Philadelphia all have additions on the back of their buildings. Built primarily to service the public-serving functions of the atores, restaurants, and pubs that filled the fronts of the buildings, these back additions were built in an ‘ad-


New Philadelphia Master Plan

[35]

hoc� manner, meaning without consideration of wider application. The system of back alleyways and lots in new Philadelphia presents an opportunity for new public spaces.


36 [36] Academic Work

OPENING UP NEW SOCIAL SPACES While the fronts of the buildings being a nod the past, the backs of these buildings present an opportunity for a modern architectural intervention. Over time, additions and modifications to New Philadelphia’s buildings have been done in an “Ad Hoc” manner, serving primarily for utilitarian purposes. This project accepts the elements of fire escapes, balconies, sloped roofs, electrical conduits, and downspouts as an architectural vernacular, exaggerating them and using them on purpose. With this approach, creating


New Philadelphia Master Plan

[37]

modern interventions aims to spawn new ideas about the backs of downtown buildings and act as a catalyst for future development. Just as a dialogue between the inside and outside is important in the front, it is also true for the back. Opening up the back can catalyze the development of New Philadelphia’s back alleyways as public space.


38 [38] Academic Work

BACK LOTS AS PUBLIC SPACE New Philadelphia has a unique system of back alleyways and parking lots behind downtown buildings. Simple interventions such as repaving the asphalt lots with richer materiality can improve the experience of these places. In this project, the materiality of the ground plane regulates space while providing flexibility for multiple use of the back lot as public space. Opportunities include music venue, farmers market, art festivals, food trucks, or simply hanging out and people watching.


New Philadelphia Master Plan

[39]

Holding the corner of the lot is a public “loggia,� which serves as civic infrastructure where people can sit and hang out, or can be used as a performance stage.


40 [40] Academic Work

BACK LOTS AS PUBLIC SPACE New Philadelphia has a unique system of back alleyways and parking lots behind downtown buildings. Simple interventions such as repaving the asphalt lots with richer materiality can improve the experience of these places. In this project, the materiality of the ground plane regulates space while providing flexibility for multiple use of the back lot as public space. Opportunities include music venue, farmers market, art festivals, food trucks, or simply hanging out and people watching.


New Philadelphia Master Plan

[41]

Holding the corner of the lot is a public “loggia,� which serves as civic infrastructure where people can sit and hang out, or can be used as a performance stage.


ROBOTIC CRAFTING

UNDERGRADUATE STUDIO - KENT, OHIO

-

Architecture is a broad field that meets many different disciplines. One discipline is robotics; hand. Another such discipline is architectural ceramics; a traditional craft that that dates back cen intersection of robotics and architectual ceramics. Three projects involved the design and fabricati


- 2014

INDEX

a progressive topic in architecture that elevates the speed and precision of craftsmanship beyond the capabilities of the human nturies in the history of architecture. Partnering with Kent State Univesity’s ceramics department, this elective studio explored the ion of drawings and two ceramic tiles by programming a Kuka six-axis robotic arm.


44 [44] Academic Work

ROBOTIC CONTOUR DRAWING For each exercise, a different tool was developed to attach to the sixth axis, the “wrist” of the robot. The “tool path” was the route that the wrist of the robot followed to move the tool in relation to the medium being worked on. This contour drawing served as an introduction to creating and programming the robot’s tool path. The 2D contours were first drawn in Rhino and plugged into a grasshopper script. The grasshopper script controlled the speed and rotation of each of the robot’s different


Robotic Crafting

[45]

axes in relation to the dimensions of the medium, a 24 x 36 piece of mat board. The robot was also calibrated to the size of the sharpie holder which fastened to the wrist of the robot. The mat board was placed in the correct location in relation to the robot, and the runtime for the robot to complete the drawing was less than 5 minutes.


46 [46] Academic Work

2D geometry

Flow Along Surface

Lasercut

Prepare Ceramic Tile

ROBOTICALLY STAMPED CERAMICS The second project involved the creation of a 12� x 12� terra cotta tile. A wave pattern was developed and applied to a rolling tool that could fasten to the robotic arm. While the tool path was seemingly a simple progression of three parallel lines, there was the added complexity of having to program the robotic arm to lift in the z-axis to repeat each stamp. Once the pattern was developed, rhino was used to apply the pattern to a rolling tool. Layers were created that could be lasercut and glued together. While high definition 3d Printing was an


Robotic Crafting

[47]

Stamp

option for the tool, the low-definition layering of the basswood imprinted on the ceramic tile and created an interesting reveal of how the tile was made.


48 [48] Academic Work

ROBOTICALLY STAMPED CERAMICS The second project involved the creation of a 12� x 12� terra cotta tile. A wave pattern was developed and applied to a rolling tool that could fasten to the robotic arm. While the tool path was seemingly a simple progression of three parallel lines, there was the added complexity of having to program the robotic arm to lift in the z-axis to repeat each stamp. Once the pattern was developed, rhino was used to apply the pattern to a rolling tool. Layers were created that could be lasercut and glued together. While high definition 3d Printing was an


Robotic Crafting

Final Roller

[49]

Final Tile

option for the tool, the low-definition layering of the basswood imprinted on the ceramic tile and created an interesting reveal of how the tile was made.


50 [50]

program robot

ROBOTICALLY CARVED CERAMICS The second project involved the creation of a 12� x 12� terra cotta tile. A wave pattern was developed and applied to a rolling tool that could fasten to the robotic arm. While the tool path was seemingly a simple progression of three parallel lines, there was the added complexity of having to program the robotic arm to lift in the z-axis to repeat each stamp. Once the pattern was developed, rhino was used to apply the pattern to a rolling tool. Layers were created that could be lasercut and glued together. While high definition 3d Printing was an


Robotic Crafting

[51]

Axon

option for the tool, the low-definition layering of the basswood imprinted on the ceramic tile and created an interesting reveal of how the tile was made.


52 [52] Academic Work

ROBOTICALLY CARVED CERAMICS The final exercise with the robotic arm was to develop a carved pattern in a ceramic tile. A standard ceramic carving tool was attached to the arm and was used to carve the pattern. The application of this tile is a shading device or wall.


Robotic Crafting

[53]


54 [54]


Robotic Crafting

PROFESSIONAL WORK

[55]


EASTMINSTER PRESBY

LOYSEN + KREUTHMEIER ARCHITECTS - PITTS

The historic eastminster presbyterian church initiated a project to enhance it’s entry experie / large. the proposed scope is a blend of these. the design proposal was to renovate the existing conceal mechanical equipment will be taken out and relocated to reveal beautiful historic maso


YTERIAN CHURCH

SBURGH, PA - 2017

INDEX

ence and create more generous congregating spaces on the first floor. various options were explored, with scopes described as small / medium historic entry on station street, making it the primary accessible entrance to the sanctuary. additionally, a drop-ceiling previously added to onry arches, drastically enhancing the historic interior.


58 [58] Professional Work

Existing Entrance

EXISTING CONDITIONS Existing mechanical equipment housed above the drop ceiling will be relocated to reveal the original exterior arches, clarify circulation, and create a new accessible restroom.


Eastmister Presbyterian Church

Existing Interior Hallway

[59]


60 [60] Professional Work

REVEALING HISTORIC ARCHES Existing mechanical equipment housed above the drop ceiling will be relocated to reveal the original exterior arches, clarify circulation, and create a new accessible restroom.


Eastmister Presbyterian Church

[61]


© Thomas Little

CITY OF ASYLUM CULT

LOYSEN + KREUTHMEIER ARCHITECTS - PITTS

City of Asylum is a nonprofit organization which provides sanctuary to creative writers unde Pittsburgh’s Northside neighborhood to transform into a thriving community hub for readers, write new program includes performance spaces for readings, writing workshops, residencies, a restaura


TURAL CENTER

SBURGH, PA - 2017

INDEX

er threat of persecution, imprisonment, or death in their native countries. In 2015, the organization purchased the historic Masonic Hall in ers and neighbors. The project involved transforming a historic, deteriorating building from a house of secrets into a public mixed-use venue. The ant and bookstore.


4

[64] Professional Work

20'-5"

REMOVE EX'G STAIR REMOVE SUBFLOORING AND JOISTS THROUGHOUT, THIS BAY; PROVIDE TEMPORARY BRACING AS INDICATED IN DETAIL 4/A0.0

3

REMOVE EX'G STAIR

REMOVE EX'G STAIR EX'G MASONRY ARCHES TO REMAIN

19'-2"

NOT IN SCOPE

REMOVE SUBFLOORING AND JOISTS FOR STAIR OPENING.

2

REMOVE EX'G PARTITIONS SHOWN DOTTED

REMOVE EX'G STAIR

20'-5"

REMOVE EX'G STAIR REMOVE SUBFLOORING & JOISTS FOR NEW ELEVATOR & STAIR OPENING.

1

REMOVE FLOOR FRAMING THIS BAY. PROVIDE TEMPORARY BRACING AS INDICATED 4/A0.0

14'-6"

H

15'-10"

G

17'-9"

F

12'-6"

E

12'-6"

D

12'-6"

C

14'-5"

B

A

Existing Floorplan

EXISTING CONDITIONS Prior to the renovation, the Masonic Hall lain abandoned for many years and used for storage. In 2015, the building was in a state of deterioration. Interior partitions has been built to separate the three structural bays, sectioning off the main space. Many of the original


City of Asylum 04

03

02

NEW FRAMING

105 2

01

105 3

fixed door

005 2

014 1

013 2

005 1

NEW CASED OPENING

Existing Section

moldings around windows, doors, and at the base of columns had remained, but damaged. Some furniture had been left behind.

[65]


66 [66] Professional Work

Š Thomas Little

BOOKSTORE To accomodate larger events, a track system enabled the custom bookshelves to be quickly stored away in a back room. The extra space is periodically used to expand the capacity of the main space. New steel framing was used to hold the weight of the track system,


City of Asylum

[67]

10" x 1 5/8" x 12 GA FRAMING @ 16" O.C.

4

10" x 1 5/8" x 16 GA FRAMING @ 16" O.C. W10 X 15 + PL

W10 X 15 + PL

W10 X 15 + PL

W10 X 15 + PL 10" LT GA FRAMING @ 16" O.C.

DBL. 2 x 14

BRG PL 1/2 x 6 x 1'-0" TYP.

NEW STAGE FLOOR

1

W10 X 49

2

INTERMEDIATE PARTITION BELOW STAGE

2x8 @ 12" O.C.

6" STUD WALL BELOW

NEW 2 x 14 @ 16" O.C.

6" STUD WALL BELOW

W10 X 49

W10 X 49

W10 X 49

W10 X 15 + PL

W10 X 49

W10 X 15 + PL W10 X 49

W10 X 15 + PL

NEW 2 x 6 @ 12" O.C.

W10 X 15 + PL

W10 X 15 + PL

3

W10 X 15 + PL

10" LT GA @ 16" O.C.

2

10" LT GA FRAMING 16" O.C.

A

B

C

D

E

Bookshelf Track Framing Plan F

G

H

MOBILE SHELVING TRACK NEW 3/4" WOOD FINISHED FLOOR NEW 3/4" P'WOOD NEW W10 X 15 10" LT GA @ 16" o.c. NEW 1/2" ST'L PLATE, UNDERSIDE OF NEW W10 X 49

Bookshelf Track Detail

replacing some of the existing wood joists that held the first floor.

NEW W10 X 49


Notes

011

OFFICE SUPPORT

STAIR 02

001

LOUNGE

1

1

012

MULTIPURPOSE ROOM

1'-2"

Exit Sign, Typ.

CORRIDOR

014 013

WINE

005

CORRIDOR

002

OFFICE 003C

KEG COOLER

003B

FOOD COOLER

003

PREP KITCHEN

HOOD DUCT TO ABOVE

003A

REST. OFFICE/ STORAGE

004

NEW DUCTWORK ABOVE SHOWN DOTTED.

1

PROGRAM STORAGE

20'-5"

2

ELEVATOR

fixed door

STAIR 01

19'-2"

010

OFFICE GWB @ 7'-6"

015

CORRIDOR

009

BOOK SORTING

008

GREEN ROOM

007

A\V SUITE

GWB @ 7'-6"

006

FAMILY WC

3

ELEVATOR BY OTHERS

20'-5"

ELEVATOR MACHINE ROOM (SHARED)

4

[68] Professional Work

14'-5"

A

12'-6"

B

12'-6"

C

12'-6"

D

17'-9"

E

15'-10"

F

14'-6"

Reflected Ceiling Plan G

TOP OF EXISTING FLOOR

H

8"

SLAB DRILL AND EPOXY #3 @16" #4 REBAR @12" EW 4" CONT. PERF. PIPE

1'-0"

4"

CONNECTED TO SUMP PIT

2'-0"

Underpinned Foundation Detail

© Thomas Little

BASEMENT A rentable conference room, along with the organization’s offices, and the prep kitchen for the restaurant were located in the basement. The original basement had a clearance of about 6’-0”. The existing foundations had to be underpinned to allow a lower floor level


City of Asylum

[69]

which afforded a comfortable floor to ceiling height for the occupants as well as flexibility for the mechanical and electrical quipment. The existing masonry of the foundation was left exposed to demarcate space and new lights were placed in the joists.


Image Copyright © Joerg Lohse

ALEXANDER-BONIN GAL

RENFRO DESIGN GROUP - NEW YORK, NY - 201

Alexander and Bonin, an art gallery that dates back to 1995, was moving to 47 walker street in Renfro Design Group (RDG). The lighting design process includes an on-site mock up to present diff will perform. However, a mockup of such a scale was a first for RDG. Executing the mockup meant


LLERY

16

INDEX

n New York City’s Tribeca neighborhood. The space was designed by New York firm Bade Stageberg Cox with lighting design by fferent lighting options. When it comes to lighting design, mockups are important to see important qualitative aspects of how light building a portable, safe, free-standing, structure to hold bulky lighting fixtures on-site.


[72] Professional Work

29° 33° 36° 42° 3’-10 1/4” 3’-3” 2’-10 3/8” 2’-4 1/2”

Ideal Art Lighting Locations

PLANNING

Ideal Art Lighting Angles

The project involved studying the ideal lighting for artwork. Ideal locations for lighting fixtures were determined as a function of the ceiling height and measured as distances from the wall.


Alexander-Bonin Gallery

10’-4” First Floor Ceiling 9’-0” Basement Ceiling

Finished Mock-Up

[73]


[74] Professional Work

Installing Track Heads

EXECUTING Forthcoming.

Constructing the Temporary Structure


Alexander-Bonin Gallery

[75]


NORTH SALEM RESIDE BOHLIN CYWINSKI JACKSON - NORTH SALEM,

Nestled on a hillside and overlooking the Titicus Reservoir in upstate New York, this house st nature had to offer, while providing them with enough space to entertain friends and family. The de scale model measured 36x48� and had to be split up into four pieces.


ENCE

NY - 2016

INDEX

tretches out to embrace the scenic views. the owners desired an enticing vacation home that would take advantage of all that esign process included quickly reiterating physical models with the help of rhino modeling and the laser cutting. the large-


78 [78] Professional Work

Model Looking West

MODEL PLANNING Nestled on a hillside overlooking titicus reservoir, this house stretches out to embrace the scenic views. the owners desired an enticing vacation home that would take advantage of all that nature had to offer, while providing them with enough space to entertain friends and


North Salem House

[79]

Site Plan

family. The design process included quickly reiterating physical models with the help of rhino modeling and the laser cutting. the largescale model measured 36x48� and had to be split up into four pieces.


80 [80] Professional Work

MODEL PLANNING Nestled on a hillside overlooking titicus reservoir, this house stretches out to embrace the scenic views. the owners desired an enticing vacation home that would take advantage of all that nature had to offer, while providing them with enough space to entertain friends and


North Salem House

[81]

family. The design process included quickly reiterating physical models with the help of rhino modeling and the laser cutting. the largescale model measured 36x48� and had to be split up into four pieces.


82 [82]


North Salem House

FINE ARTS

[83]


84 [84] Other Work

Portrait, “Allison� Pencil drawing fall 2011


[85]

Driftwood charcoal on newsprint fall 2011


[86] Other Work

chairoscuro contĂŠ crayon on midtone paper fall 2011


[87]


88 [88] Other Work

saturation study collage fall 2011


[89]

hue study collage fall 2011


CONTACT: Jonathan Tomko (330) 506 5293 jtomko91@gmail.com 334 Yvonne Drive Youngstown, Ohio 44505 Thank you.


JONATHAN TOMKO  

DESIGN PORTFOLIO

JONATHAN TOMKO  

DESIGN PORTFOLIO

Advertisement