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JOHN VOGTMAN


CONTENTS

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Résume Graduate School

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Joyland Fields. Topical Studio.

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Bruce Monroe Community Center. Integrated Design Studio.

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Owen Brown Village Center. Studio IV.

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Camp Woodlands Girl Scout Camp. Studio III.

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Iterative Design. Computer Applications.

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Paper Streets. Site Analysis.

65 67

Work Samples AECOM Hord Coplan Macht Study Abroad

69

Italy Study Abroad


RÉSUME

JOHN VOGTMAN 3109 EDGEWOOD AVE. PARKVILLE, MARYLAND 21234 johnvogtman@gmail.com 443-722-1045

EDUCATION SEPT. 2014 - DEC. 2017 (EXP.) 2005 - 2010

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, PLANNING, AND PRESERVATION. COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND Master of Architecture TEMPLE UNIVERSITY, COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING. PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA Bachelor of Science, Civil Engineering. Magna Cum Laude

STUDIO / DESIGN EXPERIENCE SPRING 2017 1

FALL 2016

SUMMER 2016

SPRING 2016

FALL 2015

SUMMER 2015

SPRING 2015

FALL 2014

GRADUATE TOPICAL STUDIO. COLEMAN JORDAN. Using sports to build confidence and overcome stigmas towards disabilities in Kisumu, Kenya. GRADUATE COMPREHENSIVE STUDIO. PETER NOONAN, AIA. Community Center in Washington, DC focused on structure and building systems through an integrated design approach. SCANDINAVIA STUDY ABROAD. PETER NOONAN, AIA, CARL DUPUY, AIA. Analyzed the relationship between culture, place, and architecture. GRADUATE DESIGN STUDIO IV. JANA VANDERGOOT, AFAAR & RA Urban design studio re-imagining the Owen Brown Village Center in Columbia, Maryland. GRADUATE DESIGN STUDIO III. MADELINE SIMON, AIA. Girl Scout Camp in Annapolis, Maryland investigating relationships between the building and the natural environment. ITALIA STUDY ABROAD. BRIAN KELLY, AIA, MICHAEL AMBROSE, AIA. Analyzed architectural and urban conditions through atmospheric and analytical drawing. GRADUATE DESIGN STUDIO II. BRIAN KELLY, AIA. Boutique Hotel in Washington, DC to investigate vertical surface, promenade, and unit aggregation. GRADUATE DESIGN STUDIO I. MICHAEL AMBROSE, AIA. Cultural Center for Amelia Earhart in College Park, Maryland as an introduction to spatial relationships in architecture.


WORK EXPERIENCE SEPT. 2015 - PRESENT

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND. Structures Teaching Assistant

JUN. 2017 - AUG. 2017

HORD COPLAN MACHT. BALTIMORE, MD. Architectural Intern

JUL. 2016 - JAN. 2017

AECOM. WASHINGTON, DC. Architectural Intern

JUL. 2015 - SEPT. 2015

SMOLEN EMR ILKOVITCH, ARCHITECTS. ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND. Architectural Intern

APR. 2011 - AUG. 2014

PHILADELPHIA WATER DEPARTMENT. PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA. Civil Engineering Specialist

JUN. 2010 - APR. 2011

GEOSTRUCTURES, INC. KING OF PRUSSIA, PENNSYLVANIA. Civil Engineer

CERTIFICATIONS AND ACCREDITATIONS APR. 2010

EIT. PENNSYLVANIA.

OCT. 2010

OSHA 10.

AWARDS AND ACTIVITIES 2015 - PRESENT 2016 + 2017 OCT. 2014 - PRESENT

TUA SIGMA DELTA. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. ARCHITECTURE DEANS SCHOLARSHIP. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. AIAS. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND.

SKILLS COMPUTER APPLICATIONS. AutoCAD. Rhino + Grasshopper. V-Ray. Revit. Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, InDesign. ArcGIS. Sketch Up. Google Earth. Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint. PHYSICAL MODELING. Hand Drafting and Modeling. 3D Printing (MakerBot). Laser Cutting.

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JOYLAND FIELDS STRENGTHENING MIND, BODY, AND SPIRIT GRADUATE TOPICAL DESIGN STUDIO, SPRING 2017 TEAM MEMBER: JOSH KILLIAN PROFESSOR COLEMAN JORDAN

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Joyland Fields developed from the notion that sports can be a powerful tool for building character and bringing people together. Athletics teach the importance of teamwork and help build confidence, leadership, and responsibility. The main purpose of this project was to use the power of sports to break down stigmas against those with disabilities and to help students develop skills to help them succeed in all aspects of life. This can be achieved by transforming Joyland into a premier training center with the capacity to host Paralympic and Special Olympic events.

The heart of this transformation begins with a central track and football field which serves as a link between the northern primary school and southern secondary school. A new dining hall and sports pavilion flank either side of the field providing students with covered spaces to eat and play sports protected from the intense rain and sun in Kenya. Additionally, a primary path weaves its way through the campus linking the various sporting nodes and public spaces together. The new master plan also seeks to provide healthy food to its athletes through an accessible garden and stresses the importance of rehabilitation and strength training.


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JOYLAND FIELDS: MASTER PLANNING Urbanistically, this master plan adds density to the existing site by developing additional dorms and classrooms for the secondary school and filling gaps in the fabric of the primary school with sports related facilities. All existing buildings were maintained in an effort to utilize available infrastructure and resources. With the exception of the primary loop, which weaves through the entire campus, all new buildings follow and build on the existing grid structure of the site. In an effort to increase security and raise awareness for Joyland, a Public Square was developed at the northern entrance to the site. The Square is designed to improve security by increasing visibility and using Jane Jacobs philosophy of placing more “eyes on street.� The Square also provides a location for local markets, community involvement, and the opportunity for Joyland to sell locally grown food or products created in their vocational school. 6

PRIMARY ENTRANCE

DINING HALL CENTRAL FIELD

ACTIVITY NODES

EVENT ENTRANCE SPORTS PAVILION

PATH GARDEN


Campus Circulation

Connection

Link

7 Viewing

Elevation Change

Programming

JOYLAND FIELDS: DINING HALL


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Track. Dining Hall Serves as an Anchor and Covered Pavilion for Viewing Sporting Events.


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Elevated Path. Additional Means of Movement and Viewing Platform.

Portal. Bamboo Screened Circulation.


JOYLAND FIELDS: SPORTS PAVILION

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Sports Pavilion. Exterior View from Track.


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LIVE + GROW + PLAY COMMUNITY DRIVEN SUSTAINABILITY GRADUATE INTEGRATED DESIGN STUDIO, FALL 2016 TEAM MEMBERS: AREN KNUDSEN PROFESSOR OF THE PRACTICE PETER NOONAN, AIA

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The purpose of the 600 comprehensive studio was to understand how building technologies, materials, and systems are implemented into the design process. This required us to move beyond schematic design to the design development phase. For the first half of the semester, we completed a series of fast paced module exercises that stemmed from the analysis of a “seed� wall section and grew into a single story building with HVAC, lighting, and structural systems. The modules included topics such as structural and spatial components, structural patterns, construction systems, building skins, system integration, and program and code analysis. For the second part of the semester, we applied the lessons learned from the modules to designing a community building centered on the idea of urban farming. This involved site analysis, meeting with consultants, and working collaboratively with a partner to complete the final design.

BRUCE MONROE COMMUNITY CENTER Finding a place to buy or grow fresh, healthy food can be difficult, especially in dense urban settings. This project seeks to create a community center in the Park View neighborhood of northern D.C. built on the concept of urban farming, healthy living, and sustainability. The site plan includes a series of terraced garden plots, central plaza, playground, and multi-use court. The building is urbanistically and contextually placed to optimize solar exposure and create a continuous street wall along the commercial corridor of Georgia Avenue. It uses natural building materials, glazing, and vegetation to create connections between indoor and outdoor spaces. The Bruce Monroe Community Center is a place where community members can live, grow, and play while learning about healthy lifestyles and sustainability.


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The 12,000 SF Bruce Monroe Community Center is split to accommodate two distinct programs and form a gateway to the park. The northern portion includes a 4000 sf event space that opens onto an outdoor terrace, a linear gallery for displaying local artwork, two multipurpose meeting rooms, offices, a staff room, and a kitchen. The southern building includes a co-op / cafĂŠ that sells local food and a community kitchen for cooking classes.

12. 10. 2.

11. 5. 3.

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4. 6. 13. 8.

7.

9.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13.

Terraced Gardens Multipurpose Court Park Entrance Market Plaza Courtyard Greenhouse Playground Picnic Area Bike Parking Green Roof PV Panels Light and Air Chimneys Bioswale

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1.


Site. Temporary park located on Georgia Avenue between Irving Street and Columbia Road. 2.

3. 9.

Connections and delineations. Existing streets and alleyways were used to organize the site creating a microcosm of the city.

4. 9. 1. 4. 10.

Street Wall. Building was placed along Georgia Avenue to create a continuous street wall and protect the park from the busy thoroughfare.

6.

5. 3. 5.

Gateway. Building was split to create a gateway or main entry to the site.

7.

Event Space. Event space was placed perpendicular to service building to receive optimal solar gains and to establish protected outdoor courtyard space.

8.

Light and Air Chimneys, Chimneys were placed along northern side of the event space to provide additional light and air circulation to both the event space and linear gallery.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Event Space Linear Gallery Lobby Meeting Room Office

6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Staff Room Co-Op / Cafe Community Kitchen Bathroom Mechanical Room

10.

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Georgia Ave. Approach

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Georgia Ave. A

Linear Gallery. Circulation zone for display of local art.

Linear Gallery

Court-side. Exterior view facing east. Multi-use Court / West Elevation

Connection DetailEvent Terrace

Plaza. Plaza and event space facade.

Multi-use Cou


Linear Ga 18

Connecti Event Space. Exposed glulam column and beam framed space looking out to exterior plaza and park. Event Space


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Light and Air. The event space uses a glazed southern curtain wall system and overhang to block direct summer sun while allowing winter sun to penetrate deep into the space. Operable windows allow air to flow into the room and escape through the light and air chimneys. The chimneys also provide natural light and air circulation to the linear gallery located along the northern side of the building and act as beacons of sustainability to help establish an identity for both the building and the community. Water Cycle. Storm water is managed using various techniques throughout the site. Water collected on the lower portion of the roof is mitigated with an extensive green roof. Water from the event space roof is channeled into rain gardens and stored in a cistern beneath the multi-use court which is then pumped to the garden plots. Additionally, the bioswale and compacted gravel plaza allow storm water to naturally soak into the ground. Components of the rainwater management system are made visible as a way of educating the public and celebrating the importance of sustainability.

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64%

87%

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Daylit During Operable Hours

Views to the Outdoors

Green Roof

64%

7%

67%

Witin 15’ of Operable Window

Light and Air Chimneys Rain Gardens 87%

67%

107% Storm Water Manged Onsite for 24 Hour 2 Year Storm

Section Perspective Linear Gallery and Event Spac

Radiant Floor Heating

PV Panels

107%

Bioswale 23% Views to Witin 15’ of Storm Water Manged Onsite Daylit During and Construction.Operable Window Outdoors for 24 Hour 2 Year Storm perable HoursMaterialsthe The building is constructed primarily of glue laminated wood and 70% masonry. By choosing glulam, weLight wereand able span long distances Greenroof AirtoStacks Radiant Flooring Cistern in the event space without using material with high embodied energy such as Rain steel or concrete. It also provided a warmer and more Gardens ARCH 600 + 611 Integrated Design Studio, Fall 2016 | John Vogtman + Aren Knudsen | Professor Noonan + Professor Bovill 4 | Bioclimatic Design 5 | Light and Air comfortable feeling that we thought essential to a community center focused on food and farming. Both timber and masonry can be 7% obtained locally and if maintained correctly, will have a long lifespan. Bioswale 23%

27% 195 77000

64%64%

70%

Photovoltaic Panels

6|

87%87%

67%67%


Linear Gallery

Connection Detail

Event Space Event Space

Ceiling Study: 4’ purlin spacing with 6” decking

e: ce

Ceiling Study: 2’ purlin spacing with 6” decking

Ceiling Study: 4’ purlin spacing with 10” decking

Ceiling Study: 2’ purlin spacing with 10” decking

ARCH 600 + 611 Integrated Design Studio, Fall 2016 | John Vogtman + Aren Knudsen | Professor Noonan + Professor Bovill

64%

87%

67%

Views to the Outdoors

Daylit During Operable Hours Linear Gallery and Event space promenade

Linear Gallery

Rain Gardens

| Water Cycle

107% 107%

7% 23%

70%

Bioswale

Witin 15’ of Operable Window

107% Storm Water Manged Onsite for 24 Hour 2 Year Storm

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OWEN BROWN VILLAGE CENTER GRADUATE STUDIO IV, SPRING 2016 TEAM MEMBERS: JOSH KILIAN, RENATA SOUTHARD, ARICA THORNTON ASSISTANT PROFESSOR JANA VANDERGOOT, AFAAR & RA

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“Students in the Master of Architecture program worked with representatives from the Howard County Department of Planning, the Columbia Association, and the Owen Brown Village board to come up with redevelopment schemes for Owen Brown Village Center. The semester began with the production of a series of base maps, which analyzed demographics, hydrology and the historical vision of James Rouse for the city of Columbia. Students also researched a series of built case study projects from around the world that provided inspiration and metrics for their design proposals at Owen Brown. Finally, each design team worked closely with a student from the Real Estate Development Capstone course to come up with program, square footages, and adjacencies for their design schemes.”

ELKHORN PROMENADE “This project proposes a method for bringing the nearby Lake Elkhorn, a significant recreational activity amenity in Columbia, into Owen Brown Village Center as a way of restructuring and organizing the central public plaza space. A set of mixed use residential/retail buildings line a newly created water-lined promenade and guide both pedestrian and auto traffic from Lake Elkhorn through to a newly designed Upper Park System that reconnects the existing library and school with a safe and lushly vegetated path system. The public plaza is capped by a grassy amphitheater and town homes where public festivals and events can take place.” - Jana Vandergoot


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Pedestrian Circulatory System. Discontinuities and lack of continuity between residential and commercial zones for primary, secondary, and tertiary pathways.


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Satellite Aerial. Columbia, MD.

Open Space. Hierarchy and connectivity of open space.

Edges. Building and tree lines that define space.

Base Map. Village Centers.

Pedestrian Paths. Improved connectivity.

Spatial Organization. Regulating lines.

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Existing Site Plan. Owen Brown Town Center

Phase I. Creating place.

Phase II. Developing promenade.

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Phase III. Densification.

Phase III Zoom. Pedestrian promenade leading from Lake Elkhorn, through mixed-use development, to recreational zones.


ELKHORN PROMENADE Elkhorn Promenade was developed to encourage revitalization of the Owen Brown Village Center using the following key tactics: tying Lake Elkhorn and the existing community amenities to the Village Center, highlighting the Interfaith Center, and strengthening the existing trail system.

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First, Elkhorn Promenade sought to capitalize on the existing amenities by directly linking the Village Center to Lake Elkhorn and the northern park system. This was accomplished by widening the underpass, pulling water into the retail area, and using a stream and path system to knit the two areas together.

The proposed project also highlights the Interfaith Center as an important cornerstone of the community. A secondary axis leading to a small courtyard integrates the Interfaith Center into the master plan. While much of the site will undergo revitalization, celebrating the Interfaith Center will help retain the original character.


Finally, Elkhorn Promenade addresses the need to improve connectivity between the Village Center and the greater community of Owen Brown and Columbia. By utilizing and strengthening the existing pathways, the Village Center becomes a prominent node in a web of alternative transportation systems.

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VIEW 1: Community Center / Parking

Arrival. Redefining the parking lot.

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VIEW 2: The Avenue

The Avenue. Procession.

VIEW 3: The River Walk

The Overlook. View of Elkhorn Promenade.


VIEW 6: Lake Elkhorn

The Amphitheater. A view from above.

VIEW 4: Interfaith Center

The Alley. Human scale intimacy.

The Underpass. Portal to nature.

VIEW 5: The Brewery

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CAMP WOODLANDS GIRL SCOUTS GRADUATE STUDIO III, FALL 2015 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR MADLEN SIMON, AIA

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The purpose of this studio was to investigate the relationship between the man-made and natural environment. Students were asked to approach the analysis and design of the site and the building as one integral process. This was achieved by recognizing that a building can form a relationship with its surroundings by considering factors such as natural lighting, air flow, sight lines, materials, and physical and visual connections to the natural environment. The analysis also included consideration of the historical, typological, environmental, and physical site conditions throughout the design process. In order to achieve these objectives we engaged in a community-based design project for the Girl Scouts of Central Maryland which focused on re-envisioning a camp in Annapolis, Maryland. This involved design work at various scales including developing a master plan for the entire camp and designing a lodge, cabin, and gateway.

CABIN DESIGN The design for the cabins developed from the idea of sleeping in the walls. It focused on creating a fun and comfortable camping experience for the Girl Scouts. The cabins feature a glazed rear wall with views to the woods, an indoor fire place for year round occupation, bunk beds that are built into the walls, and an open central space for gathering and playing. They are designed to sleep up to sixteen campers, the typical size of one Girl Scout troop. Cabins are arranged so that the front is public, providing a communal space for campers to interact with other troops. The rear is private and allows troops to gather amongst themselves for a more intimate experience. Thus the cabin is really a portal from the controlled man-made environment to the natural environment.


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Plan.

Design Process.


Longitudinal Section. Glazing is used to create transparency in both the longitudinal and transverse directions. The rear fire place creates an anchor and gathering spot within the cabin.

Transverse Section. Operable windows 36 are used to improve airflow, increase natural lighting, and establish views to the surrounding environment.

Longitudinal Elevation. The cabins are built on piles to minimize their impact on the landscape and allow for a degree of mobility if the camp site were to change locations.

Front Elevation.


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Cabin Model. Created using chipboard and basswood.

Entry. Front exterior perspective.


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Sleeping in the Walls. Interior cabin perspective.


LODGE DESIGN

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The lodge was designed to create a grand portal into the camp. It serves as a transition point where girls leave their parents and the worries of life behind and enter into the world of Camp Woodlands. The main room within the lodge is the dining hall. It is characterized by a twenty foot double height space with a large central stone fireplace. It contains sixteen to eighteen tables which seat twelve to fourteen people each. Closets, located along the interior wall, are designed to store furniture so that the space can also serve as a large multipurpose room. The doors and windows shown on the right open to an exterior deck creating a dynamic indoor / outdoor space where campers can eat outside or simply enjoy the weather. An important design consideration for the lodge was building it on the side of a ravine. The change in topography allowed for two main entrances on different stories which created an interesting way of separating program. The top floor is focused on establishing a grand entry and memorable experience. The bottom floor caters to the scouts and provides easy access to the dining hall from the various camp sites. The design includes large operable windows to maximize daylighting, enhance airflow, and provide views to the surrounding environment.


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Camp Portal. This perspective highlights the promenade where parents and scouts walk from the parking lot to the main entrance of the lodge. The outdoor space also serves as a place where girls can relax under the trees, do outdoor activities, and meet with their troops. The lodge is meant to appear iconic, light, and transparent which is emphasized by the glazed entry space and delicate structural elements.


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Lodge Site Model. Investigation into building and site relationships through physical modeling. Created using cardboard, chipboard, and 3D printed buildings.


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Site Analysis. Building placement based on sight lines and topography.

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Upper Floor (left). Entry lobby, administrative offices, and flex space. Ground Floor (above). Dining hall, outdoor terrace, and kitchen.


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Transverse Section. This section highlights the importance of topography. Campers walk across the pedestrian bridge into the lodge where they are greeted by a grand staircase. The stairs act as a continuation of the hill leading to the upper floor of the Lodge.


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Lodge Building Model. Investigation of constructibility and integration to site. Topography created using Grasshopper script, lasercutter, and cardboard. Model created from laser-cut chipboard and basswood.


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COMPUTER APPLICATIONS COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN ARCHITECTURE, SPRING 2016 BRENT WHITE, LECTURER

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Computer Applications in Architecture is an introductory course to computer applications focusing on developing digital skills to augment the design process. This was accomplished by completing a series of short projects that introduced various softwares including Revit, Rhino, and Grasshopper.

INTERSECTIONS This project utilized Grasshopper as a primary design and production tool to develop a wall or separation that captures the intersection of two distinct spaces. In an attempt to integrate this course with studio I chose to apply this project to the pedestrian bridge that spans the ravine at Camp Woodlands. The bridge acts as a separator with varying degrees of opacity between the man-made and natural environment and a connector between the old and the new.


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Grasshopper was utilized in conjunction with Rhino to create a pedestrian bridge. The bridge was designed to be a link between the old and the new. On one side of the ravine is the original, historical lodge. On the other side is the new lodge, designed to fit the needs of the Girl

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Scouts on the newly envisioned camp grounds. It also serves as an intersection between the natural and man-made environment. Campers inhabit the canopy as they walk across the bridge completely surrounded by trees. Yet they are reminded of the man-made environment by

the framed view of the new lodge created by the repetitive square frames. The railings are made from bending, wriggling wood that serves to mimic the surrounding trees.


John Vogtman ARCH470 12/01/2015

INTERSECTIONS:

BACKGROUND

of the ravine is Lamb Lodge, the original, gned to fit the needs of the Girl Scouts on atural and man made environment. Campers rees. Yet they are reminded of the man made

BRIDGE

This bridge is designed to be a link between the old and the new. On one side of the ravine is Lamb Lodge, the original, historical lodge at Camp Woodlands. On the other side is the new lodge, designed to fit the needs of the Girl Scouts on the newly envisioned camp grounds. It is also the intersection between the natural and man made environment. Campers inhabit the canopy as they walk across the bridge completely surrounded by trees. Yet they are reminded of the man made environment by the framed view of the new lodge created by the repetitive square frames. The railings are made from bending, wriggling wood that serves to mimic the surrounding trees. DESIGN PROCESS

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ITERATIVE DESIGN This project utilized digital modeling in Rhino to take a rectangular building mass and manipulate it to form a more dynamic object. I began by slicing diagonal strips from the mass at regular intervals. Then, I twisted the object 90 degrees

about the central axis and excavated a large void in the center. Next, I incrementally expanded the diagonal sections to increase the massing moving from the bottom to the top of the object. Finally, I removed the interior pieces of the

expansions leaving only a shell which I then rebuilt and made translucent in order to reveal the interior core of the massing.

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Extrude.

Slice.

Twist.


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Excavate.

Expand.

Reveal.


SITE ANALYSIS SITE ANALYSIS, FALL 2015 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR JANA VANDERGOOT, AFAAR & RA

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This project was focused on large scale site analysis for Tacoma Park, Maryland as a method of design preparation for a series of Paper Streets. Paper Streets are parcels of land, usually owned by the city, designated for roads that were never built. The first phase of this analysis involved using Google Earth Pro and Illustrator to develop diagrams of landscape ecology using key terms such as corridor, patch, matrix, pattern, density, and flow as a basis for investigation. Analysis at this scale demonstrated relationships between transportation, density, pattern of development, land forms, and hydrology. It also demonstrated the importance of large scale site analysis in understanding local systems and processes.

The next phase required additional diagramming in terms of more specific categories. I focused on topography and how that related to movement and transportation. I then allowed the transportation analysis to inform the design of a bicycle repair shop/cafe to occupy one of the paper streets. Located along a heavily traveled bike route, this paper street provided the ideal location for bicyclist to make repairs or stop to take a coffee break. It would also serve the community by creating a place where people from the local neighborhood could take classes and interact with more experienced bicyclists to learn about maintenance techniques and foster additional public transportation options.


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Top left. D.C. / Tacoma Park aerial map. Top right. Network of waterways and greenery. Bottom left. Highway and rail circulation. Bottom right. Urban density.


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Synthesis. Urban development radiating along waterways and natural corridors.


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PAPER STREET PROJECT The next phase required additional diagramming in terms of more specific categories. I focused on topography and how that related to movement and transportation. I then allowed the transportation analysis to inform the design of a bicycle repair shop / cafe to occupy one of the paper streets. Located along a heavily traveled bike route, this paper street provided the ideal location for bicyclist to make repairs or stop to take a coffee break. It would also serve the community by creating a place where people from the local neighborhoods could take classes and interact with more experienced bicyclist to learn about maintenance techniques and foster additional public transportation options. 61

Top left. Topography in relation to roadways and corridors. Top right. Traffic flow in relation to topography and nodes. Bottom left. Transportation analysis. Bottom right. Material pallet ideogram collage. Opposite page. Community bike shop design proposal.


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Bike Workshop and Park Entrance.


Fountain Feature and Outdoor Cafe

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Fountain Feature and Outdoor Cafe


AECOM INTERNSHIP, SUMMER 2016 GERALD BRIGGS, DAVE MCCLINTOCK

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During my internship at AECOM I prepared and submitted select projects to AIA competitions using InDesign and Photoshop, developed topographic models in Revit for 3D printing and digital modeling, created mixed media study models for presentations and collaboratively developed renderings for a mixed use high rise building in Baltimore City using Photoshop. A few of the renderings are shown here. My work focused on adding reflections, shadows, vegetation, lighting highlights, and various masking elements. I had the pleasure of working directly under the Director of Architecture, Gerald Briggs, and Senior Project Manager, Dave McClintock.


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HORD COPLAN MACHT INTERNSHIP, SUMMER 2016 NICK AELLO, MATHEW FITZSIMMONS, BERET DICKSON, FRANK ANDRE

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During my internship at HCM I collaborated with the Multifamily Housing, Planning, and Landscape Studios on a variety of projects. I produced plans, diagrams, 3D printed models, and presentation documents to illustrate design intentions for RFPs and UDARP Presentations. I worked with the Planning Studio to create illustrative master plans, site diagrams, and presentation documents for proposed mixed use communities. I also worked in Revit at the SD, DD, and CD design phases and created phasing diagrams for construction sequencing and scheduling.

Federal Hill UDARP Presentation. Baltimore, MD.


Johns Hopkins Landscape Design. Baltimore, MD.

68 Master Planning. Longmont, CO. Harbor Point RFP. Baltimore, MD.

BALCONY

BEDROOM 9'1" x 13'2"

LIVING 12'0" x 19'6" BEDROOM 11'0" x 16'0"

BEDROOM 9'9" x 8'5"

LAUNDRY

KITCHEN

MECH

THE HAVEN AT HARBOR Federal HillNATIONAL Unit Plans. Baltimore,

145 RIVERHAVEN DRIVE NATIONAL HARBOR, MD 20745

WH

MD.

UNIT 3A 1/4" = 1'-0"

2.3.17

Blackhills Design Guidelines. Germantown, MD. C

2015

NOMA RFP. Washington, DC.


ITALIA STUDY ABROAD THE EYE, THE MIND, AND THE DRAWN IMAGE DRAWING II, SUMMER 2015 PROFESSOR BRIAN KELLY, AIA

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This class was focused on atmospheric drawings that tried to capture the play of light and shadow. We used a variety of mediums including pencil, charcoal, and watercolor. Although it was my first time using watercolor I found it to be an interesting medium that really forced you to think about light and shadow. I grew to like these kind of drawings because they begin to capture the intangible qualities of a place.

Vicenza. Watercolor.


Piazza di Santa Cecilia. Watercolor.

Basilica Santi Giovanni e Paolo. Watercolor.

Venice. Watercolor.

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Baths of Caracalla. Charcoal.

Piazza Giovanni Agelli: Museo della Civita Romana. Charcoal.

Ostia Antica. Charcoal.


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Architecture Portfolio  

Graduate school work samples from the University of Maryland

Architecture Portfolio  

Graduate school work samples from the University of Maryland

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