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Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Jonathan R. Klaas

Mineral M ineral PPoint o WI

A Senior Capstone Project at the University of Wisconsin- Madison prepared under the mentorship of Shawn Kelley and Sue Thering May 2009 “Our native landscape is our home, the little world we live in, where we are born and where we play, where we grow up and finally where we are...laid to eternal rest. It speaks of the distant past and carries our life into the tomorrow. To keep this pure and unadulterated is a sacred heritage, a noble task of the highest cultural value.� - Jens Jensen


Jonathan R. Klaas

Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Mineral M ineral PPoint o WI

Table of Contents P ART 1

| Introduction

| Design Solutions

1.1 Statement of Purpose/Clients

P ART 3

1.2 Community Vison/Planning Goals

3.1 Regional Programming

1.3 Unitarian Universalist

3.2 Program Development: Concept Origins

7 Foundational Principles 1.4 Community Context and History

3.3 Program Development: Core Aspects

1.5 Design Ethics: Achieving the

3.4 Regional Design: Program Concept

“Pinnacle of the Profession”

3.5 Master/Site Plan

P ART 2

| Inventory and Analysis

3.6 Master Plan Topography: Before and After- 10ft. contour intervals

2.1 Geographical Context and Topo-

3.7 Master Plan Cut and Fill

graphical Identity

3.8 Master Plan Topographical Design

2.2 Geographical Context- Master/Site Plan

3.9 Master Plan Irrigation Schedule

2.3 Contextual Design Goals- Restoring the “Driftless” Character

3.10 Sections 3.11 Details

2.4 Regional Scale

3.12 Perspectives

2.5 Master Scale

3.13 Planting

2.6 Site Plan: Visual Inventory 2.7 Master/Site Scale: Opportunites and Constraints 2.8 Precedent Studies: Jens Jensen and Frank Lloyd Wright

P ART 4

| Appendix

4.1 Project Log 4.2 References/Special Thanks


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Jonathan R. Klaas

Mineral M ineral PPoint o WI

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1.1 Statement of Purpose/ Project Clients This study proposes to explore social programming strategies as they pertain to the greater human social environment. Many subsystems within our social structure have a negative trickle-down effect that ends up destroying the very fabric of our social connectedness and development. This study attempts to address these greater social dilemmas by rethinking the process in which we organize the relationships between social groups and classes. This approach and strategy will inform the cornerstones of social structure by presenting alternative social solutions to some of our most pressing communal issues. In order to facilitate this thesis study, I will employ two different variables: 1. The Unitarian Universalist organization and its underlying principles and perspectives. These principles represent an uncompromising commitment to the well-being of the interdependent web of all existence of which humans are a part. 2. A historic establishment in the state’s driftless region, Mineral Point, Wisconsin. Mineral Point is symbolic because of its rich historical and social integrity as well as its commitment to the preservation and enhancement of life for its citizens and visitors.

1.2

| Community Vision and Planning Goals

Town Vision Statement: Mineral Point is a community...

Mineral Point’s famous 130 year old zinc canine reflects the town’s British ancestry

-that values small business suited to the community and provides entrepreneurs with the support needed to suceed

-that has successfully incorporated its skills in agriculture and its natural resources into both our local and export economies -where many forms of art are both passion and profitable business enterprises -where young people receive a quality education and are encouraged to give back to the community in service and entrepreneurial projects -that has become a year-round tourist destination -that has experience growth while retaining its small town qualities and natural countryside landscapes

Mineral Point is a community that is thriving through homegrown success.


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Jonathan R. Klaas

Mineral M ineral PPoint o WI

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1.3 Unitarian Universalist 7 Foundational Principles 1. The inherent worth and dignity of every person

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1.2 Community Vision and Planning Goals (continued) The overall objectives, policies, and goals of Mineral Point:

2. Justice, equity and compassion in human relations 3. Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations 4. A free and responsible search for truth and meaning

1. Protect and improve the health, safety, and welfare of residents in the City of Mineral Point.

5. The right of conscience and the use of the democratic process within our congregations and in society at large

2. Preserve and enhance the quality of life for the residents of the City of Mineral Point.

6. The goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all

3. Protect and preserve the small community character of the City of Mineral Point.

7. Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part.

Th hi The historic i Boyer B school h l ((top off page)) and d the h W Walker lk H House are two examples l off community’s commitment to preserving the historical integrity of Mineral Point


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Jonathan R. Klaas

Mineral M ineral PPoint o WI

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1.4 Community Context and History The specific location for this study is not an arbitrary decision; as my regional analysis will present, Mineral Point lies within a specific geographical region that is demographically significant and convenient for a regional study of its kind. The regionally significant elements of the town are its proximity to surrounding county seats and the city of Madison, as well as its adjacency to a major state highway. These three elements will Mineral Point emerge as major elements to the regional design’s success and vitality. One Iowa County of the key characteristics of this part of the state is its unglaciated character, also known as the driftless region.

2nd Place- Most Distinctive Architecture & Best Galleries and Arts Scene

As for the town itself, Mineral Point has recieved numerous official (and unofficial) awards for its timeless character and prestine preservation of the old limestone buildings of its early settlement. The essential charm of the town reflects an old world English community rural in nature, as most of the original European settlers were of Cornish decent. Its first European settlers called Mineral Point home in 1827, and many of the town’s cherished historic buildings are dated back as far as this time. Madison

It has received many distinguishing awards, most recently it was named one of “America’s Top Ten Cool Towns” by Budget Travel SW WI Regional Planning Magazine. Also in 2008, MinCommission outline with County Seats eral Point was awarded the “Best Wisconsin Town for a Historic Getaway” and the “Most Beautiful Wisconsin Town” It also was nominated as one of the “Dozen Distinctive Destinations” by the National Trust for Historic Preservation in 2007


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Jonathan R. Klaas

Mineral M ineral PPoint o WI

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1.4 The History of Mineral Point The town of Mineral Point follows the Driftless Area’s history because its settlement was a result of this region’s geographic formational history. The “driftless” nature of the area created a landscape where mineral deposits were readily accessible from the surface of the earth. Prospectors and miners took advantage of this opportunity in the 1820’s and began settling in the area. The first European inhabitants burrowed shelters into the hillside called badger holes. This term later prompted the State’s nickname,

“The Badger State.” In the 1830’s, Cornish miners learned of the resources prevalent in Mineral Point, and large numbers of Cornish immigrants began to arrive in the area in search of their piece of the United State’s first mineral rush. They brought with them the advanced mining skills and character stone building traditions from their Cornish homeland. From these early times, Mineral Point’s citizens have produced buildings and architecture have been intimately tied into the landscape.

Mineral Point’s most famous site, Pendarvis, is a prime example of how early settlers used their knowledge of hard stone building techniques to design into the landscape. Because of Mineral Point’s success as an early mining town, its population exploded in quick time. As a result, Mineral Point became the first county seat of Iowa county after the Wisconsin Territory was established. It previously belonged to the Territory of Michigan. At this point, the town was larger than Milwaukee and Chicago combined. In 1836, Wisconsin officially became an official Territory. The ingauguation was held at Mineral Point. The history of the town continued steadily. It was enhanced and diversified by the addition of the railroad in 1857, which brought new business and commerce to the city. Agriculture began to take a foothold as an economic base because of the region’s productive Alfisol soil type. As many people know, this portion of the country has the ability to produce high crop yields. A recent addition to Mineral Point’s economic vitality is its strong fine arts community. The town is home to nearly 20 different art galleries, ranging from potters, weavers, glass artists, painters, photographers, sculptors, and woodworkers


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Jonathan R. Klaas

Mineral M ineral PPoint o WI

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1.5 Design Ethics: Achieving the ‘Pinnacle of the Profession’ In my opinion, the pinnacle of the profession occurs when a landscape architect can transcend self. What does this mean exactly? Well, in order to achieve a well-rounded ability to practice as a landscape architect, one must put aside their own beliefs, wants, and desires in order to attain the ability to objectively design. When a designer can overcome self, she/ he has a greater ability to focus on the important aspects of a particular design, such as the greater social needs, but more importantly, environmental concerns. These seem to be the most important factors in design, but when one aspect gets in the way of the other, the result is usually conflict.

Taking this concept further, the tendency of the larger social consciousness is to put people paramount in everything we design. I remember a teacher saying that we design landscapes for people. The transcended designer designs landscapes for reality. People just happen to be a small facet of this frame- when we design wholly for people, we miss the point, and design inevitably falls short.

There’s the concept of the holistic designer; I like the statement, but I think there’s a large amount of misconceptions about this it, and it usually comes down to people not understanding their roles in reality.

Merriam Webster defines holistic in this way:

relating to or concerned with wholes or with complete systems rather than with the analysis of, treatment of, or dissection into parts- holistic medicine attempts to treat both the mind and the body- holistic ecology views humans and the environment as a single system

I find that most people believe that they are the center of the system that they exist within, but this is simply not the case, and a designer that has not accepted or realized this truth has not transcended self and will less likely be able to attain the pinnacle of the profession- designing for reality, not man.


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Jonathan R. Klaas

Mineral M ineral PPoint o WI

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2.1 Geographical Context and Topographical Identity The Driftless Area is a very unique geographical entity in the American Midwest. The term “driftless” refers to a lack of glacial drift- the material left behind by retreating or melting glaciers. This “driftless” landscape therefore eluded our most recent glacial period, and as a result has a unique topographical character because it has had more time to weather without glacial interuption. This weathering has gouged and sculpted a very unique landscape. Because of this history, it is characterized by its deep river valley channels and cave systems. This type of terrain is defined as a Karst topography. A karst landscape is shaped by the dissoluton of soluble bedrock beneath the soil. Here in southwest Wisconsin, this stone is primarily limestone, which is largely composed of calcium carbonate (CaCO3). This eroding stone, over thousands of years, has revealed deep cuts in the bedrock due to the constant contact with water and the elements. It is this ancient interaction that makes the Driftless Area magical.

cold water re-emerges from an underground spring

The karst landscape presents an itricate terrain of complex underground water movement. This includes cave systems, disappearing and re-appearing streams, sinkholes, and springs. This waterflow route into the earth often cools the water, creating an ideal cold water habitat conducive to trout life. This key natural feature is what makes the area a class-1 trout fishing destination.

“Taking the steps necessary to restore the Driftless Area and its streams and rivers would not only make the region a world class trout fishing destination, it would ultimately provide its residents with substantial economic and social benefits.” ‘Three Chimney’ rock formation Viroqua, WI

“Duke” Welter- Trout Unlimited Trout stamp holders alone spend in excess of $600 million in the Driftless Area each year, producing a total annual economic benefit of approximately $1.1 billion in the region.

the coveted Brown Trout; Salmo trutta

It is essential to the vitality of the region that we endorse organizations like Trout Unlimited- protect, reconnect, restore, and sustain our natural resources for present and future generations.


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Jonathan R. Klaas

Mineral M ineral PPoint o WI

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2.1 Geographical Context and Topographical Identity (continued) The Driftless Area is located primarily in southwest Wisconsin, but also includes areas of Minnesota, Iowa, and Illinois. The graphic below outlines the Driftless Area and highlights depth to bedrock- this illustrates how the lack of glacial interaction has allowed a greater weathering of the earth’s surface, creating a landscape more intimately related to its parent material; soluble limestone.

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Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Jonathan R. Klaas

Mineral M ineral PPoint o WI

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2.2 Geographical ContextMaster and Site Plan Level Because of the unique topography of the Driftless Area, it is very essential to integrate its opportunities and constraints into the analysis and design considerations. Mineral Point’s character is reflective of the region’s overall geography, therefore special consideration is appropriate specifically for the topography. As the model below reveals, the entire site design parameters are nestled in the cusp of a ridge and valley system. Over the 182 years of community development, this natural ridge and valley system has become interrupted and altered to fit the needs of the developing community.

Shake Rag Alley Center for the Arts; low point of master plan

2.3

| Contextual Design Goals-

Restoring the “Driftless” Character 1. Protect and improve the health, safety, and welfare of the residents and visitors of the City of Mineral Point, as well as the character of landscape 2. Emphasize exposed parent materials, whether as landscape features or as building materials. This effort shall act as a passive education tool, intertwining users to the landscape 3. Water management practices will collect, conduct, and utilize stormwater in a way that reflects the natural character of the Driftless Area 4. Water practices shall encourage water to enter the ground, promoting a net cooling effect, enhancing trout habitat downstream

high point of master plan Model Information: -model size: 9.5”x12.5” -model scale: 1”= 300 ft. -contour intervals: 10 ft. -elevation change: 230 ft. -vertical exaggeration: 1: 1.875 -view looking north


Jonathan R. Klaas

Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Mineral M ineral PPoint o WI

2.4

| Regional Scale

Region: State of Wisconsin

Regional Demographic Study: Correctional Rehabilitation Suitability This study proposes to identify all appropriate locations in the State of Wisconsin for the development and exploration of rehabilitational correctional centers that specializes in holistic community reintegration and emphathetic development The three layers of this analysis are graphically displayed to the right. This study is entirely demographic, because the statistics are very tangible and empirical. A regional design of this sort also needs to take into account the contextual environment, which is a qualitative study. This aspect of the suitability study takes into consideration community composition, economic vitality, diversity and resource availability, as well as the quality of work available. In order to fulfill both the ‘environmental’ and “social’ dynamics of the program design, green collar jobsthat is, jobs that prove to have a positive effect on the environment, will be incorporated into the overall programming. Therefore, communities with an interest and desire for renewable energy production, biotechnology, sustainable building materials, recycled goods manufacturing, sustainable urban agriculture.

-Population -Transportation

Jurisdiction: county seat 10 mi. radius

Population: greater than 50,000

Transportation: major roads 2 mi. radius

Results: suitable sites for Wisconsin

Layers with Results


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Jonathan R. Klaas

Mineral M ineral PPoint o WI

2.4

| Regional Scale: State Level

Jurisdiction: This layer represents a very important aspect of the regional design because the county seats have a vital connection to the Rehabilitational Correctional Center concept. It will always be important that a county locates any correctional facilities close to the county seat because it is from there that all of their jurisdictional acts will be carried out, such as court proceedings and county jail transferring and booking. By assigning a 10 mile radius from the State’s 72 county seats, this layer helps to reduce transportation costs and labor costs, increase security and inter-facility efficiency. These considerations are critical to a study of this sort.

Madison

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Jonathan R. Klaas

Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Mineral M ineral PPoint o WI

2.4

| Regional Scale: State Level

Population: Population is a critical aspect to this study for several different reasons. Crime tends to happen closer to largely populated areas, and in Wisconsin, it is no different. Dane and Milwaukee counties make up the wide majority of incarcerated individuals, in both the prison and jail systems of the state. Another reason why this variable is critical is because many of the individuals being held in custody live in or near proximity to the largest populated areas of the state. If these individuals are removed from their communities, their chances for family and community support are reduced greatly. The graphic below illustrates 60 mile radii around the State’s 12 largest metro areas. Each represent a population of at least 50,000 people.

Eau Claire Green Bay Appleton Oshkosh

La Crosse

Waukesha Madison

Milwaukee West Allis Racine

Janesville Kenosha

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Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Jonathan R. Klaas

Mineral M ineral PPoint o WI

2.4

| Regional Scale: State Level

Transportation: The major roadways of Wisconsin are relavent for this demographic study because they will connect municipalities to the various facilities placed around the state. For both the cost of fuel and time in labor spent transporting inmates from one place to another, it is important to set a two mile distance from U.S. highways as well as interstates. This will increase security as well, guaranteeing that all travel occur in a high traffic areas where they can be inforced by state patrol units. This proximity also plays into the economic aspect of the study because one of the proposed jobs for inmates will be production and cultivation of switchgrass sw along all the major roads of Wisconsin. This revenue in renewable energy production alone will make the proposed plan feasible and worthwhile to the State.

Madison

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Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Jonathan R. Klaas

Mineral M ineral PPoint o WI

2.4

| Regional Scale: State Level

Results: The 3-layered analysis reveals all the suitable locations for Rehabilitational Correctional Facilities in Wisconsin. As the programming discussed in part one, these areas will produce economic support for their surrounding communities, as they attempt to encourage resident inmates to engage in positive social interaction. By establishing this new relationship with the surrounding area, inmates will develop the skills necessary to re-integrate into the community through active participation. This reconnecting will inevidably reduce the rates of recidivism, tax-payer burden, as well as creating a voice in the community for crime prevention and education because of their experiences. It is part of my proposal that each of the regional planning commisions in the state shall have available at least one Rehabilitational facility. Outlined in thick black, the southwest region will be the sub-regional focus of my study.

Madison

composite of layers with results in red

Madison

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Jonathan R. Klaas

Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Mineral M ineral PPoint o WI

2.4

| Regional Scale: County Level

Madison

SW WI Regional Planning Commission outline with County Seats

County Demographics: As observed at the county level, Mineral Point is a centrally located town in the SW Region of Wisconsin. This location offers an opportunity to serve as the region’s Rehabiliation facility concept location. In the diagram below, the distances to the surrounding county seats are in red numbers.

Dodgeville- Iowa county seat, is located 8 miles from Mineral Point. Madison is 55 miles to the east northeast, and U.S. Highway Iowa county 18/151 curls around the northern aspect of the town. These three aspects, along with its location within the SW WI Regional Planning Area, make Mineral Point the prime location for the regional design site. As we move into the town scale, we will further analyze the suitablity of the Rehabilitation facility.

Richland Co. Richland Center

46

KEY DISTANCES TO COUNTY SEATS (mi) COUNTY ROADS U.S. HIGHWAYS MINERAL POINT

Iowa

Co. Dodgeville

8 31 Grant Co. Lancaster

TOWNS OF IOWA COUNTY

38 15

Lafayette Co. Darlington

Green Co. Monroe

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Jonathan R. Klaas

Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Mineral M ineral PPoint o WI

2.4

| Regional Scale: Community Level

Mineral Point- Rehabilitational Facility Site: At the community level, the different scales of the project dissect, because their programs are intended for different parts of the community. In regards to the first site, it is in very close proximity to U.S. Highway 18/151, and located in the recently added business district of Mineral Point. Mineral Point

This district emerged because of the recent highway changes; highway 18/151 used to cut through the town, creating a busy and dangerous vehicular hazard for the citizens of Mineral Point. The newly designed highway has provided a safer environment, as well as creating new commercial opportunities where the town now connects to the U.S. highway. The site location is within two miles of the highway, making it very accessible. It is also contextually appropriate, because it is important that the Rehabilitational facility is placed in an economically feasible location. In addition to the facility, a green collar community shall be established. Renewable energy production, biotechnology, sustainable building materials, recycled goods manufacturing, and sustainable urban agriculture are just a few examples of this economic community. The inmates will be offered employment with these companies as part of their reintegration. This will develop the social (economic) and environmental aspect for the inmates, connecting them to the community through positive means and to the environment through participation and education.

KEY

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1 2

REGIONAL CONCEPT SITE LOCATION MASTER AND SITE PLAN LOCATION MINERAL POINT CIVIL BOUNDARY U.S. HIGHWAY 18/151

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Jonathan R. Klaas

Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Mineral M ineral PPoint o WI

2.4

| Regional Scale: Community Level

Mineral Point- Shake Rag Valley Restoration: As the regional design concept develops itself in the business community near highway 18/151, the other holistic community concept development will be implemented near the downtown of Mineral Point, in one of the town’s oldest establishments- The Shake Rag district. The lowest aspect of Shake Rag valley is currently interrupted by Highway 23, where a large amounts of fill were added to create an even downward sloping road. The image to the left shows its construction in 1955. This roadway connects the high point of Mineral Point in a direct path to downtown, disrupting the natural lay of the land and watershed. Although the road is an extrememly important aspect of Mineral Point, its route creates several topographical problems for the community- Shake Rag Alley Center for the Arts campus is specifically impacted by the road’s current layout. The high traffic rate of the road and topographical manipulation create an abrupt edge that ruins part of the magic of the Shake Rag campus. The disproportionate fill also led to the area’s biggest conundrum: natural watershed distruption and intense runoff variables. The stormwater that once dispersed gently into the valley is now cannoned through a small culvert that shoots right into the heart of Shake Rag campus. This manipulation has caused unnecessary flooding and property damage to the campus. It has also increased the sediment runoff and temperature of the water, which spills into the Pecatonica River just a few feet below Shake Rag campus. The master plan for this location will include the restoration of the valley as well as water management practices that will improve the overall vitality and water quality of the valley.

KEY

1

1 2

REGIONAL CONCEPT SITE LOCATION MASTER AND SITE PLAN LOCATION MINERAL POINT CIVIL BOUNDARY U.S. HIGHWAY 18/151

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Jonathan R. Klaas

Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Mineral M ineral PPoint o WI

2.5

| Master Plan Scale:

Restoring the Waterflow: The Master Plan parameters revolve solely around restoring the stormwater flow to its original essence. This study illustrates four crucial watersheds within the master plan, each with specific implications to the Shake Rag valley. The first and fourth quadrants are part of larger watersheds. They represent the areas from where the water enters the site from the above elevation. In the key below, rate of waterflow for each quadrant helps illustrate the amount of waterflow during a 3 hour/100 year storm event. The seam between the two sets of watersheds is a ridgeline that enters into the site as well. This ridge and valley system creates dramatic views from all directions in the site. master context

One aspect of the final master plan will be the emphasis of elevation change, and the relationship between areas of the site through this transition. Opening up lines of site to both on and off site will also help establish a sense of holism and reuniting that helps edify the project’s greater concept.

MASTER PLAN SITE PLAN 1

WATERSHED RATES: QUADRANT 1: 37 GALLONS/MINUTE

2

4 3

QUADRANT 2: 59 (22) GALLONS/MINUTE QUADRANT 3: 99 (14) GALLONS/MINUTE QUADRANT 4: 85 GALLONS/MINUTE


Jonathan R. Klaas

Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Mineral M ineral PPoint o WI

2.6

| Site Plan Scale: Visual Inventory

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3

2

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7

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7 1 4 3 5 2

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Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Jonathan R. Klaas

Mineral M ineral PPoint o WI

2.7| Master/Site Plan Scale: Opportunities/Constraints Opportunities: The biggest opportunity of the site is its steep elevation change from the high end to the low end of the site. The historic and cultural entity sets the stage for a strong communal connection with past and future generations. Shake Rag valley accepts a large watershed runoff; which offers remediation opportunities for community Highway 23 connects the downtown of Mineral Point to Highway 18/151 and to Darlington. Downtown Mineral Point is within 45 miles of 5 county seats; 8 miles within Dodgeville: Iowa county seat

Constraints: Shake Rag Alley Center for the Arts sets at the bottom of a large valley, which creates an ongoing water issue within the site. The connection of the site to a major highway creates a safety concern for pedestrian circulation. The community’s pool, sporting fields, and restored historic prairie. This part of town has a history of problems with lead in the soil. Remediation is needed which will be an expensive task. There are a number of non-conforming elements such as the Napa Autoparts business adjacent to Shake Rag campus.


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Jonathan R. Klaas

Mineral M ineral PPoint o WI

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2.8 Precedent Study: Jens Jensen’s “The Clearing”

Jensen’s Council Ring The aspect of Jensen’s landscape design is his use and philosophy of the Council Ring. Its symbolism represents the democratic social connection that makes humanity possible.

As a freshman in the Landscape Architecture 312 Graphics for Designers class, I researched and presented a project on “The Clearing” in Ellison Bay. Its designer, Jens Jensen, was a retired landscape architect and conservationist who was well known for his contribution to the public parks system of Illinois as well as his collaboration with Frank Lloyd Wright to begin the “Prairie School” of landscape architecture.

This design element represents the hope of a better world, one that is joined seamlessly as one unit, knowing and feeling the other components of itself. When users experience this unity of the council ring, the statement of peace becomes evident. It is an instructor of empathy and of holism.

The Clearing was envisioned by Jensen as a “school of the soil”, where people could come to establish ethical values through interaction with the natural environment. In order to achieve this transcendence, classes involve direct experience with nature, creative expression, thoughtful study and contemplation.

“Instruction at The Clearing is non-competitive - there are no credits, no grades, no degrees, no pitting of one student against another.” Jens Jensen


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Jonathan R. Klaas

Mineral M ineral PPoint o WI

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2.9 Abstraction Essence: Frank Lloyd Wright’s “Taliesin”

Landscape Integration It is my intent, with this inspiritor, to develop a landscape design that emulates the natural and cultural character of Mineral Point. This emulation will reflect the natural history of the Driftless Area, as well as the rich cultural history of the town.

As a designer, its important to develop a sense of drive and motivation for the landscapes one is creating. This is the basis behind conceptual development- creating something inspired by greater roots. One strong influence on my concept of the Shake Rag valley restoration is Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin. Taliesin is a Welsh word meaning “shining or radiant brow.” This inspiration for Frank Lloyd Wright was apparent in many of his designs, because he had an intuitive ability to design and integrate his architecture into the landscape. My assumption is that some of this skill was developed because he lived much of his formative life in southwest Wisconsin.

In many of Wright’s designs, he chose this motivation because of his beliefs in the spiritual connectedness between man and Earth. He transformed this vision into a concept lineage that moved modern architecture and design to a better understanding of the ultimate connectedness between our human frame and our parent material; the living earth. I am proud to continue the relationship between man and nature in my design concepts and development.

This same skill is prevalent in the architecture of Mineral Point. The town’s intimate relationship with the hillside displays that the original builders and inhabitants of the town were in-tuned with their surroundings and landscape that the called their home.

“Organic buildings are the strength and lightness of the spiders’ spinning, buildings qualified by light, bred by native character to environment, married to the ground.”


Jonathan R. Klaas

Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Mineral M ineral PPoint o WI

Design Solutions

REUNITE RENOVATE

REMEDIATE RESTORE

RECONNECT

REPAIR REDEVELOP

RENEW

REINTRODUCE REBUILD


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Jonathan R. Klaas

Mineral M ineral PPoint o WI

|

3.1 Regional Programming: Study Focus Rehabilitation through Empathy and Holism As the introduction eluded to, the programming for a Regional Rehabilitational facility for corrections inmates will be the focus for my study. In my approach, I am interested in finding alternative solutions to the current corrections footprint in the United States. Of all the landscape topics available,

Why Corrections Rehabilitation?? Nationwide prison population is approximately 1.6 million , 723,000 people are in local jails . Therefore, the total incarcerated population of the United States was 2.32 million in 2008. 2.32 million incarcerated/230 million total population- Incarceration state of United States citizens: 1 in 99 U.S. citizens incar-

cerated. 1 in 36 Hispanics are incarcerated. 1 in 15 African Americans are incarcerated.

Recidivism in Correctional System The recidivism rate in the United States is approximately 60-65%, in comparison to the United Kingdom, whose rate is about 50%. This rate difference is attributed to the governmental response to crime. It is my intent to survey the different approaches to corrections and determine whether or not a change in approach could positvely effect recidivism rates in the United States. If we were to reduce our national recidivism rates by 10%, this number would represent a national tax relief of $6.96 billion. In the U.K., the approach to the corrections system is based on rehabilitation, education, and re-integration into society, whereas in the U.S. the focus is on punishment and deterrence. This critical difference in perspective leads incarcerated individuals to become separated and alienated from society, which often leads to further criminal behavior and deviant perspectives. Studies conducted by the Florida Dept of Corrections indicate that programs devoted to rehabilitation, education, and re-integration have a positive effect on recidivism rates.

1 in 9 African American men between ages 20-34 are incarcerated.

Academic Programs: earning a GED reflected an 8.7% reduction in recidivism

Total spending of U.S. states for corrections in 2008: $49 billion.

Vocational Programming: earning a vocational certificate reflected an 14.6% reduction

Average cost to incarcerate an individual for one year : approximately $30,000.

Substance abuse programing: individuals with substance abuse history completing a treatment program: 13.2% reduction in recidivism


Jonathan R. Klaas

Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Mineral M ineral PPoint o WI

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3.2 Program Development: Concept Origins Unitarian Universalist Principles 1. The inherent worth and dignity of every ry person

Transformative Program Model: This Model represents the development of social justice standards that can be reflected onto the Correctional Facility concept. This Model was developed from the Subedi information included in the capstone handbook

Social 2. Justice, equity and compassion in human n relations

3. Acceptance of one another and encourageg ment to spiritual growth in our congregations ns

4. A free and responsible search for truth and meaning

5. The right of conscience and the use of the democratic process within our congregations ns ns and in society at large

6. The goal of world community with peace, e,, liberty, and justice for all 7. Respect for the interdependent web of allll existence of which we are a part.

(including economic): All humans have the right to social interaction and public participation. This connection helps bind one person to another, creating a string of support and edification.

Environmental:

All humans have the right to contribute positively to the natural environment in which they live. This interaction includes opportunities of contribution as well as environmental education development.

Educational:

All humans have the right to develop towards mental maturity. This facet of the Model is represented in different ways, including passive educational experiences as well as formal classroom development for a holistic education perspective.

Spiritual:

All humans have the right to develop a spiritual understanding of themselves within a religion-free environment. This study seeks to develop a spiritual freedoms perspective that will engage individuals in spiritual contemplation and religious objectivity. This study will also encourage people to edify others’ beliefs in whatever spiritual development that is of interest to them.


Jonathan R. Klaas

Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Mineral M ineral PPoint o WI

|

3.3 Program Development: Core Aspects

-the external -the teacherr -the giver

Social::

Environmental:

-improving the health, safety and welfare of our communityy

-connectedness t d of people -unified in development

-connectedness -co to all existance -development of reverence through knowledge

-the learner -moving towards enlightenment

-empath and tolerance -empathy toward different peopless towards

Educational:l Ed

Spiritual: -the internall -the studentt -the receiver


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Jonathan R. Klaas

Mineral M ineral PPoint o WI

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3.4 Regional Development: Conceptual Program Design Building the Conceptual Backbone After developing the framework and conceptual backbone for my overall design, I wanted to delve into some of the specifics of this program as it relates to my regional design. This proposal for the Department of Corrections is intended for individuals repentant and ready to bridge the gap between custody and freedom . As in any correctional system, there will be individuals willing to seek personal development, and others who are unwilling. This program is not intended for hard-nosed people continuing to live in hostility and separation from the public. This plan distinguishes between the two, because those unwilling to reconnect themselves socially are fundamentally incongruent with this study’s philosophy. But for those who wish to correct the aspects of their lives that led them to incarceration, the Rehabilitational Facility can become the conduit between incarceration and social reintegration. The core aspects of the design will aid the overall success of this program; not just for the inmates being held at the facility, but for the correctional officers, the community, and the general public. The intent of this program is holism and empathy- it will crumble to pieces unless it remains so. The concept itself exists to foster love and consideration for all things living.

Four Aspects Dissected Social: The social aspect aims at developing individuals in the different social realms of independant life. This includes human to human interaction, social participation, and vocational development, such job training and job placement. As I discussed earlier, the proposed facility is to incorporate within the existing business community of Mineral Point. This opportunity will be utilized in the development of several new “green collar” jobs that will facilitate vocational integration for the individuals at the Rehabilitational Facility. These new jobs, as well as many existing jobs in Mineral Point will aid in this development. To name a few, current businesses such as artisan galleries, local farms, landscaping companies, Alliant Energy, Premier energy co-op, Iowa county courthouse, and other companies will be a part of this vocational development for the community. Renewable energy production, biotechnology, sustainable building materials, recycled goods manufacturing, and sustainable urban agriculture are all part of the social/economic model because they are great sources for financial security, but also because they allow for a sensitivity between humans and the environment which we live in. Environmental: The next aspect of the concept development recognizes that human life and welness are strongly dependant on the earth that sustains us. This notion is part of the core structure, and the “green collar” job industry will aid individuals in thinking and connecting to the environment and its endless resources that it offers.


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Jonathan R. Klaas

Mineral M ineral PPoint o WI

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3.4 Regional Development: Conceptual Program Design Four Aspects Dissected Environmental: Along with the “green collar” aspects of the design, there will also be an emphasis on other environmental factors such as sustanance farming for the facility. Other visioning concepts include a recycling plan, environmental education classes, and environmental stewardship opportunities that involve switch grass farming and cultivation for biofuels production. As mentioned earlier, all four of the program aspects will overlap with regularity. The environmental will overlap with the educational, creating a wellrounded, holistic approach at human development. Educational: The Rehabilitation Facility is a unique opportunity for individuals to participate in mental development by developing on several different fronts. The other aspects will incorporate learning, but the development can not stop there. The facility will offer a range of formal education, including literacy and a GED program, as well as many higher education programs ranging from business development, environmental studies, human services, and sustainability. The greater vision for the facility offers accredited programs through the UW-extension office and area technical colleges. A model of this nature will equip individuals to develop individually, but also as part of a greater social network.

Spiritual: The final aspect of the programming is the spiritual aspect. This includes not only religious and secular development and understanding, but also incorporates a physical wellness component that aims at connecting the body and mind. This element seems to be the universal connector between the other elements, and it is from this element that complete social unification is possible. The love and connection to one’s self, others in the community, as well as the greater connection to the environment and the planet are emphasized. Another important concept developed in this aspect is the freedom of religious and spiritual development. The program aims to bring people together as they seek out individual paths of understanding and reflection, and helps develop spiritual tolerance for others seeking different paths. This perspective will enhance the empathetic aspect of the program, fostering a goal of holistic unity between individuals within the greater community. This aspect will be reflected by a religious freedoms organization that will be voluntary and based on people’s self interests. The organizing of this program would be facilitated by staff by promoting knowledge and study of various religions and a open communication system that would allow individuals to seek out what spiritual stances they believe in and find logical. The spiritual concept is ultimately meant to tie the entire program together. It is within this realm that the individuals at the rehabilitation facility can grow and develop into socially sensitive members of the community, tolerant of others and in-tune with their own existance.


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Jonathan R. Klaas

Mineral M ineral PPoint o WI

3.12| Master/Site Plan: Programming

nts RED: SOCIAL REALM- promoting social justice and equality, unifying community by encouraging human connections; greater concept reflects social restoration and altruism YELLOW: SPIRITUAL REALM- connecting individuals to greater spiritual awareness; astrological observation deck encourages spiritual contemplation; open prairie symbolizes the oneness of all living beings VIOLET: EDUCATIONAL REALM- serves as educational connector between all levels of development; encourages all users to act as teacher and student, as several educational styles are explored GREEN: ENVIRONMENTAL REALM- encourages environmental connections with native plant species, as well as environmental education and environmental stewardship BLUE: LIFE FORCE, CONNECTOR, UNIFIER- restored valley acts as the conduit and unifier; represents time and connectedness to the past and present, as well as the life supplier- without water, life would not be possible. This aspect connects the four main concepts together and symbolizes the greater human existance and the proliferation of our existence


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Jonathan R. Klaas

Mineral M ineral PPoint o WI

3.13| Master/Site Plan: Planting

nts RED: “showy” planting scheme consists of native and non-native species, highlighting ornamental and attractive varieties, ones that would be typically used in public showcases. Although non-natives can be specified, aggressive/invasives will be avoided YELLOW: reflecting tallgrass prairie environment, creating a timeless effect. Central concept will express a variety of native species that are typical of a pre-European settlement natural environment VIOLET: continuing conifer theme that currently exists in Shake Rag alley. In addition, showy native specimen will be encouraged in order to beautify campus. Restored perennial gardens will be re-established to honor Al Felly, long-time Shake Rag alley supporter and horticulturist GREEN: all native area expressing Wisconsin’s plant cultures, including conifer forest, deciduous forest, tallgrass prairie and lowland habitats BLUE: representing native lowland and wetland species of Wisconsin. Initial plant selections will be chosen as biological remediators, due to the current soil contaminants


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Jonathan R. Klaas

Mineral M ineral PPoint o WI

3.13| Master/Site Plan: Planting

TREE AND SHRUB EXAMPLES: ACER SACCARUM AMELANCHIER ARBOREA BETULA VARIETIES CARYA OVATA CELTIS OCCIDENTALIS CORNUS ALTERNIFOLIA CRATAEGUS CRUSGALLI FAGUS GRANDIFOLIA HAMAMELIS VIRGINIANA POPULUS TREMULOIDES QUERCUS ALBA QUERCUS MACROCARPA QUERCUS RUBRA QUERCUS PALUSTRIS SAMBUCUS CANADENSIS ABIES VARIETIES GINKGO BILOBA HYDRANGEA VARIETIES CERCIS CANADENSIS COTINUS VARIETIES FOTHERGILLA VARIETIES JUNIPERUS VARIETIES LARIX LARICINA PINUS VARIETIES PICEA VARIETIES

GROUND COVER, GRASS, VINE AND PERENNIAL EXAMPLES: ASARUM CANADENSE KOELERIA MACRANTHA SPOROBOLUS HETEROLEPIS SCHIZACHYRIUM SCOPARIUM ANDROPOGON GERARDII PANICUM VIRATUM SORGHASTRUM NUTANS SPARTINA PECTINATA ADIANTUM PEDATUM SYMPHYOTRICHUM VARIETIES HELIANTHUS OCCIDENTALIS PHLOX VARIETIES RUDBECKIA VARIETIES

**THIS IS A LIST OF KEY SPECIES; OTHER SPECIES MAY BE ACCEPTABLE BASED ON THE PLANTING ZONES. INVASIVE AND AGGRESSIVE SPECIES WILL NOT BE ACCEPTABLE


Jonathan R. Klaas

Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Mineral M ineral PPoint o WI

4.1

| Project Log:

Fall and Spring Semesters: 2008-2009 Week:

Semester 1:

Semester 2:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

10 hrs 12 hrs 8 hrs 16 hrs 14 hrs 18 hrs 14 hrs 16 hrs 20 hrs 20 hrs 18 hrs 20 hrs 25 hrs 30 hrs 27 hrs 33 hrs 40 hrs

13 20 18 14 13 17 20 30 15 18 15 22 30 36 38 45 50

Total:

341 hrs

414 hrs

Cumulative:

755 hrs

hrs hrs hrs hrs hrs hrs hrs hrs hrs hrs hrs hrs hrs hrs hrs hrs hrs


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Jonathan R. Klaas

Mineral M ineral PPoint o WI

4.2

| References:

Available upon request

A Special Thanks to faculty members Shawn Kelley, Sue Thering, Evelyn Howell My parents: Helen and Donald And my siblings: Paul, Theresa, Rachel, Ann Marie, and Matthew

In Memory of Donald Raymond Klaas- you will always be in my heart, and there in each and every design that I create. Until we meet again, special friend...


Jonathan R. Klaas

Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Mineral M inerall PPoint o WI

|

3.5 Master/Site Plan

A

1

B

B 1

A

nts


Jonathan R. Klaas

Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Mineral M inerall PPoint o WI

3.6| Master/Site Topography: Before and After 10 ft. contour intervals

nts


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Jonathan R. Klaas

Mineral M inerall PPoint o WI

3.7| Master/Site Plan: Cut and Fill: 10 ft. contour intervals

(balanced @ 10 ft. c. i.)

CUT: 5200 sq. ft FILL: 6500 sq ft.

nts


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Mineral M inerall PPoint o WI

3.8| Master/Site Plan: Topography Design2 ft. contour intervals

nts

Jonathan R. Klaas


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Jonathan R. Klaas

Mineral M inerall PPoint o WI

3.9| Master/Site Plan: Irrigation Schedule

nts Yellow- impervious PVC Blue- pervious ‘spreader’ PVC


Mineral M inerall PPoint o WI

Shake Rag Valley Restoration

A

3.10| Sections: ‘Down the Valley’

nts

Jonathan R. Klaas

T HE

RESTORED VALLEY CUTS THROUGH THE FIVE RETENTION PONDS INTO SHAKERAG ALLEY CENTER FOR THE ARTS

ELEVATION CHANGE: A TO A1: 1060- 980

1

A


Mineral M inerall PPoint o WI

Shake Rag Valley Restoration

B

3.10| Sections: ‘From Ridge to Ridge’

Jonathan R. Klaas

THE POWER OF ELEVATION PLAYS A PROMINENT ROLE IN THIS LANDSCAPE RESTORATION

ELEVATION CHANGE: B1- VALLEY: 1110 to 1060 VALLEY- B: 1060 to 1030

1

B


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Mineral M inerall PPoint o WI

3.11| Details

Jonathan R. Klaas

nts


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

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3.11| Details

Jonathan R. Klaas

nts


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

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3.12| Perspectives

Jonathan R. Klaas


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Mineral M inerall PPoint o WI

3.12| Perspectives

Jonathan R. Klaas


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Mineral M inerall PPoint o WI

3.12| Perspectives

Jonathan R. Klaas


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Mineral M inerall PPoint o WI

3.12| Perspectives

Jonathan R. Klaas


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Mineral M inerall PPoint o WI

3.12| Perspectives

Jonathan R. Klaas


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Mineral M inerall PPoint o WI

3.12| Perspectives

Jonathan R. Klaas


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Mineral M inerall PPoint o WI

3.12| Perspectives

Jonathan R. Klaas


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Mineral M inerall PPoint o WI

3.12| Perspectives

Jonathan R. Klaas


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Mineral M inerall PPoint o WI

3.12| Perspectives

Jonathan R. Klaas


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Mineral M inerall PPoint o WI

3.12| Perspectives

Jonathan R. Klaas


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Mineral M inerall PPoint o WI

3.12| Perspectives

Jonathan R. Klaas


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Mineral M inerall PPoint o WI

3.12| Perspectives

Jonathan R. Klaas


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Mineral M inerall PPoint o WI

3.12| Perspectives

Jonathan R. Klaas


Shake Rag Valley Restoration

Mineral M inerall PPoint o WI

3.12| Perspectives

Jonathan R. Klaas

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