Page 1

JONATHAN SHARP Tulane School of Architecture

New Orleans, LA

Selection of Works


2 3001 Calhoun St. New Orleans, LA 70118 718 Rihely Pl Encinitas, CA 92024 847.757.5609 jsharp5@tulane.edu

JONATHAN SHARP EDUCATION Tulane University - New Orleans, LA Dean’s List, 2012-2015 Outstanding First Year Portfolio, 2012 Comprehensive Studio Award, 2014 GPA - 3.5

M.ARCH Candidate 2016

EXPERIENCE Intern Designer - Studios40 - Paris, France Firm specializing in television set design in France & across Europe. Performed schematic 3d modeling, construction drawings, renderings, and assisted site visits. In addition, worked on the design development of an apartment renovation which involved weekly site visits with the client and contractors. June 2015 - August 2015 Student Designer - URBANbuild10 - New Orleans, LA Schematic design proposal (with partner) selected for construction in the Fall semester. Primary member of Design Development team that produced the Construction Document Set. In the Spring, was on site with 14 other students building the house. In addition, took the lead on the design and fabrication of the custom front guardrail. August 2014 - May 2015 Lead Designer - BUKU Music + Art Project - New Orleans, LA Designed and fabricated main entrance piece of festival with another student the last two years. Worked consistently with production managers of the festival through schemes and approaches. Produced budgets, construction documents, and renderings for each submission. Worked with engineer to stamp our final drawings in order to pass festival code. Spring 2013 - 2015 Lead Designer - Coastal Retreat - Encinitas, CA Commissioned with fellow classmate to design/build a renovation for a backyard. We held weekly client meetings and worked through iterations and budgets. We produced a Construction Document set and contracted out concrete work. We constructed the rest of the project consisting of two decks, a fire pit, bar, and barbeque island. June 2014 - August 2014 Intern Architect - Filoramo Talsma Architects, LLC - Chicago, IL Worked on the design of a house renovation, a restaurant, and a community center sponsored by Northwestern. Created renderings, assisted in schematic design and produced construction documents. June 2013 - August 2013 SKILLS & INTERESTS Other Fluent in French & English Club Hockey Captain, Tulane University

Technical Rhinoceros, AutoCAD, V-Ray, Grasshopper Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign CNC Mill Technician & Wood Shop Assistant Resume


3

Architectural education, for me, has shaped its way into an intensive process of questioning. A constant desire to push concepts in efforts to produce a contextual and human architecture. Through the process of physically constructing projects, I am interested in the mediation between our hyper-digital age and the beautiful traditional elements of architecture. The act of building demands an intuitive search for solutions in building methods and materials. Contributing to the reconstruction of New Orleans, physically, and interacting with the locals, culturally, over the last five years has shown me the power of architecture to engage a community. There is no better feeling than admiring a completed built project with the builders and users involved in the process.

01 URBANbuild 10 Design/Build Studio - New Orleans, LA - Fall 2014/Spring 2015 Academic - Built 02 BUKU Wall BUKU Music & Art Project - New Orleans, LA - Spring 2015 Professional - Built 03 Tanzakademie Comprehensive Studio - New Orleans, LA - Spring 2014 Academic - Unbuilt 04 Coastal Retreat Design/Build - Encinitas, CA - Summer 2014 Professional - Built 05 Sukkah 7 Sukkah 7.0 - New Orleans, LA - Fall 2015 Academic - Built 06 BUKU Tower BUKU Music & Art Project - New Orleans, LA - Spring 2014 Professional - Built

Personal Statement & Contents


01

URBANbuild 10

*Winning Scheme Selected for Construction* Collaborators : Ali Rex In the summer of 2005 a small group of students and faculty conceived of a design/build program to address the deteriorating neighborhoods of urban New Orleans, and the URBANbuild program was created to provide students with the opportunity to work collectively on the design, development and construction of affordable housing prototypes. The goal was to provide struggling neighborhoods with some sense of progress and value. The tenth anniversary of, not only, the program but also Hurricane Katrina carried a lot of pressure towards how this house was going to exhibit URBANbuild’s place in a “recovered” New Orleans. Ali and I developed a scheme that was dedicated to the user experience. Instead of creating a form then inserting program, we designed from the inside-out and the form resulted from our careful manipulation of spaces and circulation. We also strictly investigated the relationship between interior and exterior so that every space has an adjacent outdoor space. URBANbuild 10 prioritizes the living and dining spaces as the heart of the home. These public spaces open up to the front and back decks so that the home can further connect with the community. This allows for crossventilation and natural light throughout. The master suite is situated on the ground floor, providing flexibility for the homeowner. If necessary, it can be used as a mother-in-law suite for housing elderly family members. Two bedrooms upstairs open up to a shared sundeck. And all rooms at ground level have access to adjacent outdoor decks, which make the rooms feel larger and brighter.

Design/Build Studio

New Orleans, LA

Fall 2014/Spring 2015


6

2nd level 2nd level

1st level 1st level

side elevation side elevation

Rental Unit Floor Plan

Single Family Home Floor Plan

Our initial scheme was selected for construction at Midterm Fall 2014, then the remainder of the semester was dedicated to Design Development and the production of a comprehensive CD set. This page showcases the initial scheme as it was presented when it was selected. During the rest of the semester, other students had the chance to contribute some of their own ideas to the scheme. This was an extremely valuable experience as we learned how to relinquish total ownership of the scheme and let fellow designers propose new ideas.

Initial Design : Floor Plans

Second Floor Plan


7

Front View : Harmony Street

Section Perspective

Interior View : Living Room Initial Design : Perspectives


8

Diagrammatic Floor Plan

Diagrammatic Short Section

Composite Diagrams


B



9

A 1

1

5.4

5.2

8' - 6 5/8"

0' - 6"

14' - 10 3/4"



7' - 2"

2' - 4 1/2"

3' - 5"

2' - 10 3/4"

3' - 0"

UP 2 3

3 1 5.1

11' - 8 1/4"

3' - 2"

BEDROOM VARIES

BEDROOM VARIES

8

10 2.2

FUR-DOWN HEIGHT 8' - 6"

MECHANICAL DUCT

10' - 3 1/2"

7' - 6 1/2"

2 3

6

6

7

BATHROOM 10'-0"

6' - 2 1/2"

6' - 2 1/2"

6

5' - 8 1/4"

6' - 2 1/2"

11' - 2 5/8"

6' - 0"

11' - 3"

 

1

1

5.4

5.2

B

A 33' - 9 7/8"

3' - 0"

11' - 9 1/2"

6' - 9 3/8"

10' - 5 3/8"

2' - 7 3/4"

1 3.2

 

9' - 3"

 

2

11' - 7"

LIVING ROOM VARIES

5



 

5 2.2



5

ENTRY 8'-6" 8'-0"

DW MASTER BEDROOM 3 VARIES

2 0 -1 -2 -3 -4 3 3' - 2"

-5

-6

-5 -6

1 DN



4

MASTER BATH 11'-0" 8'-0"

5' - 8 3/4"

4

DN

3

2 3.2

 

 

 



 



10' - 10 1/2"



DW

3' - 0 1/2"

 



4' - 0"



12' - 5 1/2"



8' - 8 1/4"

4

DN

5.1

KITCHEN 10'-0"

17' - 10 7/8"

UP

1 1

9' - 2 1/2"

7' - 2 1/4"



-6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 0

3 3.2

TULANE UNIVERSITY TULANE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

62

7 3.2

5.3

5' - 0"

8' - 11 1/8"

3' - 2 7/8"

10' - 8 7/8"

1

 

AVERAGE SETBACK OF BLOCK: 58'-2" / 8 = 7'-3 1/4" THEREFORE AS PER SECTION 15.6.7.1 IN ACCORDANCE WITH A 3' ACCEPTABLE VARIATION, THIS PROJECT WILL USE SETBACK OF 5'-0"

16' - 5"

5' - 6 1/2"

15' - 0"

3' - 3"

8' - 6 3/4"





29' - 6 7/8"

 

 





Redlined Floor Plans

B

3  

12 1 2

1

PRESSURE TREATED LUMBER

2

METAL ROOFING

3

BUILDING INSULATION

8

CABINETRY

9

PRESSURE TREATED 5/4" x 6" WOOD DECKING

10

4

PAINTED GYPSUM BOARD

11

6" x 6" PRESSURE TREATED SILL

5

HURRICANE STRAPPING (PER IRC)

12

RAISED EARTH PLANTER BED

CMU PIER

6

HARD WOOD FLOORING

13

CONCRETE PILE CAP (PER STRUCTURAL)

7

PAINTED CEMENTITIOUS FIBER BOARD

14

PRESSURE TREATED WOOD PILE



REFERENCE DESIGNATIONS

A

 

11' - 6 3/4"

4

12 1 2

   

 

8

11' - 2"

3

3' - 1 3/4"

TULANE UNIVERSITY TULANE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

9 6

1  

10  

5

 

12



11 

13





14

 

 

 



 

 





 

Redlined Longitudinal Section

Redlined Construction Documents


10

Photo : Construction

Photos : Completion

The construction process was the most incredible three months in architecture school. The house was completed in 105 days with 15 students and two professors. Starting from an empty lot, we dropped piles, laid the foundation, and framed, clad, and painted the house. Also fabricated some custom elements such as the guardrail on the front porch and the floating master closet. Everyday was a new challenge, coming up with solutions on the fly. The most valubale part, however, was interacting with the members of the neighborhood. We witnessed the actual interaction between architecture and context. The critism was mainly positive, but it is important to realize that scale and form have a direct implication to the immediate area.

Process Photos


11

Photo : Completion

Jeffery Zolan Photography


02 THE BUKU WALL

Collaborators: Max Katz, Charles Boyne, Matt Raybon After its inaugural year in 2012, the BUKU Music & Art Project was recognized as an extremely successful “boutique” festival and has grown exponentially since then. Showcasing the newest electronic music sensations along with a taste of hip-hop and indie rock, BUKU is a unique festival located on the banks of the Mississippi River characterized by good vibes and raw aesthetics. After successfully completing the BUKU Tower in 2014, the production manager gave us the opprotunity to push our conception of the entrance even further. We took this commission as a chance to test modularity more efficiently and elegantly through digital processes and the CNC mill. We started with the scale of the BUKU Tower and flipped it horizontally to make a 32ft wall. The BUKU Wall is intended to extend the entry and be an architectural transformation of a sign. Branding was very important to the client, so 16ft of the wall is dedicated to the letters “BUKU” and the other half of the wall is our investigation of tectonic/stereotomic materials and planes. The structural modules are CNC plywood that recieve aluminum angles and the cladding. The cladding is an aluminum/plastic composite that could be easily milled and bent. Aluminum angles were also used as structural connections and formal accents within the cladding. The wall was backlit with eight stage lights and became the meeting point for all the festival attendees.

BUKU Music & Art Project

New Orleans, LA

Spring 2015


14

original tower

rotate 3d new tower

rearrange structural modules

BRANDING WALL

Concept Diagrams

Photo : Construction

Photos : Construction

Fabricating the wall using the CNC mill meant we could mass produce the pieces in a warehouse for transportation to site later in the process. We built the base for the wall on site then constructed all the structural modules in the warehouse. We packed all the modules and pre-cut cladding in a 20’ moving truck. Assembly and cladding of the wall happened on site and took about a day and a half. This was a valuable expercise in the act of prototyping and digital design.

Process Photos

NEW ENTRY SCHEME


15

Photo : Completion

Georgia Modi Photography


03

TANZAKADEMIE

*Comprehensive Studio Award Recipient* Comprehensive Studio is about complete building system understanding through iterative and research-based proposals and explorations. The goal of the studio was to design a Dance Academy in New Orleans, which opened up opprotunities to transform all the required technical systems into beautiful concepts relating to the art of ballet. The fundamental idea of the project was investigating the concept & presence of the mirror. The dancer spends all their time practicing in face of the reality of their reflection. This is a very difficult feat that goes highly unnoticed by spectators & audiences. The concept of mirror & reflection was incorporated very literally in the parti of the plan and sections and helped organize the procession of the Dancer vs Spectator so that each have their own circulation that work in opposition to each other until finally meeting at the Main Theatre. Then came the question: How do you take the idea of the mirror but start to alter, or blur, what is seen in the reflection? Through studies of layering plexi on top of mirrors, it was discovered that you can easily start to manipulate the reflection to create less realistic and more beautiful images. This idea translated directly into the facade treatment and resulted in a highly transparent first floor, then adding a layer (corrugated metal, louvres, or glass) to each following level terminating in the dance studios which hold a top heavy, semi-transparent appearance to reveal only silhouettes to the passers-by on the street.

Comprehensive Studio

New Orleans, LA

Spring 2014


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2

3

4

5

6

7

2

3

4

5

6

C

C

D

D

E

E

7TH FLOOR PLAN 1/8” = 1’-0” 3RD FLOOR PLAN 1/8” = 1’-0”

2

1

2

3

4

5

6

3

4

5

6

7

A

C

B

D

C

E

D

6TH FLOOR PLAN 1/8” = 1’-0”

E

F

2

3

4

5

6

G

C

H

D

2ND FLOOR PLAN 1/8” = 1’-0”

E 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

A

5TH FLOOR PLAN 1/8” = 1’-0”

B

2

3

4

5

6

7

C

C D

D E

F

E

G

H

4TH FLOOR PLAN 1/8” = 1’-0” 1ST FLOOR PLAN 1/8” = 1’-0”

Floor Plans


DRESSING DRESSING

N/S SECTIONAL SITE RESTRICTION

50’

100’

THEATRE COURTYARD

N/S SECTION PROGRAM

CILBUP

STUDIO STUDIO STUDIO

OFFICE OFFICE LECTURE LECTURE

EROC

100’

PRIVATE CORE

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N/S SECTION CONCEPT REFLECTION

STUDIO STUDIO STUDIO

BALCONY OFFICEOFFICE DRESSING BALCONY LECTURELECTURE DRESSING

BLACKBOX

SCENE

THEATRE RECEPTION

CAFE/BOOK

E/W SECTION PROGRAM

E/W SECTION CONCEPT OPAQUE V TRANSPARENT

50’

PLAN SITE RESTRICTION

PUBLIC V PRIVATE

COURTYARD / ACCESS

Site Plan & Diagrams

EXTENSION OF THEATRE

STRUCTURAL CONCEPT


20

Section & Elevation

Perspective Renderings

Inherent in the comprehensive studio project was the ability to produce a detailed wall section as it would appear in a Construction Document Set. This was a valuable first attempt at designing our own structural system based off a buiding concept. It was restrictive because every decision we made had to be able to be detailed in the wall section. In addition, exploded assembly axons were another layer of detail that brought this project close to reality.

Final Drawings


21

Detail Wall Section & Assembly Axons


04 COASTAL RETREAT

Collaborators: Max Katz When trying to decide what to do in the summer of 2014, my classmate Max and I took advantage of the recent move of my family to renovate their new backyard. We were officially commisioned and committed to making the process as professional as possible. We kept up a, minimum, 40 hour week, had weekly “client” meetings and produced a comprehensive CD set. Perched on the hilltop in historic Encinitas, CA, this house overlooks the Pacific Ocean and offers opprotunities in the backyard to frame views and offer a retreat from suburbia. Our scope of work includes retexturing the ground plane of the backyard, installing millwork, and carving out a fire pit. Our initial observations of the site were that furniture placement and paved vs grass surfaces were making the space feel smaller than it actually was. In response, our strategy started with creating a deck that connected the adjacent dining room inside to the new outdoor “room”. We then made another raised deck that was dedicated to the firepit and meant for gathering. Finally, the back of the site was dedicated to a more private “zen garden”. We replacied dead grass with pavers and stones, then placed the exisiting lawn chairs within the lush bamboo to provide a more intimate space within the yard. Accented with raised planters and a new barbeque island, the space came together as a whole and feels very spacious. It currently is used nightly for family dinners and weekly for the occasional bonfire with family and friends.

Design/Build

Encinitas, CA

Summer 2014


2

TEAM

MAX KATZ

PROJECT

COASTAL RETREAT 718 RIHELY PL ENCINITAS, CA 92024

JONATHAN SHARP MAX KATZ

PROJECT

10

1

KEY NOTES 1. (P) 2x8 wood structure for deck 2. (P) wood decking 3. (P) concrete fireplace 4. (P) concrete bench 5. (P) wood bar attached to concrete 6. (P) glass and aluminum handrail 7. (P) aluminum channel connected to structure of balcony 8. (P) aluminum angle for connections 9. (P) wood slats on top of concrete bench

COASTAL RETREAT 718 RIHELY PL ENCINITAS, CA 92024

9

TEAM

KEY NOTES

1. (P) vertically oriented wood bench supported by concrete bench (5) 2. (p) vertically oriented wood lounger (sandwiched connections) 3. (p) dirt, rocks, succulents, and concrete pavers 4. (p) concrete firepit 5. (p) concrete bench 6. (p) raised wood deck 7. (E) concrete floor 8. (p) raised wood deck w/ light wells cut outs 9. (E) garden with assorted trees and plants 10. (E) outdoor kitchen w/ bbq and countertop

JONATHAN SHARP

24

1

SHEET NUMBER

A-4.1

TITLE

1st FLOOR PLAN SCALE: 1/8”=1’-0”

INFO

5 4 3

10 4

2 1

PROPOSED SECTION 2 SCALE: 1/4”=1’-0”

Construction Documents : Proposed Plan

Construction Documents : Proposed Section

Photo : Construction

Photos : Completion

After an intensive two week design phase, we produced a comprehensive CD set. We then contracted out the concrete work to professionals who worked directly off our CD set. Following this, we manually completed the rest of the construction. We leveled out the ground and set our concrete blocks for the deck support. We used treated 2x4’s for the substructure and Ipe wood for the deck and custom reclining lounger. The barbeque island was a pre-fabricated concrete-fiberglass cabinet that we custom cut to fit new grill. We then clad it with Ipe wood and had a granite counter top installed.

Process & Completion Photos

DRAWN BY: MK, JS ORIGIN DATE:6-3-2014

8

2

A-4.12

8 7 6

TITLE

7

SECTION 2

+0’-4” A.F.F.

A.4.11

+1’-0” A.F.F.

2 A-8.12

SHEET NUMBER

1 A-8.10

INFO

6 A-4.12 1

1st floor plan

5

A-4.12 3

A2.10

4

DRAWN BY: MK, JS ORIGIN DATE:6-6-2014

3


25

Photo : Completion

Julia Sharp Photography


05 SUKKAH 7

Collaborators: Max Katz Sukkot is a celebratory Jewish holiday honoring the joy of being together as friends and family while the Jews made their pilgramage to the Temple in Jersulam. The traditional way to celebrate is to have meals and recite prayer in a structure known as a Sukkah. There are many restrictions on the construction of these holy structures, but most importantly they should accomodate as many people as possible and be an environment for rejoice. For the seventh year in a row, Tulane School of Architecture, in partnership with the Tulane Hillel, have hosted a Sukkah design/build where students have $1500 to design and build a hut on campus. A fellow student and I led the process with an assissting professor. Sukkah 7 was a new experiement in all aspects of the design process. Through a series of Saturday workshops, students came up with concepts solely through the use of digital models. The fellow leader and I would critique them and help the group decide on the concept to go through with. We then had a larger role in actually formalizing the project and making sure it was buildable in the given budget and time frame. The resulting structure was a test in digital technology and the structural limits of a rather thin industrial material (10mm coroplast).

Sukkah 7.0

New Orleans, LA

Fall 2015


28

1

2

3

4

wall A

1

2

3

wall B

4

1

2

wall C

CNC Milling Cut File

Photo : CNC Milling Panels

Photos : Completion

The construction process was very rewarding because we had to find ways to occupy the 12 other students helping us. By delegating the benches to one team, the wall panels to a second team, and the roof assembly to a third team we were able to include everyone in the process and finish ahead of time. The use of digital fabrication allowed us to incoporate joints and connections into the milling process, leading to faster assembly time.

Process & Completion Photos

3

4


29

Photo : Completion

Jeffery Zolan Photography


06 THE BUKU TOWER

Collaborators: Max Katz, Charles Boyne After its inaugural year in 2012, the BUKU Music & Art Project was recognized as an extremely successful “boutique� festival and has grown exponentially since then. Showcasing the newest electronic music sensations along with a taste of hip-hop and indie rock, BUKU is a unique festival located on the banks of the Mississippi River characterized by good vibes and raw aesthetics. After being a vital part of the BUKU Art Team in 2013, the Art Director asked two of us to scheme on an installation for the festival in 2014. We were in constant communication with the BUKU Production Team months before the festival and worked through two different installations before settling on The BUKU Tower. Intended to be the Beacon of the festival, we designed and built the BUKU Tower to be 32ft tall and become a symbol and destination point for everyone in attendance. Constructed completely out of aluminum angles and bolted connections, the tower had a bold, powerful and raw appearance that fit right into the festival vibe. We worked with engineers to stamp the final design and consulted a Neon Artist to make a BUKU sign for the top of the tower.

BUKU Music & Art Project

New Orleans, LA

Spring 2014


BUKU TOWER 1380 Port of New Orleans Pl, New Orleans

PROJECT INFO TITLE

PLAN 1

1

SHEET NUMBER

2

DRAWN BY: CB, MK, JS ORIGIN DATE:1-19-2014

32

1/8” acrylic panels with cutout BUKU logo

INFO

MILES KOZATCH

1 1/2”x1 1/2“x1/8” angled steel

5

CHARLES BOYNE

wood 2x4 frame

4

MAX KATZ

come-along steel cable

3

TEAM MEMBERS

2

PROJECT

5,000 lb concrete ballast (provided)

BUKU TOWER 1380 Port of New Orleans Pl, New Orleans

NOTES 1

DRAWN BY: MK, JS, CB ORIGIN DATE:1-19-2014

Construction Documents : Plan

JONATHAN SHARP

3

TITLE

4

2 1

SECTION

5

Official Festival Photos

While its presence during the day was remarkable, the tower really came alive at night. Along with the neon sign, we installed powerful concert lights in the base. The pictures document the different aesthetics the tower provided and how it worked in tandem with the main stage. The tower became the backdrop for some of the biggest shows of the weekend including Nas and Chromeo (pictured above).

Final Photos

2

Construction Documents : Section

SHEET NUMBER

3


33

Official Festival Photo : BUKU 2014 Recap Video

Final Photos


34

CODED SPACE ACSA Call for Projects Submission Proffesional w/ Marcella Del Signore & Cordula Roser Gray Fall 2014 New Orleans, LA Exhibited at Pugliarch Architecture Festival, Monopoli, Italy

I assisted two proffesors in the submission of a project for the Urbanism category of the ACSA 103rd Call for Projects Submission. We all participated in the schematic developement and I completed all the 3d modeling, renderings, and exploded axons. While we did not place, our project was exhibited at the Pugliarch Architecture Festival in Italy.

A

EVENT/ FLEX space

B

LANDMARK (POLES)

C

EXCHANGE PATH

A C

B

EXPLODED SITE AXONOMETRIC

1 of 4 Competition Boards

Exploded Axonometric Additional Works


35

PROTOTYPING MUTABLE FORM Social Innovation & Social Entrepreneuship (SISE) Elective Course Fall 2014 New Orleans, LA Advisor - Marianne Desmarais

Elective in Fall 2014 dedicated to producing a piece of furniture for the new Social Innovation and Social Entrepreneurship (SISE) design classroom. Started the semester with intuitive exercises working with cardboard and other everyday materials. Then began explorations in mutable form, or objects that could easily transform in response to the quick pace of the SISE program.

Photo : Completion

Photo : Completion

Photo : Completion Additional Works


SIMPLY THE ACTION OF SNOWBOARDING OR CONQUERING WITH STYLE POINTS. SIMILAR TO “TEARIN IT UP”.

ANY OTHER SURFACE THAN SNOW. RAILS, BOXES, TREE TRUNKS, COUCHES, BARRELS, TABLES, CARS, ETC.

SNOWBOARDING IN THE OPPOSITE DIRECTION THAT IS NATURAL TO YOU

FEMALE SHREDDER

POWDER. WHEN IT SNOWS BUCKETS AND LEAVES A BLANKET OF MULTIPLE FEET OF SNOW ON A MOUNTAIN

SNOWBOARDING WHILE PRESSING DOWN ON THE FRONT OR BACK OF YOUR BOARD. SIMILAR TO WHEELIE IN SKATEBOARDING

FLAT

ROCKER

CAMBER

BANANA

SHRED

J IB

SWITCH

BETTY

P

W

BUTTER

WOOD GNARLY

KICKER

Tulane School of Architecture

New Orleans, LA

BOX

RAIL

KINK

RAINBOW

WHALE TAIL

SHOTGUN

BATTLESHIP

FLAT DOWN

HANDRAIL

DOWN FLAT DOWN

YOUR SNOWBOARD. NAME IT HOWEVER YOU PLEASE. BUT MAKE IT A GIRLS NAME.

ADJECTIVE TO DESCRIBE WHEN SOMEONE PULLS A SWEET TRICK OR WHEN CONDITIONS ARE ALL TIME

JUMPS. PICK YOUR LINE AND LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAP.

Selection of Works

Jonathan Sharp - Architecture Portfolio 2016  

Tulane School of Architecture : M.Arch Candidate 2016

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