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issue fifteen

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Thursday, May 17th, 2018

volume lxxvii

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john adams high school

radio

Preview for an upcoming show sponsored by the Tower

Attending the trump rally: Discoveries, Hopes

Claire stowe - reporter

On Thursday, May 10th, thousands filed into Northside Middle School, taking their place in the bleachers and on the floor in the 7300-capacity gymnasium to attend President Donald Trump’s rally in Elkhart, Indiana. Supporters and hopefulattendees had been lining up on the nearby streets for twelve hours before the rally begin at 7pm. Lines of supporters carrying an array of signs reading “Keep America Great,” “Trump 2020,” “Women for Trump,” and even one reading “CNN is very fake news” wound around the school and neighborhood. All of the support for Trump was not unchallenged: across the street from the supporters were Trump protesters, shouting their own chants and holding their own signs. By 4:30, the line of protesters stretched far along Cassopolis street, next to the middle school. Arriving at the rally was somewhat of a harrowing experience in itself. Thousands of people, police brigades, closed streets, and full parking made for a difficult entrance into the venue. As Tower reporters, Seth Kirkpatrick, Ryan Downey, and myself received our first official press credentials for this event, and we arrived unaware of what our experience would hold. After a somewhat frantic search for parking, we entered the middle school and press box, passing by the long line of entering attendees. A prayer opened the event. This was somewhat jarring, as the first words spoken publicly were strongly religious. Kyle Hupfer, the Indiana chairman of the Republican party, spoke first, welcoming the audience and praising Indiana and Hoosiers before soon encouraging attendees to vote in November. “This is about control of the Senate,” he said. “[We have] one goal in mind: defeating Joe Donnelly.” Then came out the Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill, who eventually welcomed Vice President Mike Pence to the stage. Before introduc-

concerts

Dates and information for upcoming shows at Adams

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STUDENT- PRODU C ED # S I N C E 1 9 4 0 The Tower thanks the Herald-Palladium for printing services. We also request that readers consider donating to help pay for printing & production of our newspaper. Your donations will help the growth of a voice for the local community; your help and contributions are greatly appreciated.

primaries

Featuring results for the State of Indiana

ing Trump, Pence ran down the administration’s accomplishments, including their fight for “fair, free, and reciprocal” trade deals, the tax cut, and the progress on the border wall. “When it comes to that wall, we are going to build it all,” Pence said, receiving deafening cheers from the audience. Then President Trump began. “Optimism is at the top of every chart...America is being respected again,” he said, victoriously, before continuing by complimenting Hoosiers and rambling about Bobby Knight, and former Notre Dame football coach, Lou Holtz. He told more stories, talking extensively about the American embassy in Jerusalem. He released his slogan for his 2020 run: “Keep America Great.” He initiated a new nickname for Indiana Democratic Senator, Joe Donnelly: “Sleepin’ Joe,” a name which stems from Donnelly’s lack of action, according to Trump. He piled on fact after fact about low unemployment rate and job creation. He congratulated Republican Representative Jackie Walorski and Republican Senate candidate Mike Braun on their recent primary wins, and lended Braun the podium for several minutes. This was more-or-less what my co-reporters and I had expected: the mudslinging at Democrats and the wordy stories. But we were surprised at his nod toward the “fake news.” Trump’s hatred of the media is common knowledge, but this didn’t deter from my utter astonishment when the thousands in the gym turned to face the press box and began booing. Standing in the press box with locally and nationally known reporters was inspiring in itself. Seeing the unphased yet grim reaction of these reporters to the angry expressions of the audience was empowering and stunning. I was unaware of the utter disdain towards the media, and was left surprised and somewhat shaken. It was simply striking to see this behavior, and left me with a newfound understanding and idea of nobility for journalism. When the rally concluded, the crowd did not disperse immediately. The audience shifted outside of the school, members milling around or making purchases from the T-shirt and hat vendors. Along Cassopolis street, where the two lines of supporters and protesters faced off earlier, several protesters still remained. The conflict between the two never became physical, due to the large police

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spotlights

Duncan Ross Girls’ Tennis Boys’ Golf

presence and tape put up on both sides, but both supporters and protesters engaged in arguments, name calling, and chants. Although the numbers on both sides had decreased, the rift between ideas remained strong. “[Donald Trump] doesn’t make a lot of people feel welcome and we want him to not feel welcome. We hate that he’s here at a school... so we’re also here to tell the school board that they made an awful decision,” Juric Schulz said, who was protesting after the rally. “I’m mostly here to protect people who don’t feel safe under Trump’s administration, just to show them that there are people here to stand up for them and to protect them and speak up for them,” Noel Spring said, who was protesting with Schulz. Spring wanted to stress that there was aggression on both sides, and mentioned how disappointed she was at the lack of understanding and acceptance. “The divisiveness of our political climate is pretty disgusting and I think that’s what hit me the hardest today. I really wanted to talk to someone over there today because I really wanted to build a bridge or connect with someone or just share our humanity. I was able to do that, but it’s starting to get pretty negative...this is difficult to be around.” Schulz and Spring have both seen changes in their lives since Trump’s election. “The biggest thing for me is racism,” Spring commented. “Trump being in office is not deconstructing racism but is propping it up.” Spring also explained restrictions on women’s health globally, as Trump has taken measures to ban certain women’s health facilities that provide wide varieties of care, including to those in more developing countries. Schulz felt strongly about the issues surrounding undocumented immigrants. Immigration and Customs Enforcement [ICE] is “becoming a growing fear” for many, according to Schulz. But no matter party affiliation, no matter political beliefs, no matter disgust or delight at Trump’s visit to Elkhart, attending the rally was an experience: fascinating, slightly frightening, and educating. The politics of today are uncharted: no one knows where the next turn might take us. This rally cemented that belief for me, leaving me with unanswered questions and newfound hopes and fears, waiting to see what the next day holds.


2 - adams T h e

J o h n

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A d a m s

T o W E R ST A FF

Editor-In-Chief Kaity Radde ASSistant Editor-in-chief Casey Carroll managing editor Alicia Koszyk Layout EDITOR Kaity Radde LAYOUT AIDE Ryan Downey Reporters Nora Battista Ryan Downey Julianne Grohowski Claire Hargis Seth Kirkpatrick Sami Mirza Claire Stowe Anna Tarner Zachary Veazie Sierra Weaver Kenneth Weston Advisor John Nowicki

radio tower: the void

claire hargis - reporter

The Void is a new radio show being sponsored by The Tower. The show consists of three main characters: Kate, Braxton, and Oliver. The first show begins with the group driving since they are taking a trip, and let’s just say things get a little weird. Upon listening to the first episode, I have really good things to say about the show as a whole. I really enjoy the sound effects that are played during conversation. It really enhances the listening experience and makes it seem like the characters are real people. The script is very well written and the characters are well-developed, making the show easy to follow. Overall, I really recommend this show to anyone who wants to be entertained and listen to something a little strange. The listener is able to connect with the characters emotionally and be shocked and confused by the shows sci-fi nature at the same time. The show kept me on the edge of my seat and after listening to the first episode I am excited to view the next show, and I know anyone who listens to it will be thrilled. The show will be released on May 26th on https://www.soundcloud. com/sbvoid.

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senior spotlight: Boys’ Golf

julianne grohowski - reporter

One of the many thriving spring sports for the 2018 season at Adams is the boys golf team. So far with a record of 5-1, the team has competed in tournaments against local schools such as Riley, Saint Joe, Clay, and Penn. Along with these tournaments, the varsity team was invited to golf at the Kaeppler Invitational, where they placed 4th, and at the Flo Troeger Invite, where they placed in 5th. The team is practicing and working hard for the upcoming Northern Indiana Conference [NIC] tournament on May 26th, and, if anyone individually qualifies, eventually for regionals and state. For the seniors, these final few matches will be their last on the team. One of the forefront players, Maurice Manuel, has been on JV for three years and advanced to the Varsity team for his senior year. He has been golfing for five years in total so far. While he doesn’t have plans to further his golf career beyond the high school level, one of his biggest achievements while golfing was “beating [his] dad for $50.” His favorite memory is “trying to get to Chipotle and back to Erskine by 3:15.” Owen Glick, another senior, has been golfing for a total of three years with two years on JV and his senior year on Varsity. He as well doesn’t have any plans to continue golfing on a team in college, but nevertheless has had many achievements, including what he considers his greatest achievement in golf: “chipping a ball in from 50 yards away.” Glick is a standout on the team, individually ranking in this season’s tournaments: against Saint Joe and Riley he shot a 52 and at the city meet he scored a 102.


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new tvs to highlight student achievements

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sami mirza - reporter

By now most of us have seen the large, flat-screen televisions that have been installed around the building. There’s one in the cafeteria, one by guidance, and a couple in front of the main office. At the moment, most of them are displaying slides showcasing seniors and their post-graduation plans. “The program uses a Google Slide, so anything we can put on a Google Slide we can put on the T.V.’s.” wrote Principle Seitz, in an email to The Tower. “We would like to be able to have students eventually display [...] and create the content.” Televisions are not new to Adams. The old ones in the cafeteria display announcements about schedules and school activities, but these are fairly limited, often mirroring the afternoon bulletin that comes at the end of 7th hour. According to Seitz, this won’t be the case in days to come. “We want to be able to highlight our students and different events that take place at JA.” wrote Mr. Seitz. Most of the PA broadcast centers around bus changes, or club information. Already this change is evident, with the first content displayed on the new screens illustrating seniors and their plans. These improvements came at no cost to the school itself. The televisions, wiring, and the equipment necessary to translate the data from computer to the televisions were all covered by a contribution from the Wilbur and Fern Granger Memorial Fund. Said Mr. Seitz: “There was no cost to the school, students, parents, or taxpayers.”

adams’ talent to be showcased

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The Yearbook will be released Tuesday, May 22. There is a limited amount so make sure to purchase one while supplies last!

by the music department, on Tuesday, May 29th the National Honors Society of John Adams will be hosting their annual Night of the Arts showcase. This year it will be a part of the “Best Week Ever” in South Bend which celryan downey - reporter ebrates culture, progress, and creativAs the 2018 school year comes to a ity throughout the community. Night close, all of the branches of the John Adams Music Department are taking a of the Arts will be a showcase of all moment to “blossom” in the spring. On art forms in the community, including pottery, photography, painting, music Thursday, May 31st, the Choir, conducted by Dr. Moely, the Band, fronted performed by John Adams students, by Ms. Zolvinski and Ms. Ronfeldt, and and even a “food-off” in the cafeteria. The admission is $5 and all of the prothe Orchestra, led by no other than ceeds will go to the Humane Society, Ms. Kohn, will perform several pieces who will be hosting an adoption event to showcase the stunning talent of the there as well! Come enjoy the fun and music department. The spring concert explore the culture of South Bend at will be held at 7 p.m in the JA Auditothe National Honors Society’s Night of rium. In addition to the performance hosted the Arts from 5-9 p.m!


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Senior spotlight: duncan ross

anna tarner - reporter

As quickly as the spring sport season started, it’s ending just as fast. With only a few weeks left of school and finals rapidly approaching, our spring sports here at John Adams are wrapping up practices and competing in their last matches, games, and meets. Sadly for some students, their high school athletic careers are coming to a close. Seniors for track, softball, baseball, girls tennis and lacrosse are being represented for their achievements these past four years, and here in newspaper, we award some of them with an article dedicated to their success as good student-athletes. Although the South Bend Bears are in fact not an Adams sports team, the majority of the team consists of our very own Eagles. The South Bend Bears are only a two year old team, but that doesn’t stop them from being one of the best boys lacrosse team in the area. Last year, as a first year team, they came out of the season going 10-2, which senior spotlight for this week’s issue, Duncan Ross, says “was something we didn’t think a lot of people were expecting.” They are continuing to power on through their second year as a club team, right now being 8-2. Although they have a couple games left, there’s no doubt that they’re ready for whatever their opponent teams will throw at them. Senior Duncan Ross has been playing lacrosse for thirteen years. Growing up in Virginia, he was surrounded by it: friends and family from the East Coast area all played, including his older sister, which sparked his interest for the sport. He began playing when he was five, and loved it from the beginning. “I was never a huge baseball or football guy, but I’ve always been really athletic and lacrosse was the most fun I ever had playing a sport. It brought a lot of aspects of different sports together, so it really was the best of both worlds. I was hooked.” Playing that long has molded Ross into an expert. Ross has been a four-year varsity player, (two years at St. Joseph High, and two years for the South Bend Bears) along with being a two year team captain alongside his brother Aidan,

THURSD A Y , and being named MVP of the team. Last year, he was named a Brine High School Lacrosse All-American, and he was able to compete in the Brine High School Lacrosse All-American tournament in Virginia. Ross says that his relationship with The South Bend Bears has always been good, and he loves the atmosphere. His relationship with his teammates has always been good, and he says that they’re some of his best friends on and off the field. They all have “wicked good chemistry” and are “able to vibe well with each other. We know each other’s style of play, so when one of us gets the ball it’s really easy to make a decision on how to play off- ball or where to set picks and whatnot. It’s a good feeling.” Although the dynamic with his coach is different than his teammates, he states that it’s a great player-coach relationship and his coach is always there if he needs something. Last year Ross committed to play lacrosse for Grand Canyon University [GCU] in Arizona. GCU is the defending Men’s Collegiate Lacrosse Association [MCLA] D-1 national champions. “I was siked to go out west and make an impact on the team, but what I wanted to do as a student changed, so I decided to decommit and look for a school that better fit my academic agenda.” He decided to go to Indiana University and play for their MCLA team. He plans on majoring in business and finance but is still waiting to see what the future holds. Ross offered advice to younger athletes: “work as hard as you can both on the field and in the classroom. I never really dug deep into the whole recruitment process, but because I worked hard and my grades were solid, a lot of colleges sought me out and that gave me a lot more options for what I wanted to do with college and the rest of my life.” He says that working hard is one of the most important things if you want to be successful in high school. Lastly, Ross wanted to thank a few important people, “Woodblock, my protégé Ezra Zabukovic, Aidan (my brother), Kaene, Vince, all my lacrosse coaches throughout my lacrosse career, and all my other homies.” Congratulations to Duncan Ross for his success in lacrosse, and good luck to him in the future. Come out on Saturday to school field to support your Adams Eagles and The South Bend Bears in their last game of the season!

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senior spotlight: Mia konkey and alaina strafford

nora battista - reporter Mia Konkey and Alaina Strafford are coming to the end of their high school tennis careers, leaving them a chance to reflect. Strafford and Konkey have been partners on the court all four years of their high school careers. They have a strong bond, both on and off the court, and greatly rely on each other. “I think our teamwork is a good reflection of our friendship: outside of the court we are good support systems for one another and it’s the same thing when we play. We are constantly supportive of each other and make each other work harder,” Konkey explains. They both shared their favorite memories and best moments while playing tennis, specifically beating Marian, La Porte, and New Prairie. Strafford has been playing tennis since the age of four, and her experience drove her to join the team during high school. Konkey was inspired to join because of her sister, who previously played for Adams. They both love being on the team and playing with their teammates. “The best thing about the team is our unanimous (but unsaid) agreement to just have fun with the season. We’re competitive, but also take dance breaks when necessary,” Konkey says. “I think the best thing about the team is the energy and spirit that all of the girls have. Win or lose, we always have a good time,” Strafford adds. They’ve taken many things away from playing tennis, but especially important are the relationships and morals that they developed. Konkey says,“After playing tennis with Alaina for four years, I built such a rewarding relationship with her... she now feels like a sister to me.” Strafford comments, “From tennis, I have taken away that the most important thing in any aspect of your life is to be kind. Tennis can be a very personal sport, and it pays off to just be nice and have fun with it.” Both Strafford and Konkey had a very fun and rewarding season, and are very deserving of their spotlights.


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tiana mudziumerama

sierra weaver - reporter The National Shakespeare Monologue Competition in New York City took place on April 23, 2018. Tiana Mudziumerama, a senior at John Adams, competed in the competition. After winning the state competition for Indiana, she went on to the national competition in New York. Mudziumerama explained her journey: “I won the state. One person from each state represents their entire state and they’re flown to New York City to compete in the National Shakespeare Competition.” Mudziumerama has been doing Shakespeare for around nine years. She explained what she has specifically focused on over the years by explaining her acting history: “I’ve probably been a part of 10 plays, but since sophomore year, I’ve only done the monologue competition.” When asked how she became involved in Shakespeare, she explained through “The Robinson Shakespeare Company. It’s an individual company at the Robinson Center. A lot of the time, the kids who attend the Robinson Center [...] hear about the Shakespeare program. It’s after tutoring, once a week on Thursdays. That’s how a lot of kids are pulled into it.” Mudziumerama spent five days in New York for the national competition. “I competed against 56 kids. I stayed in a hostel with eight other girls. We all stayed in one room for four nights. It was crazy cramped, but I met some really great people.” Mudziumerama also talked about the basics of the competition. “We had to be there from 6 am to 6 pm.[...] In the first round, all 56 kids went, and the top ten went in the second round.” There were also other activities Mudziumerama did as a part of the competition in New York. “On the night before the competition, we went to NYU and we took

classes at Tisch. [...] We went to Juilliard and we toured the dance, the theater, and the singing departments [...] When I was on my own, we went to all the cool places in Times Square and I built relationships with some of the other girls on the trip. It was really nice.” When asked about college, Mudziumerama explained her future plans. “I’m going to Northeastern University in Boston. I got a full ride.” Mudziumerama elaborated on her scholarship by saying “It’s called the Torch Scholars Program [...] I went through the whole interview process. They flew me to Boston in March, there were 500 applications and the top 50 went to Boston. We went through an all day, 12-hour interview process. I found out at the beginning of April that I had gotten the scholarship [...] It’s for whatever I want to study. I’m currently accepted into the business school, but I love so many other things. I’ve been thinking about something in science.” She also talked about her decision in colleges and how theater affected it: “I’m really hoping to do theater. One of the reasons why I selected [Northeastern University] was because it’s in a city and I know I’ll be able to do so many other things, like go to plays. New York City is only

three hours away from Boston, so I’m hoping to still be a part of theater.” Mudziumerama also gave advice to teenagers coming into high school who wish to pursue acting. “Go for it! It’s not as easy as you might think though. You have to be creative, but the biggest key is to be yourself. You have to be in touch with your vulnerable side, because some of the best actors allow themselves to reach places that are hard to face, but that’s what makes them great [...] I would encourage kids to be their purest selves, and if they don’t feel they can do it on a normal basis, then theater is where they can do it. You can openly express who you are and who you want to be.” She finished by explaining the importance of the arts in her life, and encouraged others to feel the same. “I just want to stress the importance of the arts. A lot of people think that sports hold power [...] I just wish people would put more time and effort into the arts. It has shaped me to be who I am. Theater has built me into a stronger person.” It seems that acting has truly changed Mudziumerama and that she doesn’t plan on stopping anytime soon. It is only the beginning for Tiana Mudziumerama’s acting career.


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north korea’s “bright” future

seth kirkpatrick - reporter On April 28th 2018, North and South Korea signed the “Panmunjom Declaration of Peace and Unification” which encourages both countries to enact denuclearization and also brings a formal end to their long, hard fought conflict that first began during the Korean War in 1950. This peace treaty came as a surprise to many, especially due to the fact that North Korea, only a month prior, was testing nuclear missiles and threatening a variety of different countries. With this peace treaty, North Korea also installed the internet, opening themselves up to the world, and returned three American prisoners without any compensation. With this event having raised new thoughts and questions, it seemed only logical to receive input from someone in the Adams community who is knowledgeable in these issues - Mr.Szucs. Mr.Szucs is the head of the Social Studies department at Adams, and contributed even further by beginning the famous Adams Mock Trial program. When asked about the events relating to North and South Korea, Mr.Szucs stated that he is “encouraged” by the new developments and that when two conflicting countries finally come to peace, “it’s a great thing.” He added that “any opportunity for peace is exciting,” but he was not sure if the agreement would succeed due to “North Korea’s history of not sticking to obligations.” He was not entirely sure of the reason for this, as “it could be many.” He also states that the recent olympics were an “open door” to make this peace treaty. He believes that America helped with the evolving policies, but Donald Trump “took more credit than deserved” when it came to this historic event. However, he counters this by also mentioning how the president always “gets more credit than deserved as well as more criticism than deserved.” Szucs believes that “everyone can profit from this” and is hope-

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ful that Kim-Jong Un “keeps his promises.” He sees hope in the relationship between North Korea and the world, and believes that if this works out he can see a possible conclusion to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. If this peace treaty truly comes to fruition, it can be a symbol of hope, opening doors for more countries to denuclearize themselves and put in effort to talk things out and resole age-old conflicts

The race for indiana

zachary veazie - reporter The 2018 Midterm elections are underway, and Indiana is an important battleground. The primaries happened on May 8th, determining the candidates that will be running for each party. In the Senate election, Mike Braun won for the Republicans, a staunch conservative siding with President Trump on most issues. Braun will be facing the incumbent Joe Donnelly, a “Blue Dog” conservative Democrat, in November of this year.

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Braun is an avid Second Amendment supporter; in his political adverts he is firing an AR-15 rifle and drinking beer. He’s also focusing on healthcare reform, protecting the southern border, and reducing government spending. Donnelly, despite his party affiliation, also supports the Second Amendment, being one of the few democrats with a high rating from the National Rifle Association. He takes the Pro-Life stance on abortion, being a minority within his party. He also has mixed feelings towards the LGBT community: he opposed them in his 2012 senate campaign, but a year later Donnelly changed his stance and said he supports same-sex marriage. Another important race was that of the House of Representatives. In which Jackie Walorski, the incumbent Republican, won with an overwhelming majority. Mel Hall, a moderate Democrat, took the majority in the Democratic Primary, winning the candidacy over Yatish Joshi and Pat Hackett. Hall received staunch criticism from his more progressive party members, with Hackett claiming to be the “True Democrat.”

The Tower issue #15 2017-18 (05-17-2018)  

Issue #15 of the John Adams High School Tower Student Newspaper covers stories about a new radio show at JAHS, concerts, the May primaries a...

The Tower issue #15 2017-18 (05-17-2018)  

Issue #15 of the John Adams High School Tower Student Newspaper covers stories about a new radio show at JAHS, concerts, the May primaries a...

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