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ARC535

Louis Sullivan


World Columbian Exposition (Chicago World’s Fair), Chicago, 1893 Daniel Burnham: Chief of Construction F.L. Olmsted: Consulting Landscape Architect

Charles B. Atwood: Designer-in-Chief Augustus St. Gaudens : sculpture advisor


Court of Honor with Sullivan’s Transportation Building adjacent


Adler & Sullivan, Transportation Building, World Columbian Exposition, 1893


Sullivan Pullman


Dankmar Adler 1844-1900 Architect + civil engineer. Born in Germany, immigrated to the U.S. in 1854. Civil War engineering work in the Union Army. Practice in Chicago 1866Founded firm 1871 Hired Sullivan 1880 Promoted Sullivan to partner 1883 Practice split 1895.


Adler & Sullivan, Auditorium Building, Chicago, 1886-90

second floor plan


MFWS Rookery

Auditorium


Adler & Sullivan, Schiller Building, Chicago, 1890-92


Adler & Sullivan, Schiller Building, Chicago, 1890-92


Adler & Sullivan, Schiller Building, Chicago, 1890-92


Adler & Sullivan, Chicago Stock Exchange Chicago IL, 1893-4 Demolished 1972


Adler & Sullivan, Chicago Stock Exchange, Chicago IL, 1893-4; demolished 1972


Adler & Sullivan, Chicago Stock Exchange, Chicago IL, 1893-4; demolished 1972


Sullivan, Odd Fellows Temple (project)


Wainright St. Louis MO, 1890-91 Adler & Sullivan

Guaranty (Prudential) Bayard (Condict) Buffalo NY, 1894-96 New York NY, 1897-99 Adler & Sullivan, then Sullivan Sullivan


Louis Sullivan, Wainwright Building, St. Louis MO, 1890-91


ornamented spandrel panels


Sullivan, Bayard Building, New York, 1897-99


Sullivan, A System of Architectural Ornament According with a Philosophy of Man’s Powers, 1924


Auditorium Building banquet room


Sullivan (begun with Adler) Guaranty (Prudential) Building Buffalo NY, 1894-96


Louis Sullivan, “The Tall Office Building Artistically Considered,” 1896 “Problem: How shall we impart to this sterile pile, this crude, harsh, brutal agglomeration, this stark, staring exclamation of eternal strife, the graciousness of those higher forms of sensibility and culture that rest on the lower and fiercer passions?” “We must now heed the imperative voice of emotion… It demands of us, what is the chief characteristic of the tall office building? And at once we answer, it is lofty. This loftiness is to the artist-nature its thrilling aspect. It is the very open organ-tone in its appeal. It must be in turn the dominant chord in his expression of it, the true excitant of his imagination. It must be tall, every inch of it tall. The force and power of altitude must be in it, the glory and pride of exaltation must be in it. It must be every inch a proud and soaring thing, rising in sheer exultation that from bottom to top it is a unit without a single dissenting line—that it is the new, the unexpected, the eloquent peroration of most bald, most sinister, most forbidding conditions.”


Cass Gilbert, Woolworth Building, NYC, 1915

Eliel Saarinen, Chicago Tribune Tower competition entry, 1922


Eero Saarinen, CBS Building (“Black Rock”), NYC, 1961


Schlesinger & Mayer (Carson Pirie Scott) Store Chicago, 1899-1904


Sullivan, National Farmer’s Bank, Owatonna MN, 1906-08


Sullivan, National Farmer’s Bank, Owatonna MN, 1906-08


Sullivan, National Farmer’s Bank, Owatonna MN, 1906-08



ARC535 Louis Sullivan