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What is computational design? Computational design harnesses the processing power of computers to perform millions of mathematical computations to create multiple outcomes. These computations can be anything: form generation, manipulation, or reduction. The designs created by this technique is impossible to have been sketched or sculpted by the designer. As a result, computational design challenges the limits of today’s technology, as well as conventional design teaching and practice, one of the reasons as to why Architecture Design Studio: Air is run this way, perhaps. These challenging yet innovative computational tools can be applied to challenging design problems. Contemporary architectural production employs an increasing number of computational tools that undergo continuous proliferation of function and changing allocations within the design process. CAD/CAM technologies have matured into applications with increasingly user-friendly programme structures and an efficient exchange between various analytical tools. Computational geometry allows the design and manufacturing of complex surface configurations, beyond the repertoire of analogue architectural practices constrained by the boundaries of descriptive geometry. Part of a well-known production sequence in other industries, the broader bandwidth of CAM technologies could now be beneficially assessed for novel architectural expression through control over its digitally describable content.  The current transition from Computer Aided Design (CAD) to Computational Design in architecture represents a profound shift in design thinking and methods. It includes multifaceted reflections and speculations on the profound influence of computational paradigms on architecture. It presents relevant principles from the domains of mathematics and computer science, developmental and evolutionary biology, system science and philosophy, establishing a discourse for computational design thinking in architecture. While there is a particular history of such an approach in architecture, its relative newness requires the continued progression of novel modes of design thinking for the architect of the 21st century. How can it be applied? Using computational design has captured the zeitgeist, The potential of the mathematics of computational design that underlie the complex systems of nature can now be realised by engineers and architects for the production of complex architectural forms and effects, in advanced manufacturing of ‘smart’ materials and processes, and in the innovative designs of active structures and responsive environments.


Behavioural, parametric and generative methodologies of computational design are coupled with physical computing and analogue experiments to create dynamic and reflexive feedback processes. New forms of spatial organisation are explored that are not type- or site-dependent but instead evolve as ecologies and environments seeking adaptive and hyper-specific features. This performance-driven approach seeks to develop novel design proposals concerned with the everyday. The iterative methodologies of the design studio focus on the investigations of spatial, structural and material organisation, engaging in contemporary discourses on computation and materialisation in the disciplines of architecture and urbanism. Contemporary architectural production employs an increasing number of computational tools that undergo continuous proliferation of function and changing allocations within the design process. CAD/CAM technologies have matured into applications with increasingly user-friendly programme structures and an efficient exchange between various analytical tools. Computational geometry allows the design and manufacturing of complex surface configurations, beyond the repertoire of analogue architectural practices constrained by the boundaries of descriptive geometry. Part of a well-known production sequence in other industries, the broader bandwidth of CAM technologies could now be beneficially assessed for novel architectural expression through control over its digitally describable content.  Expression of Interest


Journal Week Two  

Journal Week Two

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