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2013/14 DEBUT SEASON

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B I G S K Y, M O N TA N A

JAMES SEWELL BALLET SECOND CITY THE MOTH MAINSTAGE

INSIDE

DON’T BE BORING:

HOW TO TELL A STORY

PLUS: LEARNING TO LOVE THE ‘B’ WORD

PHOTO BY ANNA MIDDLETON

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-SHAKESPEARE

Friends of Big Sky Education (FOBSE) is a not-for-profit foundation formed in 2005, dedicated to ensuring that all Big Sky students enjoy an exceptional educational experience. FOBSE believes a better school builds a better community and managed the capital campaign for the Warren Miller Performing Arts Center. FOBSE also oversees the major programming arm of the Warren Miller Performing Arts Center; without the incredible support and passion of FOBSE’s founders and directors, this amazing venue would not be here. Period.

ADVISORY BOARD TO THE WARREN MILLER PERFORMING ARTS CENTER Doug Gale, Chair Jill Bough Kitty Clemens Patty Dash Nancy Domaille David Gasser Sarah Griffiths Barb Rooney Barbara Rowley Casey Schwartz

Photo by Kene Sperry


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FROM THE ARTISTIC DIRECTOR Dear Friends,   Welcome to the Debut Season of the Warren Miller Performing Arts Center. I am thrilled to present to you our first look into an exciting season of events that will entertain, inspire, and move you as audience members.    Warren Miller is a legend in the skiing industry, and we are so fortunate to bear his name. Warren’s inspirational work as a filmmaker and artist has set the bar for our center. We all know the adages from his movies and speeches, but one that really rings true for me is this: “Everybody’s intuition is their constant search for freedom.”   And so, it is with a nod to artistic freedom that I present to you the Debut Season of the Warren Miller Performing Arts Center. Every performer has been selected and engaged to create an intentional and original sequence of events. We will see movement that defies gravity with the James Sewell Ballet; improv comedy that will leave us exhausted from laughter with The Second City; stories that captivate and enthrall us from The Moth Mainstage. Mark Applebaum, a featured TED speaker, will show us how he pushes the boundaries of creativity in a fight against artistic ennui. David Mason and Tami Haaland, the Colorado and Montana Poet Laureates, will demonstrate how less is more when using words to change an entire society’s perspective, and Antonii Baryshevskyi, just 25 years old, will show us how to make a piano sweat (in a good way).   Though all the events in our Debut Season are equally fascinating and inspiring, I am particularly excited to present to you the “Big Sky Commission.” Philip Aaberg is a nationally recognized American composer from our gorgeous state, and we have the amazing good fortune to have him composing an entirely new piece of music dedicated to the Warren Miller Performing Arts Center in honor of our Debut Season. Accompanying him on that program are Montana mainstays Mike Reynolds and Angella Ahn. I believe that it is the responsibility of a Performing Arts Center not only to celebrate artists as performers, but also to encourage them as creators. We are celebrating what it means to be Made in Montana, and how that manifests itself within new artistic vision and works.   All in all, I am deeply humbled by the challenge and opportunity to present to you a season of performances that will inspire you to go out there and create something new in your own lives, in your own way.    Thank you for being here this evening, and thank you for your unwavering support for the arts.  

John Zirkle Artistic Director 

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SEASON LINEUP

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JAMES SEWELL BALLET: LEAVING GRAVITY AT THE DOOR On December 28, the ballet troupe the New York Times calls “the company to see” opens the Warren Miller Debut Season. Founded two decades ago in New York to perform innovative work that explores the technical boundaries of ballet, choreographer and co-founder James Sewell has been called “one of American ballet’s most inventive choreographers.” An incredibly versatile dance-maker, Sewell’s works range from comic reenactments of Garrison Keillor’s “Guy Noir, Private Eye” and family-friendly renditions of Miss Spider’s Tea, to contemporary works that explore music and movement with boundary-breaking excitement. Prepare to be astounded and inspired as this company opens the WMPAC 2013-2014 season with leaps and bounds.

THE SECOND CITY: 50 YEARS OF FUNNY Will the next Tina Fey, Bill Murray or Stephen Colbert be on the stage of the WMPAC this January 11? It is impossible to know, but given the incredible success of these and many, many other Second City alumni, the odds are very good. From SCTV to Saturday Night Live, on stages in Chicago and Toronto and on tours around the world, Second City has been spreading its trademark comedic and improvisational sensibility for half a century, and the institution the New York Times calls “a comedy empire,’ is now a ‘diversified entertainment company’ with one compelling mission: Laughter, and lots of it.


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Photo courtesy of Portland Cello Project

THE PORTLAND CELLO PROJECT: GENRE-CROSSING CELLISTS From Prairie Home Companion to punk rock clubs, The Portland Cello Project is pursuing its three-fold mission: To bring cellos to places they’ve never been before, to play music on cellos you haven’t heard them play (think: Kanye West) and to build bridges between musical genres and cultural communities. With an 800-piece repertoire, no two shows are exactly alike, though all share an ability to excite and surprise audiences. As Spin Magazine wrote: “This indie orchestra gives classical music a jolt of energy.” Brought to WMPAC by the Arts Council of Big Sky, The Portland Cello Project takes to the stage on January 25.

Photo courtesy of Second City

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THE MOTH MAINSTAGE: TRUE STORIES TOLD LIVE Yes, it’s true: the New York sensation that the Wall Street Journal calls “New York’s hottest and hippest literary ticket,” is coming to Big Sky on February 15 with an evening of storytelling designed especially for our community. Founded in 1997, The Moth has gained worldwide audiences through its podcasts and touring shows in which storytellers explore specific themes, often in unexpected ways. Standing room only crowds are the norm for the shows, in which storytellers tell their true stories live, and without notes. Watch this show live, and then re-live the experience when The Moth podcasts their WMPAC show.

Photo courtesy of The Moth

THE BRUBECK BROTHERS QUARTET: CELEBRATING AN AMERICAN ICON The Brubeck Brothers Quartet is an exciting jazz ensemble featuring two members of one of America’s most accomplished musical families, Dan Brubeck (drums,) and Chris Brubeck (bass & trombone.) On February 20, the group will be performing a musical tribute to their late father, Dave Brubeck, in what is sure to be one of most sizzling nights of the winter. Although the quartet’s style is rooted in “straight-ahead” jazz, their concerts reveal an inherent ability to explore and play odd time signatures while naturally integrating the influences of funk, blues and world music. The group’s creativity, technique and improvisation can be heard in their uncompromising music, which reflects their dedication to melody, rhythm, culture and the spontaneous spirit of jazz. This concert is brought to WMPAC by the Arts Council of Big Sky.


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ANTONII BARYSHEVSKYI: SETTING THE KEYS ON FIRE On his annual trek to Germany for a two-week composition retreat, WMPAC Artistic Director John Zirkle heard Baryshevskyi play and almost immediately began work getting the Visa for the Ukrainian pianist to come to WMPAC. “He has a fire and infectious enthusiasm for the piano that is synonymous with youth,” says Zirkle, “together with the incredible touch of the mature artist.” Put simply, Zirkle says, Baryshevskyi is “a world treasure.” Prepare for a concert like none other on March 1.

DAVID MASON & TAMI HAALAND WITH MARTHA SCANLAN: POETRY SLAM AND POET LAUREATE DOUBLE-HEADER Words are Colorado Poet Laureate David Mason’s instrument, and he plays them with the skill of a master. As the poet laureate, Mason is attempting to visit every county in Colorado for readings, each time recruiting local poets to the stage alongside him. “I go into a community where people might tell me that poetry never interested them, they didn’t have it in school, they were always afraid of it, something of that nature. And they will respond to a performance of it very positively. They’ll say ‘I never heard it that way before.’” Expect Mason’s visit to WMPAC on March 9 to include surprise local guests—including our state’s own Poet Laureate, Tami Haaland, and songwriter Martha Scanlan—as well as a perspective-shifting talk about words.

THE BIG SKY COMMISSION: MADE IN MONTANA Join Philip Aaberg, Angella Ahn and Mike Reynolds for a one of a kind evening, as composer Aaberg premieres his original, WMPAC commissioned piece on March 19. “As a Performing Arts Center we have an obligation to highlight our local performers,” says WMPAC artistic director John Zirkle. “And as it happens our local performers are also internationally-known musicians.” Ahn, a teacher at MSU has been featured in Time, People and on TED, with her sisters, who form the Ahn Trio; Aaberg, a native Montanan, is an Emmy nominated composer and performer for Windham Hill and Sweetgrass Music, and Reynolds, a Grammy nominee, is a member of the Muir Quartet, and an internationally renowned composer and performer in his own right.

Angella Ahn / Photo by Arthur Elgort

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MARK APPLEBAUM: ON THE FRONTIERS OF MUSIC A composer and performer, Mark Applebaum garnered nearly half a million views during a TED talk when he provocatively declared Beethoven to be ‘boring.’ An engaging speaker and Stanford University professor, Applebaum will explore how boredom drives his creativity both in how he composes and the instruments he creates out of combs and doorstops. In his WMPAC address, Applebaum will explore what he calls the ‘frontiers of music’ as he examines the ‘sound world’ and the role of the inventor/composer, and demonstrates music made by cutting carrots and sawing wood, the silent music of conductors with no musicians, and much more on March 29.

Photo courtesy of Mark Applebaum


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DEBUT SEASON SPONSORS PRESENTING SEASON SPONSORS - $50,000 Jill & Loren Bough PRESENTING SEASON PARTNER Arts Council of Big Sky DOUBLE-BLACK DIAMOND SPONSORS - $10,000 Sandra & Richard Jacobson WMPAC Advisory Board

BLACK DIAMOND SPONSORS - $5,000 Bob & Joanie Hall Kevin & Courtney Zirkle Anonymous “In Honor of the Loren and Jill Bough Family” SEASON UNDERWRITERS - $2,500 Barbara Rowley & Taylor Middleton

PRESENTING LODGING SPONSOR

PRESENTING MEDIA SPONSOR

PROGRAM EDITOR Barbara Rowley

PROGRAM PHOTOGRAPHY Kene Sperry, Anna Middleton

DEBUT SEASON CATERING PARTNER

WMPAC GRAND PIANO UNDERWRITERS

SPECIAL THANKS

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Proud Sponsor of the Warren Miller Performing Arts Center Debut Season

americanbankmontana.com Big Sky l Big Timber l Bozeman Livingston l Whitefish Member FDIC

We support community by supporting the people who build community.


“ G R E AT T H I N G S A R E D O N E W H E N M E N A N D M O U N TA I N S M E E T ” -WILLIAM BLAKE

FULL SERVICE MEDIA AND MARKETING (406)995-2055 • theoutlawpartners.com PROUD SUPPORTER OF THE WARREN MILLER PERFORMING ARTS CENTER


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Photo by Anna Middleton

SEE YOU ON STAGE

IF YOU BUILD IT THEY WILL PERFORM It all started with Singing Camp back in 2010.  “It was a terrible name,” says Katie Coleman, director of Camp Big Sky, which hosts the camp. But then a brainstorming session changed all that. “We came up with Big Sky Broadway. Now that was a name kids could get excited about.” It was still—essentially—a singing camp. But the name: It inspired. During the first year, high school intern Anna Middleton insisted on, and then designed and made costumes, lights and make-up. By the next year, the singing revue had become an abridged production of Willy Wonka; in the following season, a full-length version of The Wizard of Oz.  The company of elementary and middle school actors now had real sets, props and costumes, as well as a full backstage staff to direct them. The one thing they didn’t have: an actual stage.

It was a problem all arts groups in Big Sky faced before this year. Big Sky Broadway relied on the largesse of Big Sky Resort, which provided free rehearsal rooms for two weeks, and a stage and chairs in the ballroom. Big Sky Community Chorus found rehearsal space at the Big Sky Chapel. Piano recitals and school plays were also chapel or gymnasium events, as were speakers and even community meetings. It worked, but with limitations: No lights, curtains, correct acoustics, perfect seating. “There’s really no replacing a true theater for performance purposes,” says WMPAC artistic director John Zirkle. All that has now changed with the opening of the Warren Miller Performing Arts Center last spring.  And along with the stage, opportunities to perform for all ages have increased exponentially. Always had an itch to be out under the lights? Check out the burgeoning art scene in Big Sky.


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THE BIG SKY COMMUNITY CHORUS: EVERYBODY SINGS. ADMIT IT. Now in its third season, the Big Sky Community Chorus continues to reach out to new singers and old alike, reassembling each fall and winter to prepare for its two concerts a year. Accompanied by the electric pianistic stylings of Klaudia Kosiak, the chorus members are as eclectic as its song selections. Expect to sing in a half-dozen languages a repertoire than ranges from pop and rock to Eastern European folk tunes and ancient choral classics. Open to all regardless of experience or age, the chorus is both an artistic and educational endeavor for the two-dozen regular members who represent virtually every demographic in Big Sky. Rehearsals begin with a rousing warm up of “I love to sing” and ends with “après-sing” conversation at BYWOM. Join our ranks and our mailing list by contacting johnzirkle@gmail.com. Pianist Klaudia Kosiak / Photo by Anna Middleton

THE BIG SKY COMMUNITY THEATRE: JESTERS AND DIVAS RECOMMENDED. The newest entry to the Big Sky arts scene, the community theatre found a secure home in the school and the theater as an outreach of the school district’s Adult Education program. Following its success with The Importance of Being Earnest last fall, the theatre group will double its efforts this year with a holiday presentation of four short plays this December. Open to all adults, regardless of theatrical experience, Community Theatre auditions and performances take place in the Fall and Spring. For information or to be placed on the e-mail list of the theatre, contact Jeremy Harder at jharder@bssd72.org. Photo by Kene Sperry Peter Pan - Summer 2013 / Photo by Anna Middleton

BIG SKY BROADWAY IS THE PLACE TO BE Big Sky’s first and only children’s theater company, Big Sky Broadway specializes in staging a full-scale Broadway show in just two weeks in June. Founded in 2009 by Producer Barbara Rowley and Director John Zirkle as well as founding staff members Middleton and Kosiak, the performing camp has a 90 percent camper return rate each year. Its campers range from entering 5th to entering 9th grades. Auditioning for the doublecast shows occurs each March/April, and is available via Skype to out-of-towners. Although the cast works hard, every day also includes games, silly contests, and legendary dance parties. To place you and your child on the e-mail list for BSB updates, contact browley@3rivers.net.  


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JAMES SEWELL ON TRADITION, E N T E R TA I N M E N T, A N D H O W T H E A R T O F DA N C E C A N H E L P YO U S E E

Photos by Erik Saulitis


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WMPAC: How can something so traditional find the means to be open? JS: For me, it’s how we take traditional art form and make it relevant to people today. It’s not art for artists. One of the things I learned working with Balanchine was this: he would say, “it’s just entertainment, dear.” He didn’t take it so seriously. And yet, what he did was so much more than entertainment. If you don’t, on the surface level, have people engaged or--the dirty word—entertained—then you can’t then get them to the other layers. First they have to be engaged with what you’re doing, then you can go to all kinds of places; you can deal with all sorts of issues.

Warren Miller Performing Arts Center: What is the general public’s notion of ballet? What does ballet mean, and what does it imply? It’s a scary term, isn’t it? James Sewell: It is! It’s something I’ve actually had a relationship with: the b word. When we started the company in New York, we were James Sewell Dance, and I very strategically chose that because I didn’t want the baggage of the b word. Our society says, ‘Oh ballet. It’s this stuffy boring thing that people in furs want to go see, and if I like sports, I’m going to be bored going to the ballet. So I wanted to stay away from that to a certain degree, and “dance” to me was neutral. Yes we do ballet, but we also do modern, we mix in gymnastics, theatre, but it’s all dance. But after the first three years, there were at least four other companies that started with “Person’s Name” and “Dance,” and they were all definitely modern companies. WMPAC: So why did ‘ballet’ return to your name when you restarted in Minneapolis? JS: I decided to take on the idea of trying to get people to change their views of what ballet is. There are two aspects of it. There’s the “museum” ballet - the classics like Swan Lake, Giselle, and The Nutracker - and then there’s contemporary ballet, which is done with contemporary music with themes that are relevant to today. Ballet is our technical base; we start everyday with a ballet class. We use pointe shoes, so that puts us in that ballet category. But beyond that, it’s very open.

WMPAC: So what’s the difference between Art and Entertainment? JS: Entertainment reinforces what we already know, and art helps us see ourselves in our world in a new way. That to me gets to the essence of it, and it doesn’t mean that it can’t be entertaining. But that, to me, is the difference. If you give [the audience] all the information...and don’t give them the space to bring their own experience and imaginations, then you’re purely entertaining them. But to me, it’s that line, where I give people enough information where they get what’s going on, but not so much that they don’t have to think and make decisions about what it is and what it means to them. And that’s the line that I think about a lot as I work. WMPAC: You started your company in New York, and eventually decided to move it to Minneapolis. What factors led to that decision? JS: There were literally more than 400 dance companies in New York at that time, all competing for the same funding, for the same studio space, same dancers, venues, etc... I think we had something to offer, but the resistance for survival was so huge. I wanted to have my dancers on salary, with health benefits, and be able to hire an executive director, so that my wife Sally and I weren’t having to do all the business. By moving to Minneapolis, we were able [to do that] in the first year; then I found that my energy could go into the making of the work, not into the survival. WMPAC: What is special about creating art outside of New York? JS: What’s unique about the Twin Cities is the level of arts that are here. There is an amazing assortment of modern, ethnic, ballet and all different sorts of dance companies. So it’s a really great community to be working with, and here we’ve collaborated with the Minnesota Orchestra and pretty much all the major organizations here in town. And to me, it’s not about big pond/small pond, it’s about what work I’m going to do, and I’d rather be doing the work. I’d rather be having those collaborations with the major organizations, and I can do that here. Then we can go back to New York, and when we’ve gone back, we’ve been received very well. So to me it’s not a cop-out at all; it’s a way to actually raise the level of what we’re doing.

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POETRY TO THE

PEOPLE

DAVID MASON HAS A FEW WORDS FOR YOU Over the last four years, David Mason has recited poetry dozens of times to a wide variety of groups including ranchers, convicts and college kids, in front of audiences as large as 500 and as tiny as three. But if the words ‘poetry’ and ‘recited’ immediately make you stifle a yawn, think again. Mason’s favorite moment on one of his tours was when an 8-year old named Max offered up a comic poem in such a high-pitched voice, and with such hilarity that the audience began falling off of their chairs—literally. “There’s a misconception that poetry is all serious,” says Mason. “I like to lighten the mood, and remind audiences of what W.H. Auden called the ‘reverent frivolity’ of the form.” When Colorado Governor John Hinkenlooper first named him poet laureate of Colorado in 2010, Mason was initially a little conflicted about accepting the honor. “My friends worried I would sacrifice my literary ambitions to this social cause.” Ultimately, he says, “I have been more the beneficiary of this position than anyone else.” His decision to use his post to bring poetry, in live presentations, to all 64 counties of Colorado has allowed him to “get to begin to learn where I live.” He has also found himself--perhaps for the first time in his 30-plus year career--introducing himself to others as a poet. “For practical reasons, it is now necessary for me to call myself ‘the poet laureate of Colorado,’ he says, clearly aware—and slightly bashful— of the import of the title.


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Photos courtesy of David Mason

“I LIKE TO LIGHTEN THE M O O D, A N D R E M I N D AU D I E N C E S O F W H AT W. H . A U D E N C A L L E D T H E ‘REVERENT FRIVOLITY’ O F T H E F O R M .”


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In reality, poetry is only one of the ways in which the 58-year old college department chair employs words. “I’m a writer, a storyteller, an essayist, a librettist and I write poetry. It does not make sense to me to be only one thing.” In the last decade, Mason has used his words well in all ways. His verse novel, Ludlow, about the bloody labor stand off at the Colorado coal mines in 1914 , won the Colorado Book Award. He’s also written an opera based on the Scarlet Letter and seen his poems widely published from The New Yorker and Harpers to the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal. Like any writer, Mason relishes his too infrequent opportunities to write for long lengths of time. So when he gets the chance, he doesn’t waste a moment; he often stays in bed and composes for hours on end, never quite sure at the outset what form his words will take—prose or verse. “It’s impossible to predict,” he says. Still, while Mason has written a memoir and other books in prose, the lure of poetry is especially strong. “Poets write in lines,” explains Mason. “This distinguishes us from what I call the culture of prose. We can do things in lines that prose writers cannot do, so we should make use of the culture of the line and the line break whenever we can.” This doesn’t mean that simply breaking prose into short lines creates poetry. “A mediocre poem will be no different when you arrange it in lines or in prose. But a really good poem will announce itself by the deliberateness of its lines,” says Mason. “Poems are moments of articulateness, often expressing the inexpressible, so we reach for them in moments when we need language that can say what we feel.” This particular quality of poetry—expressing what seems impossible to put into words—is why Mason feels so strongly about two of his favorite approaches to the form: Speaking poetry aloud, and committing it to memory. In all of his presentations, Mason begins by having everyone in the audience participate in reading

A POET WHO KNOWS IT: A FEW MORE WORDS FROM DAVID MASON Most language that reaches our ears is mediocre or toxic in some way, so when we hear true poetry it helps detoxify the atmosphere, not just by speaking truth to power, but also by speaking beautifully, memorably, mysteriously, movingly, musically. It is a moral imperative that we train our memories. It is the ultimate counter-cultural thing to do. To be someone who can speak huge swatches of gorgeous language is to be a revolutionary in a numbed commercial culture. It is important to remember that the medium of poetry, words, are the property of everyone. The same words you use to buy a peach can be used to write a poem. William Carlos Williams said, “It is difficult/to get the news from poems/ yet men die miserably every day/for lack/of what is found there.” He was a doctor and would have known what he was talking about.


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poems aloud, line by line. Why? Because even though he’s a creative writing professor in Colorado College’s well-known English Department, Mason’s first response to poetry isn’t analytical—it’s musical. “I recite poems with audiences so they can mouth the lines and feel the words on their tongues and understand the primary contact with words before the secondary act of analysis interferes,” says Mason. “Oral and aural pleasure are necessary ingredients to the art.” Memorizing poems—that bane of existence for many a middle-school English class—is also an essential skill, one he rediscovered when a college course he was teaching in Wisconsin was filled with self-avowed poetry haters. “Then I had a brainstorm. I told the students they did not have to love what I loved. Love is your own business—nobody else’s. So you don’t have to love poetry, but you do have to memorize and recite 100 lines of it or I flunk you in the class. Simple as that.”

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The tactic worked—the students found they actually liked the process—and Mason learned a lesson he employs to this day. “I still encourage students to memorize only what they genuinely love—within reason, of course, with some discussion. We recite a few lines every day, we applaud, we laugh, we do not discuss or analyze.” And yet, for all of the ways in which Mason works hard to make poetry light-hearted and accessible, he also acknowledges that poetry is both necessarily difficult and absolutely essential. “Poetry is difficult in the way life is difficult. You have to be willing to learn, to discover. Some poems can be taken in quickly, but even those might yield up more riches if you come back to them, stay with them, live with them for a while. You can’t solve a poem. Not a real one. A real poem will keep you thinking and feeling and re-reading all your life.”

Brian Phillips, Poetry

“Ludlow bowled me over with its dramatic power, kept me reading on, under its spell. This violent chapter in American labor history richly deserves a poem of epic size, and David Mason, outstanding poet and long-time resident of Colorado, is the man to deliver it. Unforgettably, its characters practically step off the page—immigrant hero Louis Tikas, mistreated waif Luisa Mole, and Too Tall MacIntosh, the man who must stoop to work in a mine. Here is a major poem bursting with life, a book with greatness written all over it.” X. J. KENNEDY

More praise for David Mason “The language and authenticity of poem after poem provide the pleasure of discovery.” W. S. Merwin

Ludlow

Ludlow

D AVID M ASON

David Mason’s previous books of poetry include The Buried Houses, The Country I Remember and Arrivals. His book of essays, The Poetry of Life and the Life of Poetry, appeared in 2000, and he has also co-edited several anthologies and textbooks. A former Fulbright Fellow to Greece, he has published work in such periodicals as Harper’s, The Times Literary Supplement, The Nation, The New Republic, Poetry and The Hudson Review. He teaches at The Colorado College and lives in the mountains outside Colorado Springs.

“A true verse novel (real verse, real novel), David Mason’s Ludlow revisits one of the cruelest, bloodiest chapters in the history of American labor and state and corporate injustice: the Ludlow coal field massacre of 1914, in which eighteen men, women, and children of coal mining families were killed by the Colorado National Guard. Within a driving narrative that never loses momentum, Mason’s deftly drawn characters, both historical and fictional, take on the lineaments of Dorothea Lange’s photographs. With Ludlow, reminiscent in its political and dramatic power of Steinbeck’s In Dubious Battle, Mason confirms his reputation as one of America’s finest poets and a master of narrative.” B. H. FAIRCHILD

Ludlow

Literature / Poetry

“Mason is a poet who justifies his claims. His forms breathe.” Brian Phillips, Poetry [Of The Country I Remember]: “This 1300-line family and national saga is narrative poetry at its best.” Publisher’s Weekly, starred review

Cover image by David Ligare

“A welcome addition to the best that is now being written by American poets.” Anthony Hecht “This is a work of extraordinary warmth, vigor, imagination and sympathy.” Joyce Carol Oates “This book is simply grand.”

A Verse-Novel RED HEN PRESS

Red Hen Press Poetry / U. S . $ 28. 95

S

DAVID M ASON

A Verse-novel by David Mason “I believe that the poet shall once again be a maker,” wrote Jorge Luis Borges. “I mean, he will tell a story and he will also sing it. And we will not think of those two things as different, even as we do not think they are different in Homer or Virgil.” David Mason’s Ludlow is a magnificent novel in verse, meaning it has the speed, concision and accuracy of the best poetry along with the expansiveness and character development of a novel. It tells the searing story of a handful of immigrants—Greek, Mexican, Scottish, Italian—in southern Colorado, climaxing in the L ud low Massacre of April 1914. Here we find the orphaned Luisa Mole, who must choose between life among the miners and the middle-class family who adopt her, and the historical figure Louis Tikas, a Cretan immigrant with his own divided sense of American identity. There are also such characters as Too Tall MacIntosh, Lefty Calabrini, George Reed and his shopkeeping famil y, and even John D. Rockefeller, Jr., an array of figures from multiple classes in a novel that never succumbs to simplistic political pieties. Fusing fiction and history, imagination and truth, individual lives and hard facts of politic al realit y, Ludlow is a major contribution to the literature of the American West.

Fred Chappell

Ludlow coverDJ.pmd

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11/21/2006, 12:48 PM

Mason’s verse novel, Ludlow, about the bloody labor stand off at the Colorado coal mines in 1914, won the Colorado Book Award.


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LO C A L INSP IR AT IONS


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An arts community requires both teaching artists and working artists. In Big Sky, we are blessed to have a proportionally large number of both among us. On the next page, see the first list of community artists, one we know will grow in coming years. Here, local photographer Anna Middleton captures an image of a Gallatin Valley artist success story. Maria Sascha Kahn, one of the four dancers in the Kahn and Mackay families, is a professional ballerina with the Bayerisches Staatsballet in Munich. She is shown here on a return trip home making a splash in a more local venue: Ousel Falls.

Photo by Anna Middleton


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LOC A L I N SP I R AT I ON S MUSICIANS, MUSIC TEACHERS AND MOVEMENT Kevin Fabozzi. Beginner Guitar and mandolin instructor.  Professional musician.  (406) 600-0482 / kfmusic22@gmail.com Michael Haring Music and Photography. Multimedia slide presentations combining music and photography performed live. mikeharing.com

Lauren Regnier. Singer/Songwriter. Lead singer of Bottom of the Barrel and regular entertainer at Big Sky Resort, the 320 and more. (406) 531-7163 / laregs@hotmail.com Brian Stumpf. The Riot Act and Driftwood Grinners. brianjstumpf@gmail.com.

Brian Hurlbut. Jam and Country Rock. The Cropdusters and Champagne Thursdays. bigskyeditor@yahoo.com

Jennifer Waters. Private and group dance lessons in ballet, tap, jazz and more. All ages and levels welcome. (208) 340-7724 / dancebigsky@gmail.com

Heaven Phillips.  Private voice and acting lessons for adults and youth.  AEA professional performer. (406) 209-5149 / bigskyvoice@gmail.com.

John Zirkle. Conductor/Composer. Commissioned compositions for any context and instrumentation. john.zirkle@gmail.com

PHOTOGRAPHERS

GLASS, CERAMICS AND JEWELRY

Jill Bough. Fine Art Photography, portraiture and journalistic photography. jillboughphoto.com

Packy Cronin. Ceramics. Packy@bigskyhouse.com

Tori Pintar, Photographer. Sentimental photographer for adventurous souls and their handcrafted weddings.  (406) 600-2090 /hello@toripintar.com toripintar.com Kene Sperry, Eye in the Sky Photography. Weddings, portraits, skiing. info@eyeintheskyphotography.com Ryan Turner Photography. Adventure photographer specializing in fine art and commercial photography. (406) 580-5997 / ryanturnerphototgraphy.com ryan@ryanturnerphotography.

PAINTERS AND VISUAL ARTISTS Melissa Cronin. Painter, knitter. mel@bigskyhouse.com / etsy.com

Klaudia Kosiak. Private and group piano teacher. (406) 599-2709 / kosiakklaudia@gmail.com

Tyler Busby, Photographer. Contemporary photography. tylerbusbyphotography.com

Ceramic artist Jill Zeidler / Photo by Kene Sperry

Barbara Allen. Flame working Glass 3D sculptor. Oil and acrylic painter. bigskyglas@aol.com / studiobadillon Ari O Jewelry. Quality Crafted Artisan Jewelry Handmade in Big Sky, MT. Located in The Big HornCenter. (406) 580-9956 / ariojewelry.com   Jill Zeidler. Contemporary ceramic artist. jillzeidler.com

Kelsey Dzintars. Contemporary painting, illustration, graphic design. kelseydzintars.com Julie Gustafson. Gallatin River Gallery, Owner and Gallerist of Big Sky’s longest established gallery. Collage and mixed media artist. (406) 995-2909 / gallatinrivergallery.com Jolene Hegness (Swanke). Art teacher at Lone Peak High School and Ophir Middle School. Painter, designer, and entrepreneur. (406) 544-1045 / jswanke@bssd72.org Amy Jones. Mixed media. kokorosushimt@gmail.com Callen Moore. Oil and digital mediums. (406) 599-0083 / moorecallen@yahoo.com Jackie Rainford. Private and group oil painting lessons, art parties, commissions. (406) 599-7112 / rainfordcorcoran@gmail.com Paul Roden. Professional artist specializing in oil paintings of people, animals and landscapes.  Commissions and private sales. (406) 995-7598 / paulroden@3rivers.net


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-M a r c C h a g a l l

Jackie Rainford (Big Sky, MT) “A Place Somewhere,” mixed media on clayboard

THE ARTS COUNCIL OF BIG SKY IS PROUD TO HELP SPONSOR THE DEBUT SEASON OF THE WARREN MILLER PERFORMING ARTS CENTER. BRAVO! PLEASE JOIN US AT ONE OF OUR EVENTS THIS WINTER. Jan. 19

Four Divas

Big Sky Resort

Jan. 25

Portland Cello Project

WMPAC

Feb. 20

Brubeck Brothers Quartet

WMPAC

Mar. 23

Gustavo Romero

Big Sky Resort

Mar. 28

Crawfish & Cornbread

WMPAC

PO BOX 160308 • BIG SKY, MT 59716 • WWW.BIGSKYARTS.ORG • SINCE 1989

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Local dancer and instructor Jennifer Waters / Photo by Kene Sperry

WARREN MILLER PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

SCHOLARSHIPS

At the Warren Miller Performing Arts Center, we support creativity. We also recognize that creativity sometimes takes cash. That’s why we are proud to announce the creation of the Warren Miller Performing Arts Center Scholarship Fund. This scholarship fund will only support full-time local students and residents of Big Sky. Funds will be used to help provide: •

Lessons in all performing and visual arts offered in Big Sky for students who cannot afford instruction. Free WMPAC tickets for music, dance and other art students for those who apply for the program, or those who are recommended by an instructor.

Tickets for any art lover who can’t afford to attend a show and applies for funding.

Funding to help cover rental of instruments, framing of art, purchase of art supplies and other critical support for young working artists.

Arts camps, seminars, and other professional development opportunities for student artists.

Donations to the WMPAC scholarship funds are taxdeductible. Checks may be made to WMPAC or Friends of Big Sky Education, which oversees WMPAC programming and the fund. For inquiries about receiving WMPAC scholarships, contact johnzirkle@gmail.com.


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HOW I WRITE ORIGINAL MUSIC IT ALL COMES DOWN TO TWO THINGS

“There are composers who won’t tell you things,” says composer Philip Aaberg. “They don’t want to talk about what they do because they like to think it is mysterious . Also, they don’t want to talk about it anyway.” Fortunately, Aaberg, a Helena-based composer and performer of international renown, is not one of those musicians. Aaberg has been commissioned to write an original piece for the WMPAC debut season. Here, a primer on how a professional composer makes music from scratch. GETTING STARTED: WHO’S GOING TO PLAY IT? Art is in the editing. So I start by limiting what I am not going to do. The first thing I usually consider is who is going to be playing the piece. Clearly, if you are writing for a junior symphony, it can’t be too difficult. But in this case, I’m writing for three musicians who can play anything. So instead of thinking about what they can’t do, I start thinking about what I like to hear them play. I know that Angella can play anything fast and difficult , but her signature is a tone that is like a soprano singing, and you say ‘Oh my gosh, that’s Angella Ahn.’ I know in this piece you are going to hear a beautiful melodic line for Angella.” NEXT: WHERE WILL IT BE PLAYED? With this commission, there are elements I can’t ignore: Big Sky, Warren Miller, and skiing. So when I think of this piece, I’m thinking of the motion of skiing and the sensations of the movement. I’m thinking excitement, exhilaration--the state that skiers get in. I’m trying for that zone that skiers get in, the sound and the rhythm when you are turning through the trees and also the feel you have when you can look around and see what’s going on, not just the jumps and the moguls.

Composer Philip Aaberg / Photo by Thomas Lee

MOVING FORWARD: WHAT WILL IT BE ABOUT? This isn’t to say I’m putting specific visions into someone’s mind; I’m not trying to represent moguls literally. I can tell you in general what inspired me when I was writing, but I don’t have to tell you what to think. I think all composers have something going on in their piece, no matter how abstract it may seem, and whether they say so or not. THEN: HOW WILL IT BE BALANCED? Because of the topic, it is has to have some fast in it. That’s part of the deal. People like fast stuff; they like to see musicians work. But ultimately music can be reduced to something very simple: tension and release. Everything in art is about how you manipulate tension and release, whether that balance is between dissonance and consonance, loud and soft, fast and slow, density and [sparseness]. It can’t be all tension, because people will walk out, and it can’t be all release. FINALLY: WHAT DO YOU HOPE AUDIENCES WILL SAY? The best compliment is: “I like that.” In Montana, if you write something that’s not completely accessible, they’ll say, “well, that was interesting.” And that’s not a bad thing, either. 


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WARREN MILLER PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

CAPITAL CAMPAIGN (JULY 2011 - MARCH 2013)

HOW DO WE LOVE THEE? LET US COUNT THE WAYS. $400,000+ We love thee to the depth and breadth and height our soul can reach, when feeling out of sight for the ends of being and ideal grace. Big Sky Resort Tax Board Jill and Loren Bough

$100,000 - $399,999 We love thee to the level of every day’s Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light. Robert and Dana Smith Family Foundation Yellowstone Club Community Foundation

$25,000 - $99,999 We love thee freely, as men strive for right. Nancy and Mike Domaille Sandra and Richard Jacobson Governor Steve Bullock, Montana Dept. of Commerce

$10,000 - $24,999 We love thee purely, as they turn from praise. Mike and Sue Arneson Tracey and Sam Byrne Goldman Sachs Gives The Dash Family Craig and Sally Jensen Paula and Mark Schleicher

$5,000 - $9,999 We love thee with the passion put to use In our old griefs, and with our childhood’s faith. Mary Lou Cook Jim Mace and Pam Russell Haas Builders Frank, Kristin, and Kelly Kern Olive B’s Big Sky Bistro Yucca and Gary Reischel Kevin & Courtney Zirkle

$2,500 - $4,999 We love thee with a love we seemed to lose with our lost saints. Walter & Catherine Ainsworth Barbara Bradley Baekgaard Family Foundation Dennis & June Bough Warren & Laurie Miller Jerry and Anne Marie Mistretta John & Jolene Romney Janine & Richard Schaible Buzz & Kathy Tatom


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$1,000 - $2,499 We love thee with the breath,

$500 - $999 smiles, tears, of all our life;

$100 - $499 and, if God choose,

Anonymous Big Sky Broadway Big Sky Resort Buck & Helen Knight Foundation Hugh & Kimberly Byrd Carol Toeppfer Bill and Shannon Collins Michelle C. Dollinger James S. & Michelle T. Eidson Jim & Gayle Eidson David & Sandra Epstein Douglas and Alexandra Feurring Doug & Henrietta Gale Gallatin Canyon Women’s Club David & Marianne Gasser Golden Bighorn, Inc. Bob & Joanie Hall Markus Kirchmayr Wayne & Ginger Lee Les & Terye Loble Life Is Precious Sisterhood Marjie Toeppfer/Carol Toeppfer Fund/ Arts Council of Big Sky Frank & Johanne Martino Stephen & Libby Maus Scott & Karen Maybee Timothy & Deborah McKenna John & Laura Michel Taylor Middleton and Barbara Rowley Montana Living (Martha & Scott Johnson) Eric & Stacy Ossorio Norm Plaistowe & Kristen Brown Thomas & Kay Reeves Andrew & Karen Roberts Laura Saachi James & Margaret Schafer Michael & Andrea Scholz Barry and Zoey Silverman Dan & Judy Katany Taft Drs. Anne & Dennis Wentz Nick & Jane Wyer Courtney James Zirkle

Connie Barton Albert & Diane Bartzick Big Sky Vacation Rentals, Inc. (Mike and Kirsten King) Big Sky Sotheby’s Mary & Marcie Bough Michael & Sandra Brown Benjamin & Ania Bulis Caprini, Joseph & Stella Crowther, John & Debbie Dr. James & Dr. Lisbet Lund Dahlberg Jeffery & Mary Eidson Thomas Gasser Robert Goerge and Lissa Karron Cathy & Tim Gorman Sarah & Lee Griffiths Joan Halvajian Paul & Nancy Heymann Thomas & Dee Hall Wayne & Marilyn Hill Joan Hoff Jedediah & Elizabeth Hogan Jerry & Deb House The Hungry Moose (Mark & Jackie Robin) Ken & Barbara Kaufman Jim & Denise Kudrna Robert & Catherine Laughner Michael & Whitney Liddy James & Sue Lindley Susan P. Oliver Michael & Nancy Oshier Catherine J. MD Oster Steven & Jacquie Rager Bill & Jennifer Reed Roger Schwer/Peggy Dicken Schwer Fund/Arts Council of Big Sky Michael & Gabriela Smith Jeff & Karen Strickler Bill Warnock

320 Ranch Frank & Mardo Alley Peter & Janet Bachman David & Suzanne Baetz Sheri Blackwood Brandon Clifford Jessica J. DeHaan Lynette Guevara Robert J. Hall Robert Hajek & Dr. Susan Storti Thomas & Dee Hill Dave & Kathy House Alan & Rebecca Johnson Nonie Kern William & Cindy Lindner Courtney Loeb Reynold & Linda Lovold Deborah & Lewis McCabe John & Carol McGuire Outlaw Partners Roger Schwer & Marjie Toeppfer Gen. Robert & Terry Scott Alan Shaw Jim & Lenda Sherrell Steve Sparks Stephanie Dana Stranahan Jack & Adrea Sukin Bob & Donna Thompson Thomas & Nita Tosic George & Janice Wells Rumsey & Cilla Young

$0.01 - $99 we shall love thee better after death. Allyse Cope ERA Landmark Haggerty Rentals Barry and Deborah Kingston David & Rebecca Shopay John F. Zirkle

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HOW TO TEL L A STO RY EVERYONE’S GOT ONE. HERE’S HOW TO MAKE IT WORTH HEARING. In between shows in California and New York, we caught up with Producing Director of The Moth, Sarah Austin Jenness, to give us the low down on the difference between just talking and storytelling. She gave us much more, including an understanding of how watching a performance of The Moth is a lot like watching a circus act: Live storytellers are walking a tightrope. Read up now and hold the bar captive with your next Apres Ski story session:

IT’S TRUE: EVERYONE DOES HAVE A STORY People from all walks of life tell stories at The Moth.  For example, our new book, The Moth: 50 True Stories, features a gang cop, a Nobel Laureate, a Pastor, an astronaut, a pickpocket, Clinton’s former Press Secretary, a poker player, Malcolm Gladwell – the list goes on and on.  Great stories can be found anywhere.   THREE THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW BEFORE YOU START TALKING You, as the main character, must somehow change over the course of the story. Life is long but these stories are short – consider whether all the material you’ve unearthed truly supports this particular arc. If it doesn’t – cut it. Have a strong ending.  Endings can make or break a story.

WHY THE TRUTH MATTERS AND NOTES DON’T HELP There’s a connection made between the storyteller and the audience when the story is close to the bone.  True stories make us feel a little less alone – like there’s a commonality to the human experience.   People all over the world pack venues to hear these true personal stories.  They enter the building as strangers and leave having a shared experience.  The audience can’t interrupt.  They are really practicing the art of listening, as much as the storyteller is honoring the art of the raconteur – and we’re proud of that.  As for notes and scripts? They distance the storyteller from the audience.  At The Moth, the teller stands behind a single stationary microphone.  No notes, no net – as we say.  They walk a tightrope as they tell their story, but the truth is, they can’t really fall – the audience is there to catch them.    


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GET INVOLVED . This is about us. People. We are fascinating. We are different, and we are the same. That’s worth celebrating. When the house lights go down, and all we can see is a single person on stage, dancing, telling stories, improvising comedy, playing the piano or an invented instrument called “The Mouseketeer,” we are left with a sense of awe and two simple questions: “How and why do they do that?” There are no answers here, but these are the questions that keep us coming back for more. A performing arts center is more than just a building; it is a home for the development of human expression. Our primary concern is the relationship between performer and audience and its myriad forms, and how we can best foster an entertaining, inspiring, and learning environment for that relationship to grow. We are all performers in our own way, whether as the director, the usher, the actor, the dancer, or the behind-the-scenes technician, and there is always a way to get involved with your performing arts center. We all have our own fascinating ideas of what performance should and shouldn’t be, and it is our shared vision that is developed by and for the community that keeps the arts scene alive, thriving, and relevant. Ultimately, how do you see yourself on stage? We want to make that happen. Truly. Perhaps you haven’t gotten involved with the Warren Miller Performing Arts Center yet because you don’t feel creative, you didn’t know we needed you, or maybe you were just plain scared. Please know this: If you are part of Big Sky, you are part of the Warren Miller Performing Arts Center community. We want your ideas, your energy, your participation, and your involvement. In the words of our namesake:

“IF YOU DON’T DO IT THIS YEAR, YOU WILL BE ONE YEAR OLDER WHEN YOU DO.”

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DEBUT SEASON SCHEDULE 12.28 JAMES SEWELL BALLET 01.11 SECOND CITY 01.25 PORTLAND CELLO PROJECT 02.15 THE MOTH MAINSTAGE 02.20 BRUBECK BROTHERS QUARTET 03.01 ANTONII BARYSHEVSKYI 03.09 DAVID MASON, TAMI HAALAND, AND THE POETS’ CONGRESS WITH MARTHA SCANLAN 03.19 THE BIG SKY COMMISSION, FEATURING PHILIP AABERG, ANGELLA AHN, AND MIKE REYNOLDS 03.29 MARK APPLEBAUM

BUY TICKETS AT WARRENMILLERPAC.ORG


2013 / 2014 Warren Miller Performing Arts Center Programs