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“ N e v e r, n e v e r, n e v e r g i v e u p . ”


C O N T E N T S SEQUOIA NORDIC ZIPPER FAT FURNITURE PURPLE CHAIR PORTMANTEAU PURPLE STOOL B L A C K WA L R U S W H I T TA R D T E A CREDENTIALS

PA G E PA G E PA G E PA G E PA G E PA G E PA G E PA G E PA G E PA G E

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JOHNNY LEMOINE JOHN@LEMOINEDESIGN.COM W W W. L E M O I N E D E S I G N . C O M IG : LEMOINEDESIGN (US) +1 978 489 8122


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PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHNNY LEMOINE

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AFFORDABLE HOUSING FOR SENIORS COMPLETION DATE: 01/2017 | M I T H U N A R C H I T E C T S 1 2 2 1 W I L L OW R D , M E N L O PA R K , C A L I F O R N I A , U S A I N VO LV E M E N T: C O N C E P T - PA RT I A L C O N S T R . A D M I N . Sequoia Belle Haven is a response to the tremendous need for affordable housing for seniors in the most expensive housing market in the nation. The two and three story housing structure provides 86 one-bedroom and 4 two-bedroom apartment homes for low-income seniors. In addition to the 90 units, we incorporated a fitness center, a computer lab, and a community room with a kitchen for larger gatherings as well as a courtyard and an outdoor walking path. 3 D S M A X / V R AY R E N D E R I N G

Dealing with a long and thin site has its constraints, so we developed a design that broke up the building throughout with simple, big architectural moves and detailing. This creates the very important community feeling that the users, the client, and ourselves wanted from the beginning. PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHNNY LEMOINE


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CAR BUS ROUTE + F R E E WAY ACCESS

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Just south of San Francisco in Menlo Park, the site is divided by very affluent neighborhoods, large corporations (such as Facebook) and incredibly poor and struggling smaller neighborhoods that are constantly being displaced.

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Just east of the site is the Don Edward’s National Wildlife Refuge, consisting of large stretches of marshy shorelines, breathtaking salt evaporation ponds, and a wonderful Bay Trail connection immersed with diverse wildlife.

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We believed that having a conversation with the context, rather than blending in or ignoring it, was a very important aspect in making a strong community residence. The forms, patterns, and colors of the buildings and the natural landscape that surrounded the site were all fully taken into consideration.

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The marshlands and the shifting shores quickly became our concept. This concept was incredibly important to us throughout all stages of design, from laying out unit types to the landscape architecture, to the custom artwork on the interiors to the shifting modulations.

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FIRST FLOOR PLAN (SECOND PLAN SIMILAR)

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Main Lobby / Entry Second Lobby / Entry Community Center Community Kitchen Lounge Micro-lounge Irresistible Stair

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PLAN DESCRIPTIONS 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

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Mechanical Room Bicycle Storage Electrical Room Balcony / Patio One Bedroom Unit Tw o B e d r o o m U n i t Laundry Room

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Exercise Room Tr a s h / R e c y c l i n g Fire Separation Exercise Pathway Bocce Parking Pedestrian Entry

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Ve h i c u l a r e n t r y Exercise Stations Community Garden Beds Management Offices J a n i t o r ’s C l o s e t Outdoor Community Center


E A S T- W E S T A X I S , A L O N G S I T E , A N D L A R G E P R O G R A M C A L L S F O R A N E L O N G AT E D S T R U C T U R E

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MAXIMIZING SOLAR PANELS, AS WELL AS CONSIDERING CONTEXTUAL PATTERNS, EQUATES TO A ROOF ANGLE OF 22˚

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The site asks for a long geometry on its east-west axis, maximizing southern exposure for P.V.’s and indirect gain, while allowing north-south winds for ventilation. The design then developed through many masses that are shifted back and forth, resembling the tidal marshes of the Bay just one mile east of our site.

B R E A K U P A R C H I T E C T U R E W I T H L A R G E R P O RT I O N + M OV E F O R WA R D , R A I S E 2 S T O RY P O R T I O N T O 3 S T O R I E S T O A C C O M O D AT E P R O G R A M . T H I S B E G I N S TO C R E AT E A M O R E DY N A M I C , I N T E R E S T I N G D E S I G N , W H I L E A L L OW I N G T H R E E S E PA R AT E M A S S E S D I V I D E F O R F I R E S E PA R AT I O N

C O N T E M P O R A R Y, M O R E I C O N I C S T U C C O L O B B Y S T R U C T U R E S A R E A D D E D I N B E T W E E N

FREEHAND CONCEPTUAL SKETCHES

MODULATIONS ARE MADE TO CREATE A TOWNHOUSE FEELING. WOOD, STUCCO, AND CAREFULLY DETAILED BALCONIES ARE INTEGRATED WITHIN THE DESIGN

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1. 20GA GSM COPING, PTD TO MATCH 2. SELF ADHERING SHEET MEMBRANE 3 . C O N T I N U O U S G S M C L E AT 4. 1/4” WEEPHOLES @ 30“ OC 5. SUPERIOR #5 DRIP SCREED 6. P.T. WOOD SHIM, SLOPED 2% MIN 7. 2 X 6 WOOD FRAMING 8. WEATHER RESISTANT BARRIER

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CEMENT PLASTER SYSTEM WOOD BEAM, SEE STRUCTURAL BUILDING WRAP WEATHER RESISTANT BARRIER SELF ADHERING SHEET MEMBRANE 2 X CEDAR BLOCKING BTWN. JOISTS G A S K E T T E D FA S T E N E R P. T . W O O D B L O C K I N G

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STUCCO RAILING + SOFFIT DETAIL PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHNNY LEMOINE


PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHNNY LEMOINE


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With a background in graphic design, I had the chance to create THREE 72”X20” PAINTINGS ON ALUMINUM along with 5 very large wall coverings that tell the story of the marshland concept throughout the buildings interior. Each piece of art is an abstract painting of the salt evaporation ponds just less than one mile east of our site. REVIT / LUMION RENDERING

The artwork you see was done in addition to designing the interior, the exterior, and working with our amazing team with the detailing of the project. The entire project was documented in Revit, excluding our MEP consultants. When using BIM, I often take the models into Lumion for quick renderings to sell our design to the client. When time is of the essence, it is a very efficient method for creating a beautiful, quick image. Otherwise, 3ds Max and VRay is a wonderful tool for making those “money shot” images.


PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHNNY LEMOINE


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The Nordic Heritage Museum aims to connect the past and the five Nordic countries: Finland, Sweden, Norway, Denmark and Iceland, while creating an identity for the Nordic community in Ballard. Located just one building strip away from the waterfront in Ballard, Seattle lies a very simple container that houses most of the museum. The container is cladded in an industrious and gritty feeling cor-ten panel system that ties back into the industrial working waterfront of the site, and more appropriately, tying back to Nordic culture. Encapsulating this 'container' is a torqued, very nautical, exoskeleton that supports and celebrates the photovaltaics and a sculpture gallery along the north side of the street, while being an iconic beacon for the Nordic community. Concrete water fountains are sculptural flags of each country, and are located along the street, obscuring the view to the parking lot while creating a public domain. Conceptually, this exoskeleton represents the hull of a ship that continues to connect and bring Scandinavians to America. It is also the driving factor of why this museum is a net zero building.


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As the exoskeleton seems to torque as a whole object, it is realistically constructed of sixteen zones. These zones are made up of structurally glue laminated beams that offset each other at 8˚ angles and are laterally braced by diagonal cross bracing and thick mullions. These mullions are connected to the glulam beams by a custom metal bracket system that is painted dark red, along with most of the other facade details. Since each zone is essentially torquing by 8˚, each mullion section is only offset by 2 ˚ so polycarbonate 8’ x 8’ glass sheets are used. Unlike most thermoplastics, polycarbonate can perform very well with large bends and deformations without cracking or breaking while sporting an incredibly high R-value.


T R A N S P O R TAT I O N

RESIDENTIAL NEIGHBORHOOD

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The museum is situated between a residential neighborhood to the north and a working industrial waterfront to the south. While opening to the waterfront, the museum also embraces a proposed extension of the bicycle and pedestrian path called the Burke-Gilman Trail by creating public green space and a very large sunspace with an openable outdoor patio.

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Photovoltaic film is placed at an optimal 33Ëš in Seattle and forms a triangular pattern due to the tension cables. The film cell grid is transparent, creating a diaphanous effect below. A motorized roller shading system is integrated in every skylight for advanced light control. MOTORIZED SKYLIGHT ROLLER SHADE SYSTEM

R A D I A N T C L I M AT E C O N T R O L

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GREEN ROOF

TRIANGULAR SOLAR COLLECTION FILM

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S T R U T S F O R M PAT T E R N

Producing the entire energy consumption used on site, as well as reducing unnecessary loads, was a primary goal in achieving this net-zero building. Photovoltaic film runs across the exoskeletal structure in a triangular pattern on the south side at 33Ëš. Passive strategies such as INDIRECT GAIN FROM A PASSIVE SUNSPACE were used. Mechanical roller shades protect harsh summer rays from entering the sunspace as natural cross ventilation cools the building at night. A large green roof manages stormwater, and increases insulation as it also increases the roofing membrane durability. I N F I LT R AT I O N P L A N T E R S

GEOTHERMAL EXCHANGE

120,000 GALLON CISTERN 3


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SECOND FLOOR PLAN FINLAND

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FIRST FLOOR PLAN PLAN DESCRIPTIONS 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

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Sculpture Gallery + Entry Nordic Fountain Flags + Public Space Ticket Entry Lobby Smorgas Chef Nordic Restaurant Kitchen Waste Management

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Auditorium Nordic Heritage Store Mechanical Room Outdoor Space Five Countries Exhibit Te m p o r a r y E x h i b i t D i s p l a y Collection Storage Office

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Classroom Shipping + Receiving Collection Storage Tr a v e l i n g Te m p E x h b i t Passive Sunspace Parking J o u r n e y To A m e r i c a E x h i b i t

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Exhibit Gallery Balcony Cultural Resource Center Core Nordic Exhibit Space Craft Center Collection Management Office Storage Office Lobby + Meeting Space Offices


A L O N G C O N TA I N E R I S B O R N O N A N E A S T- W E S T A X I S

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G E N E R AT E I C O N I C F O R M + C R E AT E N A U T I C A L A P P E A R A N C E

S C U L P T U R A L E X O S K E L E TO N W R A P S C O N TA I N E R A N D B E C O M E S E N E R G Y P R O D U C E R

B R E A K S A PA RT F O R P U B L I C / P R I VAT E S PA C E S

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The site asks for a long geometry on its east-west axis, maximizing southern exposure for P.V.’s and indirect gain, while allowing north-south winds for ventilation. Aside from being net-zero and functional, the goal was to create an iconic form. Modeling and sketching, whether from scratch or tracing, was very important to the design process, and is a key component to my work.


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FREE HAND DRAWING OF VIEW FROM STREET


Z I P P E R CO-OPERATIVE PASSIVE HOUSING PROFESSORS VIRGINIA CARTWRIGHT + JOHN REYNOLDS SKINNER’S BUTTE, EUGENE, OREGON, USA Located in downtown Eugene, Oregon in the Pacific Northwest, fifteen lofts were designed to house mercantile and residential functions that belong to a local housing cooperative.

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Each unit is passively heated and cooled by simple daylighting and ventilation techniques, but also by trombe walls and cooltowers. Special attention was given to the roof forms, which function as wind catchers for the cooltowers, but are also at an optimal 31Ëš for future Photovoltaic installment phases when the budget allows. Garage doors open on each side of the ground floor unit, or the mercantile unit, and work to cross ventilate in the summers as well as to provide an easy entry and loading point. When open, the doors also provide shading to the pedestrian street below. The 'street' is intended to be a street of shops to enjoy in the local downtown Eugene area, a city that thrives off of the local market.

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The Zipper lofts are in a unique, yet very exciting upcoming location in Eugene, Oregon. Being significantly close to a 2,000 foot tall butte named Spencer, an Amtrak station and several new local restaurants and businesses, it carries quite an impressive and growing array of clientele while fitting the perfect bill for a passive heating and cooling development.

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D E T A I L I N G Each loft is equipped with garage doors on both the south and north sides. They passively cool each loft by cross ventilation with inlet areas of 7%. 60 btu/h ft 2 can be removed by these doors alone. When open, they also provide shading for the interior and the street below, acting as awnings. The detail beneath shows an example of how each pivot-door is hand cranked open with the use of mechanical gears, tying into the “do it yourself� type of mentality that is so prominent in Eugene.


B U I L D I N G I N T E G R AT E D P H OTOVO L

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Concrete Piling Cap .1 Concrete Grade Beam .2 Precast Hollow Core Slab .3 4” Radiant Topping Slab .4 2” High Compressive Strength Insulation Board .5 2” Polyiso Insul. Board with Galvanized Veneer .6 User Controlled Passivent Aircool Inlet Air Valve .7 Fiber-C Surface Mount Cladding Panel .8 Grace Ice + Water Shield / Continuous Flashing .9 Rain Collection Gutter .10 Building Integrated P.V Custom Bracket System .11 12” Polyiso Insulation Board .12 2” Cross Laminated Sheathing .13 14. 3/8” Gypsum Board .14 Light Gauge Double Wall w/ Rigid Cavity Insulation .15

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U S E R C O N T R O L L E D V E N T I L AT I O N L O U V E R S Operable hand-cranked louver mechanisms provide users to control daylight harvesting and ventilation.

Passivent Aircool Stack Base Valve .16 In Wall Stack Vent .17 Precast Hollow Core Slab .18 12“ x 24” Prefab Concrete Beam .19 Galvanized Pan Flashing .20 Prefab Steel Primary Structure .21 Fakro FTT U6 Passive House Skylight .22 Western Red Cedar Paneling .23 Passivent Aircool Stack Exit Valve .24 19

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FRENCH BALCONY E X P O S E D M A S S F O R N I G H T V E N T I L AT I O N Rigid insulation is within the slab assembly, exposing thermal mass in the ceiling and floors of all spaces. This limits wasted radiant heat to the slab and results in better zoning control.

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C R O S S V E N T I L AT I O N T H R O U G H G A R A G E D O O R S Because humans heat spaces up, especially in offices.

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EACH UNIT HAS BICYCLE PARKING FOR 5

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Reduce number of emmisions by providing more than enough bicycle parking on site.

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H I G H F LY A S H C O N T E N T S T R U C T U R A L C O N C R E T E

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For reduced cost and energy content, enhanced environmental sustainability and improved long term performance.

Optimize the building orientations for pas


TAT I C S C U S TO M B R A C K E T S Y S T E M sive solar capture in the Pacific Northwest.

D E T A I L I N G SCULPTURAL TRUSS SYSTEM PROMOTES AIRFLOW E X T E R I O R S H A D I N G F O R W H E N H E AT I S U N WA N T E D OVERHANG STOPS SUMMER TROMBE WALL ACTIVITY

Photovoltaics are integrated into the building system, cladding the mostly south facing roofs and the west facing walls. They’re integrated through a thermally broken custom bracket system that penetrates the Polyiso sandwich panels. The panels are manufactured with corrosion-protected, corrugated steel facings bonded to a core of foam that protects from the elements. Being passive solar, orientation is important for the A F T E R N O O N S U N TO WA R M T H E T R O M B E WA L L which absorbs southern solar energy and releases it selectively towards the interior at night. Being a ventilated trombe wall, the vents have one-way flaps, preventing convection in the opposite direction at night when the wall has cooled. An overhang on the south side above the trombe wall protects heavy solar gain to occur during hot summers, but allows the low winter sun to penetrate the glass and heat up the masonry wall. An inwall stack ventilation system is used for cooling, along with cross ventilation through the garage doors. High thermal mass and a highly insulated, tightly sealed envelope keep energy loss at an all time low.

B I O R E T E N T I O N A R E A C O L L E C T S E X C E S S S TO R M WAT E R


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GROUND FLOOR PLAN (MERCANTILE)

FIRST FLOOR PLAN (RESIDENTIAL)

SECOND FLOOR PLAN (RESIDENTIAL)

PLAN DESCRIPTIONS 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

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South Garage Door Entry North Garage Door Entry Store Front Windows Large Open Public Space Ve n t i l a t e d Tr o m b e Wa l l Private Space Kitchen + Bath + Storage

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Pedestrian Street Exterior Residential Entry Outdoor Patio Space W e s t e r n P r i v a c y / P. V. W a l l Sliding Glass Patio Door Potential Bed / Living Room Wall Storage + Closet

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Full Bath + Laundry/Storage Potential Bedrooms French Balcony Patio View Over Ped. Street Open Space Below Full Open Kitchen Half Bath w/ Separation

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P R O P E R O R I E N TAT I O N A N D E X A C T ROOF PITCH FOR EUGENE AT 31˚

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For the lofts to produce enough electricity on site, proper orientation and pitch to the sun is crucial. The optimal angle for a solar collection system is 31˚ in Eugene, Oregon. Being on a slightly higher site, the lofts are three stories in height, with the common areas on the very open third floor plan, obtaining a better view of the growing city of Eugene. When fused together, the lofts follow a curve, therefore taking the shape of a zipper.

SHAPE ROOF FOR CUSTOM TRUSS SYSTEM AND FOR CATCHING WIND

SUBSTRACT LENGTH OF BUILDING + ADD IN HEIGHT FOR GROUND OFFICE SPACE WHILE PROVIDING GREEN SPACE

PUSH RESIDENTIAL SECTION FORWARD ON CREATING A PEDESTRIAN STREET THAT’S THE NORTH SIDE, WHILE THE GROUND INWARD TO CREATE AN OVERHANG ABOVE AND THE VENTILATED TROMBE WALL ON

THE NORTH SIDE FOR COVERED BELOW ON FLOOR PLAN PULLS FOR EXTERNAL STAIR THE SOUTHERN SIDE

FUSE EACH BUILDING TOGETHER ALONG A SUBTLE CURVE TO FORM A ZIPPER FORMATION AND CLAD THE WEST FACING WALLS WITH CONTINUOUS BUILDING INTEGRATED P H OTOVO LTA I C PANELS

H A N D C U T MO DEL 1” = 1’-0”


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A FOOD, ART, AND TECHNOLOGY EXPERIENCE A G R I

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In 2012, a deadly earthquake struck the city of Bologna. Since then, the historically cultural city known for its food, art, and education, has been fighting to repair itself. For this architectural competition, this earthquake was looked at as a symbolic gesture in a better light. It was looked at as causing an art revolution that combined sustainable living and urban agriculture with cultural learning. As an adaptive re-use project, the brief was to transform a 1970’s brutalist building into something iconic, culturally revolutionary, and environmentally sustainable. The building has a virtual link through four “cracks” which fractured it in directions of important artistic cities, such as London, San Francisco, Tokyo, and Singapore. The art produced will be a wave that slowly starts from the epicentre to the major cities, gradually increasing its power. The impact will be strong and revolutionary on a global scale, but more importantly, it will locally support the community.


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Passive Cooling through Cool Tower Photovoltaic Film Pattern Forms around X-Bracing Geothermal Exchange Living Wall Vegetable Garden Trombe Roof Red Japanese Maple Trees Bioswales Exhibition Courtyard

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F.A.T. is the acronym of Food, Art, and Technology. The food is produced due to modern technology, but also because of age-old passive strategies thought of in new and simplified ways. The combination is the essence of an innovative cultural centre for supporting and training young and old artists from all over the world. What makes it all so very different are the amount of flexible spaces. The largest flexible space is in the centre of the building. This is the epicentre, and it resembles folding tectonic plates. It is here that local markets occur where artisans are able to sell their food, art, and performances. Other flexible spaces that occur are in the “cracks” that creep through the building and stem from the epicentre in the directions of several selected artistic cities. The centre will adapt the several activities of its programme to the four seasons of the year. Art and nature will work together supporting each other to create a building of international importance. PLATES FOLD TOGETHER TO CREATE AN EPICENTRE OF CULTURAL SIGNIFICANCE

S P A T I A L I T Y EPICENTRE

T E C TO N I C P L AT E S F O L D TO G E T H E R

“ C R A C K S ” B A S E D O N W O R L D FA U LT L I N E S

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1. ENTRY 2. GALLERY + PRIVATE ENTRY 3. HALL WITH GREEN LIVING WALLS 4. BICYCLE PARKING + WATER FEATURE 5. LARGE EXHIBITION SPACE 6. PUBLIC ENTRY WAY 7. STORAGE FACILITIES 8. SEASONAL WORKSHOPS 9. SHOP 10. TOILETS

11. CLOAK ROOM 12. RECEPTION 13. EXHIBITION 14. WORKSHOP 15. CONTROL + SECURITY 16. CONFERENCE ROOMS 17. VEGETABLE GARDEN + PAVILION 18 ARTIST STUDIOS 19. COOL TOWERS 20. FIRE STAIRCASE

TRANSFORMING EMPTY SPACE INTO A COURTYARD EXHIBITION EXPERIENCE

The idea here is to create a perfect exhibition space with maximum flexibility and changeability. It has the ability to change flow, size, and the amount of exhibition spaces and daylight conditions. What’s even more special is that the space is a perfect greenhouse area for urban agriculture. Many foods are produced within, while local markets and theatre spaces are enjoyed as well. There is a living green wall along the southern facade that wraps around the workshop balconies, creating a fantastic facade while producing fruits and vegetables that can be eaten and even sold on occasion. The gallery space is equiped with industrial style garage doors that can further open the exhibition space and also passively cool the space through cross ventilation when needed. M A X I M U M F L E X I B I L I T Y F O R L O C A L M A R K E T S , T H E AT R E , A N D G A L L E R I E S

S P A T I A L I T Y


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LIVING GREEN WALL PANELS BY AEROPONIC

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SYSTEMS TOMATO AUBERGINE CUCUMBER PEPPER

1. OFFICES 2. ARTIST STUDIOS 3. WORKSHOPS 4. EXHIBITION AREA 5. DIRECTOR’S OFFICE 6. ARCHIVES 7. MEETING ROOM

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CARROTS BANANAS SPINACH

The FAT project aims to produce over thousands of pounds of organically grown fruits and vegetables on site every year. Located on the second floor over a gallery, the main garden is surrounded by workshops, more galleries, and artists’ studios. The result is a beautiful community garden used in extremely creative ways for environmental awareness, food production, and most importantly, fun. This will not only reduce climate control costs, but will provide for an exciting community area, doubling as an amphitheatre covered by a sculptural pavilion. Soils 20-26 inches deep will allow for viable food production for the users, residents, and the on site restaurant. Green living walls grow throughout the “cracks” and create a beautiful and organic environment throughout the industrial style building. Hydroponic and aeroponic systems allow for very exciting different fruits and veggies all year round.

8. RESTAURANT 9. FOOD PREPARATION AREA 10. STORAGE 11. MEDIA ROOM 12. LIBRARY READING/AREA 13. PHOTOVOLTAIC PANELS 14. COOL TOWER

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I N T E N S I V E P R O D U C T I O N + E D U C AT I O N A L FA R M F O R A R T I S T S , B Y A R T I S T S

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WARMER MONTHS

COLDER MONTHS

TRIANGULAR GLASS PODS ON ROOF

TRIANGULAR GLASS PODS ON ROOF

M E C H A N I C A L LY C O N T R O L L E D V E N T I L AT I O N F L A P CLOSED TO FORCE WARM AIR THROUGH WALL

M E C H A N I C A L LY C O N T R O L L E D V E N T I L AT I O N F L A P OPEN TO RELEASE WARM AIR

FORCED AIR FAN

FORCED AIR FAN R E C L A I M E D WAT E R B OT T L E S

R E C L A I M E D WAT E R B OT T L E S

M E C H A N I C A L LY C O N T R O L L E D V E N T I L AT I O N F L A P OPEN TO ALLOW WARM AIR INTO ENCLOSED SPACE

The interior spaces are heated and cooled through passive strategies, and as depicted through the above diagrams, a trombe roof collects solar energy in reclaimed water jugs that are heated through triangular glass “pods”. The idea is a variation on the well known trombe wall, which contains heat by placing a high thermal mass slab behind sheets of glass. The thermal mass is under the roof and heats up and warms the air between it, which is then distributed throughout the building in colder months through forced air fans. During the warmer months, the air is then vented to the outside. A dynamic perforated metal system envelopes the southern facade. This is a green living wall with vegetation growing amongst it, providing insulation, privacy, and sun control for the artist’s live-in studios. P E R F O R AT E D M E TA L L I V I N G G R E E N WA L L

S C U L P T U R A L T R O M B E R O O F PA S S I V E LY H E AT S T H E E N T I R E B U I L D I N G

D

E

T

A

I

L

I

N

G


F U R N I T U R E

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P U R P L E

C H A I R “ P R A C T I C E S A F E D E S I G N : U S E A C O N C E P T. � The log is a white oak piece that was dredged out of a local river in Oregon. I wanted to push life back into it. The purple "fingers" that support your back are glue laminated pieces of purple heart wood. I put a lot of effort into making them ergonomically correct. The result is a quite comfortable back that has life to it with a bit of a spring. Over time, as the wood shrinks and dries, the purple pieces will slowly move and take a different form. They are embedded into the back of the log and strapped together by salvaged metal that I found laying around an old steel mill.


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P O R T M A N T E A U “SIMPLICITY, CARRIED TO AN EXTREME, IS ELEGANCE.� Portmanteau is a combination of two (or more) words, or morphemes, into one new word. Like smoke and fog become smog, the separate purple heart and hard maple lumber form a new entity, either a table, stools, or perhaps even shelving when placed in a vertical orientation. When apart they become two smaller tables or bar stools when in an upright position. Each is constructed of 40 slats that are cut at 1" x 1.5" and are connected solely of steel, magnetic rods on the interior. These rods then double as a host for magnetic feet to lift Portmanteau off of the ground when needed, either as shelving, stools, or its original table function.


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P U R P L E

S T O O L IF YOU’RE BORED, MAKE SOMETHING TO SIT ON. Purple heart slats are slotted into pine legs at about one quarter of an inch. The legs are angled inward and are finger jointed into the seat, which was cut on a dado saw at different heights and sanded down in order to achieve its concave. The stool has angled finger joints because of these inward legs and the bottoms are protected by genuine leather, protecting the flooring surface.


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B L A C K

W A L R U S “DESIGNING A PRODUCT IS DESIGNING A RELATIONSHIP.”

M A P L E I N L AY S B E T W E E N E A C H WA L N U T F I N G E R J O I N T

R OTATA B L E M A P L E B O X TO E X T E N D U S E O F T H E TA B L E

2.5 INCH OR 63.5 MM THICK BLACK WALNUT

I picked up a free edge piece of two and a half inch thick black walnut that turned into a 17” tall end table. There are six large fingers that are inlayed with thin slices of hard maple. The inlayed maple slices were cut very thinly on a table saw from my scrap material, which were also turned into lots and lots of different products that are also displayed on my website. The walnut slab, which was hand planed and cut in half, then rests on a mitered, much more delicate maple box. The box pivots on a removable swivel and can be placed in various positions for a different aesthetic or function. This table was built directly from a napkin sketch and an urge to make something beautiful.


W H I T T A R D

T E A

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TEA ROOM “I SAY LET THE WORLD GO TO HELL, BUT I SHOULD ALWAYS HAVE MY TEA.”

Recycled wooden panels have a very distressed feel to them and celebrate the old Whittard. Beneath these panels are shockingly bright white lacquer units that are pulled out, revealing the new Whittard Tea Company. These are tasting units, seating, shelving, and storage units that are fully equiped. PULL OUT THE NEW FROM THE OLD

The “Map of the World” wall is a display wall in the back of the store showcasing the world’s teas, coffees, and hot cocoas in cannisters that are picked out of each region. It is constructed of white acrylic, glass cannisters, and boasts a sliding library ladder for ease of access, reminiscing Whittard’s heritage. M A P O F T H E WO R L D D I S P L AY WA L L

Located in the very busy and popular market place of Canary Wharf in London, England, we had the wonderful opportunity to design a tea tasting room for the Whittard Tea Company, who has been looking for an evolution in their design. Whittard prides itself on heritage, but looking forward into the modern world, they needed something that expressed both sides of the timeline. Because of the small corner store, the store could easily feel cluttered if not designed properly. We took advantage of the small space by having everything hidden in a wall system. Units pull out of the rustic wall panels and are revealed as pure white, simple, and modern elements that allow for a very flexible space.


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TEA ROOM AN INSIDE / OUTSIDE CONCEPT OF A CRATE REVEALING ITS CARGO The rough and heavy timber “box” is the outer layer, protecting the delicate contents inside. Branded logos applied to the box conjure up imagery of world travel and exotic places. The contents within are valuable, intricate, and pure, represented by modern, well crafted and engineered materials. ORIGINAL CONCEPTUAL SKETCH

PROJECT IS CURRENTLY UNDER CONSTRUCTION WILL BE UPDATED AS SOON AS POSSIBLE


I.D. E D U C AT I O N

EXPERIENCE

VOLUNTEER

SKILLS

J O H N N Y L E M O I N E F R O M B O S TO N , M A S S A C H U S E T T S , U N I T E D S TAT E S O F A M E R I C A UNIVERSITY OF OREGON, MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE, 2011-2013 MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGE OF ART AND DESIGN, BFA ARCHITECTURE, 2007-2010 W E N T W O R T H I N S T I T U T E O F T E C H N O L O G Y, A R C H I T E C T U R E , 2 0 0 5 - 2 0 0 6

HAND DRAWING

MODEL MAKING

WO O DWO R KING

SILKSCR E E NING

MITHUN, ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER, 3 YEARS, SAN FRANCISCO, CA a2d ARCHITECTURE, ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER, 1+ YEARS, LONDON, UK M S C BA , G R A P H I C D E S I G N E R , 2 + Y E A R S , R E M OT E LY T H R O U G H G R A D S C H O O L MSCBA, ASSISTANT PROJECT MANAGER, 1.5 YEARS, BOSTON, MA PATURZO DESIGN, ARCHITECTURAL INTERN, 6 MONTHS, BOSTON, MA ADD INC, ARCHITECTURAL INTERN, 4 MONTHS, BOSTON, MA

SNOWBOARDING

PAINTING

TENNIS

ICE HOCKEY

CYCLING

COOKING

GOOD BEER

TRAVELING

P E R F O R M I N G A R T S W O R K S H O P, G R A P H I C D E S I G N E R , S A N F R A N C I S C O , C A U N I V E R S I T Y O F O R E G O N , G U E S T L E C T U R E R , E U G E N E , O R When it comes to computer modeling software, I am very skilled in many and have the capability to learn new programs on the fly. I also love working with my hands. I have led urban sketching courses in the past and consider sketching and watercoloring one of my favorite activities. In my spare time I design and build furniture funded through commissions. With my graphic design experience, I have developed a niche in environmental graphics throughout all of my built projects.

INTERESTS

P E R F O R M S M I R A C L E S I N P H OTO S H O P F O R C L I E N T P R E S E N TAT I O N S

Ps

ID

P R O P O S A L D E C K S + P R E S E N TAT I O N S

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I D I D T H I S P O RT F O L I O I N I L L U S T R ATO R

Ai A G R E AT 3 D F LY T H R O U G H T O O L F O R C L I E N T S

REVIT EXPERT

Revit

SketchUp

BLUEBEAM REVU FOR PUNCHING, RFIs, MARKUPS

S C H E M AT I C + P H OTO R E A L I S T I C


C R E D E N T I A L S “THE ESSENTIAL PART OF CREATIVITY IS NOT BEING AFRAID TO FAIL.”

A F E W TA L E N T E D F O L K S T H AT ’ L L VO U C H F O R M E

My aim in life is to create as many elegant pieces of work that I possibly can. If I see the opportunity to put them together with my own two hands, then I'll make it happen. I’m ready to move anywhere in this world where I am able to submerge myself in the work of meaningful places, spaces and objects alongside talented and driven people. Oh, I’m also from Boston and am a wicked goofball.

ANTONIO PARES, ARCHITECT + COLLEAGUE AT MITHUN, APARES@MITHUN.COM CLARENCE KWAN, ARCHITECT + COLLEAGUE AT MITHUN, CLARENCEK@MITHUN.COM S I M O N E C O N T I , A R C H I T E C T + C O L L E A G U E AT A 2 D A R C H I T E C T U R E , S I M C O N T I @ G M A I L . C O M J O H N R O W E L L , P R O F. U N I V O F O R E G O N + A R C H I T E C T + T H E S I S A D V I S O R , J R O W E L L @ U O R E G O N . E D U JOHN REYNOLDS, PROF. UNIV OF OREGON + ARCHITECT + SOLAR ENERGY SOCIETY CHAIR, JREYN@UOREGON.EDU EDWARD ADELMAN, DIRECTOR AT MASS. STATE COLLEGE BUILDING AUTHORITY + ARCHITECT, EADELMAN@MSCBA.ORG PAUL HAJIAN, CHAIR + PROF. MASS. COLLEGE OF ART AND DESIGN + ARCHITECT, PAUL.HAJIAN@MASSART.EDU PATRICIA SEITZ, HEAD + PROF. MASS. COLLEGE OF ART AND DESIGN + ARCHITECT, PATRICIA.SEITZ@MASSART.EDU MARSHALL AUDIN, PROF. MASS. COLLEGE OF ART AND DESIGN + UNDERGRAD THESIS ADVISOR + ARCHITECT, MAUDIN@VERIZON.NET B . K . B O L E Y, P R I N C I PA L AT A D D I N C A R C H I T E C T U R E + D E S I G N + A R C H I T E C T, B K B O L E Y @ A D D I N C . C O M NILS-OLE ZIB, VISITING PROF. UNIV OF OREGON + FURNITURE DESIGNER/MAKER AT IKEA, N I L S - O L E @ Z I B . N U

D E TA I L E D D O C U M E N TAT I O N TO C O L L A B O R AT E W I T H C O N T R A C TO R S

F O R B U I L D I N G E N E R G Y A N A LY S I S

3dsMax

Ecotect

AutoCad

RENDERINGS

SolidWorks

Rhinoceros

FURNITURE + PRODUCT DESIGN MODELING SOFTWARE

FOR THOSE GORGEOUS MONEY SHOTS PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHNNY LEMOINE


A 2014 PUBLICATION FROM JOHNNY LEMOINE

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