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PORTFOLIO JOHN CONNER SELECTED WORKS 2012-2014


RESUME JOHN CONNER CONTACT INFO

3050 Onyx St. Eugene, OR 97405 jconner2@uoregon.edu 1.541.740.3017

EDUCATION

2011 - Present University of Oregon School of Architecture & Allied Arts 2007 - 2011 Corvallis High School

EMPLOYMENT

2012 - Present Lifeguard Student Recreation Center Eugene, OR 2012 - Present Swim Instructor 2011 - Present Shift Manager 2010 - Present American Red Cross Instructor 2008 - Present Lifeguard Osborn Aquatic Center Corvallis, OR

Skills

Freehand Drawing Hand Drafting Hand Modeling AutoCAD RHINOceros

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Adobe InDesign Adobe Illustrator Adobe Photoshop Self-taught Graphic Design & Layouts

[ PORTFOLIO | | RESUME ]


JOHN CONNER

CON TENTS PACIFIC NORTHWEST WOODLAND RETREAT P. 03 SOUTHERN OREGON LAKE HOUSE P. 09 ARNARHOLL BATH HOUSE P. 13

[ PORTFOLIO | | CONTENTS ]

EAST WHITEAKER LIBRARY P. 19 YOGURT EXTREME LUMINAIRE P. 25

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PNW

Pacific Northwest Woodland retreat ARCH 283 - Architectural Design I - Winter 2012 Professor J. Travis Miller

a small writer’s cabin located deep Within the dense forests of the southern willamette valley

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DEEP IN THE WOODS

STORAGE

Designed to provide shelter for a single individuals from the elements of the forests of the Willamette Valley in the Coastal Range Mountains of Western Oregon, the writer’s hut aims to build a bond between man and nature.

The key aspects of the small hut came from the main ideas of the theoretical client of the project, the esteemed Pulitzer Prize-winning beat poet and environmentalist Gary Snyder, primarily his beliefs on the connections man and nature could have. The primary central idea around which the entire project was based was his belief that man could not directly associate or liken himself to an object, such as a tree, but instead man could create something to bridge that gap, an object that both he could associate himself to and that nature could be associated with.

8’ BED

With this central idea along with other environmental and sustainable principles, a small hut with a total footprint of 64 sq. ft. was designed to create a bridge between man and the forests of the Coastal Range. On this small 8’ x 8’ base, a 16 foot tall heavy timber and glass box reaches up to the top of the surrounding trees, housing only a sleeping area, a desk, and a small amount of storage. The clear glass walls of the retreat are covered by large 8’ x 8’ wooden panels composed of elegantly thin vertical louvres, drawing the eye farther up to the treetops. Large hinge systems allow the lower panels to be raised up, creating a further play of man and nature through the contrasting halves of the hut, the exposed glass walls up against the natural wood louvres. These large moving panels also allow for constant adaptation to the weather, allowing for various levels of shade, a semi-covered exterior space on all 4 sides of the hut, as well as natural ventilation of the space.

DESK/WORKSPACE

8’

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[ PNW WOODLAND RETREAT ]


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[ PNW WOODLAND RETREAT ]


EAST

ELEVATIONS

NORTH

EAST

NORTH

SECTIONS Pg. 08


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SOUTHERN OREGON LAKE HOUSE ARCH 283 - WINTER 2012

A LAKESIDE VILLA ALONG THE PACIFIC CREST TRAIL

ARCH 283 - Architectural Design I - Winter 2012 Professor J. Travis Miller

Settled at the top of a hill amongst the remnants of an old orchard overlooking an Oregon lake, the lake house attempts to provide a space that takes full advantage of its surroundings while fading away back in to the tree line.

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MAN WITHIN NATURE 2nd Floor At the top of a clearing overlooking the wide landscape of the Southern Oregon wilderness, the villa tries to integrate the tree line into its form and blend in to the surroundings. Designed again for poet Gary Snyder, the building sits on a relatively small rectangular footprint, less than 500 sq. ft., cantilevered over a deep man-made canyon housing a secret garden, projecting those inside out into the air whilst maintaining a grounded feeling. The thick walls and relative lack of corners of the building allow it to easily be insulated to Passivhaus standard, allowing even less impact on the environment, while the large South-facing windows with the large operable shading device allow for plenty of natural light for the villa. The home consists of a kitchen, dining room, and living room all combined into a larger multi-purpose room. Above this, a loft area oset from the main oor houses the bathroom, bedroom, and a small west-facing balcony space. Pg. 11

Ground Floor


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ARCH 284 - ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN II - SPRING 2012 - PROFESSOR J. TRAVIS MILLER

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Iceland sits atop the divergence of the Eurasian and North American tectonic plates in the chilly North Atlantic, creating an island of constant creation from the earth’s core, a true land of fire and ice. This constant shifting in the landscape plays an important role in the lives of the Icelandic people; the continuous changing and creation has had a massive effect on their culture and customs, primarily their preferred social locations. Due to the incredibly active geology of the area created by the tectonic shift, various geothermal baths and hot lagoons have been naturally formed throughout the island, creating warm spaces on even the coldest days. Over time, the connection to the natural geothermal baths has remained deeply engrained in Icelandic culture, remaining a key aspect of Icelandic life as well as evolving and changing into the man-made bath house which is seen throughout Iceland today.

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In the design for the bath house in Arnarholl Park in Reykjavik, I sought to bring the tectonic shift and the motion of splitting to the center of the building, to tie the building and the facilities it housed back to their original form in nature and how they were once created. At the same time, I tried to relate the overall form of the building back to its immediate surroundings in the heart of the capital. Located on the northern edge of Arnarholl Park, the site sits directly next to the headquarters of the Central Bank of Iceland, and across the street from both the Supreme Court and Ministry of Education. Beyond the immediate cluster of government buildings, the park is separated from the adjacent harbor and newly-built HARPA concert hall by a major artery leading through the heart of Reykjavik on its western side. Due to the location in the heart of the governmental district, I felt a responsibility to create a simple and respectful building, especially being a foreign designer working in such close proximity to key buildings in the nation’s capital.

[ ARNARHOLL BATH HOUSE ]


The building sits on the northern side of Arnarholl with a wide North-South face to utilize maximum daylighting for the building with a minimum East-West face to reduce the amount of glare experienced inside. Due to the building’s location parallel to the Central Bank of Iceland, located to the North-East of the site, a pedestrian thoroughfare occurs in the void between the buildings along the same path as Solvholsgata Street, ending at the existing staircase leading down to Kalkofnsvegur road and the HARPA concert hall. Due to this pedestrian thoroughfare, the commercial program of the building, a small cafÊ, has been shifted to the Northern side of the building to help entice people to walk through this area as well as take advantage of the large government and commercial buildings within the area.

SITE MAIN TRAFFIC GOVERNMENT BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

[ ARNARHOLL BATH HOUSE ]

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10 tectonic shifting and geological activity together with the bath house culture of Iceland into its architecture. The organization of the interior creates a large canyon between two larger masses of program, mimicking the two major tectonic plates that Iceland sits on. Between these lie the main social baths in the center, with a large class pool beneath the lobby and a single-lane lap pool off on the park side. By placing the main baths down the center of the main natatorium space, beneath the split halves of the building, it is placing the bath house culture of the Icelandic people down within the depths of the tectonic shift from which it has formed from.

1. Main Entrance & Outdoor Gallery Space 2. Lobby 3. Locker Rooms 4. Restrooms 5. Janitorial Closet 6. Lap Pool 7. Main Baths 8. Cafe 9. Lounge & Gallery Spaces 10. Administrative Offices 11. Conference Room 12. Sauna 13. Cold Room 14. Steam Bath 15. Aromatherapy Room 16. Mechanical Room 17. Class Pool

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2ND FLOOR

9

8 7

5

4 3

6 GROUND FLOOR

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2

3

1

16

BASEMENT

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[ ARNARHOLL BATH HOUSE ]


50 ft

South-West - Park Face

South-East - Front

North-East - Bank Side

North-West - Rear WHITE ROUGH-CUT SILLAR STONE

BRICK PATTERN w. PERFORATIONS

COPPER PANELS

To relate the building to its surroundings and back to the central idea of tectonic shifting and volcanic activity, the facade is coated in white sillar, mimicing the texture of the nearby Central Bank of Iceland’s facade. Over the windows on the northern face of the building, a pattern of the bricks with perforation helps create a playful light for the natatorium and the offices. This white stone is accented with copper panels inserted within the large glazing sections of the lobby and main natatorium, which will over time adapt and change with the maritime air to the well-known green patina, relating back to the copper-clad Supreme Court building nearby.

50 ft

[ ARNARHOLL BATH HOUSE ]

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arch 383 - architectural design III - fall 2012 - professor Juli Brode Pg. 20


In an age when resources and materials are readily available through online resources and digital media, the small branch library must be designed to flexible and adapt to the changes in the way people learn. If the library is unable to adapt, it will run the risk of becoming redundant and possibly ceasing to exist. To prevent this outcome, the East Whiteaker Branch Library must not only be a building focused on books, but also a flexible space able to adapt to the new forms of learning that lie ahead, and also act as a social center for the community.

The East Whiteaker Branch Library resides in Skinner’s Butte Park, on the border between Whiteaker neighborhood and the Market District, on the East side of Highway 106, which splits the Whiteaker in two. This location places the library away from the majority of the residential area of the Whiteaker area, as well as on the border of the built enviornment of central Eugene and the green space along the Willamette River. Due to this location, the identity of the site is split between the dense urban landscape and the natural terrain of the park, creating an opportunity for the building to act as a mediator between the two. Along with the overall identity combination between the two conflicting landscapes, the Whiteaker area brings another aspect to the idea of the library. Famous for being the eclectic area of Eugene, the do-it-yourself and localfocused attitude of Whiteaker causes it to be the prime location for a branch library. Although it sits only one mile away from the main Eugene public library, the area is more welcoming to localized facilities to help provide opportunities for the mostly lower-income community as well as materials specific to their eccentric artistic lifestyle. The neighborhood vernacular of the Whiteaker area is mostly smaller single-story, single-family houses built around the first half of the 20th century. With this environment, the library must act as a symbol of a new architecture for Whiteaker, being distinctly different than the rest of Eugene and Oregon Pg. 21


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To engage both the park and the city blocks, the library has a form that begins united on the Southern entrance face, but splits apart and participates with elements of the site in very different fashions. Whilst the central mass of the building continues in a rectangular shape to rise up as it continues down the plan, the outer thirds expand outward in a fan form, spreading their fingers out into the park landscape as they lower themselves down into the soil, pulling the grass up onto their sloping roofs.

looking west by the staff desk

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11 9 10

To make the East Whiteaker Branch Library a space able to adapt to the future changes in how we learn, a library of a single open room was chosen with its ability to be flexible and house what is needed now along with what would come in the future. To aid in the changes the library would have through its lifetime, the entire library was envisioned with easily-movable furniture and wheeled book shelves. This was chosen to allow the entire layout of the library to change in a matter of hours, or have areas enlarge/shrink with demand. With the mobile elements of the library, a small café was also added to the program of the building to add another reason for visitors to enter the branch library, causing it to become more of a small intimate bookstore in the park.

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1. covered entrance 2. restrooms 3. special exhibition area 4. children’s section 5. staff and administrative area 6. lounge 7. café 8. secured outdoor area 9. teen’s section 10. general book section 11. reading room

2 1

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7


west elevation

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A LUMINAIRE FOR YOGURT EXTREME JOHN CONNER - AMANDA DANIELS - Miranda Shum - jackie stinson ARCH 492 - Enviornmental Control Systems II - Spring 2013 Professor Ihab Elzeyadi

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THE EFFLORESCENT CHRYSANTHEMUM For our Enviornmental Control Systems II term project, we were instructed to investigate the electrical and daylighting situations at a local business or space. Our group chose Yogurt Extreme, a local self-serve frozen yogurt parlor chain with a location on 13th street, directly adjacent to the University of Oregon. In our study, we found that patrons mostly sat near the windows due to the abundance of southern natural light which came through. However, we also saw that other than the prospect of people watching, there was very few reasons to sit at the windows after sunset. As a result, we sought to create a wall-mounted luminaire that would create a more interesting atmosphere by the windows. The luminaire would serve as a secondary light source for the parlor during the night due to the sufficient electral lighting already in place in the parlor, as well as a sculptural piece during the day.

We as a group decided that we wanted our luminaire to relate back to its enviornment as best as possible, so we sought to utilize materials unique to Yogurt Extreme. This was the main driving force for our recycling of their used hot pink plastic spoons into the form of our luminaire. These spoons were not being recycled by the yogurt parlor, so we set up collection boxes to retrive these discarded items which we then sanitized, cut, melted and integrated into the design. These pink spoons in the shade would create a high level of red and pink tones around the bulb, so we also decided on a kelvin that would result with a much higher white content, as the cold light would then be amplified by the pink in the shade around it. Pg. 27

Left: Luminaire installed at Yogurt Extreme


PLAN

PROCESS DIAGRAMS RECYCLED SPOON FROM YOGURT EXTREME REMOVE HANDLE DISPOSE OF HANDLE, KEEP BOWL

use heat source to melt sharp cut point

ORIENT MULTIPLE BOWLS IN A CIRCULAR FORM GLUE CIRCLE OF BOWLS TOGETHER, CONTINUE CREATING CONCENTRIC CIRCLES OF BOWLS, GRADUALLY CURVING

MATERIALS

1” = 4.5”

ELEVATION

SECTION

Exterior Shell: Used Yogurt extreme pink plastic spoons e6000 epoxy glue Interior fixture stand: recycled scrap plywood light mount 125 volt wire & Plug

LIGHT SOURCE

Light Bulb: GE Compact fluorescent Light output: 850 lumens voltage: 125 volts Energy Used: 12 watts Efficiency: 65 lumens/watt life: 25,000 hours

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ALL WORK BY JOHN CONNER 2012-2014 UNLESS NOTED OTHERWISE ALL LAYOUTS BY JOHN CONNER 2013-2014 PROOFREADING & EDITING ASSISTANCE FROM ALEXANDRA HARRINGTON, VERONICA TWENGE, AND MAILE WU

John Conner - Portfolio, 2012-2014  

Portfolio of architecture work taken at the University of Oregon between 2012 and 2014, with works from 3 architectural design courses and o...

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