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FOCUS RVB FACTORY

By McGaurani Ginnini Soon Architects

Jonathan Long (582898) Tutor: Raymond Cheung


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Background Information - 01 Location of detail on plan and section - 02 Detail 1 Explanation - 03 Detail 2 Explanation - 04 Documentation approach and organizational structure - 05


Figure 1: Photograph of Focus Factory

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

The FOCUS RVB Factory was originally designed for Focus Lifestyle Products Pty Ltd. The building was originally built as a barbeque equipment manufacturing factory. The following are the conditions of the factory design: (1) Clear access, (2) Wide turning area and (3) Factory that incorporates a showroom [1]. Hence, all these factors requires a large space, therefore the factory has to be further away from the CBD or suburban area [1]. It was built in an industrial park. We think that the ultimate design intent of MGS Architects was that “they (MGS Architects) wanted to design a building that reimages the stereotype of conventional factories whilst being flexible, expandable, and efficient, welcoming and has a sense of homeliness”. In order for MGS Architects to realise this design intent, they strongly emphasized on architecture, aesthetics and interior design [2].

[1] “Commercial Projects - Focus”, McGauran Giannini Soon, last modified 2014, http:// http://www.mgsarchitects.com.au/ [2] McGauran Giannini Soon, 2014


LOCATION OF DETAIL ON PLAN AND SECTION

FIGURE 2: PART GROUND FLOOR PLAN OF ENTRANCE 1 (NOT TO SCALE) SOURCE: ARCHITECTURAL DRAWINGS (A 04-B) PROVIDED BY MGS ARCHITECTS

FIGURE 4: PART GROUND AND FIRST FLOOR PLAN (NOT TO SCALE) SOURCE: ARCHITECTURAL DETAIL DRAWINGS (A 02) PROVIDED BY MGS ARCHITECTS

FIGURE 3: LOCATION OF DETAIL 1 ON SECTION (NOT TO SCALE) SOURCE: ARCHITECTURAL DRAWINGS (A 09-B) PROVIDED BY MGS ARCHITECTS

FIGURE 5: LOCATION OF DETAIL 1 ON SECTION (NOT TO SCALE) SOURCE: ARCHITECTURAL DETAIL DRAWINGS (A 07) PROVIDED BY MGS ARCHITECTS


DETAIL 1

EXPLANATION

FIGURE 8: PHOTOGRAPH OF ENTRANCE

FIGURE 9: PHOTOGRAPH OF CURVED GLASS WALL IMAGE FROM REAL COMMERCIAL WEBSITE

FIGURE 6: PART SECTION THROUGH SMALL TERRACE, SCALE 1:20 SOURCE: ARCHITECTURAL DETAIL DRAWINGS (AD 18) PROVIDED BY MGS ARCHITECTS [2]

FIGURE 7: PHOTOGRAPH OF A SHADOWLINE PLASTERBOARD ANGLE. IMAGE FROM RONDO BUILDING SERVICES WEBSITE

MGS Architects decided to use pavers on the first floor terrace. The use of such building material helps to evoke the sense of belonging and homeliness which is only common in residential projects or houses. However, the architects incorporated the idea of a home in a factory which really ties back to the idea of reimagining a factory. The entrance is addressed with a curved curtain glass wall which juxtaposes the overall design of the factory which is rectangular and have straight walls. The curved curtain glass wall helps to address the entrance in a welcoming way and creates an inviting experience as you approach the building.

PAINTED PLASTERBOARD LINING

RONDO SHADOWLINE PLASTERBOARD ANGLE

A shadowline plasterboard angle is a Z shaped section formed by perforated hot dip galvanized steel [3]. It helps to minimise the appearance of distortion or ‘out of alignment’ walls and ceilings by giving a shadow edge after installation [4]. It creates an optical illusion that straightens a wall or ceiling. The architects may have chosen to use this specific detailing as they emphasized strongly on aesthetics and architecture and wanted to keep the workmanship and quality of the building as fine as possible.

The detail on the far left was chosen as part of explaining the architect’s design intent because I personally feel that a section like this was one that extremely uncommon in factory designs. The areas highlighted in red demonstrates the terrace area which I noticed that it was rare in conventional factory designs. The use of a terrace helps to create a sense of homeliness and is very inviting as a space for social interactions, apart from the repetitive working conditions and activities in a factory.

RONDO SHADOWLINE PLASTERBOARD ANGLE WINDOW HEAD

Therefore, I personally feel that MGS architects wanted to create a factory that contradicts the idea of a conventional factory by incorporating the idea of a home, within a factory by using small details like a shadowline plasterboard angle to emphasize strongly on aesthetics.

FIGURE 10: ENLARGED DETAIL, SCALE 1:1

[3] Rondo Building Services Pty Ltd 2007, June-last update, Rondo Metal Components - Boral [Homepage of Rondo Building Services Pty Ltd], [Online]. Available: http://www.boral.com.au/plasterboardexport/images/ rondo_products.pdf?AUD=exportPartners_PlasterboardPlasterProducts&site=Boral [2014, 14 March]. [4] Rondo Building Services Pty Ltd


DETAIL 2

EXPLANATION

I chose this detail because I felt that the architect was intentionally using functional components of a building, aesthetically. In this specific detail, MGS Architects deliberately exposed the rainwater downpipe, and tilted it at an angle where it will be very obvious and apparent. The west facade of the factory was designed to have a feature that camoulages rainwater downpipe as structural support for the roof. The deadload of the overhanging roof is supported by the steel portal frame of the factory that has already been installed before the rainwater pipes were installed. Image 4 below demonstrates that the deadload of the roof is not supported by the rainwater pipes. The detail on the left shows how the downpipe comes down from the gutter. MGS Architects could have tried to conceal the downpipes in a more sophisticated manner, however they chose to expose it deliberately, which I believe is part of their design intent to make us (viewers) perceive it as being structural.

FIGURE 12: PHOTOGRAPH OF WEST WALL OF FACTORY

FIGURE 13: PHOTOGRAPH OF FACTORY IN THE EARLY STAGES OF CONSTRUCTION

TELL-THE-TALE Frascari argued that a detail should be: [5] • A detail should tell the story of the building, as in what type of building it is, and the design intent of the architect • Detail refers to a joint, whereby different materials, elements and building components unify in a way that is effective, efficient and have aesthetic values • It should be a direct or indirect expression of the building function and structure • Drawings of a detail should be transparent and accurate. It must be able to be constructed safely, and it shows the future FIGURE 11: PART SECTION THROUGH WEST WALL, SCALE 1:20 SOURCE: ARCHITECTURAL DETAIL DRAWINGS (AD 02) PROVIDED BY MGS ARCHITECTS [2]

FIGURE 14: PHOTOGRAPH OF FRASCARI IMAGE FROM OTTAWA CITIZEN WEBSITE

[5] Frascari, M. 1996, “The Tell-The-Tale Detail” in Theorizing a new Agenda for Architecture New York: Princeton Architectural Press, , pp. 498-519.


DOCUMENTATION APPROACH AND ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE ARCHITECTURAL DRAWINGS

ARCHITECTURAL DETAIL DRAWINGS

There is a non-explicit set of hierarchies in the way these drawings were arranged. The set The architectural detail drawings were grouped according to its categories (e.g.: window of drawings began showing the site plan, then the partial ground floor and first floor plans, sections) which makes it easy for us to refer to. With this, we are able to identify quickly which then it zoomed into the reception area, general office and product testing and assembly area are we are looking at when flipping through and studying the document. - categorised as the private area. These drawings were arranged in a sequence whereby was showing the spaces of importance, followed by smaller details (e.g.: window schedule and door schedule) at the end of the document. No doubt that window and door schedules are extremely important, however these information does not demonstrate the architect’s design intent immediately. By showing the partial ground floor plan (AD 04) on the forth page of the document illustrates to us that these are the area of importance (to focus on). 19 pages

38 pages

Computer Aided Design software being used

They are hand drawn meaning that these details are designed especially for the Focus Factory. These architectural details are not those typical details which are readily available on forums or online CAD libraries. However, the scanned copies of the architectural detail drawings are of relatively poor quality and some texts could not be read properly. The use of hand drawn details might not be as accurate as CAD because some of the architects’ hand writing might not be understood by builders and contractors

CONCLUSION To conclude, a detail should briefly tell the story of the design intent of the entire building, according to Frascari. A detail should be able to show (but don’t tell) us the architect’s design concept. For example, in detail 1, by studying it carefully, we can tell that MGS Architects emphasizes strongly on architecture, aesthetics and the beauty of a building. By studying detail 1, we are able to tell that MGS Architects did not intend to expose flaws and weaknesses of the building. By using a shadowline border, it helps to conceal the imperfections of the plasterboard (e.g.: not being straight). As most of these plasterboards are cut on site, this means that it is man-made. In other words, the plasterboards may not 100% straight. Hence, MGS Architects included a shadowline border that helps to deceive us that the plasterboard lining is actually straight - but that is how we perceive it. We may not know the reality. According to Frascari’s other argument, a detail should be a direct or indirect expression of building structure and function. A detail may or may not demonstrate the structural layout of the building. The architects camouflaged rainwater downpipes as strucutral support to the roof structure. In actual fact, the deadloads of the roof structure is supported by the steel portal frame. But without studying the drawings carefully, we may just easily conclude that those rainwater downpipes are actually support for the roof structure. Hence, a detail may or may not be a direct expression of a building structure and function. Furthermore, according to Frascari, a detail is a joint that unifies several building components of different materials. It helps to joint components in a way that is effective, efficient and have aestethical values. Lastly, the drawings of a detail should be accurate and must able to show the actual product in reality. It must be clear and accurate enough for builders and contractors to ‘blindly’ follow without doubt. In conclusion, a detail may be a drawing of a very small scale, however, a large number of these “small details” make up an entire building.


REFERENCES [1], [2], [3] McGauran Giannini Soon Architects 2014, , Commercial Projects: Focus Factory [Homepage of MGS Architects], [Online]. Available: http://www.mgsarchitects.com.au/ [2014, March 15]. [4]Rondo Building Services Pty Ltd 2007, June-last update, Rondo Metal Components - Boral [Homepage of Rondo Building Services Pty Ltd], [Online]. Available: http://www.boral.com.au/ plasterboardexport/images/rondo_products.pdf?AUD=exportPartners_PlasterboardPlasterProducts&site=Boral [2014, 14 March]. [1] Frascari, M. 1996, “The Tell-The-Tale Detail� in Theorizing a new Agenda for Architecture New York: Princeton Architectural Press, , pp. 498-519.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT All architectural drawings, detail drawings and images are provided by McGauran Giannini Soon Architects unless stated otherwise.


FOCUS RVB FACTORY - Jonathan Long