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WISCONSIN NATIVEPLANT GUIDE

Nature’s Best to You.®

Trees | Shrubs | Conifers | Perennials | Vines | Ferns | Grasses


Welcome T

he use of native plants in the landscape is more than a trend. It is an awakening to the need to preserve our native flora in man-made landscapes. Why? First and foremost, out native plants are beautiful. They offer all of the color and aesthetic interest we could need, and they rival any introduced landscape plant. They are also very functional, having evolved over time to prosper in our environment, and they can fill almost any landscape need. Using Wisconsin’s native plants also connects us to our state’s natural heritage, and creates landscapes that look like Wisconsin; rather than another traditional landscape that could be anywhere. Also, as we continue to develop, disturb and destroy native habitats, we need to give back to the land the plants that were originally there. Aldo Leopold said, “To keep every cog and wheel is the first precaution of intelligent tinkering.” When we plant native plants not only do we preserve the vegetation, but also all the countless other life forms such as birds, insects, mammals, fungi and more, that depend on and interact with each other to form beautiful sustainable landscapes. How did we determine what is native? We consider plants that were growing here before European settlement to be native. We referred to the Wisconsin State Herbarium and their Checklist of the Vascular Plants of Wisconsin. For a wealth of information go to www.botany.wisc.edu/wisflora/. It was a difficult decision not to include other North American native plants in our list. An example would be Penstemon digitalis, foxglove beardtongue, which is introduced and naturalized in Wisconsin but originally grew natively just over the border in northern Illinois. Native plants can be used in your landscape in many ways. You may want to include native plants as an addition to a more traditional landscape. A specific portion of your property could be converted to a native garden. Or you may decide that you want all of your land planted exclusively with natives. Whatever you decide, the use of native plants will fulfill your needs and provide you with an appealing landscape, a sustainable environment, and the satisfaction that you are helping to preserve our natural resources. Native plants are locally adapted; they are hardy to our climate and at home in our soils. When the right plants are selected for your site conditions they are programmed to thrive, and, once established, will provide many years of beauty with reduced maintenance compared to traditional landscapes. However, even native plants are not maintenance free. It is important to provide new plantings with proper care to ensure establishment. Initial watering, mulching, and fertilization are important and native plants will respond just as other landscape plants do. Johnson’s Nursery has long used native plants in our landscape designs, even before their use became popular. We can help with plant selection for your site or provide you with consulting and designs specific to your desires and site limitations. Johnson’s Nursery can provide guidance to landscape contractors who wish to incorporate Wisconsin native plants in their designs, provide plants for DIY property owners, or our crews can install them for you. We invite you to view our facility, plants, and to visit with our experienced staff. We are eager to help you fulfill your landscape dreams. Wisconsin natives are truly Nature’s Best to You.®

Sugar Maple, Acer Sacchrum

Wild Iris, Iris Shrevei

Prairie Dropseed, Sporobolus heterolepsis


Legends Light Requirements and Sun Exposure S Full Sun P Partial Sun A Shade Whether the majority of the sunlight occurs in the morning or the afternoon, full sun locations receive 6 or more hours of direct, unfiltered sunshine.

These locations receive 4-6 hours of direct sunlight and are lightly shaded much of the day. Dappled or filtered sunlight the entire day is also considered partial sun.

Shaded locations receive little direct sun, fewer than 4 hours per day, and are heavily shaded much of the day. May also receive little to no reflected or indirect light.

Soil Type and Moisture Rich Soil (R)

Rich soil has a high content of organic matter and humus from years of built up decomposed plant and animal debris. Rich soils have high nutrient and moisture-holding capacity, as well as good aeration and drainage. Most plants thrive in rich soils and if this describes a location you plan to introduce a new plant, you are extremely lucky!

Wet Soil (W)

Wet soil is so poorly drained that it is soggy most of the time, typically holding standing water after heavy rains or the spring thaw. Many areas of Wisconsin have heavy clay soils that will remain wet much of the year, especially if the location is low or compacted. Wet soils are also common near shorelines and waterways. They can be improved through grading and to some extent by organic soil amendments.

Moist Soil (M)

Moist soil maintains consistent moisture without being too dry or too wet. It’s “just right!” These soils typically have good amounts of organic matter to help retain moisture and provide adequate aeration. Some plants prefer a consistently moist soil.

Dry Soil (D)

Dry soil contains low amounts of moisture most of the time. This is characteristic of sandy soils which allow water to drain through quickly, steeps slopes where water runs off, or beneath the overhangs of buildings. Sandy soils are often low in fertility as well. Dry soil can be improved by supplemental watering and additions of organic matter and mulching.

Well-Drained Soil (WD)

Well-drained soil allows water to pass through without becoming water-logged. They are welloxygenated which is important for healthy root growth. The use of organic amendments such as compost will improve drainage over time. Bark mulches will also improve soils as they slowly decompose.

Prairie Blazing Star, Liatris pycnostachya

Rafinesque Viburnum, Viburnum Rafinesquianum

Ironwood, Ostrya virginiana


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Native Plants for Wisconsin Landscapes

* indicates pictured on page

TREES Plant Name

Size

Soil Type

Light

Features

Acer saccharum Sugar Maple

H: 50-75’ S: 50’

R/M/WD

SPA

Acer spicatum Mountain Maple, Moose Maple

H: 25’ S: 15-25’

M / WD

SA

Alnus incana subsp. rugosa Speckled Alder

H: 15-25’ S: 10’

W-M

SPA

Amelanchier arborea Downy Serviceberry

H: 15-25’ S: 10-12’

M-D

SP

Early spring brings delicate white flowers. Edible, sweet purple fruits in June. Birds and other critters love them. Fall color varies from yellow to orange to red. Has smooth gray bark. Serviceberries are wonderful plants in any landscape setting, great year round appeal. Wonderful planted at edge of woods.

Amelanchier x grandiflora Apple Serviceberry

H: 25-30’ S: 25-30’

M / WD

SP

Typically a multi-stem tree. Early white flowers with edible purple - red berries that birds love. Yellow to red fall color. A naturally occurring hybrid, one of the best serviceberries for the landscape. Attractive year round with flowers, fruit, fall color, and smooth gray bark.

Amelanchier laevis Alleghany Serviceberry

H: 25’ S: 15’

R / M / WD

SP

Early white flowers. Purple, edible, sweet fruits. Brilliant orange-red fall color. Upright form. More tree-like than most serviceberries. Can serve as focal points in the landscape. They are wonderful landscape plants for people, birds and other wildlife.

SP

Magnificent tree, more common in the north woods but found throughout the state. Bark is silvery yellow and curly. Color changes with light conditions. Needs a cool moist soil. Grows in upland and lowland sites. Fairly shade tolerant. Gets larger than most birches. Resistant to bronze birch borer. Twigs taste like wintergreen!

S

Exfoliating cinnamon-brown bark, very attractive. Resistant to bronze birch borer. Tolerates heavy, wet soils but will tolerate dry soils once established. Very adaptable. Prefers acidic soils. Can serve as a specimen in the landscape. Also useful planted in groves.

SP

A shrub-form birch found in wetlands throughout Wisconsin. It is often seen in colonies in calcareous ferns or along lake shores. Our local seed strain has fall colors ranging from yellow to orange to red, unusual for a birch.

SPA

A fine-textured graceful small scale understory tree. Strong wooded with sinewy fluted stems which give it the name, Musclewood. Adaptable to sun or shade. Prefers moist soils. Fairly pest free. Great fall color. Can be yellow, orange to red. Great foliage, bark, and form give it year round appeal.

SP

Fastest growing hickory. Transplants well balled and burlaped, contrary to most reports by others. Attractive bark and foliage with clear yellow fall color. Stong wooded, fairly pest free, under-used tree. More northern in its range than Shagbark Hickory. Has distinctive sulphur yellow buds.

Wisconsin’s state tree. The dominant tree in our maple/basswood forest. Extraordinary fall color of gold, orange and scarlet. Prefers a rich, well-drained soil. Not tolerant of road salt or poorly drained, compacted, clay soils. Source of maple syrup for your pancakes! Shrubby tree. Large, coarsely-lobed green, leaves turn red, yellow and orange in fall. Greenish-white spiked flowers. Red samaras. Nice understory tree, typically found in cool, moist settings. Medium-sized shrubby tree. Typically found along river bottoms, edges of lakes and in swamps. Interesting persistent winter fruit that look like little pine cones. Great for wet areas and erosion control. Fixes nitrogen in the soil. Prefers slightly acidic soil.

*Betula alleghaniensis Yellow Birch

H: 50-75’ S: 35-50’

R / W-M / WD

Betula nigra River Birch

H: 50-75’ S: 35-50’

W-M

Betula pumila var. glandulifera Bog Birch

H: 6-13’ S: 6-13’

R/M/W

*Carpinus caroliniana Musclewood, American Hornbeam

H: 25-30’ S: 25-30’

Carya cordiformis Bitternut Hickory

H: 75-100’ S: 75-100’

R / M / WD

Carya ovata Shagbark Hickory

H: 80’ S: 40’

M-D

SP

A durable strong wooded tree. We have great success transplanting shagbark hickory, contrary to what is reported by others. Tolerant of a wide range of soil types, from sand to clay. The unique bark exfoliates in shaggy strips. Golden yellow fall color. Great tree as a source of edible nuts for wildlife and for humans!

Celtis occidentalis Common Hackberry

H: 60-75’ S: 40-60’

R / M-D

SP

Very adaptable tree. Tolerates clay soil, best growth on rich moist sites, but will grow most anywhere, salt tolerant. Nice bark looks like stucco. Developes an elmlike habit at maturity. Birds love the small, pea-sized berries. A river-bottom tree.

Cornus alternifolia Pagoda Dogwood

H: 10-15’ S: 15-20’

R / M / WD

PA

A great native for the shady landscape. White spring flowers are held erect on the branches. Summer brings blue/black fruits that birds love. Maroon fall color. Layered branching habit gives it its name. Mulch and water when dry for good growth. Native to every county in WI.

Yellow Birch, Betula alleghaniensis

R / M / WD

Musclewood, Carpinus caroliniana

Kentucky Coffeetree, Gymnocladus dioica


Johnson’s Nursery, Inc.™

Trees continued...

Size

Soil Type

Light

Features Tough, durable, small tree that is very useful in seemingly impossible urban sites. Drought tolerant. Handsome, horizontal branching is most beautiful when outlined by fresh snow cover. It’s glossy green foliage shows moderate resistance to cedar hawthorn rust. The brick-red fruits are susceptable to the rust. White, flattopped clusters of flowers appear in mid-spring.

Crataegus crus-galli Cockspur Hawthorn

H: 18-25’ S: 18-25’

W-M-D

S

Crataegus macrantha Fleshy Hawthorn

H: 18-25’ S: 18-25’

W-M-D

SP

Produces abundant, bright red fruits that are 3/8” – 1/2” diameter in September – October. Attracts large numbers of native bees. Is reported to have good rust resistance.

Crataegus mollis Downy Hawthorn

H: 20 –35’ S: 20-35’

SP

Very tough and hardy tree, adaptable to varying soil conditions and exposure. Wonderful horizontal branching habit gives it a distinctive outline in the dormant season. White flowers in spring followed by brick-red fruit. Can suffer from foliar diseases, and has wicked thorns.

SP

An aristocrat of the forest. Large, slow-growing, long-lived, stately tree with light gray, smooth bark that can resemble an elephant’s hide. Slender winter buds with overlapping scales resemble tiny cigars. Dried fall leaves remain on tree most of winter. Edible nuts are attractive to most wildlife and are produced about every third year. Climax forest tree.

SP

Uncommon native tree which is seldom bothered by pests. Usually found in the wild on rich, bottomland soils. Extremely tough, adaptable tree for urban sites. Wonderful bark, branching habit and foliage. Female trees have large seed bearing pods. Curious looking in youth, beautiful when mature.

S

Tough durable tree that survives abuse and thrives under good conditions. Fast growing. Nuts are great for wildlife and tasty for humans. Old specimens develop a very picturesque shape. Valuable timber tree. All parts of the tree contain a substance (juglone) that can inhibit the growth of nearby plants.

S

Our native crabapple. Spectacular fragrant pink spring flowers rival any ornamental tree. Small yellow green fruits attract wildlife. Attractive bark and branching habit makes for good winter interest. Susceptable to fungal leaf diseases that can render the tree leafless by August.

W-M-D

Fagus grandiflora American Beech

H: 60-75’ S: 55-65’

*Gymnocladus dioica Kentucky Coffeetree

H: 50-60’ S: 50-60’

R / M / WD

Juglans nigra Black Walnut

H: 50-75’ S: 50-75’

M / WD

Malus ioensis Prairie Crabapple

H: 20-30’ S: 20’

M-D

Ostrya virginiana Ironwood, Hophornbeam

H: 30’ S: 20’

M-D / WD

Populus tremuloides Quaking Aspen

H: 40-50’ S: 20-30’

Prunus pensylvanica Pin Cherry

H: 20-35’ S: 10-15’

M-D / WD

Prunus serotina Black Cherry

H: 25-40’ S: 15-20’

Prunus virginiana Chokecherry

H: 20-35’ S: 10-15’

Ptelea trifoliata Waferash, Hoptree

H: 15’ S: 15’

Quercus alba White Oak

H: 50-80’ S: 40-70’

Quercus bicolor Swamp White Oak

H: 50-60’ S: 50-60’

Quercus ellipsoidalis Northern Pin Oak

H: 55-70’ S: 25-50’

M / R / WD

SPA

It has handsome exfoliating bark, clean dark green foliage, a pleasing yellow fall color, and magical 3-4’ long catkins. Flowers in early spring. Retains brown leaves in the winter.

S

A tree with a huge native range in North America, very adaptable and fast growing. The bark is smooth, grayish white, reminiscent of Birch, very attractive. Leaves dance in the wind and exhibit a wonderful golden fall color. Forms colonies in the wild. Will send up root suckers in the landscape.

S

Very shiny reddish-brown bark, almost metallic looking. Fragrant white flowers. Edible bright red, sour cherries. Orange fall color. Generally found on dry sites in the wild. Shoots sprout from roots forming colonies. All wild cherries are good sources of fruit for the birds and other wildlife.

M-D

S

The biggest wild cherry in our forests. Fragrant white flowers develop into tart but edible black fruits, which many birds find tasteful. Fast growing and adaptable to many soils if well drained. Nice yellow to orange fall color. Dark, almost black, bark. The source of prized cherry lumber for furniture.

M-D

SP

A shrubby, suckering tree that grows throughout the state. More shade tolerant than other cherries. All the native cherries and plums are a good source of fruit for many birds and a host plant for many butterflies and moths.

SP

Very glossy leaves with sweet smelling flowers. Round, flattened hop-like seeds add interest after leaf drop. Grows in alluvial thickets on rocky slopes and in gravelly places. Very drought tolerant. The fruits were once used as a hop substitute in brewing beer!

R / WD

SP

Long-lived, well grown trees get huge and can dominate your landscape. Requires rich, well drained soil with no root competition from lawn. Wonderful architecture in winter. Fall color can be rich red. Acorns are great for wildlife. The White Oaks are less susceptible to oak wilt than are the Red Oaks. Slow growing.

W-M / Acid

SP

Easier to transplant than most oaks. Adaptable to poor drainage and compacted soils. It also grows well on upland sites. Can struggle on highly alkaline soils. Very appealing bark and foliage. Medium growth rate.

W-M / D

M-D / WD

D- Sandy Acidic

S

A excellent tree for dry sandy sites. Shiny leaves have deeply cut lobes with sharp points on the tips. Best identified by under bark which is yellow-orange in color. Fall color is scarlet red. Usually found in savanna situations with Pine, Hickory, Aspen, and Black Cherry. Its geographical range is in West Central Wisconsin. Adapts to our alkaline soils a bit more than Pin Oak.

Soil Key: (R) Rich | (W) Wet | (M) Moist | (D) Dry | (WD) Well Drained | Light Key:

S Full | P Partial | A Shade

Plants

Plant Name

4


5

Native Plants for Wisconsin Landscapes

* indicates pictured on page

Trees continued...

Plant Name

Size

*Quercus macrocarpa Bur Oak

H: 70-90’ S: 60-80’

W-M-D

Quercus muhlenbergii Chinkapin Oak

H: 45-80’ S: 50-80’

M-D / WD

Quercus rubra Red Oak

H: 60-75’ S: 45-65’

Quercus x schuettei Hybrid Swamp x Bur Oak

H: 75’ S: 70’

Salix lucida Shining Willow

H: 10’

Soil Type

R / M / WD

W-M-D

W-M

Light

Features

SP

A tough, adaptable long-lived tree. Tolerant of a wide range of soil conditions including an urban setting. The classic oak of the Midwest. With age it developes a huge picturesque spreading crown. We also grow the naturally occurring hybrid of Bur with Swamp White Oak.

SP

Rarest native oak in Wisconsin. Good for alkaline soils and adaptable to limestone bluffs, floodplains or mesic woods. Attractive foliage and picturesque branching. Sweetest tasting acorn of the oaks, especially attractive to wildlife. Fast growing when mulched, watered, and fertilized.

SP

A fast growing oak found in woodlands throughout Wisconsin. Red Oak prefers rich well drained soils. Wonderful summer foliage often turns rich red in the fall. As with many oaks, some foliage is retained in winter especially on young trees. Acorns are wildlife magnets.

SP

A naturally occuring hybrid between Q. bicolor, Swamp White Oak and Q. macrocarpa, Bur Oak. Easier to transplant than Bur Oak. More adaptable to alkaline soils than Swamp White Oak. This is a fast growing oak that is not difficult to grow. An excellent choice for tough urban sites.

S

Fast growing is an understatement for this tall shrubby willow. Long slender leaves are shiny on upper surface while being pale on the underside. Long yellowishwhite catkins emerge in May followed by fruits in June. Its fibrous roots function as a filter for ground water and improving water quality. Provides great food and shelter for many wildlife species. Many uses by Native Americans for food, tools, and medicines.

Salix nigra Black Willow

H: 30-40’+

W-M Flooded

S

A fast growing, widely common tree typically found wherever there is water. Long slender leaves are yellow-green on upper and lower surfaces. Bark is dark brown-black. Fallen branches and limbs quickly take root in moist soils. Its fibrous root system makes this a great plant for soil stabilization and early erosion control. Host plant for Viceroys and Red Spotted Purples.

Salix rigida Heart-Leaved Willow

H: 3-12’

W-M

S

Common large shrub Willow. Fairly large spring catkins. Found in wetlands. Stems are yellow to reddish brown. Emerging leaves have a burgundy blush.

Sorbus decora Showy Mountainash

H: 20-30’ S: 15-25’

R-M / WD

Tilia americana Basswood, American Linden

H: 50-70’ S: 35-50’

R / M / WD

Size

Soil Type

SP

Very attractive small scale native tree. Has pretty green-blue leaves, nice white spring flowers, bright red fruits and orange red fall color. Does best in cool, moist soils. Many birds feast upon the fruits. Found mostly in far northern Wisconsin along the Lake Superior shore.

SPA

A rapid grower with a dense teardrop outline. Often develops basal sprouts resulting in multi-stemmed trees. Quite adaptable in most urban conditions. Fragrant, creamy white flowers are the nectar source for basswood honey. Shade tolerant. A major component of our maple and basswood forest.

SHRUBS Plant Name Amelanchier stolonifera Running Serviceberry

H: 3-5’ S: 7’

Aronia melanocarpa var. elata Glossy Black Chokeberry

H: 5-7’ S: 4-6’

Ceanothus americanus New Jersey Tea

H: 2-3’ S: 2-4’

Cephalanthus occidentalis Buttonbush

H: 6-8’ S: 6-8’

Bur Oak, Quercus macrocarpa

M-D

W-M

M-D

W-M

Light

Features

SP

A medium sized thicket forming shrub. White flowers. Edible fruits, various birds and mammals love them. Yellow fall color. Nice small scale serviceberry, slowly suckers forming a mass of stems and leaves. Tolerates clay to dry sandy soils.

SP

Glossy leaves turn bright red-orange in fall. Abundant deep purple fruits hang on all winter. Easy to grow, a great plant for moist soils and for massing. Attractive year round. Found in many habitats including bogs, cliffs, prairies and forests, though is most common in wetlands.

SP

Great shrub for prairies or open savannas. Puffs of white flowers in July, followed by maroon flat-topped seed clusters. Nice clean foliage. Works well in the mixed border in landscapes. Many herbal uses by Native Americans and colonists for treating everything from snake bites to whooping cough. It is best maintained by cutting to the ground each spring. It flowers on new wood.

SP

Excellent plant for moist to wet soils. Found in bottomland forests, wet meadows and stream banks. Fragrant flowers are borne in one inch diameter perfectly shaped globes! Fruit heads turn orangy red in fall then brown and last all winter. Attracts birds, bees and butterflies.

Eastern Wahoo, Euonymus atropurpureus

Common Ninebark, Physocarpus opulifolius


Johnson’s Nursery, Inc.™

Shrubs continued...

Size

Soil Type

Cornus amomum Silky Dogwood

H: 8’ S:8’

W-M

Cornus racemosa Gray Dogwood

H: 8-12’ S: 8-12’

M-D

Light

Features

SP

Young branches are maroon-purple. White flowers. Very attractive porcelain-blue fruit clusters that the birds love. Great plant for wet areas. Dogwoods as a rule are easy to grow. Most benefit from renewal pruning. Purple-red fall color.

SP

An erect, many-stemmed suckering shrub that forms large colonies. White flowers. Abundant pearly white berries on red stalks. Purple-red fall color. Adaptable to a wide range of soils and moisture levels. Makes an excellent native leafy screen, which is especially attractive in the autumn months.

SP

Found throughout the state in moist to wet habitats. Grows best in full sun but will tolerate some shade. Clusters of white flowers in spring followed by white berries in fall. The red stems in winter make this a valuable plant to brighten our winter landscape. Benefits from renewal pruning as it ages. Beautiful red-maroon fall colors.

SP

The earliest plant to bloom in our area with interesting pendulous catkins in March-April. Clean foliage with orange-red and purple fall color. Thick and dense habit in full sun. Will tolerate light shade. The nuts are tasty but you may have to use bird netting to keep the wildlife from eating them!

SPA

An excellent low growing, suckering shrub with small yellow flowers. Good yellow, red to maroon fall color. Excellent for massing under trees and taller shrubs. A tough plant that will grow most anywhere. Grows in moist or dry situations. Can be pruned to the ground and will regrow nicely.

Cornus sericea Redosier Dogwood

H:6-8’ S: 6-8’

Corylus americana American Hazelnut

H: 8’ S: 8’

Diervilla lonicera Dwarf Bushhoneysuckle

H: 2-4’ S: 4-5’

M-D

*Euonymus atropurpureus Eastern Wahoo

H: 12-15’ S: 12-15’

M

Hamamelis viginiana Common Witchazel

H: 12-20’ S: 12-15’

Hypericum kalmianum St. John’s Wort

H: 2-3’ S: 3’

M-D

Ilex verticillata Common Winterberry

H: 3-9’ S: 3-8’

R / W-M

SP

Our native deciduous holly. Variable in size. It commonly grows in damp areas throughout much of Wisconsin. Abundant bright red fruits hug branches on the female plants from fall into winter. Plant in groups as both male and female plants are needed for fruit set. Prefers rich moist acid soils.

Lonicera oblongifolia Swampfly Honeysuckle

H: 3’ S: 3’

W-M

PA

A native honeysuckle. Light yellow flowers in June-July. Pea-sized, fleshy, bright cherry red fruits in July-August are very attractive. Grows natively in moist shady areas.

Lonicera villosa Mountain Fly Honeysuckle

H: 2-3’ S: 2-3’

W-M

SP

Another small sized native honeysuckle. White to yellow tubular flowers in May-June occur in pairs. Shredding bark. Blue-black fruits in July. Grows in moist wooded habitats in the northern part of Wisconsin. Remove some invasive honeysuckle and plant some natives.

*Physocarpus opulifolius Common Ninebark

H: 8-10’ S: 8-10’

SP

Upright spreading growth habit and dense foliage make this a nice native screening plant. Exfoliating bark peels in strips to reveal reddish to light brown inner bark. White flowers, reddish fruit capsules and bronzy fall color. This adaptable, tough plant is very easy to grow.

SP

A mounding shrub with dense branching. Bright yellow buttercup flowers begin blooming in June and continue until frost. Young branches are reddish brown and arch gently. Bluish-gray-green foliage. Found in wild bogs, dunes, lime shoreline. Adapts to poor soil sites. Native local ecotype seedlings. Numerous nativars with interesting flower color variation available.

SP

A non-invasive native buckthorn. Glossy leaves with small yellow green flowers producing reddish black fruits. Grows in wetlands and in bogs. Attracts birds and butterflies. It seems to have the ability to prevent the invasive glossy buckthorn from growing in its root zone.

S

Rare native shrub in Wisconsin. A mid-sized sprawling shrub good for massing. Dioecious flowers on females are insignificant but are followed by hairy red berries that are attractive to wildlife. The glossy green foliage is aromatic when crushed. Good fall color. Salt tolerance lends to use along roadsides.

S

Identical to Staghorn Sumac without fuzzy stems. Large spreading shrub with brilliant orange to red fall foliage. Tolerant to most any soil except those that are poorly drained. Colonizes to form large thickets. Has spectacular clusters of red fruit that stand out in fall and winter. Attractive to wildlife. Dioecious.

Potentilla fruticosa Bush Cinquefoil

Rhamnus alnifolia Alder Buckthorn

H: 3-4’ S: 2-4’

H: 3-4’ S: 3-4’

Rhus aromatica Fragrant Sumac

H: 6’ S: 8-10’

Rhus glabra Smooth Sumac

H: 10-15’ S: 10-15’

W-M

M-D

M-D

M-D

M/WD

W-M

M-D / WD

M-D / WD

SP

SPA

S

Small dark purple flowers in spring are followed by showy pink to crimson fruit. Reddish-purple fall color on this small tree or large shrub. Related to burning bush. A rare native that has been found in open fields and moist woodland or riparian habitats. It is a good addition to the shrub border. A native large shrub that blooms in the fall. Bright yellow flowers with small strap like petals in October into November. Golden yellow fall foliage. Found in the understory of our woodlands. The source of a tonic more commonly used in times past. Was also used for divining rods to locate underground water sources. Small scale shrub with fine textured blue green foliage. Bright yellow flowers an inch across last 6 weeks in mid-summer. The flowers are visited by many pollinating insects. Cinnamon-brown fruit capsules add interest in the dormant season. Great landscape plant, tough and adaptable to both moist and dry soils.

Soil Key: (R) Rich | (W) Wet | (M) Moist | (D) Dry | (WD) Well Drained | Light Key:

S Full | P Partial | A Shade

Plants

Plant Name

6


7

Native Plants for Wisconsin Landscapes

* indicates pictured on page

Shrubs continued...

Plant Name

Size

*Rhus typhina Staghorn Sumac

H: 10-15’ S: 10-15’

M-D / WD

Ribes americanum American Black Currant

H: 3-5’ S: 3-5’

D-M

Ribes missouriense Missouri Gooseberry

H: 2-4’ S: 4-6’

Rubus parviflorus Thimbleberry

H: 3-4’ S: 2-3’

Sambucus canadensis American Elderberry

Sambucus pubens Scarlet Elderberry

H: 5-12’ S: 5-12’

Soil Type

M-D/WD

M-D

W-M

Light

Features

S

The familiar staghorn sumac is a show stopper in autumn. Fall foliage can vary from bright orange to red to scarlet. Suckers to form large thickets. It is easily grown in full sun with good drainage. It is also tolerant of roadside settings. Can be pruned to the ground to renew growth.

SPA

Rounded shrub with arching stems adorned with drooping clusters of yellowishwhite, bell shaped flowers May–June. Small edible berries are wonderful for jelly, wine, pie, or tea. Natural habitat consists of sandy sedge meadows, partly shaded river banks, low areas and open woods.

SPA

A densely rounded shrub with spreading arching stems. Spring flowers occur singly or in clusters of drooping green-white flowers; attracts large numbers of native bees. Little 1/3” juicy globe berries are initially green changing to dull red or purple. Thorns are abundant on large branches while absent on smaller ones. Naturally found along woods edge. Excellent cover and food for birds.

SPA

Maple shaped leaves on a colonizing native raspberry. Large white flowers followed by edible berries. Stems are not thorny but do have prickles. Makes a great shrubby groundcover in the woodland garden. Prefers moist-well drainedshady sites. Common in Wisconsin’s northern most counties.

SPA

Medium to large suckering shrub with large white flower clusters in June/July. They can be 6 inches across. The flowers attract butterflies. Large clusters of dark purple to black fruit in late summer are relished by many birds. Very useful in moist to wet soils. Benefits from renewal pruning in early spring before new growth starts.

SPA

Another great Elderberry noted for its outstanding bright red fruit. The pyramidal flower clusters in spring are very attractive. Dappled sunlight is best for this Elderberry. It is most commonly found in moist lowland woods but will also grow on upland sites if it does not dry out.

SP

Found throughout the state in sunny wetland habitats. A fine textured shrub with 3-4” long clusters of creamy white flowers appearing in late June. Butterflies are attracted to the blooms. Requires slightly acidic soil. Grows best on sites that do not dry out.

H: 10-12’ S: 10-12’

M / WD

Spiraea alba Meadowsweet

H: 3-5’ S: 3-5’

W-M

Staphylea trifolia American Bladdernut

H: 10-15’ S: 8-12’

M / WD

SPA

A great under-used native shrub. Pretty bell shaped white flowers hang from the stems in May. Inflated bladder-like papery seed capsules follow in the fall. The dark green leaves turn a soft butter yellow in fall. Adapted to average to moist soil conditions.

Symphoricarpos albus Common Snowberry

H: 3-5’ S: 4-6’

D-M / WD

SPA

A useful low growing suckering shrub. Blue-green summer foliage. Small pinkish white flowers develop into showy white fruits ½” across in fall. Very tolerant of various soil conditions in sun to part shade. Birds are attracted to the berries.

Viburnum cassinoides Witherod Viburnum

H: 5-8’ S: 5-6’

SP

Very rare native shrub in Wisconsin. Creamy white flowers clusters, 2-5” across are followed by showy fruits changing from pink to blue to purple! They are incredible in the pink stage. Glossy leathery leaves develop brilliant red to purple fall color. Typically found in bog habitats. Prefers acidic soil.

Viburnum lentago Nannyberry Viburnum

H: 8-10’ S: 12-15’

M-D

Viburnum prunifolium Blackhaw Viburnum

H: 10-15’ S: 12-20’

M / WD

Viburnum rafinesquianum Rafinesque Viburnum

H: 6-8’ S: 6-8’

Staghorn Sumac, Rhus typhina

M/D

M-D

SPA

A large, upright multi-stem suckering shrub adaptable to both lowland and upland sites. White flower clusters up to 4.5” across. Fruits change from red to blue to black and are readily taken by wildlife. Every yard needs a Viburnum of one sort or another. Bright red to maroon fall color.

SPA

A great landscape viburnum. Develops into a large horizontally branched treelike shrub. White flowers followed by fruit that change from red to blue to black. Tough and adaptable to varying soil conditions. Its size and density make it very useful as a screening plant. Beautiful red to maroon fall color.

SPA

Our native Arrowwood Viburnum. It is named arrowwood because native Americans used the tough, straight branches for arrow shafts. Found throughout much of the state as an understory shrub in open woods. Creamy white, flat topped flower clusters appear in spring followed by glossy, jewel-like black fruits in August. The birds love them. The fall foliage consistently turns a rich maroon color.

Eastern Red Cedar, Juniperus virginiana

Wild Columbine, Aquilegia canadensis


Johnson’s Nursery, Inc.™

8

CONIFERS Size

Soil Type

Juniperus communis var. depressa Oldfield Common Juniper

H: 4’ S: 8’

D / WD

*Juniperus virginiana Eastern Red Cedar

H: 30-40’ S: 15-20’

D / WD

Larix laricina Tamarack, American Larch

H: 30-50’ S: 10-15’

W-M / WD

Picea glauca White Spruce

H: 40-60’ S: 10-20’

M-D

Pinus strobus Eastern White Pine

H: 50-80’ S: 30-50’

M-D / WD

H: 30-70’ S: 20-35’

W-M / WD / Cool

Plant Name

Size

Soil Type

Acorus americanus Sweet Flag

H: 1-3’ S: 1-2’

W

Agastache scrophulariifolia Anise-hyssop

H: 2-4’ S: 1-2’

M / WD

Allium cernuum Nodding Wild Onion

H: 2’ S: 1’

M-D

Tsuga canadensis Canadian Hemlock

Light

Features

SP

An extremely tough shrubby juniper native throughout the northern hemisphere. Tolerant of poor shallow soils and windy sites. Grows in Wisconsin on sand dunes and exposed hillsides. It will tolerate some shade. Works well in combination with short grass prairie plants. Variable in size, form, and color.

SP

Our native juniper tree. Very adaptable to soils as long as they are adequately drained. Good as a specimen and as a screen. Develops a wonderful picturesque form in age. Female junipers produce berries that are taken by birds. The berries can be used in cooking and as a flavoring in gin. Salt tolerant.

SP

A deciduous conifer native to bogs throughout the state. Will grow on an upland site given adequate moisture. Beautiful soft green needles in spring that turn to brilliant yellow in late fall. Tamarack grows fast, tall, and straight. It is adaptable to many soils; it makes a fine landscape tree.

S

A classic spire shaped evergreen with aromatic green foliage. Grow best in full sun in moist to dry, well drained soils. It is native throughout northern North America from Alaska to Maine. Excellent as a specimen or for screening a view.

S

Pyramidal in youth, becoming horizontal, picturesque and more open with age. Soft medium green needles. Grows in many habitats in the wild, from moist to dry. Struggles in heavy clay soil. It demands well aerated soils. Full sun for best growth. Commands attention in the landscape.

SPA

Pyramidal evergreen with gracefully spreading branches of soft airy foliage. Best growth on rich, moisture retentive, well drained soils. It will be more open and airy in full shade. A tree of the north. Best planted on protected sites in southern Wisconsin. Mulch well to keep the soil cool and moist.

PERENNIALS

Allium tricoccum Wild Leek

H: 6-12” S: 6-12”

Amorpha canescens Leadplant

H: 3’ S: 4’

D / WD

Anemone virginiana Tall Thimbleweed

H: 1-3’ S: 12-18”

M-D / WD

*Aquilegia canadensis Wild Columbine

H: 2-3’ S: 12-18”

Aralia racemosa Spikenard

H: 3-5’ S: 3-5’

Arisaema triphyllum Jack-in-the-Pulpit

H: 1-2’ S: 1’

M / R / WD

M / WD

M / WD

W-M

Light

S

Features Semi-aquatic perennial with aromatic tufts of long thick leaves. May produce a 2-4” dense, fleshy flower spike (spadix) which develops in June-July. Colonizes quickly by rhizomes. All parts of the plant have a sweet odor to them.

SPA

Also called Purple Giant Hyssop. This tall perennial is a member of the mint family with 3-5” purple – blue flower spikes that blooms from July to September. When crushed, the foliage exudes a licorice fragrance. Its fragrance attracts bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds. Spreads by seed but not aggressively. Nice rain garden plant. Found in moist open woods and thickets.

SP

Tufts of long grass-like leaves are topped with nodding white to pink flower clusters appear in August. Found on rocky open sites and along the woods edge. Great when combined with Anemone virginiana or Lobelia siphilitica.

PA

Also known as ramps, wild leeks have broadly lance-shaped leaves that emerge in March–April then wither away before flowers bloom. White spherical flower clusters are produced in June or July and last about 2 weeks. Fresh green leaves in early spring. A prized potting herb for those who like to forage for wild foods. Found in damp woods. Ephemeral.

SP

A shrubby perennial with fine textured gray-green foliage. In July, blue-violet flowers emerge on 6-8” spikes. Good for erosion control on slopes. Great for hot, dry sites. Adds nitrogen to the soil. Requires well drained soil. Once thought to alert miners to the presence of lead in the ground.

SP

Most commonly found in the understory of woodlands. Forms dense clumps of deeply divided foliage. In June-August, five-petaled white flowers on stiff stems are held high above the foliage. Seed heads are thimble shaped. Tolerates full shade. Spreads quickly by rhizomes.

P

A must-have in the moist woodland garden. Colorful and showy nodding red flowers with yellow centers hang above clumps of delicate blue-green fan-shaped leaves in May-June. Great when combined with ferns and Canada Wild Ginger. Freely self-sows. Attracts hummingbirds.

P

A large shrub-like understory herb for moist shade. Huge pinnately compound leaves. Tiny white flowers with long panicles which appear in July-Aug. Forms large clusters of purple-red fruits. Roots were once used as one of the ingredients in root beer. Early Native Americans used a Spikenard poultice to treat burns, skin irritation and infections.

A

A gem in the woodland garden. In spring, a thick fleshy spike or spadix forms (Jack) and is covered by a leaf like hood of striped purple, green and white (pulpit). Glossy cluster of red berries in late summer. Tends to be ephemeral. All plant parts are poisonous.

Soil Key: (R) Rich | (W) Wet | (M) Moist | (D) Dry | (WD) Well Drained | Light Key:

S Full | P Partial | A Shade

Plants

Plant Name


9

Native Plants for Wisconsin Landscapes

* indicates pictured on page

Perennials continued...

Plant Name

Size

Asarum canadense Canada Wild Ginger

H: 6-8” S: 12-18”

Asclepias incarnata Red Milkweed

H: 3-5’ S: 3’

W-M

Asclepias tuberosa Butterfly Weed

H: 2-3’ S: 9-18”

M-D / WD

*Aster azureus Sky Blue Aster

H: 2-3’ S: 18-24”

Aster ericoides Heath Aster

H: 1-3’ S: 2-3’

D / WD

Aster ptarmicoides Upland White Aster

H: 18-24” S: 12-18”

D / WD

Aster umbellatus Flat-topped Aster

H: 1-7’ S: 2-3’

Cassia hebecarpa Wild Senna

H: 3-6’ S: 2-3’

M-D

Campanula rotundifolia Blue Bellflower

H: 18” S: 12”

M-D/WD

Coreopsis palmata Stiff Coreopsis

H: 12-30” S: 12-15”

Dalea purpureum Purple Prairie Clover

H: 1-2’ S: 15-18’’

D / WD

*Dodecatheon meadia Shooting Star

H: 8-12” S: 1’

R / W-M / WD

Echinacea pallida Pale Purple Coneflower

Sky Blue Aster, Aster azureus

H: 3-4’ S: 18-24”

Soil Type R / M / WD

M-D / WD

W-M

Light

PA

Large, dark green, fuzzy, heart shaped leaves. Small red flowers are hidden under the leaves. Its seeds are disseminated by ants. Roots are aromatic when crushed. With a little time and rich soil, will form a dense groundcover. Appears to inhibit the germination of Garlic Mustard seeds.

S

Erect shrub-like perennial with sweetly fragrant clusters of pink to crimson flowers in July-August. Long seed pods enclose seed that have tufts of hair attached, which aid in dispersion. Prefers moist conditions of swamps and other wetland habitats. Attracts hummingbirds, butterflies and other pollinators. A food source for Monarch butterflies.

S

Upright shrub-like perennial with showy clusters of brilliant orange flowers in June-August. Long, skinny seed pods are packed with seeds that are dispersed with tufts of fuzz. It must have good drainage to over-winter well. Great perennial for sunny and dry habitats. Important food source of Monarch butterflies.

SP

R / D / WD

Loosely branched, erect perennial. Distinct arrow shaped, sand-papery leaves. Very showy, 1” bright lavender to blue daisy-like flowers cover this plant from August-October. One of the last asters to bloom in the fall, which is beautiful against the fading colors of the tall grass prairie.

S

Shrubby, somewhat erect perennial that produces hundreds of small white daisylike flowers that bloom August-October. Narrow leaves resemble that of the heath (hence its name). Habitats include open prairies and savannas. Larval host of the Pearl Cresent Butterfly.

SP

Sometimes referred to as Solidago ptarmicoides or Oligoneuron album. A prairie species. Low growing perennial with showy, flat-topped clusters of 1/2” white, daisy-like flowers. Plant is covered with blooms from July through September. Attracts butterflies in the summer and birds in the fall. Thrives in dry, sandy soils.

SP

A tall, erect perennial found throughout the tall grass prairie, wetland edges and open moist woodlands. White flowers appear in fairly flat clusters atop stiff stems that tend to be purple, July-Sept. One of the first asters to bloom. Important food source for many butterflies.

SP

Large shrub-like perennial with open branching and unique lush blue-green foliage. Bright yellow pea-flower clusters. Its deep root system keeps it drought tolerant. The attractive brown seed pods add interest to the winter landscape line. Great for clay soils.

SPA

A semi-erect perennial with pendulous bell-shaped blue flowers. Blooms tall, wiry stems from June–September. The basal leaves usually wither away before flowering time. Tolerant of dry, sandy soils. This is a long-blooming (2-3 months) perennial that grows to form small clumps. Attracts butterflies and bees.

SP

D / WD

Features

Stiff, upright perennial with bright yellow flowers that bloom on slender stems June-August. Narrow green foliage turns orange-purple in fall. Prefers hot, dry sites. Commonly found in prairies and dry open woods. Can spread quickly and form dense patches. Great when combined with Purple Prairie Clover.

S

Stiff, upright perennial with fine textured foliage, commonly found on dry prairies. Unique rose-purple flowers are cone-shaped and bloom from the bottom up in July-September. Removes nitrogen from the air to improve soil fertility. Birds enjoy the seeds that form in fall. Combines nicely with Stiff Coreopsis.

SP

Exceptionally beautiful springtime perennial. Dozens of deep pink to white shooting star-shaped flowers nod atop stiff stalks from April–June. They form a basal clump of smooth green foliage. This ephemeral (goes dormant by August) is perfectly happy in the prairie or open woods.

S

A tall, upright wildflower for dry prairies. Large flowers with drooping pale-pink petals encircle a large brown central cone. Its strong taproot makes for great drought tolerance. The fruit (cones) are full of seed and attract many birds. Was used by early Native Americans for many medicinal purposes. A “threatened” species in Wisconsin.

Shooting Star, Dodecatheon meadia

Wild Geranium, Geranium maculatum


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Perennials continued...

Size

Eupatorium maculatum Spotted Joe-Pye Weed

H: 4-6’ S: 2-3’

Soil Type R/W/M

Light

S

A tall, stiff, clump forming wetland indicator plant. Showy, pink-to-purple flowers appear in branched clusters atop rigid purple spotted stems from July-September. A true butterfly magnet. Easily identifiable, and a joy to see while driving next to wetland areas.

SPA

Low growing perennial that reproduces by long arching runners. The small white flowers occur in clusters and bloom from April-June; usually up to 12 flowers per plant. The strawberries ripen from May to June are quite small, but wonderfully delicious. The fruit can be eaten raw, cooked, or dried. Tea can be prepared from fresh leaves. Wild Strawberry is found throughout Wisconsin in moist forests, sandy wooded riverbanks, fields, and meadows. Loose, showy clusters of lilac-pink flowers with white centers, blooms in May above clumps of deeply divided foliage. Red fall color. Great for massing as a groundcover. Prefers shady conditions, yet will be fine in sun with plenty of moisture.

Fragaria virginiana Wild Strawberry

H: 2-8” S: 8-12”

*Geranium maculatum Wild Geranium

H: 1-2’ S: 18”

R / M / WD

SPA

Geum triflorum Prairie Smoke

H: 12-15” S: 18”

R / D / WD

S

Iris shrevei Wild Iris

H: 2-3’ S: 1’

W-M

Iris versicolor Harlequin Blue Flag

H: 2-3’ S: 18-24”

Liatris pycnostachya Prairie Blazing Star

H: 3-5’ S: 1-2’

M-D

Lobelia cardinalis Cardinal Flower

H: 2-4’ S: 1-2’

W-M

Lobelia siphilitica Great Blue Lobelia

H: 1-4’ S: 1-2’

Mertensia virginica Virginia Bluebells

H: 1-2’ S: 12-15”

R/M

Monarda fistulosa Wild Bergamot

H: 2-3’ S: 2’

M-D / WD

Parthenium integrifolium Wild Quinine

H: 2-4’ S: 1-2’

Phlox pilosa Prairie Phlox

H: 1-2’ S: 1-2’

Polygonatum biflorum Giant Solomon’s Seal

Ratibida pinnata Yellow Coneflower

H: 3-4’ S: 1’

H: 3-4’ S: 18-24”

M-D

W-M

W-M

M-D

M-D / WD

W-M

D-M

Features

A gem for the prairie or dry woods edge. Deep pink nodding flowers in April rise above ferny foliage. Extraordinary pink feathery seed heads have a smoke-like appearance as they sway in the breeze, from May-June. Delightful when massed.

SP

Similar to a typical iris, yet thrives in water. Erect fans of pale green sword-like leaves. Beautiful 3” blue-violet flowers with yellow and white markings in JuneJuly. Ideal for a rain garden.

SP

Clump forming, moisture loving, rhizome creeping, tall growing, spring flowering perennial. Long narrow sword like leaves emerge in spring followed by beautiful blue-violet beardless iris flowers that bloom May-July. Occurs naturally on lake shores, stream banks, swamps, and wet meadows.

S

A truly magnificent plant for the moist prairie. Tall, erect stems are covered with grass like leaves. Dense bottlebrush-like wands of mauve-pink emerge 3-5’ above foliage, from July-Sept. Drought tolerant. Butterfly magnet. Awesome when combined with Compass Plant or Yellow Coneflower.

SP

A tall upright, wetland indicator plant. The large spike-like clusters of intense crimson-red in late summer are truly stunning along streams and moist woodland edges. Attracts the Ruby-throated Hummingbird. Combines well with Great Blue Lobelia. Can be short lived on dry sites.

SP

A tall perennial that forms loose upright clumps. Long erect spikes of deep blue tubular flowers from June-September. Most comfortable in shaded woods or along a sunny stream. More drought tolerant than Lobelia cardinalis. Attracts hummingbirds and butterflies.

PA

A beautiful spring ephemeral for woodland settings. Rich blue, bell-shaped flowers hang in clusters in late March-May, above smooth light-green foliage. Combines with Solomon Seal, Wild Geranium, and Pennsylvania Sedge for early springtime color.

SP

Wisconsin’s native bee balm. A stiff, upright perennial that forms thick clumps. Pink to lavender tubular flowers form shaggy clusters in July-September. Being a member of the mint family, all parts are aromatic. Wild Bergamot is happy almost anywhere, so it is a perfect addition to any garden.

S

This unique sturdy perennial is a must have in the native garden. Its wooly looking flower heads bloom from late June-September. The foliage is sand-papery to the touch and fragrant when crushed. Thrives in open woods, thickets, and rocky prairies. Combines beautifully with Liatris, Echinacea and Ratibida. Was used as a substitute for quinine during World War I.

SP

An upright, vigorous perennial found on dry to mesic prairies and woods. Clusters of 5-petaled fragrant pink to lavender flowers bloom in April-June. Also known as Downy Phlox, due to the fine hairs covering leaves and stems. Perfect for the butterfly garden and for hummingbirds.

SPA

Long, stiffly-arching stems that are densely lined with lance shaped leaves. The plant adds architectural interest to the forest floor. Showy greenish-yellow tubular flowers are hidden along the undersides of the stems in May-June, followed by gorgeous blue fruit. Spreads and forms dense colonies. Combines well with Wild Geranium and Ferns.

S

This tall coneflower bears flower heads of drooping bright-yellow petals surrounding a grayish-brown cone. Flowers bloom atop tall slender stiff stems. Long bloom time in summer from July-September. Cones smell of anise when crushed. The foliage is hairy, upright and deeply cut. Attracts butterflies and birds. Combines beautifully with Wild Bergamot and Prairie Blazing Star. Drought tolerant.

Soil Key: (R) Rich | (W) Wet | (M) Moist | (D) Dry | (WD) Well Drained | Light Key:

S Full | P Partial | A Shade

Plants

Plant Name

10


11

Native Plants for Wisconsin Landscapes

* indicates pictured on page

Perennials continued...

Plant Name

Size

Soil Type

*Ruellia humilis Hairy Wild Petunia

H: 1-2’ S: 12-15”

R / M-D

Silphium laciniatum Compass Plant

H: 3-10’ S: 2-3’

M-D

Silphium terebinthinaceum Prairie Dock

H: 7-8’ S: 3-5’

M-D

Smilacina racemosa False Solomon’s Seal

H: 3’ S: 2’

Solidago flexicaulis Zig Zag Goldenrod

H: 2-4’ S: 12-18”

Solidago ulmnifolia Elm-leaved Goldenrod

H: 2-4’ S: 1-2’

D

Thalictrum dasycarpum Purple Meadow Rue

H: 3-5’ S: 3-4’

R / W-M / WD

R / M / WD

R / M / WD

Tradescantia ohiensis Spiderwort

H: 2-3’ S: 18-30”

D-M / WD

Vernonia fasciculata Ironweed

H: 4-6’ S: 15-18”

W-M / D

Veronicastrum virginicum Culver’s Root

H: 3-6’ S: 1-2’

R / M-D

Zizia aurea Golden Alexander

H: 18-36” S: 18-24”

M

Size

Soil Type

Light

Features

SP

Forms dense, sprawling clumps of gray-green fuzzy leaves and stems. Showy lavender funnel-shaped flowers bloom all the way from from June-September. Resembles cultivated Petunias. Drought tolerant. Beautiful when combined with Little Bluestem or Prairie Dropseed. Is an “endangered” species in Wisconsin.

S

Distinctly huge leaves are deeply lobed and orient themselves with the sun in north-south direction throughout the day. Large bright-yellow flowers bloom July-Sept. in branched clusters high above the foliage. Native Americans used the resinous sap from the top stems as breath-freshening chewing gum.

S

Easily identified on the prairie with its large clump of huge paddle-like leaves. In midsummer, it sends up a tall purple flower stalk that is topped with a cluster of bright yellow flowers. A truely unique plant that stands out when planted with native grasses.

SPA

An excellent woodland ground cover. Plume-like clusters of star shaped flowers bloom at the tips of the arching stems of this beautiful woodland plant from May-June and have a surprisingly rose-like fragrance. Large clusters of bright red berries ripen from August-October. Arching stems are lined with glossy oval leaves that display strong veins. Has a nice, yellow fall color. Can form dense colonies over time.

SPA

A unique woodland native with stems that usually ‘zig zag’. Small clusters of bright-yellow flowers form between the leaves on the upper part of the plant in Aug-Sept. A wonderful native to lighten up a shady spot. Common throughout Wisconsin’s forests.

SPA

A wonderful, woodland goldenrod with foliage that resembles Elm leaves. Yellow to yellow-orange flowers bloom on the tops of arching stems in spreading clusters, Aug-Oct. Has a loose appearance that combines nicely with other woodland natives.

SP

A unique native found throughout Wisconsin’s moist prairies, open woods and along stream banks. Fine-textured blue-green foliage resembles Aquilegia. In JuneJuly, greenish-white fringe-like flowers form large airy clusters that are held high atop stiff purple stems. Beautiful when massed.

SP

A clump forming perennial with grass like leaves and three-petaled flowers. Large flower bud clusters appear at the tips of flower stem. The bright-blue to lavender flowers bloom from May-July, each lasting for just 1 day, but could remain longer on a cloudy days. The bluish-green arching foliage is folded lengthwise forming a channel. Goes dormant in late summer. Found in well-drained woods, prairies, and meadows.

S

A towering perennial for wet prairies and swampy meadows. Bright reddishpurple flowers appear in dense, branched clusters atop ‘iron’ stiff stems in JulySept. Combines beautifully with Solidago or Silphium for outstanding late summer color. Tolerates flooding.

SP

An elegant native with a strong vertical stature. The foliage adds to the amazing visual texture. Showy-white candelabra-like flowers bloom in late summer for 2-4 weeks from July-Aug. Common throughout Wisconsin on moist prairies, savannas and open woodland edges.

SP

As a member of the carrot family, Golden Alexander has clusters of bright-yellow umbel flowers that bloom from May-June. This upright perennial has lobed leaves with serrated edges. The leaves and fruit slowly turn purple in fall. Important food source for the caterpillars of the Black Swallowtail Butterfly. Found in open woods and wet meadows.

VINES Plant Name *Celastrus scandens American Bittersweet

H: 20’+

Hairy Wild Petunia, Ruellia humilis

M-D

Light

SP

Features A fast growing, twining and sprawling vine. Greenish-white flowers followed by drooping clusters of orange seed capsules revealing bright red seeds that hang on through winter. Male and female plants are needed for fruit display. Often used in dried flower arrangements.

American Bittersweet, Celastrus scandensis

Pennsylvania Sedge, Carex pensylvanica


Johnson’s Nursery, Inc.™

Perennials continued...

Plant Name Clematis virginiana Virgins bower

Size

Smilax herbacea Carrion Vine

H: 12-20’+

Soil Type M / WD

Light

12

Features

SPA

A vigorous, twining vine found on woodland edges and stream banks. Numerous clusters of fragrant, starry, white flowers appear in July-Aug, followed by feathery seed heads in Aug-Sept. Often confused with Sweet Autumn Clematis. Beautiful as it trails along fences or over nearby plants.

SP

Found on moist forest edges. Climbs on nearby plants and structures with twining tendrils. One-inch, round clusters of green flowers are malodorous (fly pollinated). Female plants form spectacular golf ball sized round clusters of blue fruits in fall. Herbaceous. Young vigorous shoots were harvested by Native Americans and eaten.

H: 3-10’

M

Plant Name

Size

Soil Type

Adiantum pedatum Maidenhair Fern

H: 12-18” S: 18-24”

R / M / WD

Athyrium filix-femina Lady Fern

H: 2-3’ S: 2’

R / M-W

Matteuccia struthiopteris Ostrich Fern

H: 3-6’ S: 2-3’

Onoclea sensibilis Sensitive Fern

H: 3-4’ S: 3-4’

W-M WD

Osmunda cinnamomea Cinnamon Fern

H: 3-5’ S: 3’

R / W-M

PA

An excellent fern for shaded wet habitats. Same habit as Ostrich Fern except for dramatic orange-red colored fertile fronds that protrude through the center in June. Common name refers to the soft cinnamon colored hairs on the stems. Tolerant of flooding.

Polystichum acrostichoides Christmas Fern

H: 18-24” S: 18-24”

R / M-D

PA

A wonderful woodland fern that is evergreen. Forms a fountain-like clump of dark green, leathery, glossy fronds. Eventually the fronds will lay on the ground as they mature. Has been used in Christmas decorating. Drought tolerant once established. Due to rarity, it has a WDNR status of “Special Concern”.

Size

Soil Type

FERNS

R/M

Features

A

Probably the most beautiful and easily recognized fern of Wisconsin’s rich, moist woods. Does not exhibit the typical vase shape of other ferns. It forms a clump of dark, wiry stems with fine-textured fronds that branch out horizontally. In spring, the emerging fronds are bright pink. It performs best in humid conditions.

PA

Wonderfully upright arching habit with bright-green feathery fronds. Forms dense clumps. A dominant fern in forested habitats and along shaded streams. More drought tolerant than other ferns. Deer resistant. Combines with Wild Geranium or as an under-plant with Virginia Blue Bells.

PA

Long arching, light-green, fronds unfurl in April-May and form large clumps. Common throughout Wisconsin in moist, shady woods. Impressive when massed or when planted with spring ephemerals. Provides great cover for our amphibian friends.

SPA

Fiddleheads emerge in spring with shades of pale red. There are 2 types of fronds on this fern, fertile and infertile. The fertile fronds are elongated with bead-like leaflets becoming dark brown in winter, while the infertile fronds are deeply and narrowly lobed. Called Sensitive Fern due to the fronds being sensitive to the first fall frost. Found in woodlands, moist meadows and prairies.

GRASSES Plant Name Andropogon geradii Big Bluestem

H: 4-7’ S: 3’

W/D

*Carex pensylvanica Pennsylvania Sedge

H: 6-12” S: 12-15”

M-D / WD

Elymus hystrix Bottlebrush Grass

H: 1-3’ S: 8-12”

W-M / WD

Schizachyrium scoparium Little Bluestem

H: 2-4’ S: 12-18”

Sorghastrum nutans Indiangrass

H: 4-5’ S: 3-4’

M-D

Sporobolus heterolepsis Prairie Dropseed

H: 2-3’ S: 2-3’

M-D / WD

M-D

Light

Features

PA

Large clumps of silvery-blue foliage that turns orange-to-bronzy in fall. Purple, 3-parted seed heads resemble a turkey foot and emerge in August. Great warm season grass for erosion control and wind breaks. Dominant grass in native tallgrass prairies.

PA

Finely textured, bright green arching tufts turn a nice tan in fall. Great spreading habit, which forms a loose turf in the dense-to-dappled shade of forest habitats. Happiest with the oaks. Reddish-brown, thimble-like flowers in May. Birds enjoy the seeds. A cool season sedge (will emerge in early spring).

PA

An outstanding native grass for moist to dry, shady woods. This clump forming grass has gray-green tufted foliage. In June, 4” loose bottlebrush-like seed heads form and remain attractive through winter. Early Native Americans ground a very nutritious flour from the seeds.

S

A dominant grass in the prairie. Forms upright clumps, with hues of blues and greens that turn reddish-gold in the fall. Branched stems of purplish-bronze flowers appear in August. Fluffy-silver seed heads remain attractive throughout winter. Wonderful when massed with other prairie wildflowers. Birds love the seed.

S

Was the second most dominant grass in the tall grass prairie. Upright clumps of slender blue-green leaves turn beautiful shades of orange-yellow in fall. Soft, feathery flowers in July, followed by chestnut-colored seed heads that last all winter. Great for erosion control.

S

A dominant grass of the prairie. Fountain-like clumps of fine textured foliage turn shades of gold and orange in the fall. Fragrant pale pink flowers form in late summer and rise above the foliage. Beautiful when massed. An important food source for birds during fall and winter.

Soil Key: (R) Rich | (W) Wet | (M) Moist | (D) Dry | (WD) Well Drained | Light Key:

S Full | P Partial | A Shade

Plants

Light


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Native Plants for Wisconsin Landscapes

* indicates pictured on page

Plants Tolerant of Shade

Trees Acer saccharum Sugar Maple Acer spicatum Mountain Maple Alnus incana subsp. rugosa Speckled Alder Amelanchier arborea Downy Serviceberry Amelanchier x grandiflora Apple Serviceberry *Amelanchier laevis Alleghany Serviceberry Carpinus caroliniana Musclewood Cornus alternifolia Pagoda Dogwood Fagus grandifolia American Beech Ostrya virginiana Ironwood Ptelea trifoliata Waferash Shrubs Amelanchier stolonifera Aronia melanocarpa var. elata Cornus amomum Cornus racemosa Corylus americana Diervilla lonicera Euonymus atropurpurea *Hamamelis virginiana Ilex verticillata Physocarpus opulifolius Rubus parviflorus Sambucus canadensis Sambucus pubens Staphylea trifolia Symphoricarpos albus Viburnum cassinoides Viburnum lentago Viburnum prunifolium Viburnum rafinesquianum Conifers (partial shade) Larix laricina Tsuga canadensis

Running Serviceberry Glossy Black Chokeberry Silky Dogwood Gray Dogwood American Hazelnut Dwarf Bushhoneysuckle Eastern Wahoo Common Witchhazel Common Winterberry Common Ninebark Thimbleberry American Elderberry Scarlet Elderberry American Bladdernut Common Snowberry Witherod Viburnum Nannyberry Viburnum Blackhaw Viburnum Rafinesque Viburnum Tamarack, American Larch Canadian Hemlock

Perennials Adiantum pedatum Maidenhair Fern Agastache scrophulariaefolia Anise-Hyssop Allium tricoccum Wild Leek Anemone virginiana Tall Thimbleweed Aquilegia canadensis Wild Columbine Aralia racemosa Spikenard Arisaema triphyllum Jack-in-the-Pulpit *Asarum canadense Canada Wild Ginger Athyrium filix-femina Lady Fern Carex pensylvanica Pennsylvania Sedge

Virginia Bluebells, Mertensia virginica

Alleghany Serviceberry, Amelanchier laevis

Dodecatheon meadia Elymus hystrix Geranium maculatum Lobelia cardinalis Lobelia siphilitica Matteuccia struthiopteris *Mertensia virginica Onoclea sensibilis Osmunda cinnamomea Polygonatum biflorum Polystichum acrostichoides Smilacina racemosa Solidago flexicaulis Thalictrum dasycarpum Veronicastrum virginicum

Shooting Star Bottlebrush Grass Wild Geranium Cardinal Flower Great Blue Lobelia Ostrich Fern Virginia Bluebells Sensitive Fern Cinnamon Fern Giant Solomon’s Seal Christmas Fern False Solomon’s Seal Zig Zag Goldenrod Purple Meadow Rue Culver’s Root

Vines Celastrus scandens American Bittersweet Clematis virginiana Virginsbower Smilax herbacea Carrion Vine

Plants for Wet Soil (Subject to Periodic Flooding) Trees Alnus incana subsp. rugosa Betula nigra Betula pumila var. grandulifera

Common Witchazel, Hamamelis virginiana

Speckled Alder River Birch Bog Birch

Canada Wild Ginger, Asarum canadense


Johnson’s Nursery, Inc.™

Plants for Wet Soil continued...

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Carpinus caroliniana Musclewood Celtis occidentalis Hackberry Populus tremuloides Quaking Aspen Quercus bicolor Swamp White Oak *Quercus x schuettei Hybrid Swamp x Bur Oak Salix lucida Shining Willow Salix nigra Black Willow Salix rigida Heart Leaved Willow Sorbus decora Showy Mountainash Shrubs Aronia melanocarpa var. elata Glossy Black Chokeberry Cephalanthus occidentalis Buttonbush Cornus amomum Silky Dogwood Cornus sericea Redosier Dogwood Ilex verticillata Common Winterberry Lonicera oblongifolia Swampfly Honeysuckle Physocarpus opulifolius Common Ninebark Potentilla fruiticosa Bush Cinquefoil Rhamnus alnifolia Alder Buckthorn Sambucus canadensis American Elderberry Spiraea alba Meadowsweet Viburnum cassinoides Witherod Viburnum Tamarack, American Larch

Perennials Acorus calamus Sweet Flag Asclepias incarnata Red Milkweed Aster umbellatus Flat-topped Aster Eupatorium maculatum Spotted Joe-Pye Weed Iris shrevei Wild Iris Iris versicolor Harlequin Blue Flag Iris Lobelia cardinalis Cardinal Flower Lobelia siphilitica Great Blue Lobelia Monarda fistulosa Wild Bergamot Sporobolus heterolepsis Prairie Dropseed Vernonia fasciculate Ironweed Veronicastrum virginicum Culver’s Root

Plants for Rich, Moist, Well-drained Soil

Trees *Acer saccharum Sugar Maple Acer spicatum Mountain Maple Amelanchier arborea Downy Serviceberry Amelanchier x grandiflora Apple Serviceberry Amelanchier laevis Alleghany Serviceberry Betula alleghaniensis Yellow Birch Carpinus caroliniana Musclewood

Hybrid Swamp x Bur Oak, Quercus x schuettei

Carya cordiformis Bitternut Hickory *Cornus alternifolia Pagoda Dogwood Crataegus crus-galli Cockspur Hawthorn Crataegus mollis Downy Hawthorn Crataegus macracantha Fleshy Hawthorn Fagus grandifolia American Beech Gymnocladus dioica Kentucky Coffeetree Juglans nigra Black Walnut Ostrya virginiana Ironwood Prunus virginiana Chokecherry Prunus serotina Black Cherry Quercus alba White Oak Quercus rubra Red Oak Tilia americana Basswood, American Linden Shrubs Amelanchier stolonifera Running Serviceberry Cornus amomum Silky Dogwood Diervilla lonicera Dwarf Bushhoneysuckle Euonymus atropurpurea Eastern Wahoo Hamamelis virginiana Common Witchhazel Lonicera villosa Mountain Fly Honeysuckle Physocarpus opulifolius Common Ninebark Prunus americana American Plum *Rhus aromatica Fragrant Sumac Rhus glabra Smooth Sumac

Pagoda Dogwood, Cornus alternifolia

Fragrant Sumac, Rhus aromatica

Lists

Conifers Larix laricina

Sugar Maple, Acer saccharum


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Native Plants for Wisconsin Landscapes

* indicates pictured on page

Plants for Rich, Moist, Well Drained Soil continued...

Ribes americanum Ribes missouriense Rubus parviflorus Sambucus pubens Staphylea trifolia Symphoricarpos albus Viburnum lentago Viburnum prunifolium Viburnum rafinesquianum

American Black Currant Missouri Gooseberry Thimbleberry Scarlet Elderberry American Bladdernut Common Snowberry Nannyberry Viburnum Blackhaw Viburnum Rafinesque Viburnum

Conifers Juniperus comm.var. depressa Common Oldfield Juniper Juniperus virginiana Eastern Red Cedar Larix laricina Tamarack, American Larch Picea glauca White Spruce Pinus strobus Eastern White Pine Tsuga canadensis Canadian Hemlock Perennials Adiantum pedatum Aquilegia canadensis Aralia racemosa Asarum canadense Athyrium filix-femina Campanula rotundifolia Dodecatheon meadia Geranium maculatum *Geum triflorum Matteuccia struthiopteris Mertensia virginica Onoclea sensibilis Osmunda cinnamomea Polystichum acrostichoides Polygonatum biflorum Ratibida pinnata Smilacina racemosa *Solidago flexicaulis Thalictrum dasycarpum

Maidenhair Fern Wild Columbine Spikenard Canada Wild Ginger Lady Fern Blue Bellflower Shooting Star Wild Geranium Prairie Smoke Ostrich Fern Virginia Bluebells Sensitive Fern Cinnamon Fern Christmas Fern Giant Solomon’s Seal Yellow Coneflower False Solomon’s Seal Zig Zag Goldenrod Purple Meadow Rue

Vines Celastrus scandens Clematis virginiana

American Bittersweet Virgin’s Bower

Plants for Dry Soil

Trees Amelanchier arborea Carya cordiformis *Carya ovata Celtis occidentalis Crataegus crus-galli

Prairie Smoke, Geum triflorum

Downy Serviceberry Bitternut Hickory Shagbark Hickory Hackberry Cockspur Hawthorn

Zig Zag Goldenrod, Solidago flexicaulis

Crataegus macracantha Crataegus mollis Malus ioensis Ostrya virginiana Prunus pensylvanica Prunus serotina Prunus virginiana Ptelea trifoliata Quercus ellipsoidalis Quercus macrocarpa Quercus muhlenbergii

Fleshy Hawthorn Downy Hawthorn Prairie Crabapple Ironwood Pin Cherry Black Cherry Chokecherry Waferash Hill’s Oak Bur Oak Chinkapin Oak

Shrubs Amelanchier stolonifera Running Serviceberry Ceanothus americanus New Jersey Tea Corylus americana American Hazelnut Diervilla lonicera Dwarf Bushhoneysuckle *Hypericum kalmianum St. John’s Wort Physocarpus opulifolius Common Ninebark Potentilla fruticosa Bush Cinquefoil Prunus americana American Plum Rhus aromatica Fragrant Sumac Rhus glabra Smooth Sumac Rhus typhina Staghorn Sumac Rubus parviflorus Thimbleberry Symphoricarpos albus Common Snowberry

Shagbark Hickory, Carya ovata

St. John’s Wort, Hypericum kalmianum


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Johnson’s Nursery, Inc.™

Plants for Dry Soil continued...

Conifers *Juniperus comm. var. depressa Common Oldfield Juniper Juniperus virginiana Eastern Red Cedar Picea glauca White Spruce

Plants for Clay Soils

Trees Carpinus caroliniana Musclewood Carya ovata Shagbark Hickory *Celtis occidentalis Hackberry Crataegus crus-galli Cockspur Hawthorn Crataegus mollis Downy Hawthorn Crataegus macracantha Fleshy Hawthorn Gymnocladus dioica Kentucky Coffeetree Populus tremuloides Quaking Aspen Prunus serotina Black Cherry *Quercus bicolor Swamp White Oak Quercus macrocarpa Bur Oak Quercus muhlenbergii Chinkapin Oak Quercus x schuettei Hybrid Swamp x Bur Oak Salix nigra Black Willow Tilia americana Basswood, American Linden

Swamp White Oak, Quercus bicolor

Hackberry, Celtis occidentalis

Shrubs Aronia melanocarpa var. elata Glossy Black Chokeberry Cephalanthus occidentalis Buttonbush Cornus amomum Silky Dogwood Cornus racemosa Gray Dogwood *Cornus sericea Redosier Dogwood Corylus americana American Hazelnut Diervilla lonicera Dwarf Bushhoneysuckle Physocarpus opulifolius Common Ninebark Potentilla fruticosa Bush Cinquefoil Rhus aromatica Fragrant Sumac Sambucus canadensis American Elderberry Staphylea trifolia American Bladdernut Viburnum lentago Nannyberry Viburnum Viburnum rafinesquianum Rafinesque Viburnum Confiers Juniperus virginiana Larix laricina

Eastern Red Cedar Tamarack, American Larch

Perennials Acorus calamus Allium cernuum Asclepias incarnata Cassia hebecarpa Dalea purpureum

Redosier Dogwood, Cornus sericea

Lists

Perennials Amorpha canescens Leadplant Andropogon gerardii Big Bluestem Anemone virginiana Tall Thimbleweed Asclepias tuberosa Butterfly Weed Aster azureus Sky Blue Aster Aster ericoides Heath Aster Aster ptarmicoides Upland White Aster Campanula rotundifolia Blue Bellflower Carex pensylvanica Pennsylvania Sedge Coreopsis palmata Stiff Coreopsis Dalea purpureum Purple Prairie Clover Echinacea pallida Pale Purple Coneflower Fragaria virginiana Wild Strawberry Geum triflorum Prairie Smoke Liatris pychnostachya Prairie Blazing Star Monarda fistulosa Wild Bergamot Phlox pilosa Prairie Phlox Ruellia humilis Hairy Wild Petunia Schizachyrium scoparium Little Bluestem Silphium laciniatum Compass Plant Silphium terebinthinaceum Prairie Dock Solidago ulmnifolia Elm-Leaved Goldenrod Sorghastrum nutans Indiangrass Sporobolus heterolepsis Prairie Dropseed Tradescantia ohiensis Bluejacket, Spiderwort

Sweet Flag Nodding Wild Onion Red Milkweed Wild Senna Purple Prairie Clover

Oldfield Common Juniper, Juniperus communis


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Native Plants for Wisconsin Landscapes

* indicates pictured on page

Plants for Clay Soils continued...

Eupatorium maculatum Spotted Joe-Pye Weed Fragaria virginiana Wild Strawberry Iris shrevei Wild Iris Iris versicolor Harlequin Blue Flag Iris Liatris pychnostachya Prairie Blazing Star Lobelia siphilitica Great Blue Lobelia Monarda fistulosa Wild Bergamot Parthenium integrifolium Wild Quinine Polygonatum biflorum Giant Solomon’s Seal Ratibida pinnata Yellow Coneflower Silphium laciniatum Compass Plant Silphium terebinthinaceum Prairie Dock Smilacina racemosa False Solomon’s Seal Solidago flexicaulis Zig Zag Goldenrod *Sporobolus heterolepsis Prairie Dropseed Vernonia fasciculata Ironweed Veronicastrum virginicum Culver’s Root Vines Clematis virginiana

Virgin’s Bower

Colorful or Interesting Bark

Trees Amelanchier arborea Downy Serviceberry Amelanchier x grandiflora Apple Serviceberry Amelanchier laevis Alleghany Serviceberry Betula alleghaniensis Yellow Birch *Betula nigra River Birch Carpinus caroliniana Musclewood Carya ovata Shagbark Hickory *Celtis occidentalis Hackberry Fagus grandifolia American Beech Gymnocladus dioica Kentucky Coffeetree Malus ioensis Prairie Crabapple Ostrya virginiana Ironwood Populus tremuloides Quaking Aspen Prunus pensylvanica Pin Cherry Prunus serotina Black Cherry Prunus virginiana Chokecherry Quercus bicolor Swamp White Oak Quercus macrocarpa Bur Oak Shrubs Cornus amomum Cornus sericea Physocarpus opulifolius Staphylea trifolia

Prairie Dropseed, Sporobolus heterolepsis

Silky Dogwood Redosier Dogwood Common Ninebark American Bladdernut

River Birch, Betula nigra

Plants for Birds

Trees Acer saccharum Sugar Maple Acer spicatum Mountain Maple Alnus incana subsp. rugosa Speckled Alder Amelanchier arborea Downy Serviceberry Amelanchier x grandiflora Apple Serviceberry Amelanchier laevis Alleghany Serviceberry Betula alleghaniensis Yellow Birch Betula nigra River Birch Betula pumila var. grandulifera Bog Birch Carpinus caroliniana Musclewood Carya cordiformis Bitternut Hickory Carya ovata Shagbark Hickory *Celtis occidentalis Hackberry Cornus alternifolia Pagoda Dogwood Fagus grandifolia American Beech Malus ioensis Prairie Crabapple Ostrya virginiana Ironwood Prunus pensylvanica Pin Cherry *Prunus serotina Black Cherry Prunus virginiana Chokecherry Quercus alba White Oak Quercus bicolor Swamp White Oak Quercus ellipsoidalis Hill’s Oak Quercus macrocarpa Bur Oak

Hackberry, Celtis occidentalis

Black Cherry, Prunus serotina


Johnson’s Nursery, Inc.™

Colorful or Interesting Bark continued...

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Quercus muhlenbergii Chinkapin Oak Quercus rubra Red Oak Salix lucida Shining Willow Salix nigra Black Willow Salix rigida Heart Leaved Willow Sorbus decora Showy Mountainash

Conifers Juniperus virginiana Eastern Red Cedar Larix laricina Tamarack, American Larch Picea glauca White Spruce *Pinus strobus Eastern White Pine Tsuga canadensis Canadian Hemlock Perennials Andropogon gerardii Aquilegia canadensis Aralia racemosa Aster azureus Carex pensylvanica *Cassia hebecarpa Coreopsis palmata Dalea purpureum Desmodium canadense

Common Winterberry, Ilex verticillata

Big Bluestem Wild Columbine Spikenard Sky Blue Aster Pennsylvania Sedge Wild Senna Stiff Coreopsis Purple Prairie Clover Showy Tick Trefoil

Eastern White Pine, Pinus strobus

Echinacea pallida Pale Purple Coneflower Eupatorium maculatum Spotted Joe-Pye Weed Fragaria virginiana Wild Strawberry Geranium maculatum Wild Geranium Geum triflorum Prairie Smoke Liatris pychnostachya Prairie Blazing Star Schizachyrium scoparium Little Bluestem Silphium laciniatum Compass Plant Silphium terebinthinaceum Prairie Dock Solidago flexicaulis Zig Zag Goldenrod Sorghastrum nutans Indiangrass Sporobolus heterolepsis Prairie Dropseed Vernonia fasciculata Ironweed Vines Celastrus scandens American Bittersweet Clematis virginiana Virginsbower *Smilax herbacea Carrion Vine

Plants for Butterflies

Trees Amelanchier arborea Downy Serviceberry Amelanchier x grandiflora Apple Serviceberry Betula alleghaniensis Yellow Birch Betula nigra River Birch

Wild Senna, Cassia herbecarpa

Carrion Vine, Smilax herbacea

Lists

Shrubs Amelanchier stolonifera Running Serviceberry Aronia melanocarpa var. elata Glossy Black Chokeberry Cornus amomum Silky Dogwood Cornus racemosa Gray Dogwood Corylus americana American Hazelnut Euonymus atropurpurea Eastern Wahoo Hypericum kalmianum St. John’s Wort *Ilex verticillata Common Winterberry Lonicera oblongifolia Swampfly Honeysuckle Lonicera villosa Mountain Fly Honeysuckle Physocarpus opulifolius Common Ninebark Rhamnus alnifolia Alder Buckthorn Rhus aromatica Fragrant Sumac Rhus typhina Staghorn Sumac Rubus parviflorus Thimbleberry Ribes americanum American Black Currant Ribes missouriense Missouri Gooseberry Sambucus canadensis American Elderberry Sambucus pubens Scarlet Elderberry Symphoricarpos albus Common Snowberry Viburnum cassinoides Witherod Viburnum Viburnum lentago Nannyberry Viburnum Viburnum prunifolium Blackhaw Viburnum Viburnum rafinesquianum Rafinesque Viburnum


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Native Plants for Wisconsin Landscapes

* indicates pictured on page

Plants for Butterflies continued...

Betula pumila var. grandulifera Bog Birch Carpinus caroliniana Musclewood Carya cordiformis Bitternut Hickory Carya ovata Shagbark Hickory Celtis occidentalis Hackberry Cornus alternifolia Pagoda Dogwood Malus ioensis Prairie Crabapple Populus tremuloides Quaking Aspen Prunus pensylvanica Pin Cherry Prunus serotina Black Cherry Prunus virginiana Chokecherry Ptelea trifoliata Waferash Quercus alba White Oak Quercus bicolor Swamp White Oak Quercus ellipsoidalis Hill’s Oak *Quercus macrocarpa Bur Oak Quercus muhlenbergii Chinkapin Oak Quercus rubra Red Oak Quercus x schuettei Hybrid Swamp x Bur Oak Salix lucida Shining Willow Salix nigra Black Willow Salix rigida Heart Leaved Willow Sorbus decora Showy Mountainash Tilia americana Basswood, American Linden Shrubs Ceanothus americanus New Jersey Tea *Cephalanthus occidentalis Buttonbush Hypericum kalmianum St. John’s Wort Potentilla fruticosa Bush Cinquefoil Rhamnus alnifolia Alder Buckthorn Rhus aromatica Fragrant Sumac Rhus glabra Smooth Sumac Rhus typhina Staghorn Sumac Rubus parviflorus Thimbleberry Sambucus canadensis American Elderberry *Sambucus pubens Scarlet Elderberry Spiraea alba Meadowsweet Viburnum lentago Nannyberry Viburnum Viburnum prunifolium Blackhaw Viburnum Viburnum rafinesquianum Rafinesque Viburnum Conifers Juniperus virginiana Pinus strobus Tsuga canadensis

Eastern Red Cedar Eastern White Pine Canadian Hemlock

Vines Clematis virginiana

Bur Oak, Quercus macrocarpa

Virginsbower

Buttonbush, Cephalanthus occidentalis

Perennials Agastache scrophulariaefolia Anise-Hyssop Allium cernuum Nodding Wild Onion Amorpha canescens Leadplant Andropogon gerardii Big Bluestem Aquilegia canadensis Wild Columbine Aralia racemosa Spikenard Asclepias incarnata Red Milkweed Asclepias tuberosa Butterfly Weed Aster azureus Sky Blue Aster Aster ericoides Heath Aster Aster ptarmicoides Upland White Aster Aster umbellatus Flat-topped Aster Campanula rotundifolia Blue Bellflower Cassia hebecarpa Wild Senna Coreopsis palmata Stiff Coreopsis *Dalea purpureum Purple Prairie Clover Desmodium canadense Showy Tick Trefoil Echinacea pallida Pale Purple Coneflower Eupatorium maculatum Spotted Joe-Pye Weed Fragaria virginiana Wild Strawberry Geranium maculatum Wild Geranium Geum triflorum Prairie Smoke Hypericum pyramidatum Great St. John’s Wort Liatris pychnostachya Prairie Blazing Star Lobelia cardinalis Cardinal Flower

Scarlet Elderberry, Sambucus pubens

Purple Prairie Clover, Dalea purpureum


Johnson’s Nursery, Inc.™

Plants for Butterflies continued...

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Lobelia siphilitica Great Blue Lobelia Mertensia virginica Virginia Bluebells *Monarda fistulosa Wild Bergamot Parthenium integrifolium Wild Quinine Phlox pilosa Prairie Phlox Ratibida pinnata Yellow Coneflower Ruellia humilis Hairy Wild Petunia Schizachyrium scoparium Little Bluestem Silphium laciniatum Compass Plant Silphium terebinthinaceum Prairie Dock Solidago flexicaulis Zig Zag Goldenrod Solidago ulmnifolia Elm Leaved Goldenrod Thalictrum dasycarpum Purple Meadow Rue Tradescantia ohiensis Bluejacket, Spiderwort Vernonia fasciculata Ironweed Veronicastrum virginicum Culver’s Root Zizia aurea Golden Alexander

Plants with Great Fall Color

Shrubs Aronia melanocarpa var. elata Glossy Black Chokeberry Cornus amomum Silky Dogwood Cornus racemosa Gray Dogwood Corylus americana American Hazelnut Diervilla lonicera Dwarf Bushhoneysuckle Euonymus atropurpurea Eastern Wahoo Rhus aromatica Fragrant Sumac *Rhus glabra Smooth Sumac Rhus typhina Staghorn Sumac Viburnum cassinoides Witherod Viburnum Viburnum lentago Nannyberry Viburnum Viburnum prunifolium Blackhaw Viburnum Viburnum rafinesquianum Rafinesque Viburnum

Wild Bergamot, Monarda fistulosa

Apple Serviceberry, Amelanchier x grandiflora

Plants with Outstanding Fruit Display

Shrubs Amelanchier stolonifera Running Serviceberry Aronia melanocarpa var. elata Glossy Black Chokeberry Cephalanthus occidentalis Buttonbush Cornus amomum Silky Dogwood Cornus racemosa Gray Dogwood Corylus americana American Hazelnut Euonymus atropurpurea Eastern Wahoo Hypericum kalmianum St. John’s Wort Ilex verticillata Common Winterberry Lonicera oblongifolia Swampfly Honeysuckle Lonicer villosa Mountain Fly Honeysuckle Physocarpus opulifolius Common Ninebark Rhus aromatica Fragrant Sumac Rhus glabra Smooth Sumac Rhus typhina Staghorn Sumac Rubus parviflorus Thimbleberry Ribes americanum American Black Currant Ribes missouriense Missouri Gooseberry *Sambucus canadensis American Elderberry Sambucus pubens Scarlet Elderberry Staphylea trifolia American Bladdernut Symphoricarpos albus Common Snowberry Viburnum cassinoides Witherod Viburnum

Smooth Sumac, Rhus glabra

American Elderberry, Sambucus canadensis

Lists

Trees Acer saccharum Sugar Maple Amelanchier arborea Downy Serviceberry *Amelanchier x grandiflora Apple Serviceberry Amelanchier laevis Alleghany Serviceberry Carpinus caroliniana Musclewood Carya ovata Shagbark Hickory Cornus alternifolia Pagoda Dogwood Populus tremuloides Quaking Aspen Prunus pensylvanica Pin Cherry Prunus serotina Black Cherry Quercus alba White Oak Quercus bicolor Swamp White Oak Quercus ellipsoidalis Hill’s Oak Quercus muhlenbergii Chinkapin Oak Quercus rubra Red Oak


21

Native Plants for Wisconsin Landscapes

* indicates pictured on page

Plants with Outstanding Fruit Display continued...

Viburnum lentago Viburnum prunifolium Viburnum rafinesquianum Vines Celastrus scandens Clematis virginiana Smilax herbacea

Nannyberry Viburnum Blackhaw Viburnum Rafinesque Viburnum American Bittersweet Virginsbower Carrion Vine

Deer Resistant Plants

Shrubs Ceanothus americanus Potentilla fruticosa Rhus aromatica Ribes missouriense Symphoricarpos albus

New Jersey Tea Bush Cinquefoil Fragrant Sumac Missouri Gooseberry Common Snowberry

Conifers Juniperus comm. var. depressa Oldfield Common Juniper Juniperus virginiana Eastern Red Cedar Picea glauca White Spruce Perennials Acorus calamus Sweet Flag Adiantum pedatum Maidenhair Fern Agastache scrophulariaefolia Anise-Hyssop Allium cernuum Nodding Wild Onion Amorpha canescens Leadplant Andropogon gerardii Big Bluestem Anemone virginiana Tall Thimbleweed Aquilegia canadensis Wild Columbine *Asclepias incarnata Red Milkweed Asclepias tuberosa Butterfly Weed Aster ptarmicoides Upland White Aster Athyrium filix-femina Lady Fern Campanula rotundifolia Blue Bellflower Carex pensylvanica Pennsylvania Sedge Coreopsis palmata Stiff Coreopsis Dodecatheon meadia Shooting Star Echinacea pallida Pale Purple Coneflower Eupatorium maculatum Spotted Joe-Pye Weed Geum triflorum Prairie Smoke Hypericum pyramidatum Great St. John’s Wort Hystrix patula Bottle Brush Grass Iris shrevei Wild Iris Iris versicolor Harlequin Blue Flag Iris Liatris pychnostachya Prairie Blazing Star Lobelia cardinalis Cardinal Flower Monarda fistulosa Wild Bergamot Onoclea sensibilis Sensitive Fern

Yellow Coneflower, Ratibida pinnata

Musclewood, Carpinus caroliniana

Osmunda cinnamomea Cinnamon Fern Parthenium integrifolium Wild Quinine Polygonatum biflorum Giant Solomon’s Seal Polystichum acrostichoides Christmas Fern *Ratibida pinnata Yellow Coneflower Ruellia humilis Hairy Wild Petunia Schizachyrium scoparium Little Bluestem Silphium laciniatum Compass Plant Silphium terebinthinaceum Prairie Dock *Sorghastrum nutans Indiangrass Sporobolus heterolepsis Prairie Dropseed Tradescantia ohiensis Bluejacket, Spiderwort Vernonia fasciculata Ironweed Clematis virginiana Virginsbower

Plants Tolerant of Black Walnut Toxicity

Trees Acer saccharum Sugar Maple Alnus incana subsp. rugosa Speckled Alder Amelanchier arborea Downy Serviceberry Amelanchier x grandiflora Apple Serviceberry Amelanchier laevis Alleghany Serviceberry Betula alleghaniensis Yellow Birch Betula nigra River Birch *Carpinus caroliniana Musclewood

Red Milkweed, Asclepias incarnata

Indiangrass, Sorghastrum nutans


Johnson’s Nursery, Inc.™

Plants Tolerant of Black Walnut Toxicity continued...

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Carya cordiformis Bitternut Hickory Carya ovata Shagbark Hickory Cornus alternifolia Pagoda Dogwood Crataegus macracantha Fleshy Hawthorn Crataegus mollis Downy Hawthorn Fagus grandifolia American Beech Gymnocladus dioica Kentucky Coffeetree Malus ioensis Prairie Crabapple Prunus pensylvanica Pin Cherry *Prunus serotina Black Cherry Prunus virginiana Chokecherry Quercus alba White Oak Quercus rubra Red Oak Tilia americana Basswood, American Linden

Conifers Juniperus virginiana Pinus strobus Tsuga canadensis Perennials Allium cernuum Anemone virginiana *Arisaema triphyllum Asarum canadense Asclepias tuberosa Aster azureus Aster ericoides Aster ptarmicoides Aster umbellatus Athyrium filix-femina

Black Cherry, Prunus serotina

Eastern Red Cedar Eastern White Pine Canadian Hemlock Nodding Wild Onion Tall Thimbleweed Jack-in-the-Pulpit Canada Wild Ginger Butterfly Weed Sky Blue Aster Heath Aster Upland White Aster Flat-topped Aster Lady Fern

Elm Leaved Goldenrod, Solidago ulmnifolia

*Campanula rotundifolia Blue Bellflower Carex pensylvanica Pennsylvania Sedge Cassia hebecarpa Wild Senna Desmodium canadense Showy Tick Trefoil Eupatorium maculatum Spotted Joe-Pye Weed Fragaria virginiana Wild Strawberry Geranium maculatum Wild Geranium Lobelia siphilitica Great Blue Lobelia Monarda fistulosa Wild Bergamot Onoclea sensibilis Sensitive Fern Osmunda cinnamomea Cinnamon Fern Parthenium integrifolium Wild Quinine Podophyllum peltatum Mayapple Polygonatum biflorum Giant Solomon’s Seal Polystichum acrostichoides Christmas Fern Solidago flexicaulis Zig Zag Goldenrod *Solidago ulmnifolia Elm Leaved Goldenrod Thalictrum dasycarpum Purple Meadow Rue Tradescantia ohiensis Bluejacket, Spiderwort Vernonia fasciculata Ironweed Vines Celastrus scandens American Bittersweet Clematis virginiana Virginsbower Smilax herbacea Carrion Vine

Jack-in-the-Pulpit, Arisaema triphyllum

Blue Bellflower, Campanula rotundifolia

Lists

Shrubs Amelanchier stolonifera Running Serviceberry Aronia melanocarpa var. elata Glossy Black Chokeberry Ceanothus americanus New Jersey Tea Cornus amomum Silky Dogwood Corylus americana American Hazelnut Hamamelis virginiana Common Witchhazel Hypericum kalmianum St. John’s Wort Physocarpus opulifolius Common Ninebark Prunus americana American Plum Rhus aromatica Fragrant Sumac Rhus glabra Smooth Sumac Rhus typhina Staghorn Sumac Rubus parviflorus Thimbleberry Ribes americanum American Black Currant Sambucus canadensis American Elderberry Sambucus pubens Scarlet Elderberry Staphylea trifolia American Bladdernut Viburnum prunifolium Blackhaw Viburnum


Nature’s Best to You.® Menomonee Falls, WI W180 N6275 Marcy Road 53051 262.252.4980

Jackson, WI 2681 Western Avenue 53037 262.677.8650

www.johnsonsnursery.com | info@johnsonsnursery.com Live ‘Real-time’ Inventory Availability Online | Contact Us to Receive Availability List Emails

Wisconsin Native Plant Guide Updated 2014

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Johnson's Nursery, Inc.  

The use of native plants in the landscape is more than a trend. It is an awakening to the need to preserve our native flora in man-made land...

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