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Covering Homewood, East Baltimore, Peabody,

When do carrots taste better

Young social entrepreneur is

SAIS, APL and other campuses throughout the

than candy? Psychologists’ find-

honored for pioneering a new

Baltimore-Washington area and abroad, since 1971.

ing may surprise you, page 3

form of activism, page 7

November 8, 2010

The newspaper of The Johns Hopkins University

Volume 40 No. 10

S U P P O R T

C O L L A B O R A T I O N

Big boost for KSAS grad stipends

Malaysia-bound

BY GREG RIENZI

The Gazette

Continued on page 6

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CHEE HOE, YAP / ACADEMIC MEDICAL CENTER

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he School of Arts and Sciences will receive more than $5 million from the President’s Office over the next five years to fund graduate stipends. President Ronald J. Daniels made the announcement at the Oct. 23 rededication cer$5 mill from emony of the newly renovated Gilman Hall, the school’s President’s flagship building. The investment, Office will Daniels said, would allow the Krieger augment School departments to significantly augfunding ment the number and term length of graduate stipends, which support the students’ training as scholars and compensate them for their teaching contributions. Kellee Tsai, vice dean for humanities, social sciences and graduate programs, said that the “generous contribution” will help the school recruit and retain the very best of the next generation of scholars. “The addition of $5 million toward graduate stipends is a testament to the value that President Daniels, Provost [Lloyd] Minor and Dean [Katherine] Newman place on the founding principle of Johns Hopkins as a research university,” Tsai said. The extra funds will specifically increase the competitiveness of the school’s George E. Owen Fellowships, which the university awards to exceptionally qualified students, said Newman, the James B. Knapp Dean of the Krieger School. “The presidential contribution is a very substantial addition for which we are immensely grateful,” Newman said. “It will help us make our Owen fellowships on par with the awards offered by our toughest competitors.” In addition to the funds from the President’s Office, Krieger School funds will be used to enhance a plan already in effect to increase the stipends provided

Tan Sri Datuk Dr. Mohan Swami of Chase Perdana and Edward D. Miller of Johns Hopkins shake hands while Tan Sri Dato’ Haji Muhyiddin bin Mohd Yassin, deputy prime minister of Malaysia, and Hillary Clinton, U.S. secretary of state, look on.

Johns Hopkins to help develop medical school and teaching hospital B Y N ATA L I A A B E L

Johns Hopkins Medicine International

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he Johns Hopkins University, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Johns Hopkins Medicine International have signed an agreement with Academic Medical Centre and an associate company of Turiya to help Malaysia develop its first fully integrated private four-year graduate medical school and teaching hospital.

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and Deputy Prime Minister of Malaysia Tan Sri Dato’ Haji Muhyiddin bin Mohd Yassin observed the signing ceremony, which took place Nov. 2 in Kuala Lumpur. Among those representing Johns HopContinued on page 10

H O M E W O O D

2011 Arts Innovation Program grants announced B Y H E AT H E R E G A N S TA L F O RT

JHU Museums and Libraries

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he Johns Hopkins University has awarded approximately $24,000 in grants to students and faculty to stimulate new courses in the arts and other arts-related efforts on the Homewood campus, said Winston Tabb, Sheridan Dean of University Libraries and Museums. Initiated in 2006, the Arts Innovation Program offers funding to faculty to create

IN BRIEF

New School of Ed blog; CTY deadline; Sibley joins JHM; Chili Cook-Off and Bake-Off time

12

new courses in the arts for undergraduates, with an emphasis on interdisciplinary and cross-divisional courses. The program also supports the artistic efforts of students, both those currently engaged in arts activities and those wishing to create a new venture, with an emphasis on making connections between Johns Hopkins students and the Baltimore community. Four student-proposed arts initiatives will benefit from the funding. Senior history major Shayna Abramson will receive a grant to create an interfaith

performing arts program that will produce two short plays during Intersession in January 2011. Sophomore history of art major Laura Somenzi, a Woodrow Wilson Fellow, will use the funds to support the publication of a catalog she is writing to accompany her exhibition dedicated to Zelda Fitzgerald that is scheduled to open at the university’s Evergreen Museum & Library in fall 2011. Sophomores Emily Bihl, a Writing Semi-

CALENDAR

Provost’s Lecture Series: SoN’s Jacqueline Campbell; Donny Deutsch; Apolo Ohno

Continued on page 5

10 Job Opportunities 10 Notices 11 Classifieds


2 THE GAZETTE UÊ œÛi“LiÀÊn]ÊÓä£ä I N

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School of Education launches blog for educators

JOHN ASTIN

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Aubrey Pevsner and Mike Alfieri as May and Eddie

JHUT presents Sam Shepard’s ‘Fool for Love’ B Y A M Y L U N D AY

Homewood

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he Johns Hopkins University Theatre will present Sam Shepard’s Fool for Love for two weekends beginning on Friday, Nov. 12, in the Merrick Barn on the Homewood campus. Considered a 20th-century American classic, Fool for Love is set in a seedy motel on the edge of the Mojave Desert, where transient lovers May and Eddie spin around the room in a relentless struggle for power and truth. Through recollections and dreams, multiple versions of their fierce and fatal love story are told. The cast of undergraduate performers includes Aubrey Pevsner, a sophomore in the Writing Seminars; Mike Alfieri, a senior in the Writing Seminars; Gaurav Dhar, a sophomore majoring in biophysics; and

Kelly McNamara, a senior majoring in biology. The cast is directed by James Glossman, who is teaching Directing Seminar this semester in the Program in Theatre Arts and Studies. The production will run through Sunday, œÛ°Ê Ó£°Ê ÕÀÌ>ˆ˜Ê ̈“iÃÊ >ÀiÊ nÊ «°“°Ê œ˜Ê Àˆdays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. on Sundays. Tickets are $5 for students with ID, $13 for faculty, staff and seniors (65+) and $15 for the general public, cash or check only. For reservations and information, call 410-5165153 or e-mail JHUT@jhu.edu. The theater’s website is www.jhu.edu/theatre-arts. The Johns Hopkins University Theatre is celebrating its sixth full season in the historic Merrick Barn. The program and the theater company are directed by actor John Astin, a Johns Hopkins alumnus. Astin recently performed in Ken Ludwig’s play Leading Ladies at Ford’s Theatre in Washington, D.C.

he School of Education has introduced a blog for educators—soetalk .com. Designed for students, teachers, administrators, policymakers and other interested persons, soetalk.com features articles and opinion pieces addressing policy and legislative proposals at the state and national levels, and practices of interest to teachers. The blog provides a forum where educators can express their thoughts on the issues of the day and discuss changes affecting the teaching profession. Among the recent postings: “What Tuesday’s Vote Means for Education,” “Montgomery and Prince George’s Boards Face Budget Challenges” and “Early Years to Get More Attention.”

Fall deadline nears for CTY grades 2–8 gifted testing

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ov. 22 is the fall deadline for enrolling a gifted child in grades 2 through nʈ˜Ê̅iÊÓä£äqÓä££Ê i˜ÌiÀÊvœÀÊ/>ented Youth Global Talent Search. Enrolled students take above-grade-level tests that can lead to eligibility for CTY’s popular online and summer courses. Enrollment by Nov. 22 helps families meet future test deadlines so they can apply to CTY’s 2011 summer program before spaces fill up. Faculty and staff can use tuition remission according to department policies for children grades 2 through 6 to enroll in CTY’s area day programs and, for older students, at Johns Hopkins and other campuses across the U.S. For more details, go to www.cty.jhu.edu .discover or e-mail ctyinfo@jhu.edu.

Sibley Memorial Hospital joins Johns Hopkins Medicine

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n a move to address a growing need for integrated regional health care services for patients, officials of Sibley Memorial Hospital and The Johns Hopkins Health System signed documents on Nov. 1 to inte}À>ÌiÊ Ì…iÊ 7>ň˜}̜˜]Ê ° °qL>Ãi`Ê -ˆLiÞÊ Hospital into the Johns Hopkins Health System. Under terms of this transaction, which does not involve any financial exchange, Sibley has become a wholly owned subsidiary corporation of JHHS and a member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. Sibley will retain its commitment to the local community and members of the existing medical staff, along with its name and current leadership and board of trustees. The hospital will now have access to the research and clinical programs at Johns Hopkins. Sibley will operate under the JHHS governance structure, in the same manner as

EDITOR Lois Perschetz WRITER Greg Rienzi PRODUCTION Lynna Bright COPY EDITOR Ann Stiller PHOTOGRAPHY Homewood Photography A D V E RT I S I N G The Gazelle Group BUSINESS Dianne MacLeod C I R C U L AT I O N Lynette Floyd WEBMASTER Tim Windsor

The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Howard County General Hospital and Suburban Hospital. “As a member of Johns Hopkins Medicine, Sibley will be a key force in the development of an integrated system of care for the national capital region, focused on improving health by providing access to state-of-the-art clinical medicine that’s supported by a strong base of research and medical education,” said Edward D. Miller, dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and CEO of Johns Hopkins Medicine.

Cellist Gautier Capucon, pianist Gabriela Montero to perform

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ellist Gautier Capucon, the 2001 Victoires de la Musique New Talent of the Year, and acclaimed pianist Gabriela Montero will perform in the Shriver Hall Concert Series’ annual Piatigorsky Memorial Concert at 5:30 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 14, in Shriver Hall auditorium on the Homewood campus. The duo will play Prokofiev’s Cello and Piano Sonata in C Major, Op.119, Mendelssohn’s Cello and Piano Sonata No. 2 ˆ˜Ê Ê >œÀ]Ê "«°Ê xn]Ê >˜`Ê Àˆi}½ÃÊ iœÊ >˜`Ê Piano Sonata in A Minor, Op. 36. Capucon last appeared in the series in January 2006, with his violinist brother Renaud. This is Montero’s series debut. The performers were introduced in Lugano, Switzerland, by famed pianist Martha Argerich, and a great friendship and musical partnership were born: Rhapsody, the duo’s CD of works by Rachmaninoff and *ÀœŽœvˆiÛ]ÊÜ>ÃÊÀii>Ãi`ʈ˜ÊÓään°Ê For more information or to order tickets, go to www.shriverconcerts.org or call 410x£È‡Ç£È{°Ê

Chili Cook-Off and Bake-Off set for Friday at Homewood

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he eighth annual Chili Cook-Off and Bake-Off to benefit the JHU Campaign for United Way of Central Maryland and the Johns Hopkins Neighborhood Fund will be held from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 12, in Levering’s Glass Pavilion on the Homewood campus. The deadline for entering is 5 p.m. today, œÛ°Ê n°Ê /…iÀiÊ >ÀiÊ ˜œÊ i˜ÌÀÞÊ viiÃ°Ê /œÊ Ài}ˆÃter, go to web.jhu.edu/uw and click on the Special Events link for a Chili Cook-Off registration flier, or call the Office of Work, ˆviÊ>˜`Ê ˜}>}i“i˜ÌÊ>ÌÊ{{·™™Ç‡ÈäÈä° Guest judges will award prizes for first-, second- and third-place winners, and a People’s Choice Award, based on the popular vote, will be given out in each category. In addition to sampling the chili and baked goods cooked by colleagues, spectators will be able to purchase lunch—chili, cornbread, dessert and a beverage—for $5.

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Applied Physics Laboratory Michael Buckley, Paulette Campbell Bloomberg School of Public Health Tim Parsons, Natalie Wood-Wright Carey Business School Andrew Blumberg, Patrick Ercolano Homewood Lisa De Nike, Amy Lunday, Dennis O’Shea, Tracey A. Reeves, Phil Sneiderman Johns Hopkins Medicine Christen Brownlee, Stephanie Desmon, Neil A. Grauer, Audrey Huang, John Lazarou, David March, Vanessa McMains, Ekaterina Pesheva, Vanessa Wasta, Maryalice Yakutchik Peabody Institute Richard Selden SAIS Felisa Neuringer Klubes School of Education James Campbell, Theresa Norton School of Nursing Kelly Brooks-Staub University Libraries and Museums Brian Shields, Heather Egan Stalfort

The Gazette is published weekly September through May and biweekly June through August for the Johns Hopkins University community by the Office of Government, Community and Public Affairs, Suite 540, 901 S. Bond St., Baltimore, MD 21231, in cooperation with all university divisions. Subscriptions are $26 per year. Deadline for calendar items, notices and classifieds (free to JHU faculty, staff and students) is noon Monday, one week prior to publication date. Phone:Ê{{·ÓnLJ™™ää Fax:Ê{{·ÓnLJ™™Óä General e-mail: gazette@jhu.edu Classifieds e-mail: gazads@jhu.edu On the Web: gazette.jhu.edu Paid advertising, which does not represent any endorsement by the university, is handled by the Gazelle Group at 410343-3362 or gazellegrp@comcast.net.


ÂœĂ›i“LiÀÊn]ÊÓä£ä UĂŠ/ GAZETTE

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Food tastes better when you work hard for it, study shows BY LISA DE NIKE

Homewoood

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t’s commonly accepted that we appreciate something more if we have to work hard to get it, and a study by Johns Hopkins psychologists bears that out, at least when it comes to food. The study seems to suggest that hard work can even enhance our appreciation for fare we might not prefer, such as the low-fat, lowcalorie variety. At least in theory, this means that if we had to navigate an obstacle course to get to a plate of baby carrots, we might come to prefer those crunchy crudites over the sweet, gooey Snickers bars more easily accessible via the office vending machine. “Basically, what we have shown is that if you have to expend more effort to get a certain food, not only will you value that food more, but it might even taste better to you,� said Alexander Johnson, an associate

research scientist in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences in the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences. “At present, we don’t know why effort seems to boost the taste of food, but we know that it does, and that that effect lasts for at least 24 hours after the act of working hard to get the food.� The results of the study, which appears in the Nov. 3 issue of the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, are significant not only because they hold out hope that people who struggle to maintain a healthy weight could be conditioned to consume lower-calorie foods but because they also might provide insight into methods of changing other less-than-optimal behavior, according to Johnson. Johnson teamed up on the project with Michela Gallagher, Krieger-Eisenhower Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences and Neuroscience and vice provost for academic affairs at Johns Hopkins. Using ordinary laboratory mice, the team conducted two experiments.

ing how it tastes, how hungry the mice were beforehand and how ‘sated’ or full the food made them feel.� Johnson and Gallagher used licking behavior as a measure of the rodents’ enjoyment of their treats and found that the mice that had to work harder for their low-cal rewards did, in fact, savor them more. “Our basic conclusion is that under these conditions, having to work harder to get a certain food changes how much that food is valued, and it does that by changing how good that food tastes,� Johnson said. “This suggests that, down the road, obese individuals might be able to alter their eating habits so as to prefer healthier, low-calorie food by manipulating the amount of work required to obtain the food. Of course, our study didn’t delve into that aspect. But the implications certainly are there.� The study was funded by grants from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and the National Institute of Mental Health.

In the first, mice were trained to respond to two levers. If the mice pressed one lever once, they were rewarded with a sugary treat. Another lever had to be pressed 15 times to deliver a similar snack. Later, when given free access to both tidbits, the rodents clearly preferred “the food that they worked harder for,� Johnson said. In the second experiment, the team wanted to find out whether the animals’ preference for the harder-to-obtain food would hold if those morsels were low-calorie. So half the mice received lower-calorie goodies from a high-effort lever, and half got them from a low-effort lever. When both groups of mice were given free access to the low-calorie food later, those who had used the high-effort lever ate more of it and even seemed to enjoy it more than did the other group. “We then analyzed the way in which the mice consumed the food,� Johnson said. “Why did we do this? Because food intake can be driven by a variety of factors, includ-

Overweight American children, adolescents becoming fatter

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verweight American children and adolescents have become fatter over the last decade, according to researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the National Institute on Aging. Examining adiposity shifts across sociodemographic groups over time, they found that U.S. children and adolescents had significantly increased adiposity measures such as body mass index, waist circumference and triceps skinfold thickness. The increases in adiposity were more pronounced in some sex-ethnic groups, such as black girls. In addition, these groups gained more abdominal fat over time, which was indicated by waist size and which posed greater health risks than elevated BMI. The researchers’ results are featured in the

August issue of the International Journal of Pediatric Obesity. “Our analysis shows that the increase in adiposity among U.S. children and adolescents was unequally distributed across sociodemographic groups and across the spectrum of BMI, waist circumference and triceps skinfold thickness measures,� said Youfa Wang, senior author of the study and an associate professor in the Bloomberg School’s Department of International Health. “Heavier children and adolescents gained more adiposity, especially waist size, and these findings were most significant among children ages 6 to 11. “Ethnic disparities in mean BMI have also increased substantially when comparing black girls with their white counterparts for all ages combined,� he said. “Solely

examining the changes in the prevalence of overweight and obesity based on fixed BMI cut points could not gain such important insights regarding shifts in the obesity epidemic.â€? To examine these changes over time, researchers conducted a comprehensive analysis of nationally representative survey data collected from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey since the Â?>ĂŒiĂŠ £™nĂ¤ĂƒÂ°ĂŠ /Â…iÞÊ iĂ?>“ˆ˜i`ĂŠ ĂŒÂ…iĂŠ VÂ…>˜}iĂƒĂŠ ÂˆÂ˜ĂŠ American boys and girls ages 2 to 19, as well as by ethnic groups at the population level. “Our research suggests that U.S. young people may be at greater obesity-related risks than what was revealed by increases in BMI, as waist circumference is a better predictor of future health risks, such as for type 2 diabetes and heart disease in adults,â€?

said May A. Beydoun, a staff scientist with the National Institute on Aging’s Intramural Research Program and a former postdoctoral fellow in the Bloomberg School’s Department of International Health. “More vigorous efforts should be made to understand the underlying causes. Moving forward, this could help guide future population-based interventions, including those focusing on the total population and those targeting vulnerable or genetically susceptible groups,� she said. The study was written by Beydoun and Wang. The research was supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and by the National Institute on Aging. —Natalie Wood-Wright

  

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Expectant moms and peanuts: Maybe not a good idea B Y E K AT E R I N A P E S H E VA

Johns Hopkins Medicine

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abies born to mothers who eat peanuts during pregnancy appear more prone to peanut allergy, according to research conducted by scientists at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center and elsewhere and published online Oct. 29 in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. The research team was led by Scott Sicherer, of the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York. The researchers analyzed the relationship between maternal peanut-eating habits during pregnancy and a child’s sensitivity to peanut proteins. Infants in the study whose mothers reported eating peanuts at least twice a week during pregnancy were nearly three times more likely than other infants to have levels of peanut antibodies high enough to suggest a lurking peanut allergy.

Of the 503 infants, 3 to 15 months of age, ÓnÊ«iÀVi˜Ìʅ>`ÊÃÕV…ÊLœœ`ʏiÛiÃ°ÊÊˆ˜v>˜ÌÃÊ already had either confirmed or suspected diagnoses of milk or egg allergy. The investigators emphasize that their work is far from showing a direct cause and effect between a mother’s peanut consumption and her baby’s allergy, and that the affected babies were already more likely to be immunologically susceptible to peanut allergies. The findings do suggest, however, that peanut eating may be a “priming” mechanism—possibly one of several such mechanisms—for developing peanut allergy, the investigators say. “Mom’s peanut consumption during pregnancy appears to be a key primer for allergy in babies who already have the immunologic predisposition for such, but eating peanuts in and of itself is not enough to cause the allergy,” said Robert Wood, co-author on the study and director of Allergy and

Immunology at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center. Indeed, the fact that the children in the study were already allergic to other foods suggests a predisposition to allergies, the investigators emphasize. While the scientists stop short of recommending complete peanut avoidance during pregnancy, their findings suggest that pregnant women should keep this risk factor in mind when making dietary choices, especially if they have a family history of food allergies. The investigators also caution that elevated antibody levels are not the same as clinical allergy, even though they are believed to be a potent predictor of future allergies. A food challenge remains the gold standard for clinical allergy, but because of the infants’ young age, such tests were not performed, the investigators say. Among the 211 children whose mothers reported eating peanuts at least twice a week, 35 percent had significantly elevated

antibodies to peanuts, while 22 percent of the 292 infants whose moms consumed peanuts less than twice a week had such high levels. Whether a mother ate peanuts during breastfeeding did not seem to affect a child’s risk for peanut allergy, nor did the mode of delivery, whether the baby was breast- or formula-fed or whether a baby was fed soy or milk formula, the researchers found. An estimated 1 percent of U.S. children have peanut allergies, which are often lifelong. Past research suggests that peanut allergies are more severe than other food allergies. Institutions participating in the study in addition to Mount Sinai and Johns Hopkins were Duke University Medical Center, National Jewish Health Hospital and the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health.

Positively negative: Cellular structure’s ‘enforcer’ role discovered BY MARYALICE YAKUTCHIK

Johns Hopkins Medicine

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hen cells make the proteins that carry out virtually every function of life, it’s vital that the right things happen at the right times, and—maybe more important—that wrong things are stopped from happening at the wrong times. Now Johns Hopkins scientists have found that a structure inside a cell’s protein-making machinery performs an unexpected negative “enforcer” function in addition to its known “positive” roles as protector and promoter of protein production. The research, which focuses on the odd chemical “cap” of messenger RNA, is described in the Sept. 24 issue of Molecular Cell. The team revealed that the cap—a baroque structure made of modified RNA constituents joined head-to-head rather than the usual head-to-tail arrangement found in the rest of the messenger RNA— prevents the manufacture of faulty proteins early on, at the very start of the complex

Arts Continued from page 1 nars and English major with a minor in film and media studies, and Hannah Froehle, an international relations and German major, will organize the project LBD: Liberation by Design under the auspices of the Digital Media Center. Fifteen artists and students will personalize basic black wrap dresses that will be shown in a fashion show and auctioned off for charity during the university’s ˆ˜>Õ}ÕÀ>Ê>ÀÌÃÊviÃ̈Û>]Ê«>˜˜i`ÊvœÀÊ«ÀˆÊnÊÌœÊ 10, 2011. Political science and anthropology sophomore Anna Zetkulic will organize the Hopkins Clay Initiative, a service-based program specializing in the art of pottery. The new group of student potters will create ceramic objects that will be sold to benefit Baltimore social service organizations. Additionally, three new courses will receive support. In spring 2011, Phyllis Berger, photography instructor in the Homewood Art Workshops, and Lester K. Spence, assistant professor of political science and Africana studies in the Krieger School, will teach Black Visual Politics, an interdisciplinary course in which students will address the politics of black families, the black self and black spaces in conjunction with visual analysis of related photographic images. The results of their study will culminate in individual photographic portfolios that will be displayed during the arts festival in April. In Introduction to Computer Music, stu-

process of protein manufacture, when messenger RNA delivers the genetic code from DNA to the decoding machine, which later translates it into proteins. The team began its study in yeast by separating out all the various parts of the protein-making machinery. The scientists then modified some messenger RNA by lopping off its chemical cap and left the rest intact so that when they reconstituted the machine in test tubes, they could compare the behaviors of capped and uncapped versions of messenger RNA. Because they added a radioactive atom to the messenger RNA and fluorescent tags to the other proteins required for protein manufacture, the researchers could evaluate mRNA recruitment under various conditions—with and without a cap, for instance, and in the presence and absence of various other factors. Because the cap was known to play two positive roles in the proteinmanufacturing process, the researchers were surprised to see that the capless mRNA bound even better than the capped mRNA to protein builders called ribosomes.

“This was strange because the cap of messenger RNA is supposed to be both a stabilizer and a stimulator of binding,” said Jon Lorsch, a professor of biophysics and biophysical chemistry in the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Further studies revealed that when the cap was removed, the mRNA bound efficiently but indiscriminately, even when all the other necessary proteins were not present. In this case, normal proteins could not be made. The cap appears to prevent the mRNA from interacting with the ribosome unless all the required proteins are present and accounted for, according to Lorsch. When all the factors are present, the cap stimulates binding. When they aren’t there, the cap inhibits binding. “The cap is an enforcer,” Lorsch said, “and the only pathway it’s going to allow the mRNA down is the right one. It’s preventing it from going down this wrong pathway that leads to aberrant products.” The work offers evidence, Lorsch said, that “biology is maybe more about preventing the negatives from happening than about promoting the positives.

dents will explore electronic music as a long-standing art form, and create original musical works by recording and manipulating sound on computers. This lecture and lab course will be taught in fall 2011 by Stephen C. Stone, chair of the Music Theory Department at the Peabody Conservatory; composer Mark A. Lackey, adjunct professor at the Peabody Conservatory; and sound artist Rose Burt, audio specialist at the Digital Media Center. Also to be offered in fall 2011 is Halls of Wonder: Art and Culture in the Age of ̅iÊ >ÀÛiœÕÃ]Ê £xääq£nää]Ê >Ê Vœ>LœÀ>̈œ˜Ê with the Walters Art Museum led by Earle

Havens, curator of early books and manuscripts at the university’s Sheridan Libraries; Walter Stephens, the Charles S. Singleton Professor of Italian, German and Romance Languages and Literatures at Johns Hopkins; and Joneath Spicer, the James A. Murnaghan Curator of Renaissance and Baroque Art at the Walters. Students will examine how collections of art and cultural artifacts were created, interpreted and represented to the wider world during the pre-modern era. Their research will culminate in an interactive, digital display to accompany the Hall of Wonders permanent exhibition at the Walters Art Museum. G

“The key,” he said, “is keeping all the many possible incorrect complexes from forming so that the right one can be made. If you think about diseases such as sickle cell anemia, Alzheimer’s and cancer, they are examples of the wrong things taking place when they shouldn’t; they indicate a breakdown in prevention mechanisms.” The study was supported by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences. Johns Hopkins authors of the study, in addition to Lorsch, are Sarah F. Mitchell, Sarah E. Walker and Mikkel A. Algire. Other authors are Eun-Hee Park and Alan G. Hinnebusch, both of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

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The Johns Hopkins Mood Disorders Center Arts and Psychiatry Series

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Singing in the Dark

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An exploration of creativity and madness

Susan McKeown Grammy Award Winning Irish Vocalist November 18, 2010 Tea at 5 PM |Performance at 5:30 PM | Free Hurd Hall | The Johns Hopkins Hospital www.hopkinsmedicine.org/susan_mckeown

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1 0 5 W EST 39 TH S TREET B A LT I M O R E , MD 21210 410-243-1216

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6 THE GAZETTE UĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;iÂ&#x201C;LiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;n]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£ä

One in two depressed teens prone to recurrence after recovery B Y E K AT E R I N A P E S H E VA

Johns Hopkins Medicine

R

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s higher education for your finances. This Fall: A Financial Education Seminar Series designed specifically for JHU employees. t+)63FUJSFNFOU t4UBZJOHPO5SBDLJOB7PMBUJMF.BSLFU t&BSMZ$BSFFS4BWFGPS5PNPSSPX 4UBSU5PEBZ t.JE$BSFFS"SF:PVPO5BSHFU  t1SF3FUJSFNFOU3FBEZ 4FU 3FUJSF

esearch conducted at the Johns Hopkins Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Center and elsewhere shows that regardless of the type of treatment they get, nearly half of severely depressed teens who recover from a depressive episode are likely to slip back into depression within two to three years. The findings of the multicenter NIHfunded study, which appears in the November issue of JAMA-Archives of General Psychiatry, show that nearly all (96 percent) of the 196 teenagers in the research group either improved or fully recovered after an initial `iÂŤĂ&#x20AC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x160; iÂŤÂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;`i]Ă&#x160; LĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; {Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x160; ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;ViÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160; them had one or more subsequent depressive episodes in an average of two years. Much to the investigatorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; surprise, they said, the type of treatment received made no difference in terms of recurrence. Indeed, teens treated with a combination of medication and cognitive behavioral therapy appeared just as likely to suffer subsequent depressive episodes (49 percent of them did) as those who received either treatment alone (46 percent). Two potent predictors of recurrence did emerge: being female and showing no response to treatment at all. For reasons that are not clearly understood, the researchers said, girls were more likely to have repeated bouts of depression, with nearly 60 percent of them suffering subsequent depressive episodes after recovery, compared to 33 percent of the boys. Teens who showed no improveÂ&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; `Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160; Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;i>Ă&#x152;Â&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; ­Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160; ÂŁÂ&#x2122;Ă&#x2C6;ÂŽĂ&#x160; but who subsequently recovered were also more likely to have subsequent episodes of `iÂŤĂ&#x20AC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;pĂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x160;ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;ViÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;`Â&#x2C6;`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;]Ă&#x160;VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;ÂŤ>Ă&#x20AC;i`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160; 43 percent among those who responded to treatment either fully or in part. The findings highlight a need for longterm follow-up and rigorous monitoring of symptoms among depressed teens, even when they seem to be on the mend, the investigators said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;To ward off more bouts of depression and to recognize and treat them promptly if they do occur, parents, pediatricians and mental health professionals should view childhood

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to current students, Newman said, whether Owen fellows or not. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All of our doctoral students are outstanding and deserving of our support,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These colleagues represent the future of the academy and many professions, and it takes years of hard work and devotion to be able to do high-quality independent scholarship.â&#x20AC;? Newman said that she, the vice deans and the department chairs will think through the most useful ways to craft the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s graduate funding â&#x20AC;&#x153;packages,â&#x20AC;? a process that will take at least a month. The extra stipend funds will be available soon, Newman said, so that their impact can be immediate and have a positive impact on

depression as a chronic condition marked by remissions and flare-ups,â&#x20AC;? said researcher Golda Ginsburg, a psychologist at the Johns Hopkins Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Center and an associate professor of psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Symptoms should be monitored carefully and therapy frequency and medication dosage adjusted as needed in all teens diagnosed with depression, Ginsburg said. Because nearly all teenagers recovered within two years of starting treatment, the results are far from discouraging, the researchers said, indicating that while not long-lasting, the therapy is highly effective in the short term. But the findings, they said, hint at the need to identify treatments that reduce recurrences and improve longterm recovery. The new results are based on a threeand-a-half-year follow-up of 196 teens who participated in an earlier seminal study, published in JAMA in 2004, comparing outcomes among 439 teens with depression treated with medication, cognitive behavioral therapy, a combination of the two or placebo. At three months, teens receiving the combination treatment had the best response, but after nine months and after one year, the three treatments resulted in similar outcomes. Three months into the original study, those receiving placebo got the treatment of their choice. Depression, which in the United States affects an estimated 6 percent of teen girls and nearly 5 percent of teen boys, can lead to impaired school performance and social functioning, adult depression and suicide. The research was funded by the National Institute of Mental Health. John Curry, of Duke University, was the lead author on the paper. Elizabeth Kastelic, of the Johns Hopkins Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Center, was co-investigator. Institutions participating in the study in addition to Johns Hopkins and Duke were the Oregon Research Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, University of Texas-Southwestern, Columbia University Medical Center, Cincinnati Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, University of Oregon and Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital of Philadelphia.

the upcoming recruitment season. They will be distributed by the Deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office to the Krieger School departments, which decide on the awardees. The School of Arts and Sciences curĂ&#x20AC;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Â?Â?Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2122;nĂ&#x2021;Ă&#x160; }Ă&#x20AC;>`Ă&#x2022;>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160; Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x2022;`iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; ­Â&#x2DC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; counting those enrolled in Advanced Academic Programs). Newman said that it is exceedingly difficult to find sources of philanthropic support for doctoral students, with some notable exceptions, including Johns Hopkins alumni and institutions such as the Andrew Mellon Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the Soros Foundation for New Americans, the National Institutes of Health and a set of foundations that provide research funding for dissertations. The lionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s share of responsibility for graduate support, she said, comes from within the university for the humanities and social sciences, as well as from research grants, primarily in the natural and social sciences. G

GIVE BLOOD. A JHU Blood Drive is scheduled for Wed., Nov. 10, at Hopkins@Eastern, 101 E. 33rd St., from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. For more information, e-mail johnshopkinsblooddrive@jhmi.edu


œÛi“LiÀÊn]ÊÓä£ä UÊ/ GAZETTE

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R E C O G N I T I O N

Young social entrepreneur makes spare minutes matter B Y A M Y L U N D AY

Homewood

BART MICHIELS / ROLEX AWARDS

J

acob Colker, a graduate student in the Communications in Contemporary Society program in the Krieger School’s Advanced Academic Programs, is among the first group of young social entrepreneurs to be honored by the Rolex Awards for Enterprise: Young Laureates Programme. On Thursday, Nov. 11, Colker and four other winners will be feted for their dedication to overcoming challenges in the fields of public health, applied technology, the environment and cultural preservation at an award ceremony at the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne in Switzerland. Colker is the only laureate from the United States; the others are from the Philippines, Nigeria, India and Ethiopia. Colker, who is 26, is being recognized for changing the way people get involved in community service as co-founder of the Extraordinaries, an Internet-based program allowing “microvolunteers” to use their skills and expertise online. Their flagship product is free and available to the public at www .sparked.com. The Young Laureates Programme seeks to foster a spirit of enterprise in the next generation by giving young people the financial support and recognition they need to innovatively tackle the challenges facing humanity. The laureates, all aged between £nÊ >˜`Ê Îä]Ê ÜˆÊ i>V…Ê ÀiViˆÛiÊ fxä]äääÊ œÛiÀÊ two years, giving them time to focus on their

Jacob Colker will be honored with a Rolex Award for his project that combines volunteering, the Internet and mobile phones to pioneer a new form of activism.

pioneering projects and move forward in implementing them. Colker said he will use his Rolex Award to expand microvolunteering to more Internet users and gain publicity to “encourage millions of people to volunteer.” Colker’s project combines volunteering, the Internet and mobile phones to pioneer a new form of activism in which almost anyone with a smart phone or Web access can devote spare time to a useful charitable or

scientific task. More than 40,000 microvolunteers have signed up to carry out a wide range of tasks, from helping the SETI Institute develop social media outreach materials to helping village leaders in Kenya research grant opportunities for new hospitals. Through the www.sparked.com website, nonprofit groups can easily post questions, problems or tasks, and thousands of microvolunteers can read the posts to offer assistance. Volunteers may select from 12 areas

of interest, including poverty, youth, injustice, food, politics and animals, and then decide which personal skills they will use in their spare time to help solve problems posted there. “For the most part, traditional volunteer opportunities require a certain level of commitment. They require a commitment of time,” Colker said in a video posted on Rolex’s Young Laureates website, young.rolexawards .com. “Our approach is to help make it so easy that in the same amount of time it takes you to check Facebook or watch a YouTube video, you could actually do something worthwhile in that same five- or 10-minute chunk of time.” A notable success for the project came in January 2010, in the aftermath of the massive earthquake in Haiti. From its headquarters in San Francisco, the Extraordinaries Ìi>“Êi˜}ˆ˜iiÀi`Ê>ÊÜiLÈÌiÊ܈̅ˆ˜ÊÇÓʅœÕÀÃ]Ê enabling its volunteers to compare photos of missing people to photos taken by news agencies. The volunteers identified 24 of the missing people. Colker said, “It was just an incredible moment, realizing, Wow, we actually found missing persons using this technology that didn’t exist before. If we can help people realize that doing good is as easy as clicking a mouse or typing a few sentences on a keyboard, my hope is that at its scale, we will have millions of people sharing their skills and expertise and helping to move humankind forward. That’s a big goal, but that’s what we wake up every single day and try to do.”

Long hours + multiple nights on call = surgeon burnout BY STEPHANIE DESMON

Johns Hopkins Medicine

J

ust as with everyone else perhaps, the more hours surgeons work, and the more nights they spend on call each week, the more likely they are to face burnout, depression, dissatisfaction with their careers and serious work-home conflicts, according to a major new study led by Johns Hopkins and Mayo Clinic researchers. Yet a forced reduction in work hours may not be the solution for even the busiest surgeons, who could resent punching a time clock. The study, published in the November issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons, showed a strong connection between increasing hours and nights on call and a detrimental psychological impact on surgeons in almost every setting, both pro-

fessionally and personally. “Increasing hours and nights on call results in surgeon distress using every variable we have,” said Charles M. Balch, a professor of surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the study’s lead author. “There’s a strong correlation between workload and distress, which comes out in the personal and professional lives of surgeons.” Ê ,iÃi>ÀV…iÀÃÊ >˜>Þâi`Ê `>Ì>Ê vÀœ“Ê >Ê ÓäänÊ ÃÕÀÛiÞÊ Vœ“«iÌi`Ê LÞÊ Ç]™äxÊ ÃÕÀ}iœ˜ÃÊ vÀœ“Ê across the nation. Of surgeons working “œÀiÊ̅>˜ÊnäʅœÕÀÃÊ>ÊÜiiŽ]ÊxäÊ«iÀVi˜ÌʓiÌÊ the survey’s criteria for burnout, 39 percent were screen-positive for depression, and 11 percent reported that they had made a significant medical error in the previous three months. One in five surgeons who worked “œÀiÊ̅>˜ÊnäʅœÕÀÃÊ>ÊÜiiŽÊÃ>ˆ`Ê̅iÞÊܜՏ`Ê not become a surgeon again if they had the choice today.

Despite the evidence linking a heavy workload with many types of distress, Balch and his colleagues do not advocate restrictions on work hours. “While there is evidence that burnout can lead to problems, there is no evidence that reducing hours would make all doctors more satisfied or lead to better patient care,” Balch said. “If hours were regulated, the reality is that people would have to punch time clocks, and I don’t think surgeons necessarily want their workload monitored.” The key, Balch suggested, is more attention to earlier identification of surgeons at higher risk for burnout problems. In the survey, two-thirds of surgeons, even ̅œÃiÊ Ü…œÊ ܜÀŽi`Ê “œÀiÊ Ì…>˜Ê näÊ …œÕÀÃÊ >Ê week or were on call more than three nights a week, said they did not want limits put on their hours. Surgeons who were salaried were more likely to favor restrictions than those whose pay was based entirely on billing.

Balch said he hopes that his research draws attention to the issues facing surgeons who work long hours who are also at risk for personal consequences such as addiction, early retirement and even suicide. “Part of it is just trying to get this issue of personal wellness on people’s radar screens,” he said. Surgeons and their supervisors, he added, should use the data to identify candidates for counseling or tailored schedules to address individual concerns. “Burnout has no single simple cause, and therefore there’s not going to be a simple solution,” he said. The American College of Surgeons recently began a second study of burnout and related issues. The new data, Balch said, should provide a clearer picture about these associations between workload and surgeon distress. Julie A. Freischlag, director of the Department of Surgery at Johns Hopkins, was the senior investigator on the study.

Pediatric hospitalizations for ATV injuries more than double BY TIM PARSONS

Bloomberg School of Public Health

A

ll-terrain vehicles are associated with a significant and increasing number of hospitalizations for children in the United States, according to a new report by the Center for Injury Research and Policy at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Ê "ÛiÀÊ >Ê ˜ˆ˜i‡Þi>ÀÊ «iÀˆœ`Ê ­£™™ÇqÓääÈ®]Ê hospitalizations for ATV injuries increased £xäÊ «iÀVi˜ÌÊ >“œ˜}Ê ÞœÕÌ…Ê ÞœÕ˜}iÀÊ Ì…>˜Ê £nÊ years, with important demographic variations. Rates increased most dramatically in the South and Midwest, and among teens >}iÃÊ£xÊ̜ʣǰÊ7…ˆiʓ>iÃÊLiÌÜii˜Ê£xÊ>˜`Ê £ÇÊ …>ÛiÊ Ì…iÊ …ˆ}…iÃÌÊ À>ÌiÊ œvÊ /6Ê …œÃ«ˆÌ>ˆâ>̈œ˜]Ê vi“>iÃÊ >}iÃÊ £xÊ ÌœÊ £ÇÊ iÝ«iÀˆi˜Vi`Ê the sharpest rise in ATV hospitalizations over the study time period, an increase of

250 percent. The report is published in the October issue of the Journal of Trauma. “All-terrain vehicles are inherently dangerous to children,” said Stephen M. Bowman, assistant professor with the Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy and the report’s lead author. “While manufacturers are required to label vehicles with engine sizes greater than 90cc as inappropriate for children younger than 16, our data indicate that a growing number of children are receiving serious injuries due to ATV use, suggesting that parents are unaware of these recommendations or are choosing to ignore them.” Ê ˜Ê £™nn]Ê Ì…iÊ œ˜ÃՓiÀÊ *Àœ`ÕVÌÊ ->viÌÞÊ Commission and representatives of the ATV industry entered into a decade-long consent decree to reduce the risk of injury associated with ATV use; provisions included a ban on the sale of three-wheeled ATVs, a free nationwide training program for all ATV

purchasers, improved safety labeling and a public awareness campaign. This consent `iVÀiiÊ iÝ«ˆÀi`Ê ˆ˜Ê £™™nÊ >˜`Ê ˆÃÊ Vœ˜Ìˆ˜Õi`Ê by only some manufacturers on a voluntary basis. While previous studies have examined the impact of the expiration of the consent decree between the Consumer Product Safety Commission and the ATV industry immediately following its termination, this is the first study to examine whether rates of ATV-injury hospitalizations have continued to increase. “Clearly, too many children are being injured on these vehicles,” said Mary E. Aitken, professor of pediatrics with the Arkansas Children’s Hospital and a co-author of the report. “Given the dramatic increases in hospitalization that we report, a renewed effort by the public health community, the ATV industry and the [Consumer Product Safety Commission] to address this problem is warranted.”

The researchers analyzed hospital discharge data from the Kid’s Inpatient Database of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, which is sponsored by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Injury Severity Scores, a widely accepted measure of injury severity, were calculated for each hospitalization. Results showed that all types of injury (minor, moderate and major) increased over the study time period, with rates for hospitalizations with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury tripling. “In our study, 30 percent of patients hospitalized for ATV-related injuries had a diagnosis of traumatic brain injury,” Bowman said. “Increasing helmet use through a combination of policy and education is critical to curbing the increasing trend in ATV-related hospitalizations among children.” Support for this research came from the Arkansas Biosciences Institute.


8 THE GAZETTE UÊ œÛi“LiÀÊn]ÊÓä£ä


Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;iÂ&#x201C;LiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;n]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£ä UĂ&#x160;/ GAZETTE

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Immune systemâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bare essentials used to detect drug targets B Y D AV I D M A R C H

Johns Hopkins Medicine

S

cientists at Johns Hopkins have taken a less-is-more approach to designing effective drug treatments that are precisely tailored to disease-causing pathogens, such as viruses and bacteria, and cancer cells, any of which can trigger the bodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s immune system defenses. In a report published in the issue of Nature Medicine online Oct. 31, researchers describe a new â&#x20AC;&#x153;epitope-mappingâ&#x20AC;? laboratory test that within three weeks can pinpoint the unique binding siteâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or epitopeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;from any antigen where immune system T cells can most securely attach and attack invading germs or errant cells. Knowing exactly where the best anti}iÂ&#x2DC;q/Ă&#x160; ViÂ?Â?Ă&#x160; vÂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;VVĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;p>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x153;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160; Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; stretches of proteins, called peptides, bind and are displayed on the surface of antigenprocessing immune system cellsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is a prerequisite for designing effective and targeted drug therapies, researchers say. Identifying the best binding site, they say, should speed up cancer vaccine development, lead to new diagnostic tests that detect the first appearance of cancer cells, well before tumors develop, and sort out disorders that are difficult to diagnose, such as Lyme disease. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our new, simplified system reproduces what happens in the cells of the immune system when antigens from a pathogen first enter the body and need to be broken down into peptides to become visible to T cells, one of the two immune defender cell types,â&#x20AC;? said immunologist Scheherazade Sadegh-Nasseri,

an associate professor of pathology, biophysics and biophysical chemistry at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once T cells recognize an antigen, they latch on, become activated and call for other immune system cells to enter the fight,â&#x20AC;? said Sadegh-Nasseri, the senior study investigator for the team of scientists who developed the new epitope-mapping process. Sadegh-Nasseri said that the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new lab test takes a fraction of the time involved in current methods, which rely on sequencing, or identifying every single peptide in the antigenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s makeup, one after another. Such sequencing can take months, or even years, to identify possible T cell binding sites. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The added beauty of our system is that the entire process can be done in the lab, so we do not have to perform tests in people,â&#x20AC;? said Sadegh-Nasseri, who has a patent pending for the test. The Johns Hopkins team, including colead investigators AeRyon Kim and Isamu Hartman, also immunologists, based their test on nearly 20 years of the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s previous research into how immune system cells selectively process antigens and the maze of possible protein combinations inside. That cumulative research led them to narrow their search to five essential and welldescribed proteins involved in antigen processing by immune system cells. In its latest series of experiments, the team tested a mix of the selected immune system proteins to see if it could accurately detect two already known epitopes, those of the Texas strain of the influenza virus and type II collagen, both widely used experimental antigens. Then, they used the mix to find unknown epitopes for portions of the N O V .

influenza virus that causes avian flu and for the parasite involved in malaria. Chief among the epitope-mapping testâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chemical components was a protein molecule called HLA-DR that is common to all the bodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s immune system cells. This molecule is one of the most common binding molecules used in the natural immune systemâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s peptide selection process. HLA stands for human leukocyte antigen, and HLA-DR is produced in a gene-dense region of the bodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s immune system, the major histocompatibility complex. Other key chemicals in the makeup were HLA-DM, another protein compound that disrupts the binding of HLA-DR molecules to an antigen if the fit is not perfect, and three of the most common enzymes, socalled cathepsins, involved in breaking up the antigen into its visible, identifiable protein parts. In the first set of experiments, the team mixed chemical solutions of each antigen with the five key proteins and used mass spectrometryâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;an electron-beaming device that can measure the exact makeup of moleculesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;to determine the best-fitting peptide based on precisely which segment of the antigen appeared as mass peaks. Peaks would indicate that HLA-DR had successfully bound to the antigen at a likely epitope. Next, researchers confirmed their mass spectrometry findings by injecting mice bred to produce human HLA-DR with each antigen to trigger a standard immune response and collecting samples of the resulting T cells. The T cells were then grown in the lab and exposed to various peptides, including the suspect epitopes, to identify and confirm that only one triggered the greatest chemi8

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Calendar Continued from page 12 Modifier,â&#x20AC;? a Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry seminar with Christopher Lima, Sloan KetterÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;i°Ă&#x160;xÂŁĂ&#x2021;Ă&#x160;* / °Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;EB Wed.,

Nov.

10,

2

p.m.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sequence-Influenced Methylation Polymorphism,â&#x20AC;? an Institute of Genetic Medicine seminar with Andrew Chess, Center for Human Genetic Research of Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital. Mountcastle Auditorium, PCTB. EB Wed., Nov. 10, 3 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Directionally Freeze-Cast Titanium Foams,â&#x20AC;? a Materials Science and Engineering seminar with David Dunand, Northwestern University. 110 Maryland. HW

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Structural Insight Into Mitochondrial Protein Import,â&#x20AC;? a Cell Biology seminar with Toshiya Endo, Nagoya University, Japan. Room Ă&#x201C;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x201C;ää]Ă&#x160;ÂŁnĂ&#x17D;äĂ&#x160; Â?`}°Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;EB Wed., Nov. 10, 3 p.m.

Wed.,

Nov.

10,

3:45

p.m.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Using Joint Longitudinal-Survival Models for Individual Prediction and Estimation of Treatment Effects,â&#x20AC;? a Biostatistics seminar with Jeremy Taylor, University of Michigan School of Public Health. W2030 SPH. EB Wed., Nov. 10, 4 p.m.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Epi-

genetic Control of Cell Cycle Checkpoint and Invasion and Its Implication in Cancer Therapy,â&#x20AC;? a Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences seminar with James Hsieh, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. West Lecture Hall (ground floor), WBSB. EB Thurs., Nov. 11, 10:45 a.m.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Meaning Propagation,â&#x20AC;? a Computer Science seminar with Fernando Pereira, University of *iÂ&#x2DC;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x17E;Â?Ă&#x203A;>Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;>°Ă&#x160; ÂŁĂ&#x2021;Ă&#x160; >VÂ&#x17D;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x201C;>Â&#x2DC;°Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160; HW

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Targeting Oncogenic PIK3CA Mutations for Breast Cancer Therapy,â&#x20AC;? a Cell Biology seminar with Ben Ho Park, SoM. Room 2-200, ÂŁnĂ&#x17D;äĂ&#x160; Â?`}°Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;EB

Thurs., Nov. 11, noon.

Thurs., Nov. 11, 1:30 p.m.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Graph Metrics and Dimension Reduction,â&#x20AC;? an Applied Mathematics and Statistics seminar with Minh Tang, WSE. 304 Whitehead. HW The Bromery Seminarâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x153;A New Hydrologic and Historical AssessÂ&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160; Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160; ÂŁnnÂ&#x2122;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Floodâ&#x20AC;? with Neil Coleman, Carrie Davie-Todd and Uldis Kaktins, University of Pittsburgh. Sponsored by Earth and Planetary Sciences. 305 Olin. HW Thurs., Nov. 11, 3 p.m.

Thurs., Nov. 11, 3 to 7 p.m., and Fri., Nov. 12, 9 a.m. to 1

p.m. The Futures Seminarâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Anthropology, with Arjun Appadurai and Matt Canfield, NYU; Bhrigupati Singh and Steven Caton, Harvard University; Sameena Mulla, Marquette University; Xiao-bo Yuan, University of Chicago; and Jennifer Culbert, KSAS. Mason Hall Auditorium (Thursday) and Salon B, Charles Commons Conference Center (Friday). HW Thurs.,

Nov.

11,

3:30

p.m.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Nature of Molecular Innovations at the Origin of Eukaryotes,â&#x20AC;? a Molecular Biology and Genetics seminar with Eugene Koonin, NCBI, NLM and NIH. WBSB Auditorium. EB â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Value of Humanity,â&#x20AC;? a Political and Moral Thought seminar with Sarah Buss, University of Michigan. Sponsored by Philosophy. Ă&#x201C;nnĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â?Â&#x201C;>Â&#x2DC;°Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;HW

Thurs., Nov. 11, 4 p.m.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bacterial or Cellular Microrobotics for Biofactory-on-a-Chip,â&#x20AC;? a CEAFM seminar with Minjun Kim, Drexel University. 110 Maryland. HW

Fri., Nov. 12, 11 a.m.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Inner Workings of an ATP-driven DNA Damage Sensor,â&#x20AC;? a Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry seminar with David Jeruzalmi, Harvard 1Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;°Ă&#x160;xÂŁĂ&#x2021;Ă&#x160;* / °Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;EB Fri., Nov. 12, 1:30 p.m.

Fri., Nov. 12, 4 p.m.

cal response from the cultured T cells. The scientists knew that if they could match a peak highlighted by mass spectrometry to the peptide that produced the greatest T cell reaction, they had found the most heavily favored epitope. When both tests were performed on any of the four disease antigens, researchers were able to narrow the suspect binding sites to one â&#x20AC;&#x153;immunodominantâ&#x20AC;? epitope each for Texas strain of the flu, type II collagen, avian flu and malaria. Kim, a postdoctoral research fellow at Johns Hopkins, said that designing both experiments and completing the verification study took some seven years, noting that adding HLA-DM, which she calls a protein editor, was the pivotal factor in making the initial epitope-selection process work. Researchers said that their next steps are to broaden and refine their chemical mixture for selecting and identifying possible epitopes for other kinds of HLA because the current set of experiments analyzes only one of the most common HLA-type molecules in whites. Study support was provided with funding from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Additional funding came from the Johns Hopkins Malaria Research Institute. In addition to Sadegh-Nasseri, Kim and Hartman, Johns Hopkins researchers involved in this study were Robert Cotter, Kimberly Walters, Sarat Dalai, Tatiana Boronina, Wendell Griffith and Robert Cole. Hartman is now at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. Other investigators, based at the U.S. Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, were Robert Schwenk, David Lanar and Urszula Krzych.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Steer-

ing Forces in Protein Folding: Looking Behind the Curtain,â&#x20AC;? a Biophysics thesis defense seminar with Lauren Porter. 111 Mergenthaler. HW â&#x20AC;&#x153;Structures of Ribonucleoprotein Particles That Make Ribosomes, Spliceosomes and Telomerase,â&#x20AC;? a Biophysics seminar with Hong Li, Florida State University. 111 Mergenthaler. HW Mon., Nov. 15, noon.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Epithelial Branching Morphogenesis and Cancer Invasion,â&#x20AC;? a Carnegie Institution Embryology seminar with Andrew Ewald, SoM. Rose Auditorium, 3520 San Martin Drive. HW

Mon., Nov. 15, 12:15 p.m.

Mon., Nov. 15, 1 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Obesity and Glycemic Measures Among HIV-infected Injection Drug Users,â&#x20AC;? an Epidemiology thesis defense seminar with Akosua Ă&#x192;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x153;>Ă&#x160; Ă&#x17E;iÂ&#x17D;Ă&#x17E;iÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;°Ă&#x160; 7Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x160; SPH. EB

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Statistical Analysis of Cross-Sectional Survival Data With Applications to the Study of Dementia,â&#x20AC;? a Biostatistics thesis defense seminar with Marco Carone. E9519 SPH. Mon., Nov. 15, 2 p.m.

EB Mon.,

Nov.

15,

3:30

p.m.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Promising Environmental Strategies to Prevent and Reduce Mental Health Disparities,â&#x20AC;? a Center for Health Disparities Solutions seminar with Debra Furr-Holden, SPH. Sponsored by Health Policy and Management. B14B Hampton House. EB â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Race of Fascism: Je Suis Partout, Race and Culture,â&#x20AC;? a History semi-

Mon., Nov. 15, 4 p.m.

nar with Sandrine Sanos, Texas E]Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;ÂŤĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2026;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;°Ă&#x160; Ă&#x17D;änĂ&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Â?man. HW SPECIAL EVENTS

2010 Milton S. Eisenhower Symposiumâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Global Network: Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Changing Role in an Interconnected World, with legendary adman Donny Deutsch. (See photo, p. 12.) Talk followed by questionand-answer session and reception. Shriver Hall Auditorium.

Tues., Nov. 9, 8 p.m.

HW Fri., Nov. 12, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The eighth annual

Chili Cook-off and Bake-off to benefit the JHU Campaign for United Way of Central Maryland and the Johns Hopkins Neighborhood Fund. (See In Brief, p. 2.) Glass Pavilion, Levering. HW THEATER Fri., Nov. 12, and Sat., Nov. 13, 8 p.m. , and Sun., Nov. 14, 2 p.m. Johns Hopkins University

Theatre presents Sam Shepardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fool for Love. (See story, p. 2.) $15 general admission; $13 for senior citizens, JHU faculty, staff and retirees; $5 for students with ID. Merrick Barn. HW WORKSHOPS

Tues., Nov. 9, 1:30 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eyes on Teaching: Evaluation to Improve Instruction,â&#x20AC;? a Center for Educational Resources workshop for faculty, postdocs and graduate students only. Registration required; go to www.cer.jhu.edu. Garrett Room, MSE Library. HW


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B U L L E T I N

Job Opportunities The Johns Hopkins University does not discriminate on the basis of gender, marital status, pregnancy, race, color, ethnicity, national origin, age, disability, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, veteran status, or other legally protected characteristic in any student program or activity administered by the university or with regard to admission or employment.

Homewood Office of Human Resources: -Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160;7Ă&#x2C6;ää]Ă&#x160;7Ă&#x17E;Â&#x201C;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Â?`}°]Ă&#x160;{£äÂ&#x2021;xÂŁĂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;nä{n JOB#

POSITION

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Schools of Public Health and Nursing Office of Human Resources: 2021 East Monument St., 410-955-3006 JOB#

POSITION

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School of Medicine Office of Human Resources: Â&#x2122;nĂ&#x160; °Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;>`Ă&#x153;>Ă&#x17E;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x20AC;`Ă&#x160;vÂ?Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;]Ă&#x160;{£äÂ&#x2021;Â&#x2122;xxÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x201C;Â&#x2122;Â&#x2122;ä JOB#

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LAN Administrator II Software Engineer DE Instructor, Center for Talented Youth Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;*Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;}Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;>}iĂ&#x20AC;]Ă&#x160; iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160; for Talented Youth Residential Life Administrator Tutor Building Operations Supervisor Building Maintenance Technician Program Manager, Center for Talented Youth Admissions Officer Project Manager LDP -Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2DC;}Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iiĂ&#x20AC; *Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;}Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x201C;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;>Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;>Â&#x2DC;VÂ&#x2C6;>Â?Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;>}iĂ&#x20AC; Multimedia Technician Sr. Technical Support Analyst Research Service Analyst

44005 {ÂŁnĂ&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x160; {{xnĂ&#x17D;Ă&#x160; {{Ă&#x2021;ÂŁxĂ&#x160; 44065 44112 {{Â&#x2122;nÂ&#x2122;Ă&#x160; {{Ă&#x2021;{äĂ&#x160; 39063 44603

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Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;V>Â?Ă&#x160;"Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;`Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC; -Ă&#x20AC;°Ă&#x160;*Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;}Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x201C;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;>Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152; Employment Assistant/Receptionist Payroll and HR Services Coordinator Research Data Coordinator >Â?>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;>Ă&#x160;`Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x20AC; Data Assistant Ă&#x2022;`}iĂ&#x152;Ă&#x160;-ÂŤiVÂ&#x2C6;>Â?Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152; Academic Program Administrator Sr. Research Program Coordinator Research Observer >Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;VĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;ÂŤĂ&#x152;Ă&#x160; `Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;] American Journal of Epidemiology Research Service Analyst i>Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160; `Ă&#x2022;V>Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC; Ă&#x2022;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;i`Â&#x2C6;>Ă&#x160;*Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;`Ă&#x2022;VĂ&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x2022;ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC; ,iĂ&#x192;i>Ă&#x20AC;VÂ&#x2026;Ă&#x160;*Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;}Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;`Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC; Research Data Manager Sr. Laboratory Coordinator -Ă&#x20AC;°Ă&#x160;,iĂ&#x192;i>Ă&#x20AC;VÂ&#x2026;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152; -Ă&#x20AC;°Ă&#x160;`Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;`Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC; Research Assistant Budget Analyst

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POSITION

Ă&#x17D;näĂ&#x17D;xĂ&#x160; Ă&#x17D;xĂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x160; 30501 22150 Ă&#x17D;näĂ&#x2C6;{Ă&#x160;

Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;`Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC; -Ă&#x20AC;°Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;>Â&#x2DC;VÂ&#x2C6;>Â?Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;>Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152; Nurse Midwife Physician Assistant `Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x160;-ÂŤiVÂ&#x2C6;>Â?Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;

This is a partial listing of jobs currently available. A complete list with descriptions can be found on the Web at jobs.jhu.edu.

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Notices MLK Jr. Community Service Award Nominations â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Organizers of the upcom-

ing Martin Luther King Jr. Commemoration Celebration are calling for nominations of faculty, staff, graduate students and retirees for the 2010 Martin Luther King Jr. Award for Community Service. Recipients who demonstrate the spirit of volunteerism, citizenship and activism that characterized Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life will be recognized at the annual commemoration event, to be held in January. To submit a nomination, go to hrnt.jhu .edu/mlk. The deadline is Nov. 15. For more information, university affiliates should contact Amanda Sciukas at worklife@jhu.edu Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;{{Ă&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2122;Â&#x2122;Ă&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;äää°Ă&#x160; Â&#x201C;ÂŤÂ?Â&#x153;Ă&#x17E;iiĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x192;ÂŤÂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;>Â?Ă&#x2030; health system should contact Christina Pickle >Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;VÂŤÂ&#x2C6;VÂ&#x17D;Â?iÂŁJÂ?Â&#x2026;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;°i`Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;{£äÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x2C6;ÂŁ{Â&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x201C;£°

Malaysia Continued from page 1 kins were Edward D. Miller, dean of the School of Medicine and CEO of Johns Hopkins Medicine; Mohan Chellappa, president for global ventures at Johns Hopkins Medicine International; David Nichols, vice dean for education in the School of Medicine; Steve Thompson, senior vice president of Johns Hopkins Medicine; and Charles Wiener, professor of medicine and vice chair of education in the School of Medicine, who has been named the founding and interim dean and CEO of the medical school and hospital. The school, to be called Perdana University Graduate School of Medicine, will open in fall 2011. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For more than a century, Johns Hopkins has been recognized as a national and global leader in patient care, research and education,â&#x20AC;? Miller said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are honored to have an opportunity to share our innovations and best practices with the people of Malaysia. We firmly believe that this project will help us to continue our historic and vital mission of helping to raise the standards of health care around the world.â&#x20AC;? Under the agreement, Johns Hopkins will assist with the development of every major aspect of the new medical enterprise, including medical education programs, campus design and facilities planning, and clinical affairs. Johns Hopkins also will guide academic development in alignment with the breakthroughs of its new Genes to Society curriculum and will consult on other important components, including the teaching environment and infrastructure, pedagogy, administration and student affairs. Johns Hopkins also will provide guidance on the design and development of Perdana University Hospital, a 600-bed teaching facility that will include a full complement of ambulatory care facilities, diagnostic capabilities and ancillary support services. And, in a third major component of the agreement, Johns Hopkins will advise Malaysian colleagues on the development and integration of research programs across the entire medical enterprise. Operationally, all education, patient care and research functions and programs will be managed in accordance with the Johns Hopkins Medicine organizational and operational model. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is a great privilege to be able to assist Malaysia with the establishment of its first private graduate medical school and teaching hospital,â&#x20AC;? Nichols said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not only will this

Read The Gazette online gazette.jhu.edu

B O A R D

Season of Giving â&#x20AC;&#x201D; During the holiday

season, the Office of Work, Life and Engagement is inviting the Johns Hopkins community to help the less fortunate by participating in its Season of Giving programs. In November, a $20 donation to the JHU Vernon Rice Memorial Butterball Turkey Program will provide a food basket, containing a fresh turkey and vegetables from local and free-range farms, to a family in need for the Thanksgiving holiday. During December, faculty, staff, students and retirees can participate in the Adopt-aFamily/Adopt-a-Senior program, conducted in partnership with local nonprofit social services agencies. Participants can provide gifts, clothing and/or grocery store gift cards to individuals who may not otherwise receive or be able to afford gifts during the holiday. To participate or to learn more about the programs, go to hopkinsworklife.org/ community/index.cfm or contact Brandi Monroe-Payton at bmonroe6@jhu.edu or {{Ă&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2122;Â&#x2122;Ă&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x2C6;äĂ&#x2C6;ä°

collaboration have a transformational impact on the quality of medical education, research and health care delivery for Malaysia and the region, but it also will bring a wide range of benefits to the university, departments, faculty and staff here in Baltimore.â&#x20AC;? Johns Hopkins will provide a leadership team for the new school that includes vice deans as well as a founding dean and CEO; advise and consult with its Malaysian partners on faculty and student recruitment; recruit and supply founding core faculty and staff, who will administer the Genes to Society curriculum and advance the new schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s research mission; provide training in the Genes to Society curriculum and educaĂ&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;>Â?Ă&#x160;ÂŤĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;}Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;`iĂ&#x203A;iÂ?Â&#x153;ÂŤÂ&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;qÂ&#x153;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; Hopkins faculty; and advise and consult in campus design, research program development and hospital operations. Johns Hopkins faculty will have opportunities to take temporary or potentially permanent assignments of six months to two years at Perdana University Graduate School of Medicine or Perdana University Hospital; participate as curriculum trainers for Malaysian and other international faculty, or in specific research collaborations, during their stays in Baltimore; or visit Kuala Lumpur as guest faculty for one to two weeks. JHM staff will also be eligible for some temporary or permanent positions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is a remarkable opportunity to transform the medical educational system and introduce a new thematic medical paradigm to Southeast Asia,â&#x20AC;? said Wiener, who will take up residence in Malaysia in January. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The people there are enthusiastic about medical education reform and establishing an academic medical center with Hopkins values. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I hope that the Johns Hopkins community will share this excitement and participate in the groundbreaking effort,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are looking for teachers and role models who are looking to live in this exciting environment. Johns Hopkins is deeply invested in the success of this collaboration. I welcome people who want to be part of it.â&#x20AC;? The curriculum, Wiener said, will be in English, and applicants will be required to complete the MCAT in English. The school is projected to open with up to 100 â&#x20AC;&#x153;highly qualifiedâ&#x20AC;? students, Wiener said. David Trabilsy, former director of admissions at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, will be interim director for medical student admissions. In preparation for Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160; Ă&#x201C;䣣qĂ&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160; >V>`iÂ&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x160; Ă&#x17E;i>Ă&#x20AC;]Ă&#x160; v>VĂ&#x2022;Â?Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; >Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160; staff from Johns Hopkins are expected to be in place in Malaysia in July. Academic Medical Centreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s primary focus is to develop Perdana University, a publicprivate partnership. Chase Perdana holds >Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; näĂ&#x160; ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;ViÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; iÂľĂ&#x2022;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; V>`iÂ&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x160; Medical Centre, while Turiya Berhad owns the remaining 20 percent. A premier construction company in Malaysia and the Middle East, Chase Perdana was the main contractor to design and build the University Malaysia Sabah, one of the premier universities in Malaysia. G


Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;iÂ&#x201C;LiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;n]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£ä UĂ&#x160;/ GAZETTE

Classifieds

M A R K E T P L A C E

APARTMENTS/HOUSES FOR RENT

for 2 postdocs to share. $900/mo + utils. {£äÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;{Ă&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;xäĂ&#x201C;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;iÂ&#x17D;>VÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x2122;Â&#x2122;JÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;Â&#x201C;>Â&#x2C6;Â?°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;°

Baltimore City, updated 1BR condo in secure gated community, assigned prkng, swimming, tennis, nr hospital and university; option to own ($135,000). $1,200/mo Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;VÂ?Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â?Ă&#x192;°Ă&#x160;{£äÂ&#x2021;Â&#x2122;xÂŁÂ&#x2021;{Ă&#x2021;xä°

Union Square, 1BR boutique apt in Victorian TH, furnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d, flexible terms, in historic `Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x152;°Ă&#x160; {£äÂ&#x2021;Â&#x2122;nnÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;ÂŁĂ&#x17D;Ă&#x2021;]Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;VÂ&#x2026;>Ă&#x20AC;`Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;ÂŁnnĂ&#x2C6;J gmail.com or http://therichardsonhouse .vflyer.com/home/flyer/home/3200019.

Belvedere Square, 2BR, 1.5BA upstairs apt unit, lg living and dining area, kitchen, hdwd flrs, powder rm, fp, balcony, quiet residential neighborhood 10 mins to JHU Homewood, 15 mins to JHMI. 410-435Ă&#x2C6;{ÂŁĂ&#x2021;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;Â&#x17D;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x201C;>Ă&#x20AC;ÂŁÂŁĂ&#x201C;äJĂ&#x17E;>Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;°

Wyman Court Apts (Beech Ave), new, spacious efficiency w/balcony, sunlight, 3 closets, 5-min walk to Hopkins. $625/mo. smartdocs@gmail.com.

Bolton Hill, 1BR studio apt w/luxury BA, vĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;½`]Ă&#x160; ÂŁĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; vÂ?Ă&#x20AC;]Ă&#x160; ÂŤĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2DC;}]Ă&#x160; 7Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2C6;°Ă&#x160; fnĂ&#x2021;xĂ&#x2030;Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;VÂ?Ă&#x160; everything. sheezabrikhouse@yahoo.com. Butchers Hill, fully furnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d 1BR + office, dw, W/D, all appls, hdwd flrs, satellite TV, DVD player, WiFi access, sec sys, cute cottagestyle RH south of JHMI. $1,100/mo + utils. jhmirental@gmail.com. Canton, 2BR, 2.5BA rehabbed TH, great location close to JHH/JHMI. Courtney, cedwar15@gmail.com. Canton, 2-3BR, 2.5BA harborfront TH, fully furnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d, entertainment system, granite counters, marble flrs, stainless steel appls, 2-car garage. 443-955-2040. Charles Village apts: studio ($625/mo) and Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x153;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;iÂ&#x2DC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;½`Ă&#x160; ÂŁ ,Ă&#x160; >ÂŤĂ&#x152;Ă&#x160; ­fnĂ&#x201C;xĂ&#x2030;Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;ÂŽĂ&#x2020;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â?Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; inclâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d for both. murilo_silvia@hotmail.com. Charles Village, spacious, bright 3BR apt, Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x20AC;`Ă&#x160; vÂ?Ă&#x20AC;]Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;iÂ&#x2021;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; VÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;`Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;°Ă&#x160; fÂŁ]Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2021;xĂ&#x2030;Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;°Ă&#x160; 443-253-2113 or pulimood@aol.com. Clipper Mill, lovely 3BR, 3.5BA, 2-car garage, bonus rm, deck, community swimming pool, Woodberry lt rail station yds away, nr walking trail and Druid Hill Park, avail short-term or yearly lease, nr UniverĂ&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;*Â&#x17D;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x17E;]Ă&#x160;i>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;>VViĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2021;nĂ&#x17D;]Ă&#x160;nÂ&#x2021;£äĂ&#x160;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160; °Ă&#x160;fĂ&#x201C;]xääĂ&#x2030;Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;°Ă&#x160;{{Ă&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2122;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2122;ÂŁnä° Columbia/Howard, newly renovâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d 3-4BR TH, 3.5BAs, family rm, priv BA, W/D, AC, carpool to JHU, nr community college and Columbia town center. $450/$550/mo Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;VÂ?Ă&#x160; >Â?Â?Ă&#x160; Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â?Ă&#x192;]Ă&#x160; Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x152;°Ă&#x160; xĂ&#x2021;ÂŁÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2021;ÂŁÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x201C;Â&#x2122;Â&#x2122;ÂŁĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; viaianhan@yahoo.com. Ellicott City, 4BR, 2.5BA single-family house w/finâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d bsmt, 2-car garage, lg backyd, excel schools and location. $2,600/mo + Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â?Ă&#x192;°Ă&#x160; Ă&#x201C;äĂ&#x201C;Â&#x2021;{{ÂŁÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;Â&#x2122;ÂŁĂ&#x17D;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; Â?Â&#x201C;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x201C;Â&#x2122;ÂŁnJ}Â&#x201C;>Â&#x2C6;Â? .com. Evergreen/Roland Park, sunny, furnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d 3BR house, available January-June 2011, 20-min walk to Homewood campus and shuttle. fÂŁ]nääĂ&#x2030;Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;°Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Â?°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x2030;Ă&#x201C;>nĂ&#x17D;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2026;i° Hampden, 3BR, 2BA TH, dw, W/D, fenced yd, nr light rail. $1,100/mo + utils. 410Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x2021;nÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x17D;Â&#x2122;Ă&#x17D;° Mt Vernon, 2BR split-level condo, hdwd flrs, walk-in closets, skylight, fp, deck, prkng. fÂŁ]Ă&#x17D;xäĂ&#x2030;Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;°Ă&#x160; Ă&#x201C;{äÂ&#x2021;{Ă&#x2021;xÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x2C6;nÂŁĂ&#x2021;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x203A;Ă&#x203A;>Â&#x2C6;`Ă&#x17E;>{äJ gmail.com. Mt Washington, 2BR, 2BA apt in Ivymount community, pet-friendly, incredible view of the woods, avail Dec 15. $1,395/mo incl Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â?Ă&#x192;°Ă&#x160; {{Ă&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;xÂ&#x2122;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2122;ÂŁxxĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; LÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x152;Ă&#x153;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}iĂ&#x20AC;J yahoo.fr. Rosedale, 3BR single-family house, nice kitchen, dining rm, living rm, W/D, lg, priv backyd, garage, 5-min drive to JHMI, ideal

Federal Hill Sublet -

Female non-smoker for 1 BD (furn.) w/closet + new priv. BA in 3 BD w/ 2 female students. W/D new kitch/LR, Pking, rooftop balcony, Cable, CAC, close to universities, dining, ball parks, transportation, Avail - 1/1/11 to 9/1/11 $900mo./inclusive + 1 mo. Sec. dep. 631-428-6310, OD]]XUUR#SPVFKRROVRUJ

11

Cozy 3BR, 2.5BA house nr Homewood/Towson University/Belvedere Square, charming house perfect for family/friends to share, hdwd flrs throughout, finâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d bsmt, front and L>VÂ&#x17D;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x17E;`Ă&#x192;°Ă&#x160; {{Ă&#x17D;Â&#x2021;{ÂŁ{Â&#x2021;Ă&#x2C6;nĂ&#x17D;{Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; Â?>Â&#x17D;i>Ă&#x203A;i{Ă&#x20AC;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;J gmail.com. 3BR, 1BA TH w/bsmt, fenced backyd w/ patio, nr JHU campus, perfect for grad student or faculty. $1,300/mo (1st month free). 410-925-6646. TH nr JHMI, 2BRs each w/priv BA, 1st flr, living rm, dining rm, kitchen, W/D, AC, >Â?>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160; >Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160; Â&#x2026;>Â?vÂ&#x2021; °Ă&#x160; fÂŁ]Ă&#x17D;ääĂ&#x2030;Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;°Ă&#x160; xÂŁĂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x2C6;näÂ&#x2021; Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x2021;äĂ&#x17D;°

F wanted for rm w/priv BA in lg 2BR, 2BA VÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;`Â&#x153;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x160; Â&#x2026;>Ă&#x20AC;Â?iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160; -Ă&#x152;]Ă&#x160; nĂ&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160; vÂ?Ă&#x20AC;]Ă&#x160; >Â&#x201C;>âÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160; view, swimming pool, gym, sauna, doorman, 24-hr security, underground prkng, walk to Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x153;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;`Ă&#x160;V>Â&#x201C;ÂŤĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x2030;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;Â?i°Ă&#x160;{£äÂ&#x2021;Â&#x2122;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x2021;Â&#x2021;{änx°

Clarinet and piano lessons available, curĂ&#x20AC;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; *i>LÂ&#x153;`Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; VÂ?>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x152;Ă&#x160; Â&#x201C;>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;½Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x2022;`iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;]Ă&#x160; Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x160; yrsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; experience. $20/half-hour, $40/hour. Ă&#x201C;{äÂ&#x2021;Â&#x2122;Â&#x2122;{Â&#x2021;Ă&#x2C6;{nÂ&#x2122;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2026;Ă&#x2022;}Â&#x2026;Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Â?iÂ&#x2DC;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;viĂ&#x20AC;J}Â&#x201C;>Â&#x2C6;Â? .com.

1BR avail in 3BR house in Cedonia, owned by young F profâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;l, modern kitchen, lg deck, landscaped yd, free prkng, nr JHH/Homewood/Morgan State, nr public transportation, pets welcome. $550/mo + utils. 410493-2435 or aprede1@yahoo.com.

Responsible, fun and creative babysitter/ nanny and recent Peabody grad available on short notice, if interested, could also teach beginner piano or beginner Spanish/French. xäĂ&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;{Â&#x2122;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x201C;{{Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Â?>Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;iÂ&#x2DC;nnĂ&#x192;JĂ&#x17E;>Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;°

Share all new refurbished TH w/other medical students, 924 N Broadway, 4BRs, 2 full BAs, CAC, W/D, dw, w/w crpt, 1-min walk to JHMI. gretrieval@aol.com.

CARS FOR SALE

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;04 VW Golf, silver w/black interior, new tires and brakes, 40K mi, in good cond. fn]£ää°Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2DC;iÂ&#x2DC;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x17D;JĂ&#x17E;>Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;° â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;96 VW Jetta, Trek edition, black, manual transmission, 1 owner, in great cond, free LÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x17D;iĂ&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;>VÂ&#x17D;]Ă&#x160; Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160; Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;°Ă&#x160; fĂ&#x201C;]Â&#x2122;ääĂ&#x2030;LiĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;vviĂ&#x20AC;°Ă&#x160; {ÂŁ{Â&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;xäÂ&#x2021;x{Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x201C;°

Mature, experienced nanny available, warm, energetic, upbeat and very reliable, outstanding references from JHU faculty. >Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;]Ă&#x160;{£äÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;äĂ&#x201C;xĂ&#x17D;° Need help with your JHU retirement plan investments portfolio? Free, confidential consultation. 410-435-5939 or treilly1@aol .com. Absolutely flawless detailing; visit website for package info. Jason, 410-630-3311. Friday Night Swing Dance Club, open to public, no partners needed, great bands. 410663-0010 or www.fridaynightswing.com.

ITEMS FOR SALE

Ă&#x2022;Â?Â?`Â&#x153;}Ă&#x192;°Ă&#x160; fxxäĂ&#x2030;i>Ă&#x160; ­Â&#x2DC;i}Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;>LÂ?iŽ°Ă&#x160; {£äÂ&#x2021;xĂ&#x201C;nÂ&#x2021; ÂŁxĂ&#x201C;n]Ă&#x160;{{Ă&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;äĂ&#x2021;Â&#x2021;xÂŁÂŁÂ&#x2122;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;{{Ă&#x17D;Â&#x2021;nĂ&#x17D;Â&#x2122;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x2C6;äĂ&#x201C;Ă&#x2021;°

Lg, renovâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d 1BR apt w/new kitchen, BA, VĂ&#x20AC;ÂŤĂ&#x152;]Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;>Â?Ă&#x160;Â?Â&#x2C6;}Â&#x2026;Ă&#x152;]Ă&#x160;7Ă&#x2030; ]Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x203A;>Â&#x2C6;Â?Ă&#x160; iVĂ&#x160;£°Ă&#x160;fnääĂ&#x2030; Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;ÂłĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â?Ă&#x192;°Ă&#x160;Â?>Â&#x2DC;]Ă&#x160;{£äÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2021;Â&#x2021;nnĂ&#x2021;Â&#x2122;°

Authentic Michael Kors bag, stud detail, red leather, brand new, $100; new replica Gucci handbag, black leather, $200; authentic >Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160;-ÂŤ>`iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;>Â?Â?iĂ&#x152;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;i`Ă&#x160;ÂŤ>Ă&#x152;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Â?i>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x20AC;]Ă&#x160;fĂ&#x2021;xĂ&#x2020;Ă&#x160; V>Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Â?Ă&#x17E;°Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x2022;Â?Â?Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;>Â&#x2DC;nÂ&#x2122;J}Â&#x201C;>Â&#x2C6;Â?°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;°

HOUSES FOR SALE

Sand beach chairs (2), three-step ladders (2), dresser w/shelves, reciprocating saw, ÂŤĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;]Ă&#x160; `Â&#x2C6;}Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;>Â?Ă&#x160; ÂŤÂ&#x2C6;>Â&#x2DC;Â&#x153;°Ă&#x160; {£äÂ&#x2021;{xxÂ&#x2021;xnxnĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; iricse.its@verizon.net.

Gardenville, 3BR, 1.5BA RH in quiet neighborhood, new kitchen and BA, CAC, hdwd flrs, club bsmt, fenced, maintenance-free yd w/carport, 15 mins to JHH. $139,500. 443610-0236 or tziporachai@juno.com.

Â?iÂ&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x192;VÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; >Â&#x201C;ÂŤ`iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; ­Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160; >Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160; Roland, nr Homewood campus), seeks afterschool tutors for Tues, Wed or Thurs, 3:15{\Ă&#x17D;äÂ&#x201C;°Ă&#x160; -Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; *>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; *Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;}>Â&#x2DC;]Ă&#x160; {£äÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;nÂ&#x2021;ÂŁĂ&#x201C;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; phogan_2@juno.com.

Tutor avail for all subjects/levels; remedial and gifted; also help w/college counseling, speech and essay writing, editing, proofreading, database design and programming. 410Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2122;nĂ&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x160;­>vĂ&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;nÂŤÂ&#x201C;ÂŽĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;ÂŁĂ&#x161;Ă&#x161;JÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;Â&#x201C;>Â&#x2C6;Â?°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;° Licensed landscaper avail for lawn maintenance, yd cleanup, other landscaping services, trash hauling, fall/winter leaf and snow Ă&#x20AC;iÂ&#x201C;Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;>Â?°Ă&#x160;/>Ă&#x17E;Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x192;V>ÂŤÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160; °Ă&#x160;{£äÂ&#x2021;nÂŁĂ&#x201C;Â&#x2021; 6090 or romilacapers@comcast.net.

2-pc sectionals (2), one cream-colored, the other dk beige. $450/ea. kiera_wise@yahoo .com.

Need a photographer or videographer for weddings, other events? Edward S Davis ÂŤÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;}Ă&#x20AC;>ÂŤÂ&#x2026;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x2030;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;`iÂ&#x153;}Ă&#x20AC;>ÂŤÂ&#x2026;Ă&#x17E;°Ă&#x160;{{Ă&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x2C6;Â&#x2122;xÂ&#x2021;Â&#x2122;Â&#x2122;nnĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; esdavisimaging@gmail.com.

Greektown house, why rent when you can LĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Â?iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;°Ă&#x160;fÂ&#x2122;Â&#x2122;]äää°Ă&#x160;{£äÂ&#x2021;{xnÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x201C;nĂ&#x2021;n°

Conn alto saxophone, best offer; exercise rowing machine, $50; both in excel cond. {£äÂ&#x2021;{nnÂ&#x2021;ÂŁnnĂ&#x2C6;°

Experienced gardener wanted to help w/fall cleanup and planting. $15/hr. Jim, 410-366Ă&#x2021;ÂŁÂ&#x2122;ÂŁĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Â?Â?Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;J}Â&#x201C;>Â&#x2C6;Â?°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;°

Hampden, updated 2BR, 2BA TH, hdwd flrs, CAC, lg closets, beautiful deck, prkng, easy walk to Homewood campus. $209,000. {£äÂ&#x2021;nänÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x201C;Â&#x2122;Ă&#x2C6;Â&#x2122;°

Ă&#x201C;äänĂ&#x160; 9>Â&#x201C;>Â&#x2026;>Ă&#x160; 9<,Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x160; Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;VĂ&#x17E;VÂ?i]Ă&#x160; VĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160; body work, helmet inclâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d, 2K mi. 410-320n£äĂ&#x2C6;°

Bodywork massage studios, professional massage services, gift certificates avail. 443Â&#x2122;nĂ&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;Â&#x2122;nĂ&#x2021;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°LÂ&#x153;`Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x153;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x17D;Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;LÂ&#x2C6;Â?iÂ&#x201C;>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;>}i .com.

Mt Vernon, adorable efficiency co-op on Hopkins shuttle route, sophisticated, secure Â?Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;°Ă&#x160;{£äÂ&#x2021;nÂŁnÂ&#x2021;nÂŁÂŁĂ&#x2021;° Cozy 3BR, 2BA condo, separate garage, walking distance to the university, great price, Â?Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;i`Ă&#x2022;Vi`°Ă&#x160; {{Ă&#x17D;Â&#x2021;n{nÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x17D;Â&#x2122;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x192;Ă&#x2022;i°Ă&#x20AC;âiÂŤĂ&#x201C;J verizon.net. Last chance to own a fabulous house, while mortgage rates are still low, ideal Â?Â&#x153;V>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; >Â?Â?Ă&#x160; °Ă&#x160; Ă&#x17D;äĂ&#x201C;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2122;nÂŁÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x2C6;Â&#x2122;{Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; www.3402mountpleasantavenue.canbyours .com. Ă&#x2021;äĂ&#x201C;Ă&#x160; -Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;iÂ?iÂ&#x2C6;}Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160; ,`]Ă&#x160; Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;iÂ?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; { ,Ă&#x160; Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x160; Ă&#x153;Ă&#x2030;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160; full BAs, new kitchen, finâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d bsmt, great pubÂ?Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x160;Ă&#x192;VÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x192;°Ă&#x160;fxÂŁx]äää°Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;i]Ă&#x160;{£äÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;Â&#x2122;äÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;ään°

ROOMMATES WANTED

Share 3BR, 2.5BA RH in Wyman Park/Remington area, finâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d bsmt, W/D, dw, cable, Internet, deck, prkng, 2 blks to Homewood campus. $450/mo + share of utils. nancyshipley@ hotmail.com. Mature grad student/profâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;l wanted for 2 lg rms in historic RH, share w/profâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;l couple, share all common space, free WiFi, W/D, suite is unfurnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d w/bed avail, pref nonsmokiĂ&#x20AC;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;ÂŁĂ&#x201C;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?i>Ă&#x192;i]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;ivĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;i¾½`°Ă&#x160;fĂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x2021;xĂ&#x2030;Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;ÂłĂ&#x160; ÂŁĂ&#x2030;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â?Ă&#x192;°Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;i>vÂ&#x153;>Â&#x201C;Ă&#x2021;JÂ&#x201C;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;°  WYMANCOURTHICKORYHEIGHTS Beech Ave. adj. to JHU!

Studio

from $570 1 BD Apt. from $675 2 BD from $785

Hickory Ave. in Hampden, lovely Hilltop setting!

2 BD units from $750, or, with Balcony - $785! 

Shown by appointment - 410-764-7776

www.BrooksManagementCompany.com

Beautiful Chickering baby grand piano, in excel cond, all ivory keys in great VÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;`]Ă&#x160; ÂŤĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;ViĂ&#x160; Â&#x2DC;i}Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;>LÂ?i°Ă&#x160; {£äÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;{{nnĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; stamusicministry@gmail.com. Knabe upright piano, immaculate condiĂ&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;]Ă&#x160;}Ă&#x20AC;i>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x203A;>Â?Ă&#x2022;i°Ă&#x160; Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;iÂ?Â?i]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D;ä£Â&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;ÂŁnÂ&#x2021;nnÂ&#x2122;n° Beautiful living rm set: sofa, loveseat, end tables (2), lamps (2), coffee table w/glass Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;°Ă&#x160;fnääĂ&#x2030;LiĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vviĂ&#x20AC;°Ă&#x160;{{Ă&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2122;nĂ&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x201C;° Formal oak dining rm table and 6 fabricVÂ&#x153;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x20AC;i`Ă&#x160;VÂ&#x2026;>Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;>LÂ?iĂ&#x160;iĂ?Ă&#x152;iÂ&#x2DC;`Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;{{¸Ă&#x160;Ă?Ă&#x160;nĂ&#x2C6;¸]Ă&#x160; in excel cond. Lsab1960@yahoo.com.

SERVICES/ITEMS OFFERED OR WANTED

Affordable and professional landscaper/certified horticulturist available to maintain existing gardens, also designing, planting or masonry; free consultations. David, 410Ă&#x2C6;nĂ&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;}Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;}>Â&#x2DC;°v>Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â?Ă&#x17E;JÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;Â&#x201C;>Â&#x2C6;Â?°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;° Trustworthy dog walker avail day and evening, overnight sitting w/complimentary housesitting services, impeccable referenciĂ&#x192;°Ă&#x160; {{Ă&#x17D;Â&#x2021;nä£Â&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;{nĂ&#x2021;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; >Â?Ă&#x153;>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;iÂŤVJ}Â&#x201C;>Â&#x2C6;Â? .com. Soup for the Soul fund raiser, Nov 20, {Â&#x2021;nÂŤÂ&#x201C;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; /iÂ&#x201C;ÂŤÂ?iĂ&#x160; Â&#x201C;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;iÂ?Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160; >Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;i]Ă&#x160; mentoring families living in poverty. Tickets >Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160;fĂ&#x201C;x°Ă&#x160;{{Ă&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;änÂ&#x2021;xxĂ&#x201C;x°

Free if you can haul it: Two lg blue circular sofas from Storehouse, use together for conĂ&#x203A;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;ÂŤÂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;°Ă&#x160;{£äÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;nnÂ&#x2021;nĂ&#x2021;nĂ&#x201C;°

Professional landscaping at its finest, high-quality landscaping at an affordable price. Terry Butler, 410-652-3446 or masterpiecelandscaping@yahoo.com.

Wanted: advanced Peabody piano student to teach popular piano music to my son in Â&#x201C;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;i°Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;äÂ&#x2122;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x201C;ÂŁĂ&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x201C;äĂ&#x201C;xĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;v>Ă&#x20AC;LiĂ&#x20AC;JVÂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x153;iÂ&#x201C;L .edu.

Graphic designer w/20 yrsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; experience, 10 yrs in Web design, can assist w/reports, preĂ&#x192;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;°Ă&#x160;,i>Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;>LÂ?iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x192;°Ă&#x160;nĂ&#x201C;nÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x201C;Â&#x2122;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2021;Â&#x2122;Ă&#x160; or thejetsons2@mac.com.

PLACING ADS Classified listings are a free service for current, full-time Hopkins faculty, staff and students only. Ads should adhere to these general guidelines: UĂ&#x160; "Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;>`Ă&#x160;ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x153;iiÂ&#x17D;°Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160; new request must be submitted for each issue. UĂ&#x160; `Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;i`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;`Ă&#x192;]Ă&#x160; including phone, fax and e-mail.

UĂ&#x160; 7iĂ&#x160;V>Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;ÂŤÂ&#x17D;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160; business phone numbers or e-mail addresses. UĂ&#x160; -Ă&#x2022;LÂ&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Â?Â?Ă&#x160;LiĂ&#x160;VÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;`iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;i`Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160; the editorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s discretion. UĂ&#x160; i>`Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;`>Ă&#x17E;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160; one week prior to the edition in which the ad is to be run. UĂ&#x160; ,i>Â?Ă&#x160;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160;Â?Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x201C;>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;LiĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;vviĂ&#x20AC;i`Ă&#x160; only by a Hopkins-affiliated seller not by Realtors or Agents.

(Boxed ads in this section are paid advertisements.) Classified ads may be faxed to 443-287-9920; e-mailed in the body of a message (no attachments) to gazads@jhu.edu; or mailed to Gazette Classifieds, Suite 540, 901 S. Bond St., BalĂ&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;i]Ă&#x160; Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ÂŁĂ&#x201C;Ă&#x17D;£°Ă&#x160;/Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;ÂŤĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;VÂ&#x2026;>Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x160; a boxed display ad, contact the Gazelle Group at 410-343-3362.


12 THE GAZETTE UÊ œÛi“LiÀÊn]ÊÓä£ä N O V .

8

1 5

Calendar Cultural Conversations series. To RSVP, e-mail laustin@jhu.edu or call 202-663-5635. Kenney Auditorium, Nitze Bldg. SAIS

COLLOQUIA Tues., Nov. 9, 4:15 p.m. “The Chemistry and Biology of Subglutinols A and B,” a Chemistry colloquium with Jiyong Hong, Duke University. 233 Remsen. HW

“Beyond Separatism: Interpreting Canadian Federalism in Quebec,” a SAIS Canadian Studies Program discussion with Guy Laforest, Universite Laval, and David Rovinsky, U.S. State Depart“i˜Ì°Êx£ÇÊ ˆÌâiÊ `}°ÊÊSAIS

Mon., Nov. 15, noon.

Wed., Nov. 10, 3:30 p.m. “Dust Formation and Evolution in CoreCollapse Supernovae: Clues to Understanding the Dust Content of Early Galaxies,” an STSci colloquium with Geoff Clayton, Louisiana State University. Bahcall Auditorium, Muller Bldg. HW

“The Race of Nimble Fingers: Changing Patterns of Child Labor in South Africa’s Wine Industry,” an Anthropology colloquium with Susan Levine, University of Cape Town. 404 Macaulay. HW

GRAND ROUNDS Mon., Nov. 8, 8:30 a.m. “Recent

Wed., Nov. 10, 4 p.m.

“Spatial Representation in the Mind/ Brain: Do We Need an Internal Spatial Map?” a Psychological and Brain Sciences colloquium with Zenon Pylyshyn, Rutgers University. 233 Ames. HW

Wed., Nov. 10, 4 p.m.

Thurs.,

Nov.

11,

3

p.m.

“Twenty-five Years of Lattice Gauge Theory: Consequences of the QCD Lagrangian,” a Physics and Astronomy colloquium with Andreas Kronfeld, Fermilab. Schafler Auditorium, Bloomberg Center. HW Thurs., Nov. 11, 3 p.m. “ ‘Be Secret in Any Matter Appertaining to Your Office’: Midwives, Gossip and the Secrets of Women,” a History of Science and Technology colloquium with Sam Thomas, University of Alabama, Huntsville. Seminar Room, 3rd floor, Welch Library. EB Thurs.,

Nov.

11,

3:45

p.m.

“Recognizing Questions,” a Cognitive Science colloquium with Christine Gunlogson, University of Rochester. 134A Krieger. HW Thurs., Nov. 11, 4 p.m. “Shakespearean Autonomy,” an ELH colloquium with Stephen Greenblatt, Harvard University. Sponsored by English. 130D Gilman. HW

“Our Economic Insecurity and Its Relationship to the Overall Security of the Nation,” an Applied Physics Laboratory colloquium with Michael Greenberger, University of Maryland. Kossiakoff Auditorium. APL

Fri., Nov. 12, 2 p.m.

Fri., Nov. 12, 4 p.m. “On the Postcolony: Ten Years On,” an Anthropology colloquium with Achille Mbembe, Wits Institute for Social and Economic Research. 404 Macaulay. HW

CONFERENCES Mon., Nov. 8, 5 to 6:30 p.m.

“Cyber Security,” a SAIS Review of International Affairs conference with Howard Schmidt, cyber security coordinator at the White House. For information, e-mail

Adman and TV personality Donny Deutsch is the next speaker in the Milton S. Eisenhower Symposium. See Special Events.

idevali1@jhu.edu or call 202-531™ÇÓÇÆÊ̜Ê,-6*Êi‡“>ˆÊÃ>ˆÃÀiۈiÜJ jhu.edu. Kenney Auditorium, Nitze Bldg. SAIS DISCUSSION/TALKS

“Ideas and Economic Crises in Britain From Attlee to Blair,” a SAIS Center for Transatlantic Relations Program panel discussion on Matthias Matthijs’ book of the same name. Panelists are Matthijs, American University and SAIS; Peter Matheson, British Embassy; Mark Blyth, Brown University; Daniel Hamilton, director, CTR; and Pravin Krishna, moderator, SAIS. To RSVP, go to transatlantic.saisjhu.edu/events/2010/matthijs.htm. Co-sponsored by the International Economics Program and the Bernard L. Schwartz Forum on Constructive Capitalism. Rome Auditorium. SAIS

Advances in the Diagnosis and Management of Human Allergic Disease,” Pathology grand rounds with Robert Hamilton, SoM. Hurd Hall. EB

Mon.,

Nov.

15,

8:30

a.m.

“Rats, Lice and History: Successes and Misadventures of a Clinical Microbiologist on the Fringe,” Pathology grand rounds with Steve Dumler, SoM. Hurd Hall. EB

Tues., Nov. 9, 6 p.m.

“Bosnia and Herzegovina After the Elections: Prospects for Bringing Bosnia Back on the EU Reform Path,” a SAIS Center for Transatlantic Relations panel discussion with Daniel Serwer, Vedran Dzihic and Michael Haltzel, SAIS; Kemal Kurspahic, managing editor, The Connection Newspapers, and founder, Media in Democracy Institute. To RSVP, e-mail transatlanticrsvp@jhu.edu or call ÓäӇÈÈ·xnnä°ÊxääÊ iÀ˜ÃÌiˆ˜‡"vvˆÌÊ Bldg. SAIS Wed., Nov. 10, 2:30 p.m.

Thurs., Nov. 11, 12:30 p.m.

“Combating Slavery in Ghana,” a SAIS African Studies Program discussion with James Kofi Annan, founder and executive director, Challenging Heights. A Year of Demography event. Co-sponsored by the SAIS International Law and Organizations Program. For information, e-mail itolber1@jhu °i`ÕÊ œÀÊ V>Ê ÓäӇÈÈ·xÈÇÈ°Ê xääÊ Bernsein-Offit Bldg. SAIS Thurs.,

Nov.

11,

6:30

p.m.

“Picturing the Shahnameh: Word and Image in Ferdowsi’s Book of Kings,” with Massumeh Farhad, chief curator and curator of Islamic art, Arthur M. Sackler and Freer Gallery of Art. Part of the SAIS

LECTURES Wed., Nov. 10, 4 p.m. The 2010 Lawrence Grossman Lecture—“Human DNA Mismatch Repair: What We’ve Learned About How It Works,” with Paul Modrich, Duke University School of Medicine. Sponsored by Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. W1214 SPH. EB Wed., Nov. 10, 8 p.m. Ê/…iÊ£Ç̅Ê

annual Sidney W. Mintz Lecture in Anthropology—“Imaginary Moneys: Transactions, Markets and the State of Haiti” by Federico Neiburg, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Sponsored by Anthropology. Mason Hall Auditorium. HW

Thurs., Nov. 11, 4:30 p.m.

“The Invisible Demos of Pergamon: A Subversive Reading of Attalid Kingship,” a Classics lecture by Ruth Bielfeldt, HarÛ>À`Ê 1˜ˆÛiÀÈÌÞ°Ê £änÊ ˆ“>˜°ÊÊ HW Thurs., Nov. 11, 4:30 p.m.

/…iÊÓä£äqÓ䣣Ê*ÀœÛœÃ̽ÃÊiVÌÕÀiÊ Series—“ ‘We Must Do Better’— Three Decades of Research, Collaboration and Mentorship to Improve the Safety and Health of Abused Women” by Jacquelyn Campbell, SoN. 110 Hodson. HW Thurs., Nov. 11, 5:15 p.m.

“A Geneaological Approach to the Narconovel,” a German and Romance Languages and Literatures lecture by Hermann Herlinghaus, University of PittsLÕÀ}…°Ê{Ǚʈ“>˜°ÊÊHW MUSIC

The Peabody Camerata performs music by Schoenberg, with guest artist mezzo-soprano Sonya Knussen. Griswold Hall. Peabody Sat., Nov. 13, 7:30 p.m.

Sun., Nov. 14, 5:30 p.m. The Shriver Hall Concert Series presents cellist Gautier Capucon and pianist Gabriela Montero. (See ˜Ê Àˆiv]Ê«°ÊÓ°®ÊfÎnÊ}i˜iÀ>Ê>`“ˆÃsion, $19 for non-JHU students; free for JHU students. Shriver Hall Auditorium. HW

READINGS/ BOOK TALKS Mon., Nov. 8, 5 p.m. Winter Olympic speed skater Apolo Ohno will sign copies of his life story, Zero Regrets: Be Greater Than Yesterday. Barnes & Noble Johns Hopkins. HW

Reading by poet Tan Lin, New Jersey City University. Sponsored by English. 50 Gilman. HW

Mon., Nov. 8, 6 p.m.

Thurs., Nov. 11, noon. Nature author John Vaillant will discuss and sign copies of his latest book, The Tiger: True Story of Vengeance and Survival. Sponsored by the Center for a Livable Future. W1030 SPH. EB

SEMINARS Mon., Nov. 8, 12:15 p.m. “The Woman Question in Medicine and Bioethics,” a Berman Institute of Bioethics seminar with Hilde Lindemann, Michigan State University. Co-sponsored by Gynecology and Obstetrics and by Population, Family and Reproductive Health. ՘V…Ê ܈Ê LiÊ «ÀœÛˆ`i`°Ê 7ÎäänÊ SPH. EB Mon., Nov. 8, 2:30 p.m. “Human

University of Missouri. Room ӇÓääÊ£nÎäÊ `}°ÊÊEB Tues., Nov. 9, noon. “Mitochondria and Neurodegeneration,” a Biological Chemistry seminar with Hugo Bellen, Baylor College of Medicine. 612 Physiology. EB Tues., Nov. 9, noon. “Monitoring Secondhand Smoke: A Mechanism for Supporting Policy Development and Implementation,” a FAMRI Center of Excellence at Johns Hopkins seminar with Stephen Tamplin, Institute for Global Tobacco Control. W1030 SPH. EB

“Role of Employee Assistance Programs in Addressing Intimate Partner Violence,” an Occupational Injury Prevention seminar with Keshia Pollack, SPH. Sponsored by the Center for Injury Research and Policy, the Department of Health Policy and Management, and the Education and Research Center for Occupational Safety >˜`Êi>Ì…°Ê7Óä£ÇÊ-*°ÊÊEB

Tues., Nov. 9, 12:10 p.m.

Tues., Nov. 9, 3 p.m. “Sources, Storage and Flux of Sediment in the Chesapeake Watershed,” a Geography and Environmental Engineering seminar with Allen Gellis, U.S. Geological Survey, MD-DE-DC Water Science Center. 234 Ames. HW Tues., Nov. 9, 4 p.m. “Genomewide Approaches to Manipulate Flies,” a Biological Chemistry seminar with Hugo Bellen, Baylor College of Medicine. 490 Rangos. EB

Common Disease and Mouse Phenotype Gene Sets in the Analysis of Microarray and Human GWAS Data,” a Center for Computational Genomics seminar with Kevin Becker, NIH Biomedical Research

i˜ÌiÀ°Êx£ÇÊ* / °ÊÊEB

Tues., Nov. 9, 4:30 p.m. “Language-Universal Speech Modeling: What, Why, When and How,” a Center for Language and Speech Processing seminar with Chin-Hui Lee, Georgia Institute of Technolœ}Þ°Ê £ÇÊ>VŽiÀ“>˜°ÊÊHW

Mon., Nov. 8, 4 p.m. “Health Reform: Policy and Politics,” a Social Policy seminar with Mark Duggan, University of Maryland. Sponsored by the Institute for Policy Studies. 526 Wyman Park Bldg. HW

Wed., Nov. 10, noon.

“A Portrait of a Soviet Woman as Citizen Soldier: Theoretical and Interpretive Challenges,” a History seminar with Anna Krylova, Duke University. 305 Gilman. HW

Wed.,

Mon., Nov. 8, 4 p.m.

“Pointwise Decay on Nonstationary Spacetimes,” an Analysis/PDE seminar with Mihai Tohaneanu, Purdue University. Sponsored by Mathematics. 304 Krieger. HW

Mon., Nov. 8, 4 p.m.

Mon., Nov. 8, 4 p.m. “Genomic Analysis of the Saccharophagus degradans Cellulolytic System,” JHU Bioenergy Group seminar with Steve Hutcheson, University of Maryland. 205 Krieger. HW

“Transchromatic Generalized Character Maps,” a Topology seminar with Nathaniel Stapleton, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Sponsored by Mathematics. 300 Krieger. HW Mon., Nov. 8, 4:30 p.m.

Tues., Nov. 9, 10:30 a.m. “The Pelvis in Hominid Evolution: Body Form, Hip Function and Locomotor Adaptation,” a Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution seminar with Carol Ward,

“Learning About Potassium Channels by Knocking Out Their Beta Subunits,” a Physiology seminar with Geoffrey Abbott, Weill Cornell Medical College. 203 Physiology.

EB Nov.

10,

12:15

p.m.

Wednesday Noon Seminar— º …ˆ`Ê-iÝÕ>ÊÃÃ>ՏÌÊ£™™xqÓääx\Ê Results and Challenges from the NSA and NSA-R” with Benjamin Saunders, Medical University of South Carolina. Sponsored by Mental Health. B14B Hampton House. EB Wed., Nov. 10, 1:30 p.m. “Structural and Functional Insights to Post-Translational Modification by SUMO, a Ubiquitin-like

Continued on page 9

Calendar Key APL BRB CRB EB HW KSAS

(Events are free and open to the public except where indicated.)

Applied Physics Laboratory Broadway Research Building Cancer Research Building East Baltimore Homewood Krieger School of Arts and Sciences PCTB Preclinical Teaching Building SAIS School of Advanced International Studies SoM School of Medicine SoN School of Nursing SPH School of Public Health WBSB Wood Basic Science Building WSE Whiting School of Engineering


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