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TRIBAL WATER

EASY AS TACO SOUP

Quality Recognized

Vitamin Packed and Delicious

CHEYENNE COUNTRY CheyenneNation.com | April 2013 | VOICE OF THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBE |

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Fiscal Cliff Impacts Cheyenne and Tribal Nations Sequestration forcing budget cuts across the board for next 10 years

By Lenny Smith Of Cheyenne Country This month the Northern Cheyenne Nation began slashing millions of dollars from the tribe’s budget—an estimated $20 million. Beginning March 1, 2013, forced spending cuts reached the Northern Cheyenne Reservation impacting tribal programs in the Department of the Interior. According to Mike Addy, Superintendent of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, in a discussion with tribal officials on sequestration in early March, the timing and magnitude of most of the cuts are uncertain. In the meantime, the Northern Cheyenne Tribe is preparing to make annual cuts

across the board meaning that agencies and departments don’t have any input on how it goes into effect. “It’s going to be that way for the next ten years essentially. The sequestration was a ten year plan, and it indiscriminately cut everybody officially by 5 percent,” stated Beverly Stiller, Administrative Officer for the Bureau of Indian affairs. In addition to this Stiller stated that all programs will freeze hiring on nonessential positions and reduce training and travel. The cuts will jump to 8 percent or more in 2014 and will remain at that level until 2023. Jefferson Keel, President of the National Congress of American Indians outlined in a series of

letters how the cuts would lead to devastating impacts to health care systems, law enforcement, education and other essential governmental services for tribal

“The tribe is at a very critical time in it’s development.”

—President Robinson Northern Cheyenne Tribe

governments and communities. Unfortunately, the cuts will disproportionately hit the neediest tribal members, with cuts to housing, health care and education. “Federal responsibilities to

tribes are already significantly underfunded and the problems we are working hard to confront will only be exacerbated if treaty obligations are treated as line items,” stated Keel. “Tribal programs make up a miniscule part of the federal budget – for example the Indian Health Service is 0.12 percent of federal spending and Bureau of Indian Affairs is -0.07 percent. Cuts at the sequester level of 8.2 percent, or deeper, to investments in education, housing, roads, law enforcement, tribal courts, natural resources, energy development, job training, and health care will deal a devastating blow to already dire economic conditions in Indian Country.” According to Northern Tribal

President John Robinson, “The tribe is at a very critical time in it’s development.” He believes the sequestration could thwart the tribe’s ability to promote economic growth or plan for the benefit of future generations and that we need to make changes to help adapt to the budget cuts. However, despite the effects of sequestration, the tribe is still committed to fulfilling everything in it’s scope even though it has less money to operate. “I think that people are starting to recognize the true impacts and that it’s everywhere. It’s not just us as a tribe,” says Stiller. “We have no choice but to be creative in insuring in that we somehow still meet our requirements.”

Honor Your Life

John A. Youngbear/Cheyenne Country

Northern Cheyenne Tribal Health’s Community Health Programs initiates events and outreach that focus on educating the tribal community about teen pregnancy, tobacco prevention and suicide awareness issues in classrooms, community events and gatherings promoting healthy lifestyles. Northern Cheyenne Tribal Health’s Community Health Programs, above, initiates events and outreach that focus on educating the tribal community about teen pregnancy, tobacco prevention and suicide awareness issues in classrooms, community events and gatherings promoting healthy lifestyles. Audience members, below, review emergency contact and hotline phone resources available to youth and those impacted by suicide.

Offering Hope

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uicide is such a shocking cause of death, so often shrouded in mystery. In fact, there is a social stigma that is placed on the entire concept in American Indian culture. On reservations around the U.S., Native American children and young adults are taking their lives at more than triple the rate of other youngsters around the country, upsetting entire communities. This is devastating for the Northern Cheyenne Tribe since 60 percent of the entire population is under 30 years old. Often one death will bring others into a state of depression resulting in more suicides. According to Indian Health Service, suicide is the second-leading cause of death behind accidental injuries among American Indian youth. In recent months, the Northern Chey-

enne and Crow tribes have lost four young victims to suicide. Northern Cheyenne Tribal President John Robinson is taking a stand to promote the prevention of tragedies like those from taking place. In early March he proposed that the month of April should be Suicide Awareness and Prevention Month. The proposal was passed unanimously by the tribal council soon after, driving local programs toward addressing the issue head-on. “It won’t just quit when the month is over,” Robinson stated adding that Suicide Awareness and Prevention Month is just the beginning of a long-term and in-depth progression towards addressing the problem at its source thus preventing further suicides from happening. “We need to heal and we can’t just heal as individuals, the community is involved.”

Stories by Lenny Smith Photos by John A. Youngbear —Special Report on Page 5—


PAGE 2

PRESIDENT JOHN J. ROBINSON

CHEYENNE COUNTRY | VOICE OF THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBE

Blessing Awareness Efforts Preventing Suicide and Celebrating Life

Adapting to Our Future Nation’s motive for change

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ike many others, I campaigned for this office on a platform of change. In retrospect, the platform would have been adaptation. Our people are alive and well today because our beliefs and our practices allowed us to keep our core values as Northern Cheyenne, yet also adapt to incredibly difficult changes in circumstance. Our first treaty with representatives of the United States government was in 1825, the Friendship Treaty. For the next 55 years, the government was determined to extinguish us as a people. So much for “friendship.” We suffered a terrible loss of life, but not only did we survive, we reclaimed our homeland and have spent the decades since growing and adapting as a people. The Northern Cheyenne people are now warriors of the 21st century, and once again, we need to adapt. We are facing incredible challenges, but thanks to our courage, our resilience, and our spiritual values, we are ready for the battles. Our goal is to abolish poverty through employment, training, education, and economic growth; to eradicate drug and alcohol addiction; to eradicate domestic abuse, child abuse, and elder abuse; and to increase access to quality healthcare for all of our people. The United States government is undergoing “sequestration,” which will take its toll on the services to our Tribe starting in October. We have basic baseline data to give us our starting point, and it will be a long hard fought battle, but we will not give up. We are not going to adapt to this version of reservation life and sit around blaming “them.” I am calling upon all of our people to work together. Poverty, unemployment, high school dropout, alcoholism, drug addiction, violence against children, women, and elders are not acceptable. This is not who we are. This is not the Northern Cheyenne who fled the harsh reservation life in Oklahoma, broke out of confinement in Nebraska, and reclaimed our homeland. We are going to quit blaming, take responsibility over the future of our children, and work together with dignity, courage, and spiritual strength to lead and protect our families. The majority of our Tribe is represented by young people under 30 years old and of great concern to me is the fact that we are losing them. They are the very group of people amongst us who should be the most hopeful, yet it saddens me to say that we as a Tribe are facing a trend of youth suicide. These losses impact all of us as a Tribe, but there is slight comfort in knowing they are now with the Creator. We always ask the question of ourselves, “Could I have done more?” We as a community could help if we knew what to look for and what to do. Here is a starting point: the month of April has been declared ‘Suicide Awareness and Prevention’ month by the Northern Cheyenne Tribal Council. We cannot allow one more person—child, teen, or adult—to conclude that they have no options. We need to reach out, offer help, and offer hope. Families are grieving and don’t know where to turn. We are going to make a change. Join in the activities that will start at the Tribal Council Chambers on April 2. We will travel into each community, school, and district throughout April. This will only be the start of a community commitment to helping one another. We lost quite a few tribal members this month. Let’s keep their families and loved ones in our prayers, and let’s be ready to step up and help them through these difficult times. We are resuming the district Listening Sessions. Our people have the right to accurate information about the status of the Otter Creek coal mine, the Tongue River Railroad, and the tribal resolution that established the Energy Development Committee. I believe in the policy of transparency in government and will visit Muddy, Busby, Lame Deer, and Ashland Districts to present the information, and to hear your comments and concerns. The schedule is as follows: Lame Deer on April 2 at 6pm at the Tribal Chambers; Muddy on April 3 at 6pm at the Muddy Hall; Busby on April 9 at Northern Cheyenne Tribal Schools cafeteria at 6pm; and Ashland on April 10 at Rabbit Town Hall at 6pm. Business at the office has been extremely busy. I credit Vice President Winfield Russell and my administrative staff of Edina Red Star, Desi Small-Rodriguez, and Bill Mason for shouldering the load of keeping my office running on schedule. We are still looking for the right formula that would allow me the time to meet with as many community members as possible, still have the time for my administrative tasks, and very importantly enjoy time with my family. I am particularly interested in participating in local community events and would appreciate it if you would send notice of these events to Edina Red Star at the Tribal Office or to <edina.redstar@ cheyennenation.com> We have received a lot of good comments on our new communications department. John and Lenny are doing a wonderful job of getting the news to you. You folks out there in Cheyenne Country have a wonderful month!

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blessing by Cheyenne elder Francis Limpy opened up a series of awareness and prevention education activities by Northern Cheyenne Tribal Health’s ‘Honor Your Life and Methamphetamine and Suicide Prevention Initiative programs for the month of April. President Robinson and the tribal council declared April, ‘Suicide Awareness and Prevention’ month in response to the number of suicides in the past few years. Photos by John A. Youngbear

We are facing incredible challenges, but thanks to our courage, our resilience, and our spiritual values, we are ready for the battles.

www.ncTribeSurvey.com/resources

CHEYENNE COUNTRY John A. Youngbear Director of Communications Lenny Smith Media Specialist Editorial Headquarters: Communications Department, 600 Cheyenne Avenue, Lame Deer, MT 59043, Telephone (406) 477-4862 Tribal Headquarters: Northern Cheyenne Tribe, 600 Cheyenne Avenue, Lame Deer, MT 59043, Telephone (406) 477-6284 Where to Write: Northern Cheyenne Tribe Communications P.O. Box 128 Lame Deer, MT 59043 Email: communications@cheyennenation.com Cheyenne Country welcomes letters from its readers. For verification purposes include home address and phone number (day and evening). The more concise and reasoned a letter, the more likely it will be chosen and the less likely it will need to be condensed. Cheyenne Country is published monthly with news, calendar items, and articles promoting and disseminating tribal program updates, policies, and human interest topics and primarily for the tribal readership. Subject areas within the newspaper are evolving and changing monthly while editorial schedules are implemented some articles in the opinion are strictly in the view of the writer and do not reflect the opinion or view of this publication. Any correspondence, letters or articles published here are strictly for the convenience and use of this publication editorial, administration or advisors. Cheyenne Country is not responsible for loss, damage or any other injury to unsolicited manuscripts, unsolicited art work (including but not limited to drawings, photographs, and transparencies), or any other unsolicited materials. Those submitting manuscripts, photographs, art work, or other materials for consideration should not send originals, unless specifically requested to do so by Cheyenne Country in writing. Manuscripts, photographs, and other materials submitted must be accompanied by a self-addressed stamped return envelope, postage prepaid.


April 2013 | PAGE 3

CHEYENNE COUNTRY | VOICE OF THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBE

MONTANA HOUSE DISTRICT 41

Native Legislation

Establishing Tribal Rights for Everyone

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ndian Country Economic Development (ICED) became an issue for legislators in both the Senate and House, state economic funding is given to various districts for projects, the average amount is over $3-8 million, yet the tribes split ICED funds equally despite population differences and reservation sizes. Each tribe will receive $70,000, which is not much funding and was taken away from tribes and given to one entity in Great Falls. The Native American Caucus met with the subcommittee to discuss the loss of funding, the reasoning for this decision was based off of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families statistics and that no records were kept by the tribes, despite adequate data based on recent information, in particular the BIA Labor report statistics that can be pulled off the Internet for review by anyone. All three senators and four legislators; Sen. Shannon Aguare, Sen. Sharon Peragory, Sen. Jon Windyboy; Rep. Rae Peppers, Rep. Lea Whitford, Rep. Carolyn Pease, Rep. Clarena Brockie, Frosty Calf Boss Ribs was not present; each legislator spoke harshly of this haste decision to pull this small token of funding from the tribes. Thanks to their brave testimony ICED funding totaling $400,000 was put back in place for the tribes. SB 342 An Act Establishing the Montana Indian Language Preservation Pilot Program states that: Montana is committed in its educational goals to the preservation of American Indian cultural integrity; and language in the form of spoken, written, or sign language is foundational to cultural integrity; and Montana tribal languages are in a time of crisis through the loss of native speakers, writers, and signers; and the tribes and the state have resources, such as the tribal colleges, councils, and historic preservation offices and the state universities, historical society, and library, to preserve and protect Montana tribal languages for this and future generations. Bill will be carried by Senator Jon Windy Boy and Co-sponsored by the Indian Caucus. It has passed the Senate and will be sent to the House for another vote. SB 272 An act creating the Montana Indian Child Welfare Act; establishing that procedures for child custody proceedings involving Indian children are subject to the Montana Indian child welfare act states that: The legislature finds that the state is committed to protecting the essential tribal relations and best interests of Indian children by promoting practices designed to prevent out-of-home placement of Indian children that is inconsistent with the rights of the parents, the health, safety, or welfare of the child, or the interests of the child’s tribe. Bill will be carried by Senator Jon Windyboy and co-sponsored by the Indian Caucus. HJ 13 A Joint Resolution Of The Senate And The House Of Representatives Of The State Of Montana Urging The United States Congress To Pass The Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act Of 2013 stating that: The Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) was developed with input of advocates from around the country and from all walks of life and addresses the real and most important needs of victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking. Bill will be carried by Frosty Boss Calf Ribs and co-sponsored by the Indian Caucus. HB 286 An Act Expanding The Eligibility For Tuition And Fee Waivers to Include Residents Of Montana Who Are Enrolled Members Of A State-Recognized Or Federally Recognized Indian Tribe who HAVE ONE-FOURTH INDIAN BLOOD OR MORE or are enrolled members of a state-recognized or federally recognized Indian tribe and who have been bona fide residents of Montana for at least 1 year prior to enrollment in the Montana university system. Bill was carried by Rep. Clarena Brockie and co-sponsored by the Indian Caucus. HB 447 An Act Entitled: “An Act Establishing A State Scholarship Program For Eligible Purple Heart Recipients. Bill is carried by Rep. Rae Peppers and co-sponsored by the Indian Caucus.

Bear Butte, S.D. Members of the Tribal Council and Vice-President Russell traveled to Bear Butte, S.D. Thursday, March 28, 2013, to begin preparing the traditional camping and ceremonial site on the western side of the mountain for this summer’s cultural activities.

HISTORIC PRESERVATION OFFICE

Because of its rich history of tribal habitation there is an abundance of archaeological as well as tribal sensitive sites in the area.

Ancestral Ties

Delegates to Consult with Affected Tribes

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he Tongue River Railroad proposal has ties to when Miles City was first established in the early 1870s. Since that time there has been much discussion about a north-south rail line that would connect Miles City to the Sheridan and Decker area. This would cover approximately 125 miles adjacent to the Tongue River and within the Tongue River valley. Over the years there has been much speculation and promotional business ventures regarding the Tongue River railroad. The Tongue River begins its journey in the Rocky Mountains in North Central Wyoming. It flows into Montana and is dammed near Decker, Montana and forms the Tongue River Reservoir. It continues in a north east direction to the Yellowstone river. It also borders the eastern part of the Northern Cheyenne reservation. The Tongue River is part of the larger geologic structure known as the Powder river basin. Geologically speaking, the Tongue river is best known for its sandstone outcrops that was formed about 60 million years ago when mountain uplifts began rising from a shallow sea. The Tongue River has sandstone outcrop is part of the Fort Union Formation and has lots of coal deposits in it. According to various estimates the tongue River sandstone crops houses about 32 coal seams with a combined thickness in excess of 300 feet. It has a low sulfur content and is a highly sought energy source for coal fired generating plants around the country because of federal emission standards. A number of tribes claim the Powder River Basin as part of their ancestral homelands including the Cheyenne. More recently it is part of a greater complex of wars fought against the U.S. government called the “Great Sioux Wars.” Because of its rich history of tribal habitation there is an abundance of archaeological as well as tribal sensitive sites in the area. The Northern Cheyenne reservation is also located along the Tongue River. ince the wars, the Powder River Basin has been settled by farmers, ranchers, and the Northern Cheyenne. The most recent Tongue River Railroad venture began about 25 years ago for a line from Miles City to Decker, Montana. However, after many lawsuits and consultation with tribes and public participation, a shorter version from Colstrip to Ashland was proposed by the owners of the rail line. The new proposal will have to pass federal cultural and environmental laws. In June of 2012 the Surface transportation Board ordered TRR to reapply for a permit because the old permit was based on outdated information and a new route. The Surface Transportation Board will meet with Tribes that have ancestral ties to the region including the proposed new route for 3 days starting in April 15th through the 17th 2013. The purpose of the meeting is to consult with tribes on cultural resources within the area of potential effect (corridor). However, there will also be lots of discussion on environmental impacts to the reservation and other issues that tribes have with reference to coal development and the railroad. If you have any questions, please call Conrad Fisher, Tribal Historic Preservation Office, at 406-477-4839.

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The graphic, left, indicates alternate routes for the proposed Tongue River Railroad and Otter Creek development.


PAGE 4 | April 2013

CHEYENNE COUNTRY | VOICE OF THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBE

FITNESS

CHEYENNE COUNTRY | VOICE OF THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBE

Fit for Success An everyday lifestyle By Paul Hill Wellness Center For Cheyenne Country These terms are commonly used interchangeably; but, what do they mean to you? For most people the meaning of these terms is influenced by the viewpoint in which they are used and by the person’s interpretation based upon background and experience. Physical Fitness is the organic condition of the body which enables an individual to use his/her body in activities requiring strength, muscular endurance, cardio-respiratory fitness, flexibility, coordination, agility, power, balance, speed and accuracy – without undue experience of fatigue and exhaustion. Physical Fitness may also be defined as the ability to carry out daily tasks with vigor and alertness, without undue fatigue and with ample energy to engage in leisure time pursuits. To meet the above average physical stresses encountered in emergency situations. The components of physical fitness can be divided into two categories. Health Related Components Cardio-respiratory fitness Body composition Flexibility Absolute strength Dynamic strength (muscular strength) Motor-Related Components Coordination Agility Power Balance Speed Accuracy The health-related components take up greater importance because they make an individual fit for life – a functional, productive human being for everyday living. The motor-related components make an individual successful in athletic actions or areas of motor performance (skill).

Hydration & Sweat Key Thirst not always best indicator

According to the Nation Athletic Trainers Association website, a statement was released in February that addresses the dangers of dehydration during exercise routines. The following applies to activity at all levels of intensity. THIRST IS NOT ENOUGH: There is scientific research to support the idea that thirst is not an optimal way to determine when and how much an athlete should drink. By the time an athlete is thirsty, they are already somewhat dehydrated and in most cases will not drink enough to fully replace the fluids lost in sweat. TO BE SAFE, KNOW YOUR SWEAT RATE: Rather then relying on thirst or simply drinking as much as you can tolerate—which can also be dangerous—knowing how much you sweat is the best way to determine hydration needs. To figure how much you sweat, weigh yourself before and after exercise. The weight you lost in ounces represents fluid and that amount is how much should be consumed (in total) before, during and after exercise to adequately replace sweat and keep the body balanced. REPLACE FLUIDS AND ELECTROLYTES LOST: Optimal hydration is the replacement of fluids and electrolytes based on individual needs. Drinking a sports drink helps replace the key electrolytes lost in sweat.


Honor Your Life

Teens Coping with Sense of Self T Members of Tribal Health’s Community Health Programs discuss the impacts of suicide and becoming aware of the signs leading to it; the group focuses on strengthening family togetherness.

Unified Family Works

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Spending time together bridges the gaps and isolation created by depression

t is not a secret that many people who live in Cheyenne Country know first-hand the pain of depression and suicide. In homes around our community, many teens face extreme poverty, hunger, alcoholism, substance abuse and family violence. Diabetes rates are sky high, and untreated mental illnesses such as depression are common. Unemployment rates are high, so there are few afterschool or weekend jobs available to youth. Bullying and peer pressure pile on more trauma during the vulnerable teen years. In addition, the tragedies ripple through the entire community touching virtually everyone since tribal members are often related whether closely or distantly. Funerals and grief are common to children in tribal cultures where large extended families are essentially the same as the immediate family in the general population. Historically, family was the center of the Cheyenne social structure. Spending time with the family was very important because it helped to build relationships and while merging culture with life lessons. Families worked together to teach and learn day to day skills and build morals and as a result a strong sense of Cheyenne identity was born giving youth the strength of character needed to thrive and prosper. Affection was lavished on American Indian children and they were not spanked or beaten as punishment. Robbie Gondara is the director of Northern Cheyenne Tribal Health’s Honor Your Life, a suicide prevention program geared toward helping American Indian youth cope with depression, suicide, domestic violence and other extremely difficult life challenges. He says that it’s the parent’s job to be there for their children to give them the confidence and selfesteem that they need to deal with the everyday issues that occur on the reservation.

“If you have a healthy home and you have a healthy family you kind of have a safe place to go to after it’s done and over with. But if you don’t have that then it’s kind of one of those things that keeps getting piled on top of one another and eventually there’s going to be a tipping point,” says Gondara It is important to remember that even if the youth are nearing adulthood, they still require parental involvement. Just spending a little time as a family teaches children that they are important enough that the parent has chosen, out of all the things to do, to find the time for them. And if they go beyond that, and truly connect with them, through good conversation, that says even more. Children often reflect strengths, weaknesses, values, and attitudes of the family. Something as simple as eating together at the dinner table has been proven to open lines of communication between parents and their children. ther ways to spend bonding time with youth include incorporating family nights into the month as well as going to their school and sporting activities, attending cultural events like powwows together, cooking and making time for outdoor activities like fishing or hunting. It is very important to understand that relationships are not built overnight. Youth often don’t know how to express their gratitude and working around a busy schedule can be difficult at times. According to Gondara, making youth the top priority helps to strengthen their cultural identity and personal identity which is an important tool in teaching them how to deal with stressful situations. These times together are also provide an opportunity to talk to your teen about healthy relationships, morals, and learning what is going on in their day to day lives so that you can teach them how to handle everyday

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situations. “I think that we as a community have to start looking at ourselves if we want to look at change. Look at our youth. We can’t always point a finger at other agencies and what they are doing and what they are not doing. It’s not always other people’s

“If you have a healthy home and you have a healthy family you kind of have a safe place to go to after it’s done and over with. But if you don’t have that then it’s kind of one of those things that keeps getting piled on top of one another and eventually there’s going to be a tipping point.” jobs to raise or to make sure the next generation is the best it can be. It all starts with each individual. If you want to see the change then you personally have to be the person to change it. We all do. I think sometimes we like to look at all of the problems and put them off on somebody else but really if we each do our own part then I think in the long run its going to make a big difference,” advises Gondara.

eens deal with many different types of relationships throughout their school years including friendships, casual and romantic connections, and bullies. Unfortunately, many teenagers who grow up on reservations often lack the skills they need to have healthy and safe relationships. This is in part due to a lack of effective parenting role models and the lack of nurturing. The presence of abuse in boarding schools has resulted in parents who are uninvolved, non-nurturing and strict to varying degrees. The outcome of the boarding school legacy is weak Native identity and poor family affiliation resulting in adults who had no healthy relationship models. Other reasons for this occurrence is due to influences from friends as well as the media that sometimes bombards teenagers with the impression that the best way to connect is through unhealthy tactics. Director Robbie Gondara of ‘Honor Your Life’ program believes when parents don’t model a healthy relationship sometimes youth don’t know how much work it takes or how to communicate with one another. “You can’t work towards something that you just don’t know what it even looks like or if it even exists,” Gondara states. Honor your life is a program created to address depression, suicide, domestic violence and other extremely difficult life challenges in American Indian youth and to teach them how to cope with those issues. According to Gondara, young people often feel a sense of loss or abandonment and don’t have the adequate coping mechanisms in place to allow them to get past their anguish. For example, bullying is one of the leading catalysts for suicide nationwide. On the reservation, children often encounter what is known as ‘cultural bullying’. This type of intimidation occurs when the victims are targeted because of their cultural differences. Mistreatment of this kind often results in the teen feeling abandoned and different. It is important for the victim to have the ability to manage the situation without making it worse. Local schools are currently training to be able to address these needs and parents are encouraged to spend time with their children and assist them in being more involved in school and after-school activities to help boost their self-esteem. omantic relationships among youth are another type of connection that needs to be monitored to ensure they are in a healthy relationship. Often young people bypass dating altogether and ‘hook-up’ long-term right away. Dating is important because it allows the teen to learn what they want in a partner. Setting an example of a healthy relationship for them is one way to promote healthy dating skills for a teenager. Parents can also help by talking to their teen about drugs, alcohol and safety as well as setting expectations. Putting curfews and rules in place as well as meeting their dates are also helpful ideas in encouraging smart choices. August Scalpcane is the director of Healing Hearts, a program that provides free and confidential support, advocacy, and referral services to survivors of rape, sexual assault, relationship violence and stalking. He warns teenagers to look for red flags such as verbal abuse, jealousy, and controlling behaviors right away in a relationship. “[Teens] think domestic violence is normal and it almost is a norm. It’s happening over and over.” Other warnings of an unhealthy relationship are isolation, blaming the partner for problems, hypersensitivity, breaking objects and threats. Parents should watch for teens in relationships where they are breaking up and reconciling over and over again. Gondara advises “It’s very important to know more about what the warning signs are, to educate yourself to see what’s going on with this issue so that we can prevent it. Step into intervene whenever that does happen. Be there for them whenever they’re having signs of crying out for help.”

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Dr. Eduardo Duran Stresses Finer Points of Healing Boys at St. Labre Indian School watch and listen attentively as Dr. Eduardo Duran speaks to them about martial arts during a talking circle. He describes lessons he learned in martial arts where an emphasis is placed on the development of the spiritual and philosophical development rather than on fighting. The kids pay close attention as he describes the value of “inner peace”, to be achieved through individual meditation and training and that the use of physical force is only justified through defense. He makes his point reaching the youth at their level. Dr. Duran is a clinical psychologist and author of “Native American Postcolonial Psychology”, “Healing the Soul Wound” and “Buddha in Redface”. Currently, he is drawing on more than two decades of clinical experience to provide guidance to Tribal Health’s Methamphetamine

and Suicide Prevention Initiative and ‘Honor Your Life’ Program counselors working with Northern Cheyenne people. His goal is to bring awareness to the root of many reservation problems which he believes derives from historical trauma or as he calls it, “soulwounding. Soul-wounding is the belief that the spirit is injured and Duran alcoholism, high mortality rates, abuse, diabetes and other problems shared by reservations across the nation are symptoms of this phenomenon. Dr. Duran takes a holistic approach to counseling by translating theory into actual day-to-day practice. He believes people must take a positive approach to

suicide prevention and that focusing on the negative only exacerbates the problem. He is helping Lame Deer’s suicide prevention programs to understand how to treat prevalent problems common to reservations including substance abuse, intergenerational trauma and internalized oppression. His approach is to translate western metaphor into indigenous ideas that make sense to Native people. This culture-specific approach has profound implications for all counseling and therapy, providing invaluable concepts and strategies that can be applied directly to the individual’s life. “I talked about this in Africa, to the tribal people there, and New Zealand, to the Māori people there and their understanding is very similar. I think that there is a tribal way of understanding the world.”


PAGE 6 | April 2013

CHEYENNE COUNTRY | VOICE OF THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBE

Honor Your Life SUICIDE PREVENTION HOTLINES CALLS ARE CONFIDENTIAL

Suicide Prevention Lifeline (24 Hours) 1-800-273-TALK (8255) Joseph Littlebird, left, of Methamphetamine and Suicide Prevention Initiative speaks to viewers about Suicide.

Emergency Room (24 Hours) (406) 477-4477

Robbie Gondara, Janelle Timber-Jones and Theresa Small, right, join the list of presenters at the Boys and Girls Club of the Northern Cheyenne Nation.

Police Station (24 Hours) (406) 477-6288

Honor Your Life

Martha Garcia (24 Hours) Work (406) 477-4551 Home (406) 477-3973 Cell (406) 209-5361

Striving for a brighter future

Lane SpottedElk (24 Hours) Work (406) 477-6654 Cell (406)740-2713 Rachel SoldierWolf (24 Hours) Work (406) 477-4944 Home (406) 592-3555 Brian and Janelle Jones (24 Hours) (406) 720-0682 Behavioral Health (8 a.m.-5 p.m.) (406) 477-4514 Honor Your Life (8 a.m.-5 p.m.) (406) 477-4948 Meth/Suicide Prevention (8 a.m.-5 p.m.) (406) 477-4944 Recovery Center (8 a.m.-5 p.m.) (406) 477-4924 Health Education (8 a.m.-5 p.m.) (406) 477-4946/4955 St. Labre Indian Academy, Ivan Small (8 a.m.-5 p.m.) (406) 784-4564 Blessed Sacrament Church (24 Hours) (406) 477-6384

Audience members, above, listen as presenters kickoff ‘Suicide Awareness and Prevention’ month at the Boys and Girls Club of the Northern Cheyenne Nation.

White River Mennonite Church (24 Hours) (406) 592-3643

Janelle Timber-Jones, left, of ‘Honor Your Life’ speaks to community about warning signs and prevention. President John Robinson, right, declared the month of April ‘Suicide Awareness and Prevention’ month.

Pastor Dean Smith (24 Hours) (406) 477-6242

Suicide Warning Signs Compiled by Northern Cheyenne Tribal Health •

• •

If you or someone you know exhibits any of the following warning signs please seek help immediately. The risk becomes greater with more signs. Take all of these signs seriously. Threatening or talking about hurting or killing oneself Looking for ways to kill

oneself by seeking firearms, pills, or other means •

Talking or writing about death, dying, or suicide when these actions are out of the ordinary for the person

Feeling hopeless

Feeling rage or uncontrolled anger or seeking revenge

Acting reckless or engaging

in risky activities seemingly without thinking •

Feeling trapped like there’s no way out

Increasing drug or alcohol use

Withdrawing from friends, family, and society

Feeling anxious, agitated or unable to sleep or sleeping all

the time •

Experiencing dramatic mood changes

Seeing no reason for living or having no purpose in life

Experiencing survivor’s guilt The more clues and signs observed, the greater the risk. Take all signs seriously


April 2013 | PAGE 7

CHEYENNE COUNTRY | VOICE OF THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBE

NUTRITION CHEYENNE COUNTRY | VOICE OF THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBE

Power Packed Soup Benefits of vegetable juice

H

By Marcia Roper, RD, CDE For Cheyenne Country

ere is another way to get some vegetables into your diet—V-8 juice. Now the regular V-8 is too high in salt and the low sodium one is a bit low in flavor so the ideal way to enjoy this product is to mix them, two-thirds low sodium to one-third original high sodium. Mixing this way yields an 8-ounce drink with about 250 milligrams of sodium. Since most people don’t use a saltshaker anymore this would fit into anyone’s day—1,500-2,000 milligrams of sodium is a good level for the whole day. If you want even lower sodium then mix three-fourths cup low sodium V-8 with one-fourth cup original higher sodium drink. That will be 225 milligrams of sodium. But if you like the low sodium all by itself it is only 140 milligrams of sodium and for those who are salt sensitive or have high blood pressure this is a good choice. High blood pressure is common as people age. Stress or a lifetime of caffeine can certainly contribute. I remember one patient that had really high blood pressure during his very caffeinated recovery from alcohol. As soon as he learned that his caffeine was contributing to his blood pressure he stopped drinking it and his blood pressure was normal again. This may not happen for everyone, but it happens to enough people that trying to cut down on caffeine should make a difference. Now let’s look at all the great stuff in V-8. Tomatoes, beets, spinach, celery, lettuce, parsley, carrots and watercress are all in there. Iceberg lettuce is the lettuce mostly used in V-8 and that is loaded with choline. And choline reduces cholesterol! So don’t listen to anyone who says that iceberg lettuce is just water. It is an awesome choice for good health. The recipe on this page has been enjoyed by many and here is a list of some of the nutrient gifts you give your body with this recipe: potassium, protein, vitamin A, vitamin C, niacin, folate, fiber, lycopene, calcium, iron and more. For those of you who have no problem with salt I recommend splitting the recipe half-and-half original and low sodium. Salt has iodine and iodine can help reduce stress and is needed for the thyroid to make thyroid hormone. So if you can’t have salt take kelp supplement or kelp sprinkles to protect your thyroid gland. But enjoy V-8 in whatever form is best for you.

TACO SOUP Serves 7-8 Ingredients: 5-skinless chicken breasts 1-cup water 2-envelopes Taco Seasoning 20-ounces original V-8 juice (large jar) 20-ounces low sodium V-8 juice 3-cans (30 ounces) black beans, drained 1-can corn 5-zucchini Grated 2% cheese of your choice 1-Bunch green onion 1-carton fat free or lite sour cream 24-ounces medium picante sauce or mix mild and medium A pinch of red pepper flakes Easy steps: Add corn, beans, picante, V-8 juice, taco seasoning to slow cooker and heat on high just until steaming. Chop chicken into bite sized pieces and add to slow cooker, reducing heat to low (If cooker is too small for all ingredients, ladle out some of the liquid prior to adding chicken, refrigerate extra liquid; add back after serving some of the meal and reheat.) Cook on low until chicken is just cooked, don’t over cook. Can stay on low for 4 hours. Wash zucchini and cut off ends. Slice in half lengthwise. With spoon, scrape down center removing soft center and seeds. (Can save center scrapings for squash casserole). Cut remaining firm zucchini into bite size pieces and add to soup 1½ hour before serving. Cut off ends of green onions and peel outer skin. Chop into small slices Serve with a sprinkle of cheddar cheese, green onion and a dollop of fat free sour cream. Can also add a sprinkle of cilantro if you like it.


PAGE 8 | April 2013

CHEYENNE COUNTRY | VOICE OF THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBE

PROGRAMS CHEYENNE COUNTRY | VOICE OF THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBE

This is a partial listing of the tribal programs including an up to date summary of news and information. We strive to keep the community educated by providing the most up-to-date information for your convenience.

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION DEPARTMENT The Northern Cheyenne Tribal Environmental Protection Department is currently undertaking the task of developing a solid waste program. The solid waste issues were identified as a priority by the tribal administration and the task of developing and implementing the program was assigned to the Tribal Environmental Department. The following is a short summary to update the reservation community: First we applied for a grant and developed a solid waste code and ordinance which was presented to each reservation community for input. The code and ordinance was passed by the tribal council. We then applied for a training grant to train individuals in recycling, waste stream analysis and commercial driver’s license. The commercial drivers license training was a huge success. We partnered with Tribal Employment Rights Office, Chief Dull Knife College, Tribal Education and Jobs, Training, Partnership Act and provided a CDL training opportunity for 13 individuals. Sage trucking from Billings, Mont., provided the training. Eleven individuals passed their CDL testing and received their licenses. I would like to thank Allen Lynn Fisher of Ashland, Mont., for all his hard work in organizing the training. We also applied for a Solid Waste Equipment grant for $850,000 which was approved. We are currently working with Lucas King to acquire quotes and purchase the equipment. The equipment list is available at the office for your review. We are currently working with the tribal administration and council in the drafting of the tribal solid waste program implementation and funding for startup of October 1, 2013. A ‘Solid Waste Director’ position will be advertised as soon as the tribal council approves the proposed budget. The solid waste equipment will be ordered by April 1, 2013, and will be delivered in August of 2013. We anticipate delivery of trash canister to the rural residents in August and to have the transfer station operational by October 1, 2013. Please contact our office if you have any questions. RENOVATION UPDATE The Tribal Environmental Protection Department was able to convince the Mormon Church to donate the church building to the Northern Cheyenne tribe for their offices. The building houses the EPD and Natural Resource Departments. We have applied for several grants to retrofit the building. The retrofits include replacing the flooring, installations of windows, siding and insulation and a new roof. The Northern Cheyenne Tribal Housing Authority was awarded the contract by the tribal administration. The retrofits are scheduled to be completed by June 2013. The Tribal Environmental Department oversees approximately 20 separate federal funding grants with a mixture of work plans and objectives. We will highlight several grants each month. AIR QUALITY CONTROL DIVISION The Northern Cheyenne Tribe has been monitoring air quality since the early 1980’s. This began with Total Suspended Particulates monitoring and has followed with particulate matter of 10 micrometers or less testing and meteorological monitoring. The tribe continues to protect the Class I air shed, which covers the entire reservation. Currently, the tribe has monitored for particulate matter of 10 micrometers or less in the air, meteorological debris and visibility for over ten years. These air quality impacts include coal-fired power plants , coal bed methane wells, proposed railway lines and strip mines. The tribe employs two people, an air quality administrator, Jay Littlewolf and technician, Scott Williams, to address and comment on these issues. The air quality on the reservation is improving, especially in the particulate matter of 10 micrometers or less non-attainment area of Lame Deer, Mont. They have not exceeded funds or violated the 24 hour standard in over six years. The tribe has been monitoring for mercury since February 2009, using the wet deposition sampling method. This monitoring has been under the protocol of the Mercury Deposition Network. The tribe also implements an EPA 103 grant to monitor for mercury. One large mercury source is the coal-fired power plant, which is located thirteen miles north of the reservation. The wind direction is primarily northwest and there is potential for air quality impacts from mercury. The tribe will continue to monitor its air quality for the protection of the public and environment and to address all impacts that may affect the health and welfare of the people. The Northern Cheyenne Air Quality Control Division has had a contract with PPL Montana to monitor for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, visibility and the meteorological parameters since September 1996. Also included in this

contract are monthly and quarterly reports and weekly checks on all of the monitors. The three monitoring sites are located near the reservation’s northern border and include: Garfield Peak, Morning Star and Badger Peak. These sites were negotiated with Montana Power Company in 1980 to ensure that the tribe’s air quality wouldn’t be greatly affected by Colstrip’s coal fired power plants. The Division is in the early stages of developing air quality standards for the reservation. The tribe currently follows the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, lead, ozone, carbon monoxide and particulate matter. The Air Quality Control Division is currently working with the tribe’s attorneys in addressing potential air quality impacts from the proposed Tongue River Railroad and Otter Creek Mine Projects. These initial steps are in the scoping process and the Division will be involved in all aspects to insure that the Northern Cheyenne’s air shed will be protected for the tribe, wildlife and environment on the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation. WETLANDS The Northern Cheyenne Tribe Environmental Protection Department is currently undertaking the task of developing a comprehensive wetlands mapping, monitoring and assessment program. Over the past few years, (fiscal year 2009 and 2011), the Northern Cheyenne Tribe has been funded through the Environmental Protection Agency Wetlands Program Development Grant to accomplish this task. As a result, the tribe has been successful in utilizing partnerships to accomplish the objective of mapping and assessing quadrangles within the reservation using aerial photography and various field methods. From this, the tribe now has baseline data showing wetlands acreage and types of wetlands within the Northern Cheyenne reservation to assist in determining whether we have a no net loss of wetlands. The Environmental Protection Agency funding for wetlands program development is competitive on a bi-annual basis. In 2012, the Northern Cheyenne Tribe submitted a proposal and was awarded funding under the EPA Wetlands Program Development Grant to carry out a number of objectives in pursuit of a comprehensive mapping, monitoring and assessment program through the next two years (fiscal year 2013 and 2014). The tribe has successfully completed actions associated with one of EPA’s four core elements of a wetlands program framework and the element they have focused on is monitoring and assessment. Primary goals and priorities determined to best meet the monitoring and assessment element include: (1) Wetland mapping and assessment of the entire Rosebud watershed (HUC 10100003), (2) Review, comparison, and development or refinement of a wetland assessment method specific to the Northern Cheyenne Reservation created from research of various methods including building upon current methods such as Montana Department of Transportation method, and riparian health evaluations, (3) Refine the wetlands quality assurance project plan and develop field protocol manuals based on findings of goal 2 for duties including plant identification, vegetation surveys, wetland delineation, and wetland classification as well as ensuring the protocol manuals are culturally-appropriate in identifying cultural plants. Lastly, the tribe has prioritized a fourth goal which is to cooperate with other tribal programs to evaluate current tribal law and ordinances as they apply to wetlands and water quality of tribal water resources. By doing so, we hope to reduce duplicative efforts of each respective tribal program and properly inform the regulated public. The goals and associated objectives will be met by utilizing partnerships with Montana Natural Heritage Program and Chief Dull Knife College, collaborating with tribal water resources-related programs, developing outreach and education materials, and collaborate with other tribal, state or federal agencies for watershed-based planning efforts. NONPOINT SOURCE POLLUTION PREVENTION The Northern Cheyenne Tribe Nonpoint Source Pollution Prevention Program aims to enhance and improve land use management practices in order to prevent the pollution of tribal surface and ground water resources through projects, water quality monitoring, and education and outreach efforts. Nonpoint source pollution can come from many different diffuse sources across a landscape and are different from point sources, such as a sewage lagoon discharge point. Examples of pollution are motor oil, chemicals such as fertilizer, insecticides, & herbicides, pet wastes, sediment, bacteria, and nutrients from livestock waste. As water, such as rainfall runoff or snowmelt, moves across the land it picks up pollutants and deposits them in the surface and/ or ground water resources. Activities such as forestry and mining operations, agricultural

operations, construction sites, and paved surfaces in urban areas can all contribute to pollution. The NPS program currently has 3 projects underway to address pollution. All of the projects are along Lame Deer Creek and within the reservation boundaries. First, the Sweet Medicine Subdivision culvert was replaced to improve stream flow conditions in the hope of restoring historic conditions and stabilizing habitat (i.e. decrease stagnant water and cattail). Another project also involves replacing a culvert along Lame Deer Creek with the same objective of improving stream flow. Lastly, there is a mini-project involving fencing along creeks within the reservation. The objective of this project is to reestablish a riparian buffer along various creeks where the stream bank has been degraded by agricultural activities. For each project, stream flow and water quality parameters will be monitored over time to document any changes in water quality/quantity. Additionally, a workshop for agricultural operators and livestock owners is scheduled for April 2013 to introduce concepts of best management practices. All projects aim to reduce NPS pollution through education in hopes that stakeholders will make better and more informed land use decisions. THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE BROWNFIELDS PROGRAM What is a Brownfields Site? The law defines a brownfields site as: “real property, the expansion, redevelopment, or reuse of which may be complicated by the presence or potential presence of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant; is contaminated by controlled substance; is contaminated by petroleum or a petroleum product; is minescarred land.” Brownfields are underutilized or abandoned properties in which future development is complicated by the perception or presence of environmental contaminants. The Brownfields Program helps investigate both known and suspected environmental contamination, including hazardous materials, petroleum products, lead based paint, used petroleum ; former industrial and commercial sites such as gas stations, saw mills and landfills. Section 128(a) funds cannot be used at sites that, do not meet, or subsequently do not meet, the definition of a Brownfields site. The Northern Cheyenne Brownfields program addresses a wide range of the reservation’s contaminated land issues, from illegal open dump sites, burned and abandoned home, diesel spills, meth labs, to old gas stations. Some of the activities the Brownfields Coordinator conducts include: Identifying and taking inventory of Brownfields Sites. Review and oversight of all environmental site assessment work. Conduct research and site investigations to identify sites and properties that would benefit from further investigations (Phase I Site Assessments) Conduct soil, water and/or air sampling and analyzing to confirm whether contamination exists, and if so, to what extent ( Phase II Site Assessments) Developing corrective action plans (including alternative cleanup plans) to protect community members, demolition crew, and/or tribal employees whom might be exposed to known contaminants on site Respond to Diesel spills along US Hwy 212; ensure cleanup is completed in a timely manner and accordance with all Tribal, Federal and State regulations Re-development of brownfields properties can improve public health in a number of ways, including addressing safety or environmental concerns at each site. It may also provide an opportunity for communities to create safer, healthier communities through the redevelopment process. QUALITY ASSURANCE All Phase I and Phase II Environmental Site Assessments are in accordance with American Society for Testing and Materials International Method E-1527-05 Standard Practice for Environmental Site Assessments. To ensure the quality of assessments, the All Appropriate Inquires Act Final Rule is followed and an Environmental Professional conducts and/or supervises the assessment work completed. Assessments allow for the present conditions of contaminated or potentially contaminated sites are better understood. These Assessments allowed for proper cleanup plans to be developed and proper salvaging, demolition and safety plans to be developed. ESA is funded by the Northern Cheyenne Tribe, Environmental Protection Department and Brownfields Programs. Phase I Environmental Site Assessments for The Tongue River Lumber Company Facility, 2339 US Highway 212, Ashland, Mont. (ESA completed October 2010)

Phase I Environmental Site Assessment for The Lube Center, 224 Cheyenne Ave., Lame Deer, Mont. (ESA Completed on December 15, 2011) Phase I Environmental Site Assessment for The Lower Tipi Ranch, 8191 Birney River Road, Lame Deer, Mont. (ESA completed on December 14, 2011) Phase I Environmental Site Assessment for the Northern Cheyenne Tribal Business Office, Lame Deer, Mont. (Jan 2013) Phase I Environmental Site Assessment for the Northern Cheyenne-Food Bank Building,27 Kit Fox Road, Lame Deer, Mont. (ESA completed January 17, 2013) Targeted Brownfields Assessments funded by the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s Superfund Technical Assessment and Response Team3-Region8 through application completed by the Brownfields Coordinator. Phase II Field Sampling Plan for the Tongue River Lumber Facility Targeted Brownfields Assessment, Ashland, Rosebud County, Mont. (completed April 7, 2011) Phase II Analytical Results Report for the Tongue River Lumber Facility Targeted Brownfields Assessment, Ashland, Rosebud County, Mont. (Completed November 30, 2011) Phase I Report for Environmental Site Assessment for the Cady’s Store Property a portions of Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation Targeted Brownfields Assessment (TBA completed December 4, 2012) Phase I Report for Environmental Site Assessment for the Old Fox Station Property a portions of Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation Targeted Brownfields Assessment (TBA completed December 4, 2012) Phase I Report for Environmental Site Assessment for the Our Store Property a portions of Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation Targeted Brownfields Assessment (TBA completed December 4, 2012) Phase II Field Sampling Plan for the Targeted Brownfields Assessment Cady’s Store Property a portion of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation Lame Deer, Rosebud County, Mont. (completed October 30, 2012) Phase II Field Sampling Plan for the Targeted Brownfields Assessment Old Fox Station Store Property a portion of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation Lame Deer, Rosebud County, Mont. (completed October 30, 2012) Phase II Field Sampling Plan for the Targeted Brownfields Assessment Our Store Property a portion of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation Lame Deer, Rosebud County, Mont. (completed October 30, 2012) Phase II Analytical Results Report for the Targeted Brownfields Assessment Cady’s Store Property a portion of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation Lame Deer, Rosebud County, Mont. (completed March 1, 2013) Phase II Analytical Results Report for the Targeted Brownfields Assessment Old Fox Station Property a portion of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation Lame Deer, Rosebud County, Mont. (completed March 1, 2013) Phase II Analytical Results Report for the Targeted Brownfields Assessment Our Store Property a portion of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation Lame Deer, Rosebud County, Mont. (completed March 1, 2013) All Environmental Site Assessments, Targeted Brownfields Assessments and other Brownfields facts are public information. Copies of the reports can be found at the Chief Dull Knife College Library for Reference Material and also at the following web link: <http://www.cheyennenation.com/brownfield. html> For further questions please contact the Brownfields Coordinator: Jolisa Bahr-Whiteface, 100 Dull Knife Drive (Old Mormon Church) PO BOX 128 Lame Deer, Mont., 59043 (406) 477-6506 ext. 102 <jolisa.whiteface@gmail.com>. HUMAN SERVICES The Northern Cheyenne Human Services Program administers several very critical and important services for the Northern Cheyenne community including the Title IV- E Foster Care Program, foster care licensing, state and national Indian Child Welfare Act Units and on-going case management. Our focus is family reunification and preservation. Serving the children and families in our tribal community requires a very high level of wrap-around service coordination and communication, from multiple agencies, in order to be as effective as we can in the services we offer. The Human Services Program is happy to announce that as a result of a recent interagency meeting between Northern Cheyenne Human Services, Bureau of Indian Affairs Social Services, Law Enforcement and the BIA Superintendent that there is a renewed commitment to exactly this – we will all be working very closely together in a streamlined, coordinated manner to meet the needs and expectations of the families, children, community and organizations we serve.


April 2013 | PAGE 9

CHEYENNE COUNTRY | VOICE OF THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBE

MINUTES

CHEYENNE COUNTRY | VOICE OF THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBE

Tribal Council Of The Northern Cheyenne Tribe ■ Northern Cheyenne Reservation ■ Lame Deer, Montana REGULAR SESSION COUNCIL MEETING MINUTES February 21, 2013 CALL TO ORDER: President Robinson called the meeting to order at 11:55 a.m. INVOCATION: Cowboy Fisher ROLL CALL: All Present Quorum Established AGENDA ADDITIONRESOLUTION NO. DOI-053 (2013). Motion made by

ON THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE MEMBERSHIP ROLLS. Motion made by L.

Jace Killsback. Second by Vernon Small. 11 votes Yes 0 votes No 0 Abstentions Motion Carried

A RESOLUTION OF THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBAL COUNCIL APPROVING AND GRANTING DATE OF BIRTH CHANGES FOR TWO (2) TRIBAL MEMBERS ON THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE MEMBERSHIP ROLLS.

Cowboy Fisher. Second by Vernon Small.

Motion made by L. Jace Killsback. Second by Vernon Small.

11 votes Yes 0 votes No 0 Abstentions Motion Carried

11 votes Yes 0 votes No 0 Abstentions Motion Carried

ENROLLMENT-WALLACE BEARCHUM A RESOLUTION OF THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBAL COUNCIL APPROVING AND GRANTING THE REQUEST FOR NORTHERN CHEYENNE MEMBERSHIP THROUGH AUTOMATIC ENROLLMENT OF SIX (6) INDIVIDUALS UNDER THE APPROPRIATE SECTION OF THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE AMENDED CONSTITUTION AND BYLAWS. Motion made by

AN ORDINANCE OF THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBAL COUNCIL APPROVING AND GRANTING BLOOD QUANTUM CHANGES FOR SIX (6) TRIBAL MEMBERS ON THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE MEMBERSHIP ROLL. Motion made by

Marlene Redneck. Second by Eloise Snow. 11 votes Yes 0 votes No 0 Abstentions Motion Carried

AN ORDINANCE OF THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBAL COUNCIL APPROVING AND GRANTING THE REQUEST FOR NORTHERN CHEYENNE MEMBERSHIP THROUGH ADOPTION OF ONE HUNDRED FIFTYSIX (156) INDIVIDUALS UNDER THE APPROPRIATE SECTION OF THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE AMENDED CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS. Motion

made by Marlene Redneck. Second by Eloise Snow. 10 votes Yes 0 votes No 0 Abstentions Motion Carried

AN ORDINANCE OF THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBAL COUNCIL REENROLLING SEVEN (7) INDIVIDUALS INTO THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBE.

Motion made by Marlene Redneck. Second by Tracy Robinson. 11 votes Yes 0 votes No 0 Abstentions Motion Carried AN ORDINANCE OF THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBAL COUNCIL RELATING TO THE RELINQUISHMENT OF NINE (9) INDIVIDUALS FROM THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBE. Motion made by

Marlene Redneck. Second by Eloise Snow. 8 votes Yes 3 votes No 0 Abstentions Motion Carried

A RESOLUTION OF THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBAL COUNCIL APPROVING AND GRANTING NAME CHANGES FOR EIGHTYFIVE (85) MEMBERS

Vernon Small. Second by Cowboy Fisher. 11 votes Yes 0 votes No 0 Abstentions Motion Carried

A RESOLUTION OF THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBAL COUNCIL DELEGATING TO THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBAL HOUSING AUTHORITY THE AUTHORITY TO PREPARE AND SUBMIT ON BEHALF OF THE TRIBE AN APPLICATION FOR AN INDIAN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2013 AND CERTIFYING THAT CITIZEN PARTICIPATION REQUIREMENTS HAVE BEEN MET. Motion made

by Jennie LaFranier. Second by Donna Fisher. ROLL CALL VOTE: 11 votes Yes 0 votes No 0 Abstentions Motion Carried

A RESOLUTION OF THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBAL COUNCIL AUTHORIZING THE MODIFICATION AND OR ADOPTION OF CERTAIN BUDGETS FOR THE EXPENDITURE OF AVAILABLE FUNDS: Fund

348A-LIHEAP-$50,498.29, Fund 162-TERO$131,808.43, Fund 605-Environmental Protection Dept.$760,754.00. Motion made by Tracy Robinson. Second by Cowboy Fisher. 11 votes Yes 0 votes No 0 Abstentions Motion Carried

A RESOLUTION OF THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBAL COUNCIL APPROVING THE APPROPRIATION OF $20,000 FROM NET GAMING REVENUES TOWARDS ELDERLY FEEDING PROGRAMS IN ALL 5 DISTRICTS. Motion

made by Eloise Snow. Second by Donna Fisher. ROLL CALL VOTE: 10 votes Yes 0 votes No 0 Abstentions Motion Carried

APPROVAL OF COUNCIL MEETING MINUTES-

January 7, 2013, January 22 & 25, 2013, February 4, 2013. Motion made by Jennie LaFranier. Second by Donna Fisher. 11 votes Yes 0 votes No 0 Abstentions Motion Carried APPROVAL OF COUNCIL MEETING MINUTES FOR OCTOBER 1, 2013 FOR SESSION FROM 11:20 A.M.-12:45 A.M.-SUBMITTED BY MELISSA LONEBEAR, TRIBAL SECRETARY.

Motion made by Jennie LaFranier. Second by Donna Fisher. 5 votes Yes 2 votes No 3 Abstentions Motion Carried

MOTION MADE BY WINFIELD RUSSELL TO TEMPORARILY APPOINT VERNON SMALL AS SERGEANT AT ARMS. SECOND BY COWBOY FISHER.

7 votes Yes 1 vote No 1 Abstention Motion Carried A RESOLUTION OF THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBE AUTHORIZING THE TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT OFFICE TO FILE AND ADMINISTER A FEDERAL TRANSIT GRANT APPLICATION WITH THE FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION. Motion

made by Jennie LaFranier. Second by L. Jace Killsback. 8 votes Yes 0 votes No 0 Abstentions Motion Carried

A RESOLUTION OF THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBAL COUNCIL AUTHORIZING THE TRIBAL PRESIDENT TO EXECUTE, OF BEHALF OF THE TRIBAL COUNCIL, DOCUMENTS NECESSARY TO ADVERTISE AND SELL THE EAGLE CREEK SALVAGE LOGGING UNIT ON THE OPEN MARKET.

Motion made by Vernon Small. Second by Jennie LaFranier. 9 votes Yes 0 votes No 0 Abstentions Motion Carried

INDIAN FOREST LAND ASSISTANCE ACCOUNT (IFLAA)-TERRY SPANG, SR. A RESOLUTION OF THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBAL COUNCIL APPROVING THE FOREST MANAGEMENT DEDUCTION EXPENDITURE PLANS AND THE INDIAN FOREST LAND ASSISTANCE ACCOUNT (IFLAA), AND AUTHORIZING THE TRIBAL PRESIDENT TO EXECUTE ANY DOCUMENTS NECESSARY TO INITIATE THIS PROCESS. Motion

made by Jennie LaFranier. Second by Marlene Redneck. 10 votes Yes 0 votes No 0 Abstentions Motion Carried

TRIBAL POLICY MANUALSPRESIDENT ROBINSON A RESOLUTION OF THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBAL COUNCIL RESCINDING

RESOLUTION DOI-150 (2011) AND ESTABLISHING A NEW POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE UNDER PRESIDENT ROBINSON’S ADMINISTRATION FOR THE PURPOSES OF REVIEWING AND REVISING TRIBAL POLICY MANUALS.

Motion made by Cowboy Fisher. Second by Jennie LaFranier. 10 votes Yes 0 votes No 0 Abstentions Motion Carried A RESOLUTION OF NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBAL COUNCIL TO OVERRIDE RESOLUTION TO APPROVE THE SECOND SUBMISSION OF THE FISCAL YEAR 2013 GENERAL FUND AND INDIRECT COST OPERATING BUDGETS.

Motion made by Cowboy Fisher. Second by Winfield Russell. 8 votes Yes 2 votes No 0 Abstentions Motion Carried

MOTION MADE BY COWBOY FISHER TO FREEZE ALL HIRING. NO SECOND. MOTION DIED. ADJOURNMENT OF MEETING. Motion made by

L. Jace Killsback. Second by Donna Fisher. 10 votes Yes 0 votes No 0 Abstentions Motion Carried

Meeting Adjourned at 1:45 p.m. PASSED, ADOPTED, AND APPROVED by the

0 Abstentions Motion Carried A RESOLUTION OF THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBAL COUNCIL TO APPROVE THE REVISED SUBMISSION OF THE FISCAL YEAR 2013 GENERAL FUND OPERATING BUDGET (the

FY2013 General Fund Revenue Total is estimated as $2,806,400, the cash to be applied towards General Fund FY2013 Expenses is $2,806,400). Motion made by Tracy Robinson. Second by L. Jace Killsback. 10 votes Yes 0 votes No 0 Abstentions Motion Carried A RESOLUTION OF THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBAL COUNCIL TO REVISE FISCAL YEAR 2013 INDIRECT COST BUDGET (subject to final

adjustment, the Fiscal Year 2013 Indirect Cost Budget of $2,757,590, and a Fixed Carry-Forward Indirect Cost Rate of thirty-one point forty nine percent (31.49%). Motion made by Tracy Robinson. Second by Donna Fisher. 11 votes Yes 0 votes No 0 Abstentions Motion Carried APPROVAL OF COUNCIL MEETING MINUTES-

February 18 & 21, 2013. Motion made by Tracy Robinson. Second by Oly McMakin. 10 votes Yes 0 votes No 0 Abstentions Motion Carried

Northern Cheyenne Tribal Council by --- votes for passage and adoption, --- votes against passage CTAS GRANT and adoption, and --APPLICATION-LACEY abstentions this --- day of ALEXANDER SMALL March 2013. MOTION MADE BY COWBOY FISHER TO TABLE THE YOUTHBUILD Melissa Lonebear, GRANT. SECOND BY Secretary ELOISE SNOW. Northern Cheyenne Tribe 10 votes Yes RESCHEDULED 0 votes No REGULAR SESSION 0 Abstentions COUNCIL MEETING Motion Carried MINUTES March 11, 2013 A RESOLUTION OF THE CALL TO ORDER: President

Robinson called the meeting to order at10:16 a.m. ROLL CALL: All Present Quorum Established

AGENDA ADDITIONREVISION TO FUNERAL BENEFITS RESOLUTION (3% ANNUAL INCREASE).

Motion made by Vernon Small. Second by Tracy Robinson. 11 votes Yes 0 votes No 0 Abstentions Motion Carried

A RESOLUTION OF THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBAL COUNCIL AUTHORIZING THE MODIFICATION AND OR ADOPTION OF CERTAIN BUDGETS FOR THE EXPENDITURE OF AVAILABLE FUNDS: Fund NEW-BJA-Substance Abuse-$389,849.00, Fund 331-DVPI-$107,037.00.

Motion made by Cowboy Fisher. Second by Vernon Small. 10 votes Yes 0 votes No

NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBAL COUNCIL PROCLAIMING APRIL 2013 AS SUICIDE AWARENESS AND PREVENTION MONTH.

Motion made by Marlene Redneck. Second by Vice President Russell. 11 votes Yes 0 votes No 0 Abstentions Motion Carried

BIRNEY COMMUNITY CENTER RESOLUTION REPASSAGE A RESOLUTION OF THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBAL COUNCIL PROVIDING FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A PROPOSAL(S) FOR THE ACQUISITION OF FUNDING FROM THE MONTANA COAL BOARD FOR A TWENTY-FIVE THOUSAND (25K) FOR A PLANNING GRANT FOR ARCHITECT & ENGINEERING (A&E) SERVICES FOR BIRNEY COMMUNITY CENTER.

Motion made by Cowboy Fisher. Second by Tracy Robinson. 10 votes Yes 0 votes No 0 Abstentions Motion Carried

OTTER CREEK BILL-TRACY ROBINSON RESOLUTION ENDORSING OTTER CREEK BILL AND REQUESTING FEDERAL AND STATE SUPPORT FOR SWIFT ENACTMENT OF OTTER CREEK BILL.

Motion made by Cowboy Fisher. Second by Vernon Small. 11 votes Yes 0 votes No 0 Abstentions Motion Carried HOLIDAY SCHEDULE REVISIONS-TRIBAL SECRETARY MOTION MADE BY VERNON SMALL TO REVISE THE HOLIDAY LIST TO MAKE ALL THE HOLIDAYS “NO WORK” DAYS. SECOND BY COWBOY FISHER.

11 votes Yes 0 votes No 0 Abstentions Motion Carried FUNERAL BENEFITSVERNON SMALL A RESOLUTION OF THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBAL COUNCIL SETTING POLICY REGARDING FUNERAL BENEFITS FOR TRIBAL MEMBERS. Motion

made by Vernon Small. Second by Cowboy Fisher. 11 votes Yes 0 votes No 0 Abstentions Motion Carried TREASURER AND SECRETARY APPOINTMENTS

Votes casted by secret ballot Vote Count Secretary Kristina Redbird-4 Brooke Gondura-2 Melissa Lonebear-5 Treasurer Megan Ditonno-4 Adam Spang-7 RESOLUTION APPOINTING TRIBAL SECRETARY AND TRIBAL TREASURER

(Melissa Lonebear is hereby appointed as the Secretary of the Northern Cheyenne Tribe through 2016.Adam Spang is hereby appointed as the Treasurer of the Northern Cheyenne Tribe through 2016). Motion made by L. Jace Killsback. Second by Jennie LaFranier. 11 votes Yes 0 votes No 0 Abstentions Motion Carried

ADJOURNMENT OF MEETING. Motion made by

Tracy Robinson. Second by Vernon Small. 11votes Yes 0 votes No 0 Abstentions Motion Carried

Meeting Adjourned at 5:43 p.m. PASSED, ADOPTED, AND APPROVED by the

Northern Cheyenne Tribal Council by --- votes for passage and adoption, --- votes against passage and adoption, and --abstentions this --- day of March 2013. Melissa Lonebear, Secretary Northern Cheyenne Tribe


PAGE 10 | April 2013

CHEYENNE COUNTRY | VOICE OF THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBE

Cheyenne’s Define Water Quality Standard Implementation under Clean Water Act for Reservation Streams By Charlene Alden For Cheyenne Country The Northern Cheyenne Tribe was recently notified that its water quality standards were approved by the Environmental Protection Agency, Region 8, in Denver, Colo. This approval is the final step in the tribe’s water quality standards under the federal Clean Water Act. In 2006, the Tribe was delegated authority similar to states to promulgate and implement water quality standards for reservation waters. With the approval of its water quality standards, the tribe can now begin to fully regulate water quality on the tribe’s reservation in southeast Montana. Northern Cheyenne Tribal President John Robinson said, “Protection of reservation water quality has long been a priority for the Northern Chey-

“Protection of reservation water quality has long been a priority for the Northern Cheyenne Tribe.”

—President John Robinson Northern Cheyenne Tribe

enne Tribe. The tribe had one of the first tribal water quality monitoring programs in the country. With this approval, the Tribe’s authority to regulate this critical environmental concern has been firmly established.” The Tribe’s standards define goals for specific water bodies by designating their uses, setting criteria to protect those uses, and establishing provisions such as anti-degradation policies to protect water bodies from pollutants. The tribe’s standards specifically protect important cultural

plant species. The tribal standards will be implemented under authority of the federal Clean Water Act in all reservation streams, and will include issuing and enforcing discharge permits for reservation surface waters. The primary reservation streams are the Tongue River and Rosebud Creek. The tribe began monitoring water quality on its reservation in the 1970’s and has been persistent in pursuing approval of formal regulation of water quality under the Clean Water Act. The process has been exceptionally lengthy because of opposition and challenges from the energy industry. The Northern Cheyenne Reservation includes 444,000 acres in southeast Montana, and is 99 percent tribally owned. The tribe has 10,500 tribal members, about half of whom live on the reservation. The tribal headquarters are located in Lame Deer, Mont.

John A. Youngbear/Cheyenne Country

Tribal water quality standards have been approved by the Environmental Protect Agency—a first for a tribal nation.

A Triumph for Women in Cheyenne Country President appoints

youth to learn and hear ideas

By Lenny Smith Of Cheyenne Country

On Thursday, March 7, 2013, President Barack Obama endorsed an expanded reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act which includes important new provisions for Native Americans, undocumented immigrants and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault in the United States. Vice President Joe Biden, who first drafted the bill in 1994, stood by proudly, wiping away tears of joy as it was resigned into law after it lapsed in 2011due to opposition over the new protections. “One of the greatest sins that can be committed is an abuse of power and the ultimate abuse of power is for someone bigger and stronger to raise their hand to strike someone else,” stated Biden. The new law means big things for Cheyenne country authorizing hundreds of millions of dollars annually for domestic violence programs and permitting tribal authorities to prosecute non-native Americans for abuses committed on tribal lands. American Indian women are killed at a rate of 10 times the national average, while one in three women in tribal communities are raped in their lifetime according to the Indian Law Resource Center. Three in five will be assaulted. Also, 53 percent of Native American women are

Appointees: J.C. Lawrence, Kylee Knobloch, Calvin Russette, Aryn Fisher, Aaliyah Cunningham, Sierra Alexander By Desi Small-Rodriguez For Cheyenne Country

Healing Hearts Director August Scalpcane has a morning meeting with is staff discussion the Violence Against Women Act recently signed into law by President Obama.

married to non-natives and 70 percent of them have reported acts of violence. Until now, the offenders were free from prosecution. “Indian Country has some of the highest rates of domestic abuse in America and one of the reasons is that when Native American women are abused on tribal lands by an attacker who is not Native American, the attacker is immune from prosecution by tribal courts,” stated Obama. “Tribal governments have an inherent right to protect their people and all women deserve the right to live free from fear and that is what today is all about.” Grants will be available to improve the ability of tribes to respond to violent crimes against Indian women, enhance victim welfare and to help create education and prevention plans. Amenities will be improved for the tribal government, children who

witness violence and legal services. There will also be transitional housing assistance for those who need it. Community education and prevention campaigns will be supported targeting youth and college students. According to Northern Cheyenne Tribal President John Robinson, in the past native offenders were simply excluded off the reservation. With the new entitlements provided by VAWA, the tribal courts can deal with the issue swiftly and fairly with the respect that was built into the Cheyenne culture. Robinson says that the first step is to make sure the victim is safe then from that point therapy could be provided for the entire family. There would also be rehabilitation for the perpetrator so that they could be helped. August Scalpcane is the director of Healing Hearts,

a program that provides free and confidential support, advocacy, and referral services to survivors of rape, sexual assault, relationship violence and stalking. “By allowing us to arrest and prosecute, [abuse] goes on their record,” he stated. This is important because it didn’t go on their record before the new protections were in place. It is now feasible for prosecution in the Northern Cheyenne tribal court system and for the abusers to be supervised and rehabilitated. In addition, provisions like 24 hour services, emergency transportation and placement, transportation to court and childcare services can be implemented immediately. “It means better protections. It means the victim will get justice. Now they can report it and know something is going to be done.”

“It has personally affected me. You hear about these young people. It takes a toll on the community, you know, emotionally.” — John Burns, 43, Colstrip

Sound Off Cheyenne Country posed a question to people around town

“Has suicide ever impacted your life?” “It bothers me a lot. The younger people need to know ways to prevent suicide.” — Loy Bryant, 42, Lame Deer

“I’ve been coaching for 3 years and it just doesn’t seem like schools have a lot of assemblies that have a lot to do with depression and drugs. When I was in school we did.” — Ruthie Biglefthand, 24, Lame Deer

For the first time in recent memory, President John Robinson has established a presidential board composed of tribal youth with the sole purpose of bringing important issues impacting young people to the attention of tribal leaders. With 60 percent of the tribal population 30 years or younger and growing, President Robinson believes it is critical to empower our younger generation, “We need to utilize the energy, new ideas, and dreams of our youth to move forward as a tribe,” states Robinson. The Youth Commission is one of two new presidential boards established to serve concurrent with the president’s term of office—the other is the Otter Creek Board of Administrators. As with all the other committees and boards, young people had to fill out an application and explain why they wanted to serve on the Youth Commission. The Youth Commission is first tasked with creating its inaugural plan of operations, vision statement, and officer selection. They are also working on a strategic plan to guide short term, medium term, and long term priorities that will assist youth in their schools and communities. They are the president’s visionary leaders in creating policy for their generation and those to come. The Youth Commission’s first activity is to assist with ‘Suicide Awareness and Prevention’ month activities in April, a declaration that was introduced by President Robinson and approved unanimously by Tribal Council Resolution. They will also attend the Montana Indian Education Association Conference in April, where they will help lead the youth strand activities with Desi Small-Rodriguez, the President’s Lead Policy Advisor, who has been selected to give the Keynote on how to help Native youth bridge the urban-reservation divide. For more information please contact Small-Rodriguez at 4774848 or <desi.rodriguez@cheyennenation.com>.

“We need something for these kids to do to keep their mind on the straight road . I try to encourage them. I try to tell them to have a healthy life.” — Timothy Whistlingelk, 46, Muddy Creek


Cheyenne Country, April 2013