Issuu on Google+

JONATHAN KNIGHT LEED Green Associate Landscape Architecture . Urban Design . Urban Planning


JONATHAN KNIGHT

EDUCATION

LEED GREEN ASSOCIATE

Manhattan, Kansas jonathanknightplan@gmail.com 316.200.1473

Kansas State University

College of Architecture, Planning, and Design

2017 2012

Master of Landscape Architecture GPA: 3.9 / 4.0 Master of Regional and Community Planning GPA: 3.8 / 4.0

Selected Leadership 2014 - 2015 CELA Conference Host committee 2010 - 2012 Student Planning Association President (2011) Vice-President (2010) 2008 - 2012 Campus Planning and Advisory Committee

EXPERIENCE Summer 2016

Design Workshop, Inc.

Landscape Architecture / Urban Design Intern Graphics and presentation materials, geospatial analysis, research, photography of completed works for marketing proposals.

2012 - 2014 Aurora Public Schools Planning Assistant Geospatial analysis, enrollment projections, graphics and presentation materials, community engagement. Summer 2011 2010 - 2011

Denver Regional Council of Governments

Regional Planning / Operations Intern Research, writing, focus group support, photography for regional image catalog (photos used on website update).

K-State Office of Sustainability

Campaigns Coordinator and Communications Specialist (Student) Project manager, office assistant, writing, stakeholder outreatch and communications.

Jonathan Knight Photography 2006 - 2012 Freelance Photojournalist and Photography Assistant 2008 Photo Editor for Kansas State Collegian 2007-2012 Staff Photographer for Kansas State Student Publications, Inc. Selected clients: USA Today, The Associated Press, Kansas City Star, Kansas State University, Rivals.com

2

Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning


SELECTED AWARDS/RECOGNITION 2016 2012 2011

University Olmsted Scholar Academic Department ASLA Award of Excellence [Design/Built] Central States ASLA awarded to ICT Roots Planter ASLA Award of Excellence [Planning and Analysis] Central States ASLA awarded to Parcels and Peppers ASLA Award of Merit [Communication] ASLA Central States awarded to Urban Living Room Invited National Design Residency Program RDG Planning + Design APA New Horizon Award (group) Kansas APA awarded to Parcels and Peppers 1st Place - Gifford Park LID Student Competition Great Plains LID Research & Innovation Symposium APA New Horizon Award (individual) Kansas APA awarded to The Geography of Nature Access Opportunities AICP Outstanding Student Award Academic Department APA New Horizon Award (group) Kansas APA awarded to BOXhattan community engagement event Take Charge! Challenge $100K award as part of K-State Office of Sustainability, awarded to university

PRESENTATIONS 2016 2014 2013 2010

CELA FORUM online publication article Reflections on Kansas State University's Landscape Architecture Program Global Site Plans Urban Planning Blogger http://theglobalgrid.org/author/jonathanknight/ APA National Conference Oral Presentation The Geography of Nature Access Opportunities (Planning Master's Report) K-State Sustainability Conferene Oral Presentation (Re)thinking Rural: Greensburg, Kansas

DESIGN COMMUNICATION Graphics Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, AfterEffects, Premiere Mapping ArcGIS Desktop + Pro, ArcGlobe, ArcScene, ArcGIS Online + Collector, ModelBuilder, QGIS Construction AutoCAD Civil 3D, Land F/X 3D Modeling Sketchup + Shaderlight, Vue Infinite 3D, Lumion, Revit [limited], Rhino + Grasshopper [limited] Research and Numbers Access, Excel, Qualtrics

TEACHING Studio Site Design Studio II Graphics Technical Module I, II, III Construction Methods Materials and Methods, Design Implementation I Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

3


I recognize landscape and the built environment as the milieu for which arise beauty and resiliency for shared human experience. On the 21st century stage, I believe they are the main actors of social and cultural revision and should be synthesized as observable phenomena through space and time. My work is shaped by systems thinking and datascaping as methods for understanding site and latent potential. I strive to create open-ended places for people to live, work, and play — extracted from a rational, creative, and collaborative design operation. Rooted in this methodology is the belief that boundaries between architecture, landscape architecture, and planning are porous and I seek to bridge gaps between disciplines in my work. This theoretical framework is fused with knowledge of practice and construction implementation. I have academic experiences in landscape architecture and urban planning and professional experiences in urban planning and photography. I have also been honored to lead numerous teams to national, regional, and local awards and recognition. All of these experiences allow me the opportunity to work on projects from inception through completion. Sincerely,

Jonathan Knight jonathanknightplan@gmail.com 316.200.1473

02

Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning


Environmental Landscape Planning + Design • 2016

en

Gre

tro

Me

il Tra

n

ctio

nne

Co

THE HEART

Railroad Bridge Connection Across River

KESSLER PARK

Park Connection

Neighborhood Connection from River Market

PARCELS AND PEPPERS Community Planning + Design • 2015 ASLA Award of Excellence APA-Kansas New Horizon Award

14

Planning + Design

SOLAR04fIELDS RETURNING TO THE RIVER

New Park and Land Bridge Connection from Residential Neighborhood

PENDLETON HEIGHTS

RIVER MARKET

Balanced Suitability Analysis

I-70 Park Neighborhood Connection to I-70 Park and Downtown

More Suitable

Less Suitable

DOWNTOWN KANSAS CITY

Micro-Paving Detail

CAMPUS COLLECTIVE

18

Quadrangle Terraced Green Roof Ramp

Water Feature

Parcels and Peppers: Savory Ideas for Addressing Vacancy in St. Louis

figure 3.2.18 Creating New Economy Vacant parcels are opportunity for new economy and new energy source. (Knight 2015) Rain Gardens

Seating Pods

Campus Site Design GOALS • 2014 Utilize moderate-to-high areas of contiguous vacancy. Develop new industry and economic opportunities. Create a spectrum of blue collar to white collar jobs. Reduce fossil fuel consumption and source energy locally. Capitalize on 200 days of full or partial sun per year.

moderately-sized contiguous area

occupied parcels vacant parcels

BENEfITS

24 FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH DAYCARE

park

Utilizing solar energy farms on vacant parcels provides a variety of benefits. Solar panels are a visible and tangible industry where people can walk, bike, or drive by and see investment and redevelopment.

figure 3.2.19 Contiguous parcels in The Ville represent opportunity for solar fields. (Knight 2015)

Planting Design • 2015 - 2016

Solar panels would be a new industry in St. Louis. Thousands of jobs could be created from blue collar to white collar: solar panels require land acquisition, construction, battery designers, component manufacturing, and ongoing maintenance.

Wind power is aesthetically and environmentally controversial because they are large structures which can obstruct views or be seen as an “eyesore.” Wind turbines can also disrupt wildlife habitat. In contrast, solar panels have minimal environmental impact, no moving parts, and are totally silent. (Wright 2013; energymatters.com.au 2015)

URBAN LIVING ROOM

Opportunities to train the local workforce to work on solar farms may already exist. Technical high schools in St. Louis could begin integrating solar industry curriculum. Other “mild” vacancy strategies around the schools could provide hands-on, design-build opportunities to learn the solar industry.

32

Solar panel leases can be finite (Curwin 2012). This leaves flexible options for future development open if markets and requirements change. Depending on the extent of panel • coverage, concurrent land uses might also be possible.

Site Planning and Design 2015 ASLA Award of Merit

1

Solar development could be integrated with other strategies including meadows, hiking trails (in/around the fields), or even productive landscapes in areas in transition to a solar field. 2

3

5

4

1) 2)

96

Site Design

• • • • •

3)

D 4)

5)

6)

Topsoil exists on the entire site at an average depth of six inches (6"). The entry drive, parking, and other vehicular services are to be asphalt paving to a depth of four inches (4") on an eight inch (8") AB3 gravel sub base. Concrete walkways, outdoor terrace and pedestrian paving are to be placed to a depth of four inches (6") on a compacted subgrade. Topsoil is to be replaced at a minimum depth of six inches (6") within all graded, turfed, non-paved areas of the site within the limits of grading. Note that topsoil may be placed at a depth greater than six (6"). Consider limits of seeding to include area distributed by earthwork operations (limit of grading) and any area designated as turf or native grasses within your development plan. "No cut/no fill" lines exist in section view are based upon the line where proposed and existing grade meet rather than sub cut and sub fill. Because of vertical exaggeration, actual "no cut/no fill" line placement is distorted.

The Knight Planning+Design Group jonathan@knightplandesign.com 100 Landscape Avenue Here and There, Anywhere USA

D

CONSULTANTS Surveyor Chip Winslow, 100 Bluemont Ave, Manhattan, KS

Architect Bob Knight, 100 Retiree Ave, Manhattan, KS

Engineer Jim Fish, 345 Boring Ave, Manhattan, KS

C

C

CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS

38

First Christian Church of Manhattan Inc 115 Courthouse Pl, Manhattan, KS 66502.

Area B

First Christian Church Daycare

Cut Area

Fill Area

Design Implementation I + II • 2015 - 2016

B

B

"K" Area

Grand Mere PUD Manhattan, KS

Limit of Cut Limit of Fill No Cut / No Fill Limit of Earthwork Road Center Line Property Line FFE Finished Floor Elevation TC Top of Curb BC Bottom of Curb TW Top of Wall BW Bottom of Wall INV Invert Elevation

A

9/1/15 DATE

XXX MARK ISSUE:

Preliminary Site Plan DESCRIPTION 01 Sept 2015

PROJECT NO: 001 CAD DWG FILE: LAR438_f15_FCCBaseMap_FinalGrading_v7.dwg DRAWN BY: JK CHECKED BY: PK

A

SHEET TITLE

EARTHWORK DIAGRAM Average End Area Method Earthwork Estimation

1

ICT POP-UP PARK: ROOTS PLANTERS Materials + Methods Design/Build • 2015 ASLA Award of Excellence

42

2

3

4

5

L-3.01

Construction + Built Work

Area A

Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

03


RETURNING TO THE RIVER Location Kansas City MO Project Time 7 weeks Medium ArcGIS, Photoshop, Illustrator

ADAPTING AN ECOLOGICAL PLANNING MODEL

Research and Problem Identification

The Missouri River in Kansas City is an underutilized asset. Kansas City is the second largest city in the US with a river in its boundaries. During the growth of Kansas City, the Missouri River has been marginalized through a history of land-use decisions, transportation planning choices, and overall lack of connectivity to surrounding neighborhoods.

Inventory and Analysis

Iteration

Vision, Goals, Criteria

Suitability Model

Iteration

Alternatives

Proposal

Iteration

Iteration

LANDSCAPE GOALS

Returning to the River focuses on creating ecological connections and new opportunities to rediscover this asset. These aim to enhance ecological services of the city and create new recreational and social opportunities for Kansas City residents and visitors.

01. Connect districts, existing + future parks, and residential areas to the river and to each other 02. Create a new waterfront ecological park to be the “lifeline� of this new network 03. Provide enhanced ecological services throughout the proposal

GIS suitability analysis informed design opportunities for four landscape armatures: River bank ecology and user programming, bike and pedestrians connections, a new waterfront park, and programming for addressing vacancy. The Spine

The Heart

The Ligaments

04

Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

Rethinking waterfront experiences

2

EXISTING BANK CONDITIONS

Ecological Waterfront Development

THE LIGAMENTS

THE HEART

THE SPINE 1

The Cells

Introducing a New Waterfront Park

3

Creating pedestrian and bike connections

EXISTING WATERFRONT AREA

THE CELLS 4

Addressing Eas


DESIGN CONCEPT AND CONSIDERATIONS

RETURNING TO THE RIVER Reinstating the Missouri River as a productive social and ecological system The proposal seeks to reintroduce the river to the residents and visitors of Kansas City through a series of multi-scalar design operations. Connectivity across scales is emphasized. These operations enhance ecological services, social and cultural opportunities, and redefine the relationship between the river and the city.

Catalyzing Vacancy

Landscape Connections

s

ottom

East B

+

Kessler Park

A New Waterfront Park

River

+

Ecological Corridors

+

North

The Lig

Enhanced River Ecology

Speculative Above-Grade I-70 Park

s ent

am

town

Down

Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

05


! !

!

SITE INVENTORY

Levees Inlet/Outlet Locations Surface Water

Nearly 37 miles of levee wall along the Missouri River

Channelized river and no access to water

Rail infrastructure creates barrier

Vacant lots in need of remediation

Disconnected existing green spaces

Poor ecological services of existing waterfront

Industrial uses creates barrier

06

Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

Existing Port of Kansas City infrastructure

Hillshade

Railroads

Vacancy

250 feet of elevation change from downtown to riverfront

Nearly 60 miles of railroad tracks in the study area

Over 1,200 acres of vacant parcels in the study area

Parks

12% of study area is open space

Impervious Surface Land Cover

30% of study area is impervious surface

Industrial Zoning

The study area is 62% industrial zoning


AGGREGATED SUITABILITY MAPS Balanced Scenario Weights Landcover 0.125 Vacant 0.125 Remediation Sites 0.125 Landowner 0.125 Parks 0.125 Zoning 0.125 Land Value 0.125 Floodplain 0.125

BALANCED SUITABILITY Natural Systems Scenario Weights Landcover 0.25 Vacant 0.08 Remediation Sites 0.09 Landowner 0.08 Parks 0.08 Zoning 0.08 Land Value 0.08 Floodplain 0.25

ECOLOGICAL-WEIGHTED SUITABILITY

Economic Scenario Weights Landcover 0.03 Vacant 0.50 Remediation Sites 0.02 Landowner 0.03 Parks 0.30 Zoning 0.03 Land Value 0.30 Floodplain 0.03 ECONOMICALLY-WEIGHTED SUITABILITY Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

07


DIVERSIFICATION OF SPINE ECOLOGY AND USE OVER TIME Year 1

Year 10

Year 20+

Enhanced Plant Ecologies and Maintenance (Diversification in Time + Biodiversity) HIGH

MAINTENANCE

Wetlands Woodland The Ligaments

The Spine Tall Meadow LOW

Enhanced Social Systems (Diversification in Use + Increased Potential) INTENSITY OF ACTIVITY

HIGH

Event Spaces

campouts music festival

film festival

walking/biking The Ligaments

LOW

Wetlands Tall Meadow Woodlands walking/biking The Spine watching sunrise/sunset

Royals and Chiefs watch parties

fireworks

music festival raves!

food trucks photography

BBQ event picnics

music festival campouts

fitness stations gallery hops

photography photography art sculptures

BBQ event

urban camping

walking/biking photography

tadpole catching senior portraits

butterfly catching

fishing photography

fishing

food trucks firefly catching

canoing

sculpture garden

raves!

photography fitness stations art walks photography

gallery hops

watching sunrise/sunset hammocking photography food trucks tadpole catching canoing fishing food trucks

sculpture garden

butterfly catching firefly catching

sculpture garden

photography

bird watching

Dominant Surfaces (Enhancing Ecological Services) Impervious + Barren Land Cover Dominate

Pervious Land Cover Dominate

Asphalt Barrent Soil

From Dull to Dynamic

08

Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning


Native Grasses

Groundcover/Vines

Viewing Platform

Trees + Native Grasses

Ramp with Direct Access (ADA)

Stairs with Direct Access

Running

DESIGN CONCEPT The areas immediately adjacent to the river are re-imagined in a series of alternatives to redesign the river bank and access to the water. Ecological services are enhanced while providing recreation and social opportunities. These alternatives are selected based on location, slope, ecological needs, and adjacency to neighborhoods throughout the ecologicallyenhanced Missouri River spine.

Bird watching

Lounging Biking

Fishing Photography ADA accesssible trails Water access Urban hiking

Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

09


LIGAMENT SUITABILITY ANALYSIS

suitability: 0.25

suitability: 0.25

suitability: 0.05

suitability: 0.12

Balanced suitability analysis

suitability: 0.17

suitability: 0.34

suitability: 0.09

suitability: 0.02

suitability: 0.52

Ecologically-weighted suitability analysis

Economically-weighted suitability analysis

MAPPING ECOLOGICAL CONNECTIONS

The ligaments help to connect existing and proposed parks and open spaces. These connections provide bird and wildlife corridors and habitat as well as enhance passive and active recreation opportunities. Despite close proximity both River Market and Downtown districts are not well-connected to the river. These new corridors help to connect these districts back to the river.

The Spine

The Heart

The Ligaments

10

Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

Rethinking waterfront experiences

2

Introducing a New Waterfront Park

Ecological Waterfront Development

THE LIGAMENTS

THE HEART

THE SPINE 1

The Cells

3

Creating pedestrian and bike connections

THE CELLS 4

Addressing Eas


NEIGHBORHOOD CONNECTIONS THROUGH THE HEART

ion

ect

tro

en Gre

Me

l

i Tra

nn Co

THE HEART

Railroad Bridge Connection Across River Park Connection

Neighborhood Connection from River Market

New Park and Land Bridge Connection from Residential Neighborhood

KESSLER PARK

PENDLETON HEIGHTS

RIVER MARKET

Balanced Suitability Analysis More Suitable

I-70 Park Neighborhood Connection to I-70 Park and Downtown

Less Suitable

DOWNTOWN KANSAS CITY

Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

11


THE HEART: A NEW WATERFRONT ECOLOGICAL PARK

Woodlands wildlife habitat, heat island effect, human health and well-being, job creation

Great Lawn

Wetlands wildlife habitat, stormwater management, green infrastructure and water capture Trails human health and well-being, stress reduction

Performance Venue Meadow Prairie Plantings wildlife habitat, stormwater management, water conservation, reduced maintenance costs

Land Bridge

Waterfront Ecological Park Activities

Urban Camping

Urban Fishing

Bird Watching

Tadpole Catching

Butterfly Catch+Release

Watching Sunrise/Sunset

Royals and Chiefs Watch Parties

Front St

Photography

Music Festivals

Firefly Catch+Release

Picnics

Bike Riding

The Spine Hammocking

Kite Flying

Walks/Runs

Slacklining

DESIGN CONCEPT

The Heart is a new ecological park with passive and active recreation activities permeating throughout. It’s the new “lifeblood” of the waterfront district which enhances environmental and social services. Locust, walnut, and pecan species will also be planted in some areas to provide economic development opportunities. The Spine

12

Jonathan Knight

The Heart

The Ligaments

The Cells

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

THE SPINE

THE HEART

THE LIGAMENTS

Ecological Waterfront Development THE CELLS


CONSTRUCTED WETLAND

new recreation opportunities

restored ecologies

wetland provides habitat zone 5b marsh plants vegetation cleanses and filters stormwater

GREAT LAWN

downtown skyline views

active recreation a gathering space

passive spaces

Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

13


PARCELS AND PEPPERS Location St. Louis, Missouri Project Time 8 weeks Medium Photoshop, Illustrator, ArcGIS Team 18 members

ORIGIN/DESTINATION OF CITY OF ST. LOUIS [ALL WORKERS]

2016 ASLA Award of Excellence :: Central States ASLA 2016 APA New Horizon Award (Group) :: Kansas APA "This project is a great example of landscape architecture that has a purpose." - ASLA Award Jury

tight cluster of jobs in central St. Louis Washington University

This studio worked with K-State’s Technical Assistance for Brownfields Communities (TAB), the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the City of St. Louis to address vacant urban property. The City of St. Louis currently has over 10,000 vacant properties across the city, most prevalent in North St. Louis. The project sought to help the City better understand the types, qualities, and potential strategies related to their vacant land by developing a comprehensive typology, strategy toolbox as well as communication and engagement strategies. It considers both grassroots and top-down strategies and seeks not to set an agenda or a vision in either direction but provide a 'menu' of prototypes for implementation, which can be appropriated by many different individuals, community groups, or municipal agencies or officials. A 300-page book was designed and issued to the City at the conclusion of the semester.

BJC Healthcare

Study Area Lowest Density of Employment

Highest Density of Employment

Highest Density of Employment

Workers Employed in Area, but Live Outside

East

South

24,456 total 100%

16,988 5,385

69.5% 22.0%

25 to 50 miles

472

1.9%

Greater than 50 miles

1,611

6.6%

10 to 24 miles

Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

North

North

Less than 10 miles

14

Downtown

St. Louis City - All

North St. Louis - All

West

Study Area Lowest Density of Employment

Archdiocese of St. Louis

163,402

Employed and Live in Area, But Live in Area Employed Outside

53,584

67,995

56% of all City of St. Louis workers leave the city for employment. Workers Employed in Area, but Live Outside

27,741

Employed and Live in Area, But Live in Area Employed Outside

West St. Louis City All Workers

East

South 121,579 total 100% Less than 10 miles

84,645

10 to 24 miles

28,053

25 to 50 miles

2,278

1.9%

Greater than 50 miles 6,603

5.4%

69.6% 23.1%


Workers Employed in Area, but Live Outside

163,402

ORIGIN/DESTINATION OF NORTH ST. LOUIS [ALL WORKERS]

Employed and Live in Area, But Live in Area Employed Outside

53,584

67,995 St. Louis City All Workers

ORIGIN/DESTINATION NORTH ST. LOUIS [WORKERS EARNING $1,250 OR LESS]

Earth City Business Park

Employed and Live in Area, But Live in Area Employed Outside

Employed and Live in Area, But Workers more work outside Live to in Area Employedarea Employed in likely Outside Area, but Live Outside

27,741

163,402

Monsanto

St. Louis City All Workers

Mark Twain I-70 Industrial

Westport Plaza

Schnucks Markets

Schnucks Markets

BJG Healthcare

27,741

12,543

18,691

Workers Employed in Area, but Live Outside

Bar rier

Employed and Live in Area, But Live in Area Employed Outside

St. Louis City Workers Earning Less Than $1,250

West

21,998

2,401

22,055

22,055

90%

of North St. Louis workers leave the area for employment.

Workers Employed in Area, but Live Outside

Employed and Live in Area, But Live in Area Employed Outside

East

South

24,456 total 100%

10 to 24 miles

16,988 5,385

69.5% 22.0%

25 to 50 miles

472

1.9%

Greater than 50 miles

1,611

6.6%

Less than 10 miles

South

24,456 total 100%

Less than 10 miles

16,988

69.5%

L

10 to 24 miles

5,385

22.0%

1

North St. Louis City All Workers

25 to 50 miles

472

1.9%

2

Greater than 50 miles

1,611

6.6%

G

St. LouisSt.City - All- 1250 North Louis North Workers Employed in Area, but Live Outside

West North St. Louis City All Workers

Downtown

North

Employed and Live in Area, But Live in Area Employed Outside

2,401

West

East

Employed and Live in Area, But Live in Area Employed Outside

North

21,998

North

St. Louis City Workers Earning Less Than $1,250

Mark Twain I-70 Industrial

Monsanto

North St. Louis - All Workers Employed in Area, but Live Outside

St.

North St. Louis - All

Wal-Mart Distribution Center

Downtown

Mi ss iss ipp iR ive r as

Workers Employed in Area, but Live Outside

12,543

18,691

Bar rier

67,995 more likely to work outside area 53,584

Mi ss iss ipp iR ive r as

Workers Employed in Area, but Live Outside

3,099

90%

Employed and Live in Area, But Live in Area Employed Outside

882

7,727

of low-income North St. Louis workers leave the area for employment.

West West

East East

North St. Louis City Workers Earning Less Than $1,250

South South 121,579 total 100% 100% 8,609 total 69.6% 68.3%

1010 toto24 24miles miles

84,645 5,883 28,053 1,937

2525 toto50 50miles miles

2,278 253

1.9% 2.9%

Greaterthan than 50 Greater 50miles miles 6,603 536

5.4% 6.2%

Less than miles Less than 10 10 miles

23.1% 22.5%

Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

15


A SPECTRUM OF ADAPTABLE SOLUTIONS (DIAGRAM BY TEAMMATE)

SPICE SCALE OF IDEAS

In order to create a hierarchy of ideas for vacant parcels, we created a spice scale that divides the ideas into three categories; mild, hot, and spicy. This idea originates from the shape of the city of St. Louis which resembles a chili pepper. Mild ideas designate land use and are quick and easily implemented. Ideas operate at grassroots and overall have very few resistance factors. Little or no policy change is needed for mild ideas. Hot ideas evaluate vacant parcels on a block scale or larger. Strategies in this category often involve public and private partnership. They take more time and planning to implement compared to mild strategies. Spicy ideas are the most ambitious of the presented ideas and include long term solutions. Development opportunities for spicy ideas are found on parcels presenting consecutive vacancies and my involve relocation incentives.

Community gardens Community events

Plant nursery

Phytoremediation Side lots

Outdoor movie theater

MILD 16

Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

Education purposes

Treehouse park Create trail systems

Adult classes at local schools

Incentivize development in north St. Louis

Vineyard

Urban play district Alternative energy fields

HOT

Ecovillage / co-housing

Constructed wetlands

Stadium Black walnut tree grove

SPICY


SOLAR fIELDS VACANT PROPERTY STRATEGY I Solar Co-ops (Solar Gardens) flows

Vacant parcel Lender or Grant Opportunity

Solar panel installation Cooperative

Inves t Jo b s

Tree or meadow installation

Power

Money Energy Utility

M on

Hybrid solar field / meadow strategy

The first strategy bore from the analysis and sought to understand ways to enhance job opportunities in North St. Louis utilizing vacant land.

figure 3.2.18 Creating New Economy Vacant parcels are opportunity for new economy and new energy source. (Knight 2015)

Opportunities to train the local workforce to work on solar farms may already exist. Technical high schools in St. Louis could begin integrating solar industry curriculum. Other “mild” vacancy strategies around the schools could provide hands-on, design-build opportunities to learn the solar industry.

Lands used for Job opportunities alternative in maintenance, Reduce cost energy management, of energy fields engineering, consumption, will be mechanics, and save money. monitored more. and secure.

Investment

Time

Typology

Solar panels would be a new industry in St. Louis. Thousands of jobs could be created from blue collar to white collar: solar panels require land acquisition, construction, battery designers, component manufacturing, and ongoing maintenance.

Social Impact

figure 3.2.19 Contiguous parcels in The Ville represent opportunity for solar fields. (Knight 2015)

Ecosystem Support

Opportunities Addressed by Strategies

park

Citizen Involvement

Wind power is aesthetically and environmentally controversial because they are large structures which can obstruct views or be seen as an “eyesore.” Wind turbines can also disrupt wildlife habitat. In contrast, solar panels have minimal environmental impact, no moving parts, and are totally silent. (Wright 2013; energymatters.com.au 2015)

occupied parcels vacant parcels

Improve Quality of Life

Utilizing solar energy farms on vacant parcels provides a variety of benefits. Solar panels are a visible and tangible industry where people can walk, bike, or drive by and see investment and redevelopment.

moderately-sized contiguous area

Revenue Potential

BENEfITS

er

Productive meadows--useful for growing, phytoremediation or aesthetics--accent solar fields in land once vacant in St. Louis. Solar fields would produce a new industry in St. Louis providing a variety of blue- and white-collar jobs. Nature trails or other paths could be utilized in the development of the solar fields to create hybrid strategies and overlapping uses. A co-op setup could be used to create the solar fields.

Employment Potential

VACANT PROPERTY STRATEGY II

Crime

Utilize moderate-to-high areas of contiguous vacancy. Develop new industry and economic opportunities. Create a spectrum of blue collar to white collar jobs. Reduce fossil fuel consumption and source energy locally. Capitalize on 200 days of full or partial sun per year.

Alternative Energy fields

• • • • •

Po w

figure 3.2.20 Alternative Energy Process How alternative energy can work in St. Louis. (Knight 2015)

CREATING ECONOMY

GOALS

ey

__

Parcel Size, Block Vacancy, Context Vacancy, Sun Exposure

Hybrid figure 3.2.9 Church amphitheater for strategies Alternative baptizing. (“whywhynot” 2004) combined energy reduces Grants, with solar 20+ years of the need Private panels can __ preparation and for carbonFunding, provide implementation. emitting power Lender quality plants. of life benefits.

Solar panel leases can be finite (Curwin 2012). This leaves figure 3.2.21 Alternative Energy Opportunities Alternative energy is a long-term solution for employment. (Knight 2015) flexible options for future development open if markets and Solar development could be integrated with other strategies requirements change. Depending on the extent of panel OPPORTUNITIES The solar field strategy contain several opportunities and benefits to communities trying to solve figureabove. 3.2.10 Employment Reflective wooded areaisand meadows, hiking trailsand (in/around fields), or and even coverage, concurrent land uses might alsorecognized be possible. churchesincluding figure 3.2.8 Community garden next to places of worship. vacancy(Editor5807 problems.2011) These are outlined potential one key opportunity The second opportunity as an important cultural socialtheplatform path. (Scott 2005) productive landscapes in areas in transition to a solar field. contained within this strategy. Several typologies are addressed with this strategy.

ways in which churches can use vacant properties to further their cultural reach.

PRECEDENTS

The photos above show existing examples of how places of worship have been able to use the landscape. Gardens, wooded areas, and amphitheaters are three design elements worth considering for the development of vacant parcels adjacent to worship facilities.

17

Jonathan Knight Landscape Architecture ::and Urban Design :: Urban Planning Planning Kansas State University Department of Landscape Architecture Regional & Community s

nt

t

act

f

l

nt l

Opportunities Addressed by Strategies


CAMPUS COLLECTIVE SUMMARY SITE ANALYSIS

Location Manhattan KS Project Time 3 weeks Medium Photoshop, Illustrator, SketchUp + Shaderlight

Strong axis and regulating lines on site. Use existing geometry for cohesion and strong figure-ground. Potential to change flat topography for visual interest and drainage

The proposal for the new campus quad space is a response to Kansas State University's goal of becoming a Top 50 research institution by 2025. The campus is need of developing mixed-use housing, research, and teaching spaces to maximize infill development in the campus core. A rich hierarchy of open spaces creates a variety of socially, culturally, and aesthetically responsive spaces amongst mixed-use buildings. M

ar

lat

tH

all

Go

Denison Ave

Ackert Hall (Science)

od

no w

entry

Opportunity to create a cohesive “whole� with residence halls and proposed spaces.

Ha

ll

Wefald Hall (open 2016) entry High Point

Campus Collective seeks to promote a site of conviviality and research, as well as serve as an expression of innovative and sustainable design, planning and engineering. It follows recent architectural and landscape innovations by blending building with landscape to create strong place identity and shift the existing dominating culture of buildingssurrounded-by-lawn existing on campus. It seeks to create an openended space which can emergence in many ways now and into the future.

EXISTING SITE CONDITIONS Rathbone Hall

18

Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

Opportunity to solve Pedestrian/Auto mismatch to/from site with streetscape improvements

Service Building

Potential to further define circulation at key site entrances through site with path and building mass at key site entrances

entry Rathbone Hall (Engineering)

Existing circulation and desire lines well-established to/from campus core Opportunity to use existing dense vegetation and grade change for service screening and open space privacy Opportunity to connect visually or spatially to proposed pedestrian mall

EXPLORING FIGURE-GROUND RELATIONSHIPS - "TRASH" MODELS AND SKETCHING


ILLUSTRATIVE SITE PLAN RAIN GARDENS COMMUNITY GARDEN

Existing Trees SERVICE

GROCERY SERVICE

PRIVATE ROOF PATIOS WATER FEATURE

CAFE SEATING

QUADRANGLE CO-OP SPACE IMPROVED STREETSCAPE

SLOPED GREEN ROOF RAMP

COURTYARD

WATER FEATURE

CO-OP SPACE PRIVATE ROOF PATIOS

RAIN GARDENS WATER FEATURE

Rathbone Hall

N Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

19


DESIGN SOLUTION SEQUENCE AND KEY DESIGN MOVES

Create Building Mass

Extend Site for Pedestrian Access Improvements

Existing Site

Finesse Building Mass for Spatial Hierarchy

Entertainment Lounging Winter sports Entertainment Lounging Winter sports Entertainment Entertainment Lounging Lounging Winter Winter sports sports

DESIGN CONCEPT TWO DIVIDED SPACES

EXISTING AND FUTURE RESIDENCE HALLS

SITE ACTIVATION OF FLEXIBLE, ADAPTIVE SPACES THROUGH SPATIAL HIERARCHY

EXISTING SITE / PARKING LOT

Stormwater Stormwater Capture Capture Entertainment

Lounging

ONE CAMPUS CORE

Dipping Feet Stormwater Stormwater Dipping FeetCapture Capture Stormwater Stormwater Capture Capture

Winter sports

RAIN GARDENS

STREET PARKING

CAFE COLLECTIVE

STREET PARKING

RAIN GARDENS

CAFE COLLECTIVE

QUADRANGLE

CO-OP SPACE

IMPROVED STREETSCAPE

QUADRANGLE

GATHERING RAMP

GATHERING RAMP

CO-OP SPACE

IMPROVED STREETSCAPE

CO-OP SPACE

DROP-OFF AREA

STREET PARKING

STREET PARKING

ROOF PATIOS

RAIN GARDENSRAIN GARDENS CAFE CAFE COLLECTIVE COLLECTIVE

CO-OP SPACE

DROP-OFF AREA

QUADRANGLE QUADRANGLE

ROOF PATIOS CO-OP SPACE CO-OP SPACE

IMPROVED IMPROVED STREETSCAPE STREETSCAPE

DROP-OFF AREA

Reading/ Meeting Coffee Reading/ Friends Meeting Studying Stormwater Coffee Studying Friends Capture

RAIN GARDENS

STREET PARKING

20

Jonathan Knight

CAFE COLLECTIVE QUADRANGLE

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

Stormwater Stormwater Dipping Dipping FeetFeet Capture Capture

CO-OP SPACE

IMPROVED STREETSCAPE

DROP-OFF AREA

GATHERING RAMP

CO-OP SPACE ROOF PATIOS

DROP-OFF AREA

GATHERING RAMP

GATHERING RAMP

CO-OP SPACE CO-OP SPACE ROOF PATIOS ROOF PATIOS

Reading/ Sports Lounging Picnics Sunbathing Reading/ Sports Lounging Picnics Sunbathing Studying Studying Dipping Feet Stormwater Capture Picnics Reading/ Reading/Sports Reading/ Reading/ Meeting LoungingPicnics Sunbathing Sunbathing Sports Lounging Meeting Coffee Coffee Studying Studying Studying Studying Friends Friends


THE RAMP: A NEW CAMPUS LANDMARK Micro-Paving Detail

Quadrangle Terraced Green Roof Ramp

Rain Gardens

Water Feature Seating Pods

The open space is punctuated by a sloped green ramp which extends the flexible-use quadrangle space and event seating space while also articulating interior space for a proposed auditorium.

Aud

flat and sloped areas provide multiple seating options

itori

umRamp spac as e unroof: dern ea

th ra

mp

people watching studying eating winter sports entertainment seating

Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

21


STUDENTS WALK ACROSS NEW STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS TOWARDS THE RAMP

EXISTING STREETSCAPE

Streetscape improvements reduced the dominance of the automobile through the extended site. New bike lanes, street trees, and narrower lanes make the street more pedestrian-friendly. A bioswale buffer captures stormwater.

crosswalk handicap parking motorcycle parking

22

Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

5' bike lane

travel lane 11'

Drop-off area

parking travel lane 8' 11'

7' bioswale

sidewalk 10' 5' bike lane

crosswalk


spatial overlap: pull cafe into guad space

spatial overlap detail 02: limestone benches spatial overlap detail 01: micro-grass strips

Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

23


FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH DAYCARE Location Manhattan KS Project Time 15 weeks Medium AutoCAD, Land F/X, Photoshop, Illustrator, Premiere, e-on Vue, SketchUp

DESIGN CONCEPT

Connect to Church visually and literally

Client focus group: "Kids exploring and learning. That's exactly what we are looking for!"

Riparian area as connector and amenity, not site divider

"We love the idea of a green roof....amphitheater...sensory playground..."

Utilize topo to blend built works with existing landscape

"You really seem to understand kids and their needs" The site design and planting design for the new First Christian Church daycare is focused on their very own mission and values—education, healing and comfort, reflection, and interaction. It does so by harnessing the existing site amenities including slope, riparian area, and prairie location to create a sustainable and inclusive site for all visitors to teach, learn, and reflect. An open-ended, adaptable scheme was developed and suggested new programming opportunities for the daycare and church (to be sited in the future) not previously considered by the client. This scheme allows the site and client to respond as necessary by expanding, deleting, and adding programming as necessary through careful and deliberate siting of project programming.

Connect to Neighborhood / Provide Access to Playground

EXISTING SITE TOPOGRAPHY LP 1236

Riparian Drainage Area

civil 3d surface

HP 1286

24

Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning


CONNECTING CHILDREN TO NATURE

Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

25


ILLUSTRATIVE SITE PLAN WITH PROPOSED PROGRAM EXPANSION

Connection Bridge II To Future Church A B Service

Amphitheater

Parking

Discovery Nest (green roof)

Sensory Playground

Covered Drop-Off Drop-Off Circle

Reflection Ribbon trail B

First Christian Way

Reflection Plaza

Connection Bridge I

A Grand Mere Parkway

N

26

Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning


SECTION A-A Amphitheater for use by daycare and church

SECTION B-B

Multi-use plaza for events and views to riparian area

Bridge over riparian area to protect ecology and create unique views

Reflection Ribbon connects site features

Sensory Playground for education and fun

Discovery Nest Entry Bioswale for stormwater captures views and entry feature

Parking Lot

Entry Road

proposed building

Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

27


BUTTERFLY CATCHING NEAR THE REFLECTION PATIO

CONNECTING CHILDREN TO SITE OPPORTUNITIES

BIOSWALE TO CAPTURE RAINWATER

HABITAT FOR BUTTERFLIES

RE-ESTASBLISHMENT PLANTING MIX Bouteloua curtpindula

28

Jonathan Knight

Elymus canadensis

Sporobolus heterolepis

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

Sorghastrum nutans

Artemisia ludoviciana Asclepias 'Silver King' tuberosa

Baptisia australis

Andropogon gerardii

Brickellia eupatorioides

Populus deltoides

Schizachyrium scoparium

Panicum virgatum

Lespedeza capitata


BUTTERFLY CATCHING NEAR THE PATIO

COLLECTION FROM ENTRY AREA

COLLECTION FROM PARKING LOT

WET ZONE MESIC ZONE

MESIC PLANTING MIX Solidago rigida

Schizachyrium scoparium

WET PLANTING MIX Ratibita columnifera

Baptisia australis

Itea virginica

Dalea purpurea

Ilex glabra

Amelanchier arborea

Eupatorium perfoliatum

Juncus effusus

Carex vulpinoidea

Jonathan Knight

Aslepias incarnata

Carex lupulina

Carex hystericina

Lobelia cardinalis

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

29


SENSORY PLAYGROUND PLAN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

EARLY MORNING IN THE PLAYGROUND

_ Slide _ Rocks _ Mound _ Balance Logs _ Lazy River _ Balance Forest _ Bridge _ Sand Pit (flexible use)

Green Roof

-1

6

8

4 7

1 5

+6

3

2

SENSORY PLAYGROUND PLANT PALETTE 1

t

gh

Si

2

d

ch

un

So

1

3

u To

4 ell

5

te

s Ta

Sm

1

2

4

4

5

5

5

Syringa vulgaris 'Sensation' 1

2

2 3

4 5

Liatris spicata 'Kobold'

Jonathan Knight

3 4

4

5

5

Rosmarinus officinalis

Pycnanthemum  tenuifolium

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

3

3

1

2

3

1

2

2

3

3

3

4

4

4

4

4

5

5

5

5

5

Gypsophila paniculata  'Bristol Fairy' 1

1 2

3

30

Salvia nemorosa 'East Friesland'

1 2

2

3

4

1

1 2

2 3

Helianthus annuus 1

1

1

2

3

Geranium maculatum

1

2

3

5

Baptisia tinctoria

4 5

Campanula americana

1 2

2 3

3

Catalpa bignonioides

1

1 2

4

5

Calamagrostis × acutiflora ‘Karl Foerster’

1 2

3 4

Lavandula angustifolia  'Hidcote'

Miscanthus sinensis

1 2

3

Stachys byzantina ' Big Ears'

4 5

2 3

3

4

4

4

4

5

5

5

5

Physocarpus opulifolius

Lonicera sempervirens

Ceanothus americanus

Ribes odoratum


VIDEO USING E-ON VUE AND ADOBE PREMIERE SHOWING SITE IMPROVEMENTS

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

LATE-EVENING ON THE CONNECTION BRIDGE (E-ON VUE STILL IMAGE)

Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

31


URBAN LIVING ROOM SITE PROGRAMMING Location Manhattan KS Project Time 8 weeks Medium Photoshop, Illustrator, AfterEffects, Premiere, SketchUp + Shaderlight, ArcGIS Team 3 Members

1

5,000 square feet

2 3

2016 ASLA Award of Merit :: Central States ASLA 2015 CLARB Wayne Grace Memorial Competition "This is an ambitious project that combined research, urban design & creative communication. The collective investigation is truly impressive." -ASLA Central States Award Jury As part of the Wayne Grace Memorial Competition, the site design was intended to communicate how landscape architects enhance health and well-being. The proposal is for the in-fill redevelopment of a one block parcel in downtown Manhattan, KS which is currently an underutilized parking lot with one existing building on site. The Urban Living Room strives to be a multi-dimensional site which blends surface and building and provides unique programming and a true gathering place — it is a place to see and be seen. Passive and active activities will permeate the site at all times of day and night for all ages of visitors. In this way, the site rejects the traditional notion of 'pastoral nature' as a likely response to the need of a socially, mentally, and physically restorative space in an urban environment and seeks to create a new way of viewing landscape in urban areas. The site design was completed alongside a short film and research component. The entire project was a collaborative effort from programming through conceptual design and production. Additionally, I led the development of a website to communicate the entire studio’s work for the competition entry.

4 5

6 7 8 9

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

STREETSCAPE FOR FARMER’S MARKET 15 spots GRASSES NATIVE NATIVE GRASSES 20,000 square feet 20,000 square feet NATIVE GRASSES 20,000 square feet MULTI-USE MULTI-USE TURF TURF SPACE SPACE 10,000 square feet NATIVE GRASSES 10,000 square feet MULTI-USE TURF SPACE 20,000 square feet 10,000 square feet URBAN FOREST URBAN FOREST MULTI-USE TURF SPACE 5,750 square feet 5,750 square feet URBAN FOREST 10,000 square feet 5,750 square feet STREET STREET TREES TREES URBAN 39 trees FOREST 39 trees TREES STREET 5,750 square feet 39 trees

STREET TREES

OUTD OUTD OUTD OUTD OUTDOOR PROGRAM

VEGE VEGE VEGE VEGE VEGETATION

39 trees

10 11 12 13 14 15

16 17

19

Jonathan Knight

CHALLENGE COURSE CHALLENGE COURSE BEER GARDEN 450 feet 450 feet CHALLENGE 5,000 square feetCOURSE 450 feet RUNNING RIBBON RUNNING RIBBON 0.20 miles CHALLENGE COURSE 0.20 miles RIBBON RUNNING 450 0.20feet miles PLAYSCAPE PLAYSCAPE 14,000 square feet RUNNING 14,000 squareRIBBON feet PLAYSCAPE 0.20 miles 14,000 square feet FOR FARMER’S MARKET STREETSCAPE STREETSCAPE FOR FARMER’S MARKET 15 spots PLAYSCAPE 15 spots STREETSCAPE FOR FARMER’S MARKET 14,000 square feet 15 spots

18

32

BEER BEER GARDEN GARDEN 5,000 feet 5,000 square feet BEERsquare GARDEN

ROOF ROOF DECK DECK 6,000 square feet 6,000 square feet ROOF DECK

6,000 square feet

ROOFTOP RESTAURANT DINING ROOM

ROOFTOP RESTAURANT DINING ROOM ROOF DECK 1,300 square feet

BUILD BUIL BUIL BUIL

1,300 squareRESTAURANT feet ROOFTOP DINING ROOM 6,000 square feet 1,300 square feet

ROOFTOP STUDIO

ROOFTOP feet STUDIO DINING ROOM ROOFTOP 1,300 squareRESTAURANT 1,300 squarefeet feet 1,300 square ROOFTOP STUDIO 1,300 square OFFICES + feet RESTROOMS OFFICES + RESTROOMS 950 square feet ROOFTOP STUDIO 950 square feet OFFICES + RESTROOMS 1,300 square feet 950 square(DANCE feet STUDIO AND YOGA) STUDIO (DANCE AND YOGA) 2,600 square feet OFFICES + RESTROOMS 2,600 square feet STUDIO (DANCE AND YOGA) 950 square feet 2,600 square feet RESTAURANT RESTAURANT 3,700 square feet STUDIO (DANCE AND YOGA) 3,700 square feet RESTAURANT 2,600 square square feet feet 3,700

BUILDING PROGRAM

RESTAURANT RESTAURANT 3,700 square feet SERVICE RESTAURANT SERVICE 650 square feet 650 square feet SERVICE RESTAURANT 650 square feet EXISTING BUILDING SERVICE EXISTING BUILDING SERVICE 700 square feet RESTAURANT SERVICE 700 square feet EXISTING BUILDING SERVICE 650 square feet 700 square PARKING feet ON-SITE ON-SITE 22 spots PARKING EXISTING BUILDING SERVICE 22 spots PARKING ON-SITE 700 square feet 22 spots PARKING STREET STREET 27 spots PARKING ON-SITE PARKING 27 spots PARKING STREET 22 spots 27 spots

STREET PARKING 27 spots

SERV SERV SERV SERV

SERVICE


SITE PROGRAMMING

1 16

11 15

17

7

8 6

18

2

10

12

14

3

13

4 5 9

19

A SERIES OF UNIQUE RUNNING AND WALKING EXPERIENCES

slide

climbing columns

Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

33


TYING IN TO EXISTING BIKE AND WALK INFRASTRUCTURE SHAPING SPACES AND UNIFIERS Vattier St

Moro St 10th St

North End Redevelopment

exis buiting ldin g

Existing Shared Bike Lanes

Existing Dedicated Bike Lanes

SITE

Humboldt St

Proposed Bike Lane Connection

Existing Access to Linear Trail

frame open space

South End Redevelopment

8th St

Manhattan Ave

Pierre St

Linear Trail

ing

Existing Access to Linear Trail

uild sed b

o

prop

GOING VERTICAL TO CULTURAL ICONS

und r aro

n

ectio

ters % in

100

o

anch

MANHATTAN HILL ELEV. 1,184 FT + 164 FT

+

X

ces

spa aping

.

sh

PROGRAMMING OFF OF RUNNING RIBBON

SITE "KS" HILL ELEV. 1,170 FT + 150 FT

+

meadow

playscape

.

CONSIDERING SCALE + EXPERIENCES IN OTHER OPEN SPACES

restaurant seating

roof deck

Leavenworth St

Courthouse Plaza

Manhattan Town Center Plaza

Poyntz Avenue 3rd St

City Park

SITE

Blue Earth Plaza

34

Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

um

s dat

X

ing

runn

na ribbo


MATERIALITY AND PROGRAMMING I

MATERIALITY AND PROGRAMMING II

Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

35


USER OPPORTUNITY BY AGE

5 AM

7 AM

9 AM

11 AM

1 PM

restaurant beer garden yoga studio challenge course playscape running track lawn/open space farmer’s market (seasonal) garden areas

36

Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

3 PM

5 PM

7 PM

9 PM

11 PM

1 AM

3 AM


Running ribbon of unique experiences

Climbing tower with views to cultural icons

Urban forest area

Activity above and below the running ribbon

Play settings for all ages and abilities

SHORT FILM TO DESCRIBE HEALTH IMPACTS OF HEALTH AND WELL-BEING

COMPETITION WEBSITE

Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

37


CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS LAYOUT AND DIMENSIONING PLAN Location Manhattan KS Project Time 9 months Medium AutoCAD, Land F/X

1

2

3

0

10

5

4

Detail Plan A

GENERAL NOTES ·

20 Feet

D

·

· · · ·

The First Christian Church site design was a nine-month introduction to construction implementation including grading, earthwork estimates, layout and dimensioning, lighting, irrigation, and construction details.

The Knight Planning+Design Group jonathan@knightplandesign.com 100 Landscape Avenue Here and There, Anywhere USA

·

·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ··

C

· · · ·

·

Layout for the site development of the First Christian Church Daycare within Grand Mere development east west of Grand Mere Parkway, in the current City of Manhattan city limits, Riley County, Kansas. The coordinate tie point for this project is the southwest corner of the proposed structure located centrally within the overall development project site. Project Coordinates: X 1695406.00, Y 323063.40 Written dimensions shall prevail. Dimensions taken from BACK OF CURB unless otherwise noted. Contractor to locate ALL utilities PRIOR to construction. All angles assumed to be 90 degrees (perpendicular) unless otherwise noted. Typical Dimensions: All entry drives and parking drive widths are 35' from back of curb to back of curb, unless otherwise noted. Regular parking stalls are 10' wide by 20' deep (long). Curb widths from back of curb to edge of gutter are 2.0'. Walk widths are 6' unless otherwise noted. Contraction joints for concrete walks are to be spaced in +/- 6' intervals. Retaining walls are 2.0' in thickness unless otherwise noted. ALL seatable planter walls are 1.5' in thickness. Drawings shall NOT be scaled unless otherwise noted. See architectural drawings for building dimensions. Refer to L-10.0 CONSTRUCTION DETAILS for dimensioning details of specific elements. Contractor shall stake the Layout Plan (or retain a registered surveyor, if required) in the field and have such staking approved by the Landscape Architect before proceeding with construction. Existing conditions as plotted by: ABC Construction Engineers 3532 S Anderson Ave, Suite 12 Manhattan, KS 66502 Summer 2014

D

CONSULTANTS Chip Winslow, 100 Bluemont Ave, Manhattan, KS

Bob Knight, 100 Retiree Ave, Manhattan, KS

Jim Fish, 345 Boring Ave, Manhattan, KS

C First Christian Church of Manhattan Inc 115 Courthouse Pl, Manhattan, KS 66502

First Christian Church Daycare

LEGEND Baseline Centerline Detail Plan Area Reference Point

B

R TYP EQ W D

B

Grand Mere PUD Manhattan, KS

Radius Typical Equal Wide Deep (Long) XXX MARK

XXX DATE

ISSUE:

XXX DESCRIPTION Day, Month, Year

PROJECT NO: 001 CAD DWG FILE: ENTER CAD FILE NAME HERE.dwg DRAWN BY: YOUR INITIALS CHECKED BY: REVIEWER INITIALS

A

A

SHEET TITLE

Layout and Dimensioning

1

1

2

2

3

3

4

4

IRRIGATION HEAD LAYOUT AND PRESSURE CALCULATIONS

L-4.0

5

5

The Knight Planning+Design Group jonathan@knightplandesign.com 100 Landscape Avenue Here and There, Anywhere USA

D

D

CONSULTANTS Chip Winslow, 100 Bluemont Ave, Manhattan, KS

Bob Knight, 100 Retiree Ave, Manhattan, KS

Jim Fish, 345 Boring Ave, Manhattan, KS

C

C

First Christian Church of Manhattan Inc 115 Courthouse Pl, Manhattan, KS 66502

First Christian Church Daycare

B

B

Grand Mere PUD Manhattan, KS

XXX MARK

XXX DATE

ISSUE:

XXX DESCRIPTION Day, Month, Year

PROJECT NO: 001 CAD DWG FILE: ENTER CAD FILE NAME HERE.dwg DRAWN BY: YOUR INITIALS CHECKED BY: REVIEWER INITIALS

A

A

SHEET TITLE

Irrigation Plan

1

2

3

H:\05_Spring2016\Projects\FCC\C3D\Models\LAR438_s16_FCC_v4.dwg, 3/7/2016 8:53:12 PM, AutoCAD PDF (General Documentation).pc3

38

Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

4

5

L-5.02


PAVING, RETAINING WALL, AND BIOSWALE DETAILS 1

2

3

4

5

D

The Knight Planning+Design Group jonathan@knightplandesign.com 100 Landscape Avenue Here and There, Anywhere USA

D

CONSULTANTS Chip Winslow, 100 Bluemont Ave, Manhattan, KS

Bob Knight, 100 Retiree Ave, Manhattan, KS

ENTRY SIGN DETAIL 1

2

3

4

5

The Kn jonatha 100 La Here a

Jim Fish, 345 Boring Ave, Manhattan, KS

3B MODULAR PAVING PATTERN - SECTION 4.07.2 1/2" = 1'

3A MODULAR PAVING PATTERN - PLAN 4.07.2 3/8" = 1'

C

4A RETAINING WALL - SECTION 4.07.2 1/2" = 1'

C First Christian Church of Manhattan Inc 115 Courthouse Pl, Manhattan, KS 66502

D

D

First Christian Church Daycare

1B 4.07.2

CONSUL

Chip Wins

4B RETAINING WALL - ELEVATION 4.07.2 3/4" = 1' B

B

Bob Knigh

Grand Mere PUD Manhattan, KS

Jim Fish, 3

XXX MARK

5 BIOSWALE - SECTION 4.0 7.2 3/4" = 1'

XXX DATE

ISSUE:

XXX DESCRIPTION Day, Month, Year

PROJECT NO: 001 CAD DWG FILE: ENTER CAD FILE NAME HERE.dwg DRAWN BY: YOUR INITIALS CHECKED BY: REVIEWER INITIALS

C

A

A

3

First 115 C

Details

4

SENSORY PLAYGROUND PLANTING PLAN (LAND F/X) 1

2

3

4

C

SHEET TITLE

6 GREEN ROOF - SECTION 4.0 7.2 1/2 = 1'

L-7.2

5

PLANT SCHEDULE

5

The Knight Planning+Design Group 8A ENTRY SIGN - ELEVATION jonathan@knightplandesign.com 4.0 7.4 1/2" = 1' 100 Landscape Avenue Here and There, Anywhere USA

C

D

B

B

G M

CONSULTANTS Surveyor Chip Winslow, 100 Bluemont Ave, Manhattan, KS XXX MARK ISSUE:

Architect

PROJEC CAD DW DRAWN CHECKE

Bob Knight, 100 Retiree Ave, Manhattan, KS

Engineer Jim Fish, 345 Boring Ave, Manhattan, KS

A

A

8B ENTRY SIGN - SECTION 4.0 7.4 1/2" = 1'

8C ENTRY SIGN - PLAN 4.0 7.4 1/2" = 1'

1

2

C

A3 A3

PLAYGROUND 1" = 10'

First Christian Church of Manhattan Inc 115 Courthouse Pl, Manhattan, KS 66502.

3

4

5

First Christian Church Daycare

Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

39

SHEET T


1

CONNECTION BRIDGE I DETAILS

2

3

4

5

D

The Kn jonatha 100 La Here a

D

CONSUL

Chip Wins

Bob Knigh

Jim Fish, 3

C

C

1A WOOD AND STEEL SOUTH BRIDGE - SECTION 4.07.0 3/4" = 1'

First 115 C

1B WOOD AND STEEL SOUTH BRIDGE - ELEVATION 4.07.0 1/2" = 1'

C

B

B

G M

XXX MARK ISSUE:

PROJEC CAD DW DRAWN CHECKE

A

40

1C WOOD AND STEEL SOUTH BRIDGE - PLAN 4.07.0 3/8" = 1'

Jonathan Knight 1

A

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning 2

3

4

5

SHEET T


1

2

3

5

4

T jo 1 H

D

D

CO

2B SOUTH DECK EXTENSION - CUSTOM COMPONENTS 4.07.1 3/8" = 1'

Chip

Bob K

Jim F

C

C

2A SOUTH DECK EXTENSION - STRUCTURE PLAN 4.07.1 3/8" = 1'

B

B

2D SOUTH DECK EXTENSION - SECTION 4.07.1 1/2" = 1'

XX MA

ISS

2C SOUTH DECK EXTENSION - WOOD PLANK PLAN 4.07.1 3/8" = 1'

PR CA DR CH

A

A

Jonathan Knight 1

2

3

4

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning 5

41

SH


ICT POP-UP PARK: 'ROOTS' PLANTER Location Manhattan KS Project Time 15 weeks Team 3 Members

BEFORE TRANSFORMATION

ASLA Award of Excellence :: Central States ASLA In 2014, the Wichita Downtown Development Corporation received a grant from the Knight Foundation to create a temporary infill popup park on a vacant downtown lot — noted as an 'eyesore' by the downtown community and nearby businesses. Since completion, hundreds of Instagram photos have been posted, it has received a four star rating on Yelp, and is transforming from a once vacant space into a lively downtown civic space. Collaborative teams were created as part of an introductory construction implementation course to provide furnishings for the park. Our group was tasked with providing design alternatives for a series of planters, which doubled as tabletop space for eating, to be installed on-site—from concept through construction documentation and installation. Abstracted 'roots' were laser cut into 16-gauge steel with no diameter greater than 4" for safety purposes. The steel was layered to create a unique lighting effect and they were painted fun, vibrant colors to match other site furnishings and to encourage a playful, fun atmosphere. Considerations included the temporary nature of the park, the need for multipurpose furnishings, and the desire to create a fun atmosphere for park visitors.

42

Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

AFTER TRANFORMATION


ONE OF THREE 'ROOTS' PLANTERS INSTALLED ON-SITE

CONSTRUCTION PREPARATION

Planter area

Multiple standing options Eating surface Three layers of 16-gauge steel, laser cut "Wings" for stability (and elbows) Color selected based on other furnishings and to help create vibrant atmosphere

ON-SITE CONSTRUCTION CUT PANELS AND EXTERIOR FINISH

Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

43


PLANTER AND SURROUNDING FURNISHINGS

INSTAGRAM PHOTOS FROM SITE USERS

FINISHED PLANTERS AND SITE INSTALLATION

FINISHED PLANTERS AND SITE INSTALLATION

44

Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning


THANK YOU. JONATHAN KNIGHT LEED GREEN ASSOCIATE

Manhattan, Kansas jonathanknightplan@gmail.com 316.200.1473

Jonathan Knight

Landscape Architecture :: Urban Design :: Urban Planning

45


Jonathan Knight Landscape Architecture Portfolio - Fall 2016