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JOHN M. MATERNOSKI ASSOC. AIA, CSI-S


JOHN M. MATERNOSKI 2284 NW Everett St, Apt 406 Portland, OR 97210-5550 john.maternoski@gmail.com 920.819.2936


NW EVERETT ST

choosing, I was initially intrigued by the lack of community gardens in Northwest Portland, and began exploring ways to

FRED MEYER

W BURNSIDE

Portland, OR. As the project went on, the program evolved to

STREET

NW 20TH AVE

on the high-value site at NW 21st and Burnside Avenue in

NW DAVIS ST

NW 21ST AVE

address this while still creating a realistic and profitable program

NW 22ND AVE

Architectural Design Studio Professor Don Genasci University of Oregon 2013

Given the opportunity to work with a site and program of my

NW 22ND PL

PORTLAND “LIVING MARKET” COMPLEX

become an 80 unit apartment complex with ground-floor retail and a rooftop restaurant. Flanking the west side of the tower is a

SW YAMHILL ST

space of its generous footprint, the market contains a living roof with two components: one for growing produce for the market,

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and another serving the neighborhood as a community garden.

SW

MO RR

ISO N

local produce market, opening into a public square. Utilizing the

JELD-WEN FIELD

figure ground 1” = 100’-0”

ST


URBAN FARM +MARKET

Revit-created elevation of market showing intensive green roof and shadow study Community garden locations in Portland metro area highlighting a lack of gardens in Northwest Portland, the inspiration for the program of the project (site of market complex starred) Seasonal daylight study through section of market building

I-5

7,500 SQUARE FEET OF PLANTING AREA PROVIDING OVER 30,000 POUNDS OF FOOD PER YEAR FOR THE COMMUNITY

northwest portland

SHADOWS FROM APARTMENT TOWER PROVIDE A GRADIENT OF SUNLIGHT ACROSS GROWING AREAS - PROMOTES PLANT DIVERSITY

I-84

I-405 HWY 26

I-5

community garden locations PORTLAND, OREGON

SUMMER SUN

WINTER SUN CLASSROOM

MARKET

south elevation - market

longitudinal section b 1/16” = 1’-0”

SQUARE


ROOFTOP RESTAURANT

hRC = 7.5 (from figure 16) RCR = 5hRC[(l + w)/(l x w)] = 5(7.5)[(30+71)/(30x71)] = 5(7.5)[(101)/(2130)] = 5(7.5)(0.047) = 1.77

GREEN ROOF

URBAN FARM KITCHEN

RAIL SEATING

A

M

FIREPLACE

B

20TH PLACE

C

W

HOSTESS

SQUARE

Coefficient of Utilization:

BAR

ρCC = 80, ρW = 10, RCR = 1.77 From these numbers and MEEB table 15.1: CU = 0.59

E = (F x CU x MF)/A where: E = illumination (10-18fc needed for dining areas) F = light output (# of fixtures x lamp lumens) CU = coefficient of utilization (calculation above) MF = maintenance factor (0.70 for uplights) A = area (2,130sf for dining area)

BURNSIDE STREET

15 = (F x 0.59 x 0.70)/2130 15 = 0.413F/2130 31,950 = 0.413F 77,361 = F

A 4’ length of the selected luminaire has an output of 4,208 lumens. 77,361/4,208 = 18.38 = (19) 4’ fixtures To achieve the necessary light levels for the dining area, 19 of the selected 4’ LED fixtures will need to be used

STAGE

rooftop restaurant plan 1/16” = 1’-0”

Diagrammatic lighting plan for the restaurant with example lighting calculation determining the quantity of fixtures needed to adequately light the dining area

AutoCAD-produced schematic plan of proposed rooftop restaurant, showing space planning and layout for dining, bar, patio, and drink rail areas


APARTMENT TOWER

A

east elevation 1/16” = 1’-0”

20TH PLACE

RESTAURANT

APARTMENTS

MARKET

RETAIL

latitudinal section a 1/16” = 1’-0”

580 SQUARE FEET OF PLANTING AREA PROVIDING UP TO 2,320 POUNDS OF FOOD PER YEAR PER FLOOR PLANTS NEEDING MORE SUNLIGHT TOWARDS SOUTH, PLANTS NEEDING LESS SUNLIGHT (KALE, RASPBERRIES, COLLARDS) TOWARDS NORTH BURNSIDE STREET

Revit-produced east elevation of apartment tower with shadow study Latitudinal section showing the apartment layout in the context of the overall building complex

AutoCAD-produced typical schematic floor plan of proposed studio apartments, highlighting the community gardens on each floor for resident use


View of ground level coffee shop + bakery at base of proposed apartment building Figure ground plan showing location of proposed square (apartment building highlighted) within Northwest Portland

PUBLIC SQUARE + APARTMENT DESIGN Architectural Design Studio Professors Don Genasci + Sean Cho University of Oregon 2012

Working within a strict set of design standards and guidelines, the focus of this studio was twofold. The client, Con-way Companies,

NW Savier St

requested a design for a neighborhood public square, fitting within the already-designed master plan for the neighborhood.

NW Raleigh St

This square was shaped by the space created between several NW Quimby St

building massings, designed with specific proportions to create a comfortable square. One of these individual buildings was to

NW Pettygrove St

then be programmed and designed in greater detail, with a focus on activating the square and the neighborhood while also

NW 18th Ave

NW 19th Ave

NW 20th Ave

NW 21st Ave

NW 22nd Ave

NW 23rd Ave

providing a comfortable place to live. My focus building was a

NW Overton St

NW Northrup St

10 story apartment building with a coffee shop and bakery at the

6 | John Maternoski

base, inviting a variety of people to bring life to the square.

FIGURE GROUND PLAN SCALE: 1� = 100’

N


Breakdown of Corbusian Section plan of apartment building highlighting typical floor plans and individual unit plans

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

Massing model of proposed buildings creating a new public square

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3

2

BEDROOM CLOSET LAUNDRY BATH KITCHEN DINING LIVING BALCONY OFFICE VESTIBULE COFFEE SHOP BAKERY

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2

4

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UNIT A PLAN

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LEVEL 10

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4

1

N

7

5

LEVEL 9

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LEVEL 8 UNIT BREAKDOWN DIAGRAM

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N UNIT B PLAN

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N

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1 6

9

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2

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UNIT C PLAN

N

LEVEL 10 LEVEL 9

4

B LEVEL 10

LEVEL 8

N

LEVEL 10

N

5

LEVEL 7

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LEVEL 6

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1

A

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8 7

LEVEL 5

UNIT D PLAN

7 6

LEVEL 4

8 7

7

8

LEVEL 3

5

2

4

7 7

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LEVEL 2

7

8

6

2

7

N

LEVEL 9

4

5

B OVERALL BUILDING DIAGRAM

N

7

LEVEL 9

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8 A

N

UNIT E PLAN

8

N

1 1

2 2 3 5

1 1

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3 2

6

2 5

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B LEVEL 8

N

LEVEL 8

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John Maternoski | 7


Saarbrucken, Germany

FIERE WALDORFSCHULE

MATERIAL

Amsterdam, Netherlands

APOLLOLAAN MONTESSORI

SCHOOL PRECEDENT STUDIES

LIGHT

MINNEAPOLIS MONTESSORI SCHOOL Programming Studio University of Minnesota 2011

Through extensive research involving precedent studies of local, national and world-renowned primary education facilities, the challenge was to create a Montessori school designed to meet the unique needs of children while responding to the intense standards set forth by the Montessori program. Local schools were visited and research was conducted on the patterns and habits of children in a classroom environment. Successful and unsuccessful elements of other schools were also studied. From this research, a series of models were created at a variety of scales, exploring responses to the issues studied. These models

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led to the design of a whole school designed to fit a local site.

Models and diagrams exploring various classroom and whole-school conditions and moments, in response to the findings of extensive research


OFFICE/ADMINISTRATION SPECIALTY ROOMS STEPPED “TOWN SQUARE” CLASSROOM COMMUNITY ACTIVITY SPACE SEMI-PRIVATE STUDY AREA

1 2 3 4 5 6

2 2

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1

1

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NORTH

Time lapse diagrams created by observing the locations of children in a common area at Lake Country Montessori School in Minneapolis. The diagrams are part of a series plotting child and teacher locations in an attempt to determine what creates a draw for children.

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Proposed floor plan for a Montessori school, tailored to the needs of children based on extensive research and observation of children in a classroom environment. Illustrator-created site figure ground plan


Montessori school model Typical classroom plan Site + floor plan

NORTH


CROWN HALL STUDY

Study of Materials + Construction Techniques University of Minnesota 2010 Collaboration with Alissa Deneen

The goal of this exercise was to carefully examine the material components and assembly techniques of a post-1950 low-rise structure as a way to better understand real-world problemsolving and construction techniques. After analyzing the building components, the task was to construct a model of the building section in an effort to reinforce the knowledge gained and ensure a deep understanding of the building’s assembly. Our project focused on the International Style and the design of Mies Van der Rohe’s S.R. Crown Hall, on the campus of IIT in Chicago, Illinois. The model was constructed of acrylic, MDF, and museum board at a scale of 1” = 1’-0”.

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As we analyzed the building, we hand drew sections and individual components in an effort to truly understand how the building was constructed. Structural and building systems were analyzed on a whole-building scale to understand how these systems work individually and as a whole to make the building functional. (Drawing by Alissa Deneen)

Traditional plans and elevations were drawn to communicate the overall scheme of the building, and understand the role of each component within the greater structure. (Plan and elevation drawn by Alissa Deneen)


Hand-crafted final model exploring positive and negative space within a form created through volumetric study Hand-crafted models and drawings exploring the various form and spacial characteristics of a simple knot

THIS IS (K)NOT ARCHITECTURE Design Fundamentals Course University of Minnesota 2010

Starting with a simple knot in a piece of string, the form and shape of the knot were carried through a series of iterations spanning a wide variety of material and construction techniques. These techniques helped to identify multiple attributes of the form, ranging from its delicacy as a wire model to its volume as a massing model, culminating in a final “eggcrate� model technique, highlighting positive and negative space. The purpose of this exercise, in addition to strengthening skills in craft and model making, was to make space apparent and introduce it as part of the figure itself. These methods of construction allow the viewer to have an infinite number of experiences with the models,

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depending on the angle in which the models are viewed.


Revit-produced rendering of proposed child care center

LAS ROSAS CENTRO INFANTIL

Volunteer Project for Habitat for Humanity Cartago, Costa Rica 2008-09

Selected by Habitat for Humanity Costa Rica following an initial design competition, my task was to design a child care center following strict program and budgetary limitations. I was asked to be a complete set of construction documents, including electrical and plumbing plans, as well as a series of renderings to be used for informational as well as fundraising purposes. Using the University of Minnesota Child Development Center as a precedent study, I carefully analyzed building layout, room connections, and connection to the outdoors, using my findings from that research to influence my design for the new project.

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(Opposite page, far right)


UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

1104.90 127.00 127.00

190.50

787.40 114.30

114.30

127.00

114.30

127.00

190.50

190.50

114.30

114.30

A

114.30

DORMITORIO

Sc Lu

63.50

190.50

BAÑO

AULA

A

Sc Lu

Sc Lu 127.00

127.00

E

114.30

126.97

D

DESPACHO Y RECEPCIÓN Sc Lu

127.00

127.00

G

SALA Sc Lu

H

Sc Lu

127.00

114.30

Sc Lu

63.50

J

ARMARIO ARRIBA

ARMARIO

114.30 M

PLANTA DISTRIBUCION ARQUITECTONICA

114.30

114.30

63.50 Sc Lu

L

ESCALA 1:50

139.70

190.47

REFRIGADORA

K

139.70

VESTÍBULO Sc Lu

COMEDOR Sc Lu

114.30

393.70

139.73

1485.90

F

546.10

A

63.50

139.70

C 546.10

BAÑO

Sc Lu

114.30

B

LAS ROSAS CENRTO INFANTIL

2

SYNTAX DIAGRAM COMPARISON

B 1


THANK YOU -


Portfolio of Academic Work  

Portfolio of Work: University of Minnesota - Twin Cities, 2008-12 University of Oregon - Portland, 2012-14

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