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Middle!School!Programs! All#workshops#will#begin#with#Thermal#

OR!

Introduction!to!Water! Science!Skills!!

Insulation!+!Physics!

Thermal!(WINTER)!

Introduction!to!Field! Based!Science!Skills!!

Introduction!to!Geology!=!DAY!

www.treesfortomorrow.com! 715+479+6456!

Lake!Ecology!=!DAY!

Physical!Geology! Improving!Observation!Skills!

Developing!Observation!Skills!

Ecological!Succession!=!DAY!

Eutrophication/Pollution!–!Chemical! Diversity!of!Plants!and!Animals!+!Biological! !

Developing!Observation!Skills!

Change!over!time!–!Biological! Improving!Observation!Skills! Change!over!Time!+!BiologicalAnimal!

Bog!Ecology!=!DAY!

Adaptations#and#Intro#to#Environmental# ! Science#Skills.##Then#choose#the#next# lessons#by#following#the#chart#straight# down,#straight#across,#or#diagonal#down# one#level.#All#workshops#will#end#with#Land# Use,#Water#Use,#or#Soil#Use.!

Adaptations!=!DAY!

Succession,!Patterns!in!nature! Resource!availability!

Formation!of!Soil!–!Geological! Structure!of!Soil!+!Geological!

Understanding!Groundwater!–!Evening!

Life!in!Soil!=!DAY!

Interactions!w!Man!–!Chemical! Multiple!Use!–!Biological/Economic! !

Soil!Use!=!DAY!

Organic!Composition!of!Soil!–!Biological! Decomposition!+!Biological!

Hydrology! Not!observation/field!based!

Adaptations!to!Water!=!Evening! What!must!fish!need!to!do!to!live!in! different!qualities!of!water?!

! Water!Use!–!Day!! Interactions!with!man+!Chemical!multiple! use+!Biological/!Economic!

Soil!=!DAY!

Specialization!of!Organisms!+!Biological! Change!over!Time!+!Biological!

Bio=Inspire/Nature’s!Design!=!Evening! Applications!in!Animal!Habitat! Wildlife!Investigations!

Taking!the!Right!Step!–!Evening!(Winter)! Physics+!Adaptations!!! !

Land!Use!=!Day! Interactions!with!man+!Biological/! Economic+!Sustainable!Forestry!

!


CORE KNOWLEDGE

MS-LS2-4 MS-LS2-5 MS-LS3 Heredity: Inheritance and Variation of Traits MS-LS3-1 MS-LS3-2 MS-LS4 Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity MS-LS4-1 MS-LS4-2 MS-LS4-3 MS-LS4-4 MS-LS4-5 MS-LS4-6 MIDDLE SCHOOL EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCES CORE IDEAS (ESS) MS-ESS1 Earth’s Place in the Universe MS-ESS1-1 MS-ESS1-2 MS-ESS1-3 MS-ESS1-4 MS-ESS2 Earth’s Systems MS-ESS2-1 MS-ESS2-2 MS-ESS2-3 MS-ESS2-4 MS-ESS2-5 MS-ESS2-6 MS-ESS3 Earth and Human Activity MS-ESS3-1 MS-ESS3-2 MS-ESS3-3 MS-ESS3-4 MS-ESS3-5 MIDDLE SCHOOL PHYSICAL SCIENCE CORE IDEAS (PS) MS-PS1 Matter and Its Interactions MS-PS1-1 MS-PS1-2 MS-PS1-3 MS-PS1-4 MS-PS1-5 MS-PS1-6 MS-PS2 Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions MS-PS2-1 MS-PS2-2 MS-PS2-3 MS-PS2-4 MS-PS2-5 MS-PS3 Energy MS-PS3-1 MS-PS3-2 MS-PS3-3 MS-PS3-4 MS-PS3-5 MS-PS4 Waves and Their Applications in Technologies for Information Transfer MS-PS4-1 MS-PS4-2 MS-PS4-3 MIDDLE SCHOOL ENGINEERING, TECHNOLOGY, AND APPLICATIONS OF SCIENCE CORE IDEAS (ETS) MS-ETS1 Engineering Design MS-ETS1-1 MS-ETS1-2 MS-ETS1-3 MS-ETS1-4

treesfortomorrow.com

ating Culminn - Soils Less o

MS-LS2-3

Soil

MS-LS2-2

Life in

MS-LS2-1

n

MS-LS2 Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics

rmatio

MS-LS1-8

Soil Fo

MS-LS1-7

logy

MS-LS1-6

uc tion Introd logy to G eo ating Culminn - Water Less o

MS-LS1-5

orpho

MS-LS1-4

Fish M

MS-LS1-3

g standin Under dwater Groun

MS-LS1-2

ology

MS-LS1-1

GEOLOGY & SOIL

B o g Ec

MS-LS1 From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes

cology

MIDDLE SCHOOL LIFE SCIENCE CORE IDEAS (LS)

L a ke E

ating Culminn - Forests Less o

the Tak ingStep Right

's Naturen Desig

l Anima ations Ad a p t ical Ecologssion S u cce

e Sk ills Intr o to S cie n c Wate r

al

cie n ce Intr o to ase d S Fie ld B Sk ills

Therm MIDDLE SCHOOL CLASSES

WATER

NATURAL SYSTEMS


CLASS SUMMARY

MIDDLE GRADE CLASS PM

How do animals stay warm enough in the summer and cool enough in the winter?

Thermal STANDARDS ( NGSS) MS-PS3-3, MS-LS2-4 (SEE STANDARDS DETAILS ON BACK)

MISCONCEPTIONS:

PRIOR KNOWLEDGE

Individuals can deliberately develop new heritable traits in response to their environment.

None – This is an introductory class

The material of an object does not affect how it stores or transfers thermal energy.

TIME REQUIRED

OVERALL IDEA: Animals use their environment and physical adaptations to regulate their body temperature.

CORE KNOWLEDGE

Thermal

CLASS GUIDE SERIES

1.5 hours

SEASONS Winter

Students will design and conduct an experiment to determine how animals use individual adaptations and their environment to minimize internal temperature change. Students will make jello “critters” to test why their critter might undergo different rates of body temperature change with or without insulation in the outdoors. Students will write and test a hypothesis for their experiment, work on observation skills, record data in a TFT journal, and discuss the results with instructors and peers. Indoors and outdoors on the TFT campus.

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY (minimal)

Concepts: Ecosystem and animal adaptations Thermal energy transfer

www.treesfortomorrow.com

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Locations

Inclement Weather Locations

Trees For Tomorrow Campus

Trees For Tomorrow Campus

Goals/Standards

Objective

MS-PS3-3: Apply scientific principles to design construct or test a device that either minimizes or maximizes thermal energy transfer.

Students will design, construct, and test a device that minimizes thermal energy transfer.

Prior Knowledge None, this is an introductory class.

Materials

Safety

Gelatin

Rubber bands

Wear appropriate clothing for going outside.

Boiling water

Spoon for stirring

Use caution when working with boiling water.

3 plastic jars of suitable size to hold entire contents of mixed gelatin

Timer

Goggles and hot mitts for those involved with boiling water.

Empty film canisters with lids

LabQuest

Assorted fabric for insulation such as felt, wool, t-shirt, polyester.

Thermometer Probes

Hot pads/oven mitts

The complete Class Guide Series includes classes in four categories:

CORE KNOWLEDGE

Thermal

CORE KNOWLEDGE

WATER

GEOLOGY & SOIL

CL A S S G U I D E S E R I E S

www.treesfortomorrow.com 715-479-6456

Funding for course guide design provided by Sustainable Forestry Initiative.

NATURAL SYSTEMS

email: learning @TreesForTomorrow.com

ÂŽ 2015


CLASS SUMMARY

Field Based Science Skills

MIDDLE GRADE CLASS DAY

How do we observe and measure the environment scientifically?

Introduction to Field Based Science Skills STANDARDS ( NGSS) MS-LS2-2, MS-LS2-1 (SEE STANDARDS DETAILS ON BACK)

PRIOR KNOWLEDGE Thermal (Winter Only)

MISCONCEPTIONS: A forest contains only one ecosystem. Abiotic factors don’t influence a forest community.

OVERALL IDEA: Evidence-based knowledge of natural systems comes from observing, measuring and recording.

CORE KNOWLEDGE

Introduction to

CLASS GUIDE SERIES

TIME REQUIRED 3 hours

SEASONS All

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY Hike/Snowshoe (winter only)

In this class students practice using scientific tools, and observation skills to describe a place in the forest. Small groups of students get their own site to observe and measure. Together the students will determine what biotic and abiotic components help create ecosystems.

Concepts: Characteristics of an ecosystem Energy flow in a natural system Relationship between organisms Forest density

www.treesfortomorrow.com

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Locations

Inclement Weather Locations

Trees For Tomorrow Campus

Trees For Tomorrow Campus

Goals/Standards

Objective

MS-LS2.2: Construct an explanation that predicts patterns of interactions among organisms across multiple ecosystems.

Students create maps from evidence to describe flora/fauna observed. Students make predictions about new areas based on their maps.

MS-LS2-1: Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for the effects of resource availability on organisms and populations of organisms in an ecosystem.

Students create a rule from data that explains why flora/fauna live where they do. Students apply their rule to a new situation(s).

Prior Knowledge Previous Trees Sessions Thermal Adaptations

Materials

Safety

Journals/writing materials

Yarn

Students need to be dressed appropriately for extend period outside.

Plastic bags

Rubber bands

Place students in areas where they will be safe.

Cameras (optional)

Spring scale

Meter stick

Bandanna

Animal Tracking Guides

Orange flagging tape Dichotomous tree keys

The complete Class Guide Series includes classes in four categories:

CORE KNOWLEDGE

Introduction to

Field Based Science Skills Funding for course guide design provided by Sustainable Forestry Initiative.

CORE KNOWLEDGE

NATURAL SYSTEMS

WATER

GEOLOGY & SOIL

CL A S S G U I D E S E R I E S

www.treesfortomorrow.com 715-479-6456

email: learning @TreesForTomorrow.com

ÂŽ 2015


CLASS SUMMARY

CLASS GUIDE SERIES

Intro to Water Science Skills

DAY

Water Quality - Rivers STANDARDS ( NGSS) MS-LS2-1

How do we study a water environment?

PRIOR KNOWLEDGE

MISCONCEPTIONS:

Benchmarks of Science Literacy: 5E/E1, 5D/P1, 5D/E4, 5D/E1, 5D/E3a

Varying the size of a population of organisms will affect only those populations of organisms that are directly connected to it in a feeding relationship, not organisms that are one or more steps removed/away from it. If a population in a food web is disturbed, there will be little or no effect on populations below it in the food web (e.g. if a predator is removed, no effect on prey).

OVERALL IDEA: Water quality changes depending on the local environment.

Students build observation and data-gathering skills by collecting data at aquatic sites in the area surrounding Trees For Tomorrow. Using LabQuest2,® electronic probes, macroinvertebrate collecting equipment, turbidity tubes, and other relevant equipment, students will analyze and compare data to draw preliminary conclusions on the health of the natural water system. In case of inclement weather, testing of water gathered earlier might occur in the classroom.

WAT E R

MIDDLE GRADE CLASS

No prior knowledge necessary

(SEE STANDARDS/BENCHMARKS DETAILS ON BACK)

TIME REQUIRED 3 hours

SEASONS Spring, Summer, Fall

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY Walking

Concepts: Natural communities and their variations Needs of specific organisms Patterns of water quality Influence of weather and climate www.treesfortomorrow.com

®


Locations

Inclement Weather Locations

Rainbow Flowage, Eagle Lake Park

Trees For Tomorrow Campus

Goals/Standards

Objective

MS-LS2-1: Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for the effects of resource availability on organisms and population of organisms in an ecosystem.

Students gather and analyze data from an aquatic environmetn to determine relationshops between biotic and abiotic factors in that ecosystem.

Prior Knowledge Previous Trees Sessions Not necessary Prior Knowledge (Benchmarks of Science Literacy) 5E/E1: Almost all kinds of animals’ food can be traced back to plants. 5D/P1: Plants and animals both need to take in water, and animals need to take in food. In addition, plants need light. 5D/E4: Changes in an organism’s habitat are sometimes beneficial to it and sometimes harmful. 5D/E1: For any particular environment, some kinds of plants and animals thrive, some do not live as well, and some do not survive at all. 5D/E3a: Organisms interact with one another in various ways besides providing food.

Materials

Safety

LabPros® and probes

Distilled water

Students do not keep, torment or kill animal life.

Meter Stick

Animal Tracking Guides

Students will not enter water above their bog boots.

Dip nets

Tree ID Keys

Basins

Bog boots

Aqua scope

Fish net or kick net

Macroinvertebrate Key

Turbidity Tubes

The complete Class Guide Series includes classes in four categories:

WAT E R

Intro to Water Science Skills Funding for course guide design provided by Sustainable Forestry Initiative.

CORE KNOWLEDGE

NATURAL SYSTEMS

WATER

GEOLOGY & SOIL

CL A S S G U I D E S E R I E S

www.treesfortomorrow.com 715-479-6456

email: learning @TreesForTomorrow.com

® 2015


CLASS SUMMARY

MIDDLE GRADE CLASS

Ecological Succession STANDARDS ( NGSS) DAY

How do biological systems respond to change? MISCONCEPTION: Except for a few major changes due to large

MS-LS2-1, MS-LS2-2, MS-LS2-4

PRIOR KNOWLEDGE Thermal Adaptations (Winer Only)

NATURAL SYSTEMS

Ecological Succession

CLASS GUIDE SERIES

Intro to Field Based Science Skills

volcanic eruptions or meteorite strikes, ecosystems have been the same throughout Earth’s history.

Benchmarks of Science Literacy: 1B/E3,1B/E4, 5E/E3

OVERALL IDEA: The changes to ecosystems, such as forests,

(SEE STANDARDS/BENCHMARKS DETAILS ON BACK)

include gradual changes over time.

TIME REQUIRED Students will build on skills and experiences from Intro to Field Based Science Skills. Beginning in the classroom for a brief introduction on forest succession and changes, students will then journey to a field site with a diversity of habitat types to examine and measure a variety of trees, examine water sources and note elevation changes and other factors influencing ecological succession. Students will use evidence from observations to improve and strengthen observation skills, formulate theories, and make predictions based on existing data and understanding. In winter, participants will explore on snowshoes.

3 hours

SEASONS All

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY Hiking/ Snowshoeing (winter only)

Concepts: Ecological succession Natural community relationships Patterns in nature Availability of resources Human impact www.treesfortomorrow.com

®


Locations

Inclement Weather Locations

Jeb Lake Bog, Mud Minnow Bog, Press Forest

Trees For Tomorrow campus

Goals/Standards

Objective

MS-LS2-1: Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for the effects of resource availability on organisms and populations of organisms in ecosystems.

Students identify the absence or presence of specific resources in the ecosystem.

MS-LS2-2: Construct an explanation that predicts patterns of interactions among organisms across multiple ecosystems.

Students create maps from data collected about the types of flora and fauna observed. Students make predictions about a new area using the data collected.

MS-LS2-4: Construct and argument supported by empirical evidence that changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem affect populations.

Students will use data from observations to predict how plant species of an area change with time.

Prior Knowledge Previous Trees Sessions Thermal Adaptations (winter only), Intro to Field Based Science Skills Prior Knowledge (Benchmarks of Science Literacy) 1B/E3: Scientists explanation about what happens in the world come partly from what they observe, partly from what they think. Sometimes scientists have different explanations for the same set of observations. That usually leads to their making more observations to resolve the differences. 1B/E4: Scientists do not pay much attention to claims about how something they know about works unless claims are backed up with evidence that can be confirmed with logical argument. 5E/E3: Over the whole earth, organisms are growing, dying, and decaying, and new organisms are being produced by the old ones.

Materials Journals/writing materials

Bandanas

Plastic Bags

Spring scales

Meter Stick

Rubber bands

Cones

Whiteboards

Cameras (optional)

Markers

Tree ID keys

Quadrants

Safety Students need to be dressed appropriately for extended period outside. Place students in areas where they will be safe.

Yarn

The complete Class Guide Series includes classes in four categories:

NATURAL SYSTEMS

Ecological Succession Funding for course guide design provided by Sustainable Forestry Initiative.

CORE KNOWLEDGE

NATURAL SYSTEMS

WATER

GEOLOGY & SOIL

CL A S S G U I D E S E R I E S

www.treesfortomorrow.com 715-479-6456

email: learning @TreesForTomorrow.com

ÂŽ 2015


CLASS SUMMARY

CLASS GUIDE SERIES

DAY

What unique characteristics do animals have that enable them to live in this environment?

Animal Adaptations STANDARDS ( NGSS) MS-LS1-4, MS-LS2-2

PRIOR KNOWLEDGE

MISCONCEPTIONS: All individuals within a population of organisms are basically the same, and any differences are unimportant. Changes to the characteristics of a population of organisms is random and is not influenced by the environment. Evolution happens when individual organisms acclimate or “get used to” new conditions gradually.

OVERALL IDEAS: Some organisms have traits that improve their ability to survive and reproduce in a given environment and pass adaptations to the next generation. Changes in environmental conditions can change which traits are favorable and lead to changes in the traits in a population of organisms. Students will build on skills and experiences from the Intro to Field Based Science Skills class. In the classroom, students will discuss observations of animals such as anatomical differences, what adaptations are, and how adaptations allow an animal to survive. Students will explore a new field site, learn to look for signs of animals, and continue to improve observation and data recording skills. Activities include identification of animal tracks, and making predictions based on observations. In winter, participants will explore on snowshoes.

Thermal Adaptations (Winter Only) Intro to Field Based Science Skills

NATURAL SYSTEMS

Animal Adaptations

MIDDLE GRADE CLASS

Benchmarks of Science Literacy: 11B/1E , 1C/2E (SEE STANDARDS/BENCHMARKS DETAILS ON BACK)

TIME REQUIRED 3 hours

SEASONS All

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY Hiking/ Snowshoeing (Winter Only)

Concepts: Animal adaptations and behavior Patterns of behavior in animal populations Anatomical similarities and differences www.treesfortomorrow.com

®


Locations

Inclement Weather Locations

Franklin Lake Trail, Anvil Lake Trail

Trees For Tomorrow Campus

Goals/Standards

Objective

MS-LS1-4: Use agrument based on empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to support an explanation for how characterisitc animal behavoirs and specialisted plant structures affect the probability of successful reproduction of animals and plants respectively.

Students gather evidence and identify patterns of behavior in animal populations in the area.

MS-LS2-2: Construct an explanation that predicts patterns of interactions across multiple ecosystems.

Students create a prediction possible adaptations and population changes one might see given a change to the environment.

Prior Knowledge Previous Trees Sessions Thermal, Introduction to Field Based Science Skills Prior Knowledge (Benchmarks of Science Literacy) 11B/1E: Seeing how a model works after changes are made to it may suggest how the real thing would work if the same were done to it. 1C/2E: Clear communication is an essential part of doing science. It enables scientists to inform others about their work, expose their ideas to criticism by other scientists, and stay informed about the scientific discoveries around the world.

Materials

Safety

Animal artifacts

Pencils

Limit hike time in inclement weather.

Student journals

Snowshoes (winter only)

Keep group together. Manage rate of travel for slowest member. Teachers/adults responsible for smaller groups of students.

The complete Class Guide Series includes classes in four categories:

NATURAL SYSTEMS

Animal Adaptations Funding for course guide design provided by Sustainable Forestry Initiative.

CORE KNOWLEDGE

NATURAL SYSTEMS

WATER

GEOLOGY & SOIL

CL A S S G U I D E S E R I E S

www.treesfortomorrow.com 715-479-6456

email: learning @TreesForTomorrow.com

ÂŽ 2015


CLASS SUMMARY

What ideas and inspirations can we take from nature to develop environmentally friendly technologies to improve human wellbeing?

MIDDLE GRADE CLASS PM

Nature’s Design STANDARDS ( NGSS) MS-LS4-2, MS-ETS1-1

PRIOR KNOWLEDGE After Intro to Environmental Science Skills, Animal Adaptations

NATURAL SYSTEMS

Nature’s Design

CLASS GUIDE SERIES

MISCONCEPTION: (This lesson employs Next Generation Sci-

Benchmarks of Science Literacy: 11B.1E ,1C.2E

ence Standards for Engineering. AAAS has not yet published Misconceptions for Engineering.)

(SEE STANDARDS/BENCHMARKS DETAILS ON BACK)

OVERALL IDEA: Nature has inspired some of our best ideas.

TIME REQUIRED 1.5 hours

In this evening activity, students will apply insight from previous experiences to explore engineering applications of science knowledge for social benefit. Students will apply principles of bioinspiration to a problem they face, using internet resources to search for information on adaptations and characteristics of organisms.

SEASONS All

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY All physical abilities

Concepts: Anatomical similarities and differences among organisms Using nature to inspire real-world applications and technology Improvement of human wellbeing

www.treesfortomorrow.com

®


Locations

Inclement Weather Locations

Indoors, Trees For Tomorrow Campus

(same)

Goals/Standards

Objective

MS-LS4-2: Apply scientific ideas to construct an explanation for the anatomical similarities and differences among modern organisms.

Students create a tool or machine that uses animal ro plant adaptations to human advantage.

MS-ETS1-1: Define the criteria and constraints of a design problem with sufficient precision to ensure a successful solution, taking into account relevant scientific principles and potential impacts on people and the natural environment that may limit possible solutions.

Students will design a tool that will help humans, and have limited impacts to the environment.

Prior Knowledge Previous Trees Sessions Intro to Field Based Science Skills, Animal Adaptations Prior Knowledge (Benchmarks of Science Literacy) 11B.1E: Seeing how model works after changes are made to it may suggest how the real thing would work if the same were done to it. 1C.2E: Clear communication is an essential part of doing science. It enables scientist to inform others about their work, expose their ideas to criticism by other scientists, and stay informed about the scientific discoveries around the world.

Materials Pens, markers, colored pencils Unlined paper (8 ½ x 11)

Internet access/smart phone or laptops

The complete Class Guide Series includes classes in four categories:

NATURAL SYSTEMS

Nature’s Design

Safety Monitor students as they use the internet.

CORE KNOWLEDGE

WATER

GEOLOGY & SOIL

CL A S S G U I D E S E R I E S

www.treesfortomorrow.com 715-479-6456

Funding for course guide design provided by Sustainable Forestry Initiative.

NATURAL SYSTEMS

email: learning @TreesForTomorrow.com

® 2015


CLASS SUMMARY

MIDDLE GRADE CLASS

DAY

or

Taking the Right Step STANDARDS ( NGSS) PM

What about the design of a snowshoe helps you keep from sinking?

MS-PS2-1, MS-ETS1-3

PRIOR KNOWLEDGE Thermal Adpations, Intro to Field Based Science Skills

NATURAL SYSTEMS

Taking the Right Step

CLASS GUIDE SERIES

(SEE STANDARDS/BENCHMARKS DETAILS ON BACK)

MISCONCEPTIONS: Scientific principles are not very useful for everyday needs.

TIME REQUIRED 1.5 hours

Most problems are too complicated to understand and solve.

SEASONS

All arguments are opinions.

Winter

OVERALL IDEA: By investigating the physical environment, students will be able to better understand animal adaptations.

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY Minimal

Students will determine surface area and weight displacement of animal feet to see how they have adapted to life in cold climate habitats. They will design and test their own device based on weight and surface area.

Concepts: Adaptations Displacement Newton’s Third Law

www.treesfortomorrow.com

®


Locations

Inclement Weather Locations

Trees For Tomorrow Campus

(same)

Goals/Standards

Objective

MS-PS2-1: Apply Newton’s Third Law to design a solution to a problem involving the motion of two colliding objects.

Students use a general understanding of normal force to design an apparatus that will prevent an organism from falling below the level of the snow.

MS-ETS1-2: Analyze data from tests to determine similarties and differences among several design solutions to identify the best characteristics of each that can be combined into a new solution to better meet the criteria for success.

Students design an apparatus that prevents an animal from sinking in the snow. Students compare apparatuses and identify best characteristics of each. Students describe a ‘best snowshoe’ based on findings.

Prior Knowledge Previous Trees Sessions Thermal Adaptations (winter only), Intro to Field Based Science Skills, Succession

Materials Meter sticks Paper

Safety Students dress appropriately to be outside for an extended period of time.

Weights Supplies to make a snowshoe

The complete Class Guide Series includes classes in four categories:

NATURAL SYSTEMS

Taking the Right Step Funding for course guide design provided by Sustainable Forestry Initiative.

CORE KNOWLEDGE

NATURAL SYSTEMS

WATER

GEOLOGY & SOIL

CL A S S G U I D E S E R I E S

www.treesfortomorrow.com 715-479-6456

email: learning @TreesForTomorrow.com

® 2015


CLASS SUMMARY

DAY

How do we make decisions about land management?

MISCONCEPTIONS:

Cumulative Lesson Forests STANDARDS ( NGSS) MS-LS2-4, MS-LS2-5 (SEE STANDARDS DETAILS ON BACK)

NATURAL SYSTEMS

MIDDLE GRADE CLASS

Cumulative Lesson

Forests

CLASS GUIDE SERIES

PRIOR KNOWLEDGE

Change to the characteristics of populations (i.e. the proportion of individuals in the population having certain traits) of organisms is always random, and is not influenced by the favorability of that change in a given environment.

Thermal Adaptations (Winter only) Intro to Field Based Science Skills, Animal Adaptations, Succession

Except for a few major changes due to large volcanoes that have erupted or meteorites that have struck the earth, environmental conditions have stayed the same throughout the history of the earth.

TIME REQUIRED

OVERALL IDEAS: How an area is managed affects what can thrive there. Local governments and private landowners make decisions about land management. Collecting data helps in making management decisions.

1.5 hours

SEASONS All

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY Hiking

Students visit a site and decide how to manage it. They take data and analyze it to help make their decision. Students then present their management plan using data they collected to support their choice.

Concepts: Human impacts Land management Ecosystem interactions

www.treesfortomorrow.com

ÂŽ


Locations

Inclement Weather Locations

Press Forest, Trees For Tomorrow Campus

Trees For Tomorrow Campus

Goals/Standards

Objective

MS-LS2-4: Construct an argument supported by empirical evidence that changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem affect populations.

Students explain how plant species in an area change in response to a land management plan.

MS-LS2-5: Evaluate competing design solutions for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem services.

Students make predictions of changes to systems (biodiversity) over an extended period of time.

Prior Knowledge Previous Trees Sessions Thermal Adaptations (Winter Only), Intro to Field Based Science Skills, Succession, Animal Adaptations

Materials

Safety

Journals/writing materials

Yarn

Students need to be dressed appropriately for extend period outside.

Ziplock®-type bags

Rubber bands

Place students in areas where they will be safe.

Cameras (optional)

Spring scale

Meter stick – depth of snow

Bandanna

Tracking Guides

Orange flagging tape Dichotomous tree keys

The complete Class Guide Series includes classes in four categories:

NATURAL SYSTEMS

Cumulative Lesson

Forests

Funding for course guide design provided by Sustainable Forestry Initiative.

CORE KNOWLEDGE

NATURAL SYSTEMS

WATER

GEOLOGY & SOIL

CL A S S G U I D E S E R I E S

www.treesfortomorrow.com 715-479-6456

email: learning @TreesForTomorrow.com

® 2015


CLASS SUMMARY

MIDDLE GRADE CLASS DAY

How does water quality differ in different kinds of lakes? How does water chemistry change with depth?

WAT E R

Lake Ecology

CLASS GUIDE SERIES

Lake Ecology STANDARDS ( NGSS) MS-LS2-1, MS-LS2-2, MS-LS2-4

PRIOR KNOWLEDGE Water quality testing procedures

MISCONCEPTIONS: If a population in a food web is disturbed, there will be little or no effect on populations that are not within the linear sequence in the food web. Varying the size of a population of organisms will affect only those populations of organisms that are directly connected to it in a feeding relationship, not organisms that are one or more steps removed/away from it. If a population in a food web is disturbed, there will be little or no effect on populations below it in the food web (e.g. if a predator is removed, no effect on prey). Molecules from food are not stored in the bulbs of plants. Molecules from food are not stored in the seeds of plants. Animals cannot store molecules from food in their bodies.

OVERALL IDEAS: Water quality affects what can live in lakes. Water quality is measured by chemical and biotic tests. Lakes differ from rivers in important ways because the surrounding areas much more heavily influence them.

Benchmarks of Science Literacy: 5E/E1, 5D/P1, 5D/E4, 5D/E1, 5D/E3a (SEE STANDARDS/BENCHMARKS DETAILS ON BACK)

TIME REQUIRED 3 hours

SEASONS Spring, Fall

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY Walking, Canoeing

In this field experience, students will visit lake habitats to collect data about water quality, the condition of surrounding plant and animal communities, and use evidence to determine ecosystem conditions. Students will conduct chemical or electronic probe water testing as well as inventory plant species and soil litter. They will investigate for evidence of animal signs and human intervention. Weather permitting, canoes will be used to conduct tests at different points. Students eventually create evidence-based arguments about actions necessary to safeguard the biological health of the areas.

Concepts: Resource availability Patterns of organism interactions Population changes Human impacts www.treesfortomorrow.com

ÂŽ


Locations

Inclement Weather Locations

Goals/Standards

Objective

White Deer Lake, Anvil Lake

MS-LS2-1: Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for the effects of resource availability on organisms and populations of organisms in an ecosystem.

Students gather and analyze data about lakes to determine relationships betwen biotic and abiotic factors in a lake ecosystem.

With Canoes: MS-LS2-2: Construct an explanation that predicts patterns of interactions among organisms across multiple ecosystems.

Students evaluate data to predict the effect of water quality (biotic and abtiotic factors) in different ecosystems and throughout changing seasons.

Without Canoes: MS-LS2.4: Construct an argument supported by empirical evidence that changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem affect populations.

Students evaluate data to predict the effect of human impacts on biotic and abiotic factors in a lake ecosystem.

Prior Knowledge Previous Trees Sessions Intro to Water Science Skills Prior Knowledge (Benchmarks of Science Literacy) 5E/E1: Almost all kinds of animals’ food can be traced back to plants. 5D/P1: Plants and animals both need to take in water, and animals need to take in food. In addition, plants need light. 5D/E4: Changes in an organism’s habitat are sometimes beneficial to it and sometimes harmful. 5D/E1: For any particular environment, some kinds of plants and animals thrive, some do not live as well, and some do not survive at all. 5D/E3a: Organisms interact with one another in various ways besides providing food.

Materials LabQuests and probes from Intro to Water Science Skills Aquascopes 1 foot cotton squares Spring scales Wire coat hangers Dip nets Bog boots

Canoeing Only:

Safety All participants must wear PFDs at all times while in canoes.

Canoes Paddles PFDs Ekman samplers Bottom dredger Anchor Fish cam Sechi disks

The complete Class Guide Series includes classes in four categories:

WAT E R

Lake Ecology Funding for course guide design provided by Sustainable Forestry Initiative.

CORE KNOWLEDGE

NATURAL SYSTEMS

WATER

GEOLOGY & SOIL

CL A S S G U I D E S E R I E S

www.treesfortomorrow.com 715-479-6456

email: learning @TreesForTomorrow.com

® 2015


CLASS SUMMARY

CLASS GUIDE SERIES

How do we know an aquatic ecosystem might be changing? MISCONCEPTIONS: Except for a few major changes due to large volcanic eruptions or meteorite strikes, ecosystems have been the same throughout Earth’s history.

OVERALL IDEAS: Water quality affects what can live in lakes. The changes to ecosystems, such as forests, include gradual changes over time.

WAT E R

Bog Investgations DAY

MIDDLE GRADE CLASS

Lake Ecology STANDARDS ( NGSS) MS-LS2-1, MS-LS2-4

PRIOR KNOWLEDGE Intro to Water Science Skills, Lake Ecology Benchmarks of Science Literacy: 1B/E3, 1B/E4, 5B/E3 (SEE STANDARDS/BENCHMARKS DETAILS ON BACK)

TIME REQUIRED 3 hours

In this field experience, students will visit a bog habitat and collect data about the water quality and how that affects the plant and animal communities. Students will conduct electronic probe water testing as well as inventory plant species and soil litter. They will investigate for evidence of animal signs and human intervention. Students will analzye differences from a bog habitat to other habitats visited. Students will use evidence from observations to formulate theries and make predictions based on existing data.

SEASONS Spring, Summer, Fall

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY Walking

Concepts: Ecological Succession Patterns in nature Resource availability Natural community relationships www.treesfortomorrow.com

®


Locations

Inclement Weather Locations

Goals/Standards

Objective

White Deer Lake, Anvil Lake

MS-LS2-1: Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for the effects of resource availability on organisms and populations of organisms in an ecosystem.

Students identify the absence or presence of specific resources in the ecosystem.

MS-LS2.4: Construct an argument supported by empirical evidence that changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem affect populations.

Students will use data from observations to predict how abiotic and biotic omponents of an area change with time.

Prior Knowledge Previous Trees Sessions Intro to Water Science Skills, Lake Ecology Prior Knowledge (Benchmarks of Science Literacy) 1B/E3: Scientists explanation about what happens in the world come partly from what they observe, partly from what they think. Sometimes scientists have different explanations for the same set of observations. That usually leads to their making more observations to resolve differences. 1B/E4: Scientists do not pay much attention to claims about hwo somethign they know about works unless claims are backed up with evidence that can be confirmed with logical argument. 5E/E3: Over the whole earth, organisms are growing, dying, and decaying and new organisms are being produced by the old ones.

Materials LabQuests and probes from Intro to Water Science Skills Aquascopes 1 foot cotton squares Spring scales

Wire coat hangers

Safety Keep students a safe distance away from the edge of the open water.

Dip nets Bog boots Tree ID Keys Animal Tracking Guides

The complete Class Guide Series includes classes in four categories:

WAT E R

Bog Investigations

CORE KNOWLEDGE

WATER

GEOLOGY & SOIL

CL A S S G U I D E S E R I E S

www.treesfortomorrow.com 715-479-6456

Funding for course guide design provided by Sustainable Forestry Initiative.

NATURAL SYSTEMS

email: learning @TreesForTomorrow.com

ÂŽ 2015


CLASS SUMMARY

PM

Where does our water come from?

MIDDLE GRADE CLASS

WAT E R

Understanding Groundwater

CLASS GUIDE SERIES

Understanding Groundwater STANDARDS ( NGSS) MS-ESS2-4 (SEE STANDARDS DETAILS ON BACK)

PRIOR KNOWLEDGE

MISCONCEPTION: Groundwater occurs only in underground lakes.

OVERALL IDEA: Groundwater can flow through porous and fractured rock, where it may be withdrawn for human use.

Intro to Water Science Skills, Lake Ecology

TIME REQUIRED 1.5 hours

SEASONS In this evening experience, students will engage in a series of activities to explore the actions and function of groundwater. They will use topographic maps and contour maps to chart the flow of groundwater, determine human impact on groundwater resources, and understand how those ideas apply to a real-world example in the Northwoods.

All

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY (minimal)

Concepts: Hydrologic cycle Human impacts Contour mapping

www.treesfortomorrow.com

®


Inclement Weather Locations Trees For Tomorrow Campus

(same)

Goals/Standards

Objective

MS-ESS2-4: Develop a model to describe the cycling of water through Earth’s systems driven by energy from the sun and the force of gravity.

Students describe how water travels through rock to enter underground reservoirs. Students apply the hydrologic cycle to explain effects of human impact on natural systems.

Prior Knowledge Previous Trees Sessions With Forst Strand: Intro to Field Based Science Skills With Water Strand: Intro to Water Science Skills

Materials 1 large pickle jar

Sand

Large size river rocks

Water

Gravel

Groundwater model

Containers

LabQuests and Probes

Safety Students should be monitored while exploring stations.

Watershed Maps

The complete Class Guide Series includes classes in four categories:

WAT E R

Understanding Groundwater Funding for course guide design provided by Sustainable Forestry Initiative.

CORE KNOWLEDGE

NATURAL SYSTEMS

WATER

GEOLOGY & SOIL

CL A S S G U I D E S E R I E S

www.treesfortomorrow.com 715-479-6456

email: learning @TreesForTomorrow.com

ÂŽ 2015


CLASS SUMMARY

MIDDLE GRADE CLASS PM

What can we learn about a fish’s habitat based on its characteristics?

WAT E R

Fish Adaptations

CLASS GUIDE SERIES

Fish Morphology STANDARDS ( NGSS) MS-LS2-1, MS-LS2.4 (SEE STANDARDS DETAILS ON BACK)

MISCONCEPTIONS: Change to the characteristics of populations (i.e. the proportion of individuals in the population having certain traits) of organisms is always random. Changes in a population occur through a gradual change in all members of a population. Individual organisms can deliberately develop new heritable traits because they need them for survival. All individuals within a population of organisms are the same. Differences among them are trivial and unimportant. Change occurs in the inherited characteristics of populations of organisms over time because organisms observe other more successful organisms and model their appearance or habits. Evolution happens when individual organisms acclimate or “get used to” new conditions gradually. Changes to the environment cannot lead to changes in the traits of species living in that environment.

OVERALL IDEAS:

PRIOR KNOWLEDGE Intro to Water Science Skills

TIME REQUIRED 1.5 hours

SEASONS All

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY Minimal

OTHER Indoor Class

Anatomical differences provide adaptive advantage (form vs function). Organisms adapt to their environment.

In this evening experience, students will examine fish adaptations to understand the diversity of morphology and how it provides adaptive advantage for specific habitats.

Concepts: Adaptations and behavior Food web interactions Anatomical similarities and differences www.treesfortomorrow.com

®


Locations

Inclement Weather Locations

Lake/river/indoors

Trees For Tomorrow Campus

Goals/Standards

Objective

MS-LS2-1: Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for the effects of resource availability on organisms and populations of organisms in an ecosystem.

Students analyze fish adaptations to determine the best habitat.

MS LS2-4: Construct an argument supported by empirical evidence that changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem affect populations.

Students analyze effect of invasive species on fish populations.

Prior Knowledge Previous Trees Sessions Intro to Water Science Skills Prior Knowledge (Benchmarks of Science Literacy) 11B/1E: Seeing how a model works after changes are made to it may suggest how the real thing would work if the same were done to it. 1C/2E: Clear communication is an essential part of doing science. It enables scientists to inform others about their work, expose their ideas to criticism by other scientists, and stay informed about the scientific discoveries around the world.

Materials Journals/pencils Fish of WI data sheets

Attached fish morphology info handouts – tail shape, body shape, mouth orientation

Fish models

The complete Class Guide Series includes classes in four categories:

WAT E R

Fish Morphology

CORE KNOWLEDGE

WATER

GEOLOGY & SOIL

CL A S S G U I D E S E R I E S

www.treesfortomorrow.com 715-479-6456

Funding for course guide design provided by Sustainable Forestry Initiative.

NATURAL SYSTEMS

email: learning @TreesForTomorrow.com

ÂŽ 2015


CLASS SUMMARY

Water

DAY

How do we manage a water ecosystem?

MIDDLE GRADE CLASS

WAT E R

Cumulative Assignment

CLASS GUIDE SERIES

Cumulative Assignment Water STANDARDS ( NGSS) MS-LS2-4, MS-LS2-5 (SEE STANDARDS DETAILS ON BACK)

MISCONCEPTIONS: If a population in a food web is disturbed, there will be little or no effect on populations below it in the food web (e.g. if a predator is removed, no effect on prey). If a population in a food web is disturbed, there will be little or no effect on populations that are not within the linear sequence in the food web.

OVERALL IDEAS:

PRIOR KNOWLEDGE Intro to Water Science Skills, Lake Ecology, Understand Groundwater

TIME REQUIRED 1.5 hours

SEASONS All

Water quality affects what can live in a water ecosystem. How an area is managed directly affects how the ecosystem will function. Local government and private landowners make decisions about environmental management.

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY Walking

OTHER This class uses skills in previous classes to determine a management plan for a site.

In this class, students use prior knowledge of how to collect data from a water ecosystem and use that to determine a management plan for an area along the nearby river.

Concepts: Hydraulic cycle Human impacts Environmental management

www.treesfortomorrow.com

®


Locations

Inclement Weather Locations

T- Docks, Eagle River

Trees For Tomorrow Campus

Goals/Standards

Objective

MS-LS2-4: Construct an argument supported by empirical evidence that changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem affect populations.

Students explain how biotic and abiotic components in an aquatic ecosystem change in response to a water management plan.

MS-LS2-5: Evaluate competing design solutions for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem services.

Students make predictions of changes ot systems (biodiversity) over an extended period of time.

Prior Knowledge Previous Trees Sessions Intro to Water Science Skills, Lake Ecology, Understanding Groundwater

Materials

Safety

LabQuestsÂŽ and probes

Distilled water

Students do not drink water.

Dip nets

Turbidity Tube

Students do not keep, torment or kill animal life.

Basins

Tree ID Keys

Aquascope

Aquatic Macroinvertebrate Guide

Rinse bottles Meter Sticks

Bog boots Fish net or kick net

The complete Class Guide Series includes classes in four categories:

WAT E R

Cumulative Assignment

Water

Funding for course guide design provided by Sustainable Forestry Initiative.

CORE KNOWLEDGE

NATURAL SYSTEMS

WATER

GEOLOGY & SOIL

CL A S S G U I D E S E R I E S

www.treesfortomorrow.com 715-479-6456

email: learning @TreesForTomorrow.com

ÂŽ 2015


CLASS SUMMARY

DAY

Why are there so many landforms in Wisconsin, and what processes shaped them? MISCONCEPTIONS: Glaciers cannot break rock. Landforms look similar today as they did many millions of years ago. For example, a river on Earth today hasn’t changed over time. Large rocks (such as boulders) have always been loose rocks. They were never part of the Earth’s solid rock layer.

OVERALL IDEA: The current structure of Wisconsin’s landforms represents change over time. Evidence of that change can be found on the surface if you know where to look.

Introduction to Geology STANDARDS ( NGSS) MS-ESS2-2

PRIOR KNOWLEDGE After Intro to Environmental Science Skills

GEOLOGY & SOIL

MIDDLE GR ADE C L ASS

Introduction to

Geology

C L ASS GUIDE SER IES

Benchmarks of Science Literacy: 4C/E1, 4C/E2 (SEE STANDARDS/BENCHMARKS DETAILS ON BACK)

TIME REQUIRED 3 hours

SEASONS All

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY Walking

In this field experience, students will visit a transitional area and collect data on forest characteristics (size, quality, quantity, and species of trees) and the condition of surrounding plant and animal communities. They will use contour maps and topographic maps to correlate the landforms of the area to data about forest growth and animal movement. Students will create evidence-based arguments to explain the geological and ecological processes occurring there.

Concepts: Rock layers representing geologic time Past and current geologic processes Plate tectonics www.treesfortomorrow.com

®


Locations

Inclement Weather Locations

Nicolet National Forest

Trees For Tomorrow Campus

Goals/Standards

Objective

MS-ESS2-2: Construct an explanation based on evidence for how geosciences processes have changed Earth’s surface at varying time and spatial scales.

Students will develop explanations for the locations of forms of rock in specific areas by observing samples.

Prior Knowledge Previous Trees Sessions Intro to Environmental Science Skills Prior Knowledge (Benchmarks of Science Literacy) 4C/E1: Waves, wind, water, and ice shape and reshape the earth’s land surface by eroding rock and soil in some areas and depositing them in other areas, sometimes in seasonal layers. 4C/E2: Rock is composed of different combinations of minerals. Smaller rocks come from the breakage and weathering of bedrock and larger rocks. Soil is made partly from weathered rock, partly from plant remains – and also contains many living organisms.

Materials Overheads

Journals

Rock samples

Pen/pencils

The complete Class Guide Series includes classes in four categories:

GEOLOGY & SOIL

Introduction to

Geology Funding for course guide design provided by Sustainable Forestry Initiative.

CORE KNOWLEDGE

NATURAL SYSTEMS

WATER

GEOLOGY & SOIL

CL ASS GUIDE SER IES

www.treesfortomorrow.com 715-479-6456

email: learning @TreesForTomorrow.com

® 2015


CLASS SUMMARY

MIDDLE GR ADE C L ASS

DAY

Where does soil come from? How does it support plant and animal life?

Soil Formation STANDARDS ( NGSS) MS-ESS2-1, MS-ESS2-4

PRIOR KNOWLEDGE After Intro to Geology

MISCONCEPTIONS: Rocks cannot be broken by collisions with with other rocks, or by the growth of plant roots. Ice can only break rock when it moves (as in a glacier).

OVERALL IDEA: Soils vary in physical characteristics and quality

because they can be formed by many processes and from both organic and non-organic materials.

GEOLOGY & SOIL

Soil Formation

C L ASS GUIDE SER IES

Benchmarks of Science Literacy: 4C/E1, 4C/E2 (SEE STANDARDS/BENCHMARKS DETAILS ON BACK)

TIME REQUIRED 3 hours

SEASONS all except winter

Building upon the skills gained from the Environmental Science Skills class and Introduction to Geology, students will explore how soils are formed within our Northwoods environment. In the field, students will gather soil samples to determine soil origins as well as other important characteristics. Taxonomic keys will be developed based on gathered

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY Walking

soil samples, and compared to formal, scientific identification of soil types in published keys and field guides.

Concepts: Soil formation Soil classification Soil cycle Erosion Decomposition www.treesfortomorrow.com

®


Locations

Inclement Weather Locations

Trees For Tomorrow Campus

(same)

Goals/Standards

Objective

MS-ESS2-1: Develop a model to describe the cycling of Earth’s materials and the flow of energy that drives this process.

Students will use evidence from gathered samples to demonstrate how soil is derived from local materials and natural processes of decomposition.

MS-ESS2-4: Develop a model to describe the cycling of water through Earth’s systems driven by energy from the sun and the force of gravity.

Students will use evidence to explain how water cycling through Earth systems causes changes in Earth materials.

Prior Knowledge Previous Trees Sessions Intro to Geology Prior Knowledge (Benchmarks of Science Literacy) 4C/E1: Waves, wind, water, and ice shape and reshape the earth’s land surface by eroding rock and soil in some areas and depositing them in other areas, sometimes in seasonal layers. 4C/E2: Rock is composed of different combinations of minerals. Smaller rocks come from the breakage and weathering of bedrock and larger rocks. Soil is made partly from weathered rock, partly from plant remains – and contains many living organisms.

Materials Shovels

Plastic bags

Trowels

Journals/pens

Spring scales

Glass ball jars (pt. size) with lids

Bandanas/rubber bands

Distilled water

Measuring sticks – in centimeters

Soil Texture by Feel flowchart – laminated

The complete Class Guide Series includes classes in four categories:

GEOLOGY & SOIL

Soil Formation

Safety Mold, clay and insect allergies

CORE KNOWLEDGE

WATER

GEOLOGY & SOIL

CL ASS GUIDE SER IES

www.treesfortomorrow.com 715-479-6456

Funding for course guide design provided by Sustainable Forestry Initiative.

NATURAL SYSTEMS

email: learning @TreesForTomorrow.com

® 2015


CLASS SUMMARY

PM

Where does our water come from?

MIDDLE GR ADE C L ASS

Understanding Groundwater STANDARDS ( NGSS)

WAT E R

Understanding Groundwater

C L ASS GUIDE SER IES

MS-ESS2-4 (SEE STANDARDS DETAILS ON BACK)

PRIOR KNOWLEDGE

MISCONCEPTION: Groundwater occurs only in underground

lakes.

OVERALL IDEA: Groundwater can flow through porous and fractured rock, where it may be withdrawn for human use.

After water strand: Water Quality: Rivers, Lake Ecology; and after geology strand: Geology, Soil Formation

TIME REQUIRED 1.5 hours

In this evening experience, students will engage in a series of activities to explore the actions and function of groundwater. They will use topographic maps and contour maps to chart the flow of groundwater, determine human impact on groundwater resources, and understand how those ideas apply to a real-world example in the Northwoods. Students create evidence-based arguments about actions necessary to safeguard the water quality of the area.

SEASONS All

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY (minimal)

Concepts: Hydrologic cycle Human impacts Contour mapping

www.treesfortomorrow.com

®


Locations

Inclement Weather Locations

Trees For Tomorrow Campus

(same)

Goals/Standards

Objective

MS-ESS2-4: Develop a model to describe the cycling of water through Earth’s systems driven by energy from the sun and the force of gravity.

Students will be able to describe how water travels through rock to enter underground reservoirs. Students will apply the hydrologic cycle to explain effects of human impact on natural systems.

Prior Knowledge Previous Trees Sessions Introduction to Environmental Science Skills With Water strand (Water Quality – Rivers, Lake Ecology): Students will have used contour and topo maps. They have an understanding of human impact on water quality, and understand effects of water on erosion. With Geology strand (Geology, Soil Formation): Students understand effects of weathering and how soil is formed. They have used contour and topo maps.

Materials 1 large pickle jar

Play sand

Large size river rocks

Water

Aquarium or pea gravel

Vilas County groundwater model

The complete Class Guide Series includes classes in four categories:

WAT E R

Understanding Groundwater Funding for course guide design provided by Sustainable Forestry Initiative.

CORE KNOWLEDGE

NATURAL SYSTEMS

WATER

GEOLOGY & SOIL

CL ASS GUIDE SER IES

www.treesfortomorrow.com 715-479-6456

email: learning @TreesForTomorrow.com

® 2015


CLASS SUMMARY

MIDDLE GR ADE C L ASS DAY

What organisms live in soils that help support life? How can we know if there is something there if we cannot see it? MISCONCEPTION: Organisms higher on the food web eat everything that is lower on the food web. OVERALL IDEA: Unseen organisms in soil contribute to the

ability of soil to support life of plants and other organisms in and on the surface. Although unseen by the naked eye, evidence can demonstrate the presence of these organisms. By analyzing the evidence, we can determine what kinds of organisms might be there and how they might function.

In this class students take and analyze data from soil samples to help them determine the health of the soil ecosystem. From that they will investigate the kinds of organisms they find in the soil.

Life in Soil STANDARDS ( NGSS) MS-ESS2-2, MS-ESS2-5

PRIOR KNOWLEDGE After Soil Formation Lesson

GEOLOGY & SOIL

Life in Soil

C L ASS GUIDE SER IES

Benchmarks of Science Literacy: 5D/E5, 5D/E5a, 5D/E2 (SEE STANDARDS/BENCHMARKS DETAILS ON BACK)

TIME REQUIRED 3 hours

SEASONS All except winter

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY Walking

Concepts: Soil formation Soil classification Soil cycle Erosion Decomposition

www.treesfortomorrow.com

®


Locations

Inclement Weather Locations

Trees For Tomorrow Campus

(same)

Goals/Standards

Objective

MS-ESS2-2: Construct an explanation that predicts patterns of interactions among organisms across multiple ecosystems.

Students will use evidence from gathered samples to explain the source of gases released from soil and its effect on organisms in multiple ecosystems.

MS-ESS2-5: Evaluate competing design solutions for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem services.

Students will use evidence to explain how differences in soil microorganisms affect biodiversity and ecosystem services.

Prior Knowledge Previous Trees Sessions Intro to Environmental Science Skills, Soil Formation Prior Knowledge (Benchmarks of Science Literacy) 5D/E5: Most microorganisms do not cause disease and may are beneficial. 5D/E5a: Organisms interact with one another in various ways besides providing food. 5D/E2: Insects and various other organisms depend on dead plants and animal material for food.

Materials Vernier LabPro,ÂŽ CO2 and O2 sensors, sampling chambers

Distilled water in spray bottle for moistening soil (if needed)

Area map and GPS to record locations

Trowels and apple corers for gathering soil samples

Plant ID charts and quadrant tools for sampling

Hand lenses

Safety Mold, clay and insect allergies

Rulers for measuring plant height

The complete Class Guide Series includes classes in four categories:

GEOLOGY & SOIL

Life in Soil

CORE KNOWLEDGE

WATER

GEOLOGY & SOIL

CL ASS GUIDE SER IES

www.treesfortomorrow.com 715-479-6456

Funding for course guide design provided by Sustainable Forestry Initiative.

NATURAL SYSTEMS

email: learning @TreesForTomorrow.com

ÂŽ 2015


CLASS SUMMARY

Soil

DAY

How does management affect a soil ecosystem? MISCONCEPTIONS: Organisms higher on the food web eat everything that is lower on the food web. Rocks cannot break by colliding with other rocks. The growth of plan roots cannot break rock. Large rocks (such as boulders) have always been loose rocks. They were never part of the Earth’s solid rock layer.

OVERALL IDEAS: Human impacts affect soil health.

MIDDLE GR ADE C L ASS

Cumulative Lesson Soil STANDARDS ( NGSS) MS-ESS2-2, MS-ESS2-5 (SEE STANDARDS DETAILS ON BACK)

GEOLOGY & SOIL

Cumulative Lesson

C L ASS GUIDE SER IES

PRIOR KNOWLEDGE After Intro to Environmental Science Skills, Soil Formation, Life in Soil Benchmarks of Science Literacy: 5D/E5, 5D/E5a, 5D/E2

TIME REQUIRED 1.5 hours

SEASONS All except winter

Humans manage the environment. Local government and private landowners make decisions about land management.

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY Walking

Students visit a site and determine a management plan using data that they collect. They then present their management plan and use evidence from their data collection to support their decision.

Concepts: Environmental management Human impacts Soil systems

www.treesfortomorrow.com

®


Locations

Inclement Weather Locations

Field Sites near Eagle River

Trees For Tomorrow Campus

Goals/Standards

Objective

MS-ESS2-5: Evaluate competing design solutions for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem services.

Students use evidence to create an argument for a way to maintain biodiversity through management.

MS-ESS2-2: Construct an explanation that predicts patterns of interactions among organisms across multiple ecosystems.

Students will use evidence from gathered samples to explain the source of gases released from soil and its effect on organisms in multiple ecosystems.

Prior Knowledge Previous Trees Sessions Intro to Environmental Science Skills, Soil Formation, Life in Soil Prior Knowledge (Benchmarks of Science Literacy) 5D/E5: Most microorganisms do not cause disease and may are beneficial. 5D/E5a: Organisms interact with one another in various ways besides providing food. 5D/E2: Insects and various other organisms depend on dead plants and animal material for food.

Materials Vernier LabPro,ÂŽ CO2 and O2 sensors, sampling chambers

Distilled water in spray bottle for moistening soil (if needed)

Area map and GPS to record locations

Trowels and apple corers for gathering soil samples

Plant ID charts and quadrant tools for sampling

Hand lenses

Safety Mold, clay and insect allergies

Rulers for measuring plant height

The complete Class Guide Series includes classes in four categories:

GEOLOGY & SOIL

Cumulative Lesson

Soil

Funding for course guide design provided by Sustainable Forestry Initiative.

CORE KNOWLEDGE

NATURAL SYSTEMS

WATER

GEOLOGY & SOIL

CL ASS GUIDE SER IES

www.treesfortomorrow.com 715-479-6456

email: learning @TreesForTomorrow.com

ÂŽ 2015

Trees for Tomorrow (May 14-17, 2017)  

Information regarding our trip to Trees for Tomorrow.

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