__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

1


2

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

3


4

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

5


ABOUT THE COVER

P T

WC

KALARAMA’S

NEW YORK LADY RWC I’m A New Yorker x Lady Whitney (BHF)

& Vicki Reed

2017 World’s Champion Fine Harness Mare Southern Saddlebred Spring Fling Fine Harness Amateur Champion Single Appearance Watch for this pair at Lexington Junior League!

6

Owned by Vicki & Sam Reed Hinsdale, Illinois THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

Trained by Bruwer Stables A.J. Bruwer, Owner/Trainer Ethan Roetman, Assistant Trainer Versailles, Kentucky 859.879.9181


PB THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

7


8

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

9


10

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

11


12

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

13


14

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

15


16

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

17


ADVERTISERS CONTENTS

4 20 32 40 46 66 108 50 54 104 111 92 138

19 9 5 37 54 103 25 97 70 132 152 18 14 56 2 96 154 127 17 157 71 38 58 141 147 1 156 24 69 88 76 100 85

About the Cover The Loss of a True Champion Deveau Zubrod Kreitzer A Decade of Dedication: Adriaan Odendaal Denielle Dercksen One of a Kind - Bub Willamon Meghan von Ballmoos Don Harris Immortalized in Original Artwork Robertson Show Uniondale Show Riversdale Show Parys Christmas Festival Tersia Malan Bethlehem Show Celebrating the Life of Harold Poil Dejane and Garland Poil Hope Town Show Lead Way Farm Staff Writer

Autumn Hills Blythwood Farm Bruwer Stables Buck-Ridge Bushveld Game Capture CJ Du Plessis & Sons De Bosch Stables Dries Moolmam Boerdery Enid Norton Equestrian Centre Far Away Farms Far Niente Harold Poil Stables Harper Stables Juhantha Stables Kalarama Farm La Cola Stables Landon Farm Lavery’s Richlon Farm Majestic Oaks Milestone Stables Mountain View Stables Newline Stud Noble Equestrian Stables R&R Stables Signature Stables Skyline Stables Southern Legacy Stables Studcor Tears & Roses Stables Vic Wes Saddle Horse Stud Volvo Wilmar Stud Wimco Saddle Horse Stud

THE TEAM Pieter Hugo Managing Director

Johan Blom Chief Executive Officer

Madge Bass USA Sales Manager

Marguerite le Roux Senior Designer

Deveau Zubrod Kreitzer Features/Profiles

Marie Chin Advertising Executive

Meghan von Ballmoos Features/Billing Director

Nick Schubert Junior Staff Writer

Gasnat Jaffer Office Manager

www.showhorse.co.za EDITORIALS: Johan Blom johan@silvermane.co.za (0027) 83 324 3709 Pieter Hugo pieter@showhorse.co.za (001) 502 321 8305 Meghan von Ballmoos meghan@showhorse.co.za (001) 860 605 5041 Deveau Zubrod Kreitzer DESIGN: Marguerite le Roux mleroux@silvermane.co.za ADVERTISING: Madge Bass bass.madge@gmail.com (001) 502 299 8523 Marie Chin marie@silvermane.co.za (0027) 82 497 4475 ORDERS & INVOICING: Gasnat Jaffer gasnat@showhorse.co.za 32b Whitlers Way, Hout Bay 7806, South Africa INTERNATIONAL DIALING CODES: SA (0027) AND USA (001)

Published by:

www.silvermane.co.za

18

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

19


20

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

21


By Deveau Zubrod Kreitzer

THE LOSS OF A TRUE CHAMPION:

(SA) KALARAMA’S ULTIMATE CHOICE 10/ 13/ 2 0 0 3 - 4 /3 /2 0 1 8

On Tuesday, April 3rd, the Saddlebred community lost one of the all-time greats with the passing of (SA) Kalarama’s Ultimate Choice. He was a champion on two different continents; a five-time world’s champion, a world’s champion of champions, a two-time reserve world’s grand champion, and a twotime reserve world’s champion, all in his nine-year American show career. The striking bay stallion was born in Hekpoort, Gauteng, South Africa in 2003, under the ownership of noted trainer, Harold Poil and his wife Dejane. He was by (SA) Redwoods The General’s Choice and out of the mare (SA) Greyfour Captivation, and was formerly named Bridgewater’s Ultimate Choice. Harold Poil had gaited him as a young horse, and Larry Hodge first laid eyes on the exciting stud when he was just a three-year-old while in South Africa at the Parys Horse Show. He won there and won at their national championships in Bloemfontein as well. Soon after, Joan Hamilton purchased the stallion, and he was exported to the United States.

P T

“He was undefeated in South Africa to my knowledge,” said Hodge.“He was one of the most exciting horses I have ever shown, he gave 110% every time and was so game. He was definitely one of the best horses I have ever had the privilege to be around. He had a great personality, he was very special.” He was first shown stateside in 2009, under the direction of Kalarama Farm with Neil Visser in the irons, where he won a novice five-gaited class at J.D. Massey horse show. It was soon after that Deborah Orr began showing him. After a few shows under their belt, the duo began to click, and in August of that year, Kalarama’s Ultimate Choice garnered his first world’s championship winning the five-gaited amateur stallion and gelding class and the five-gaited amateur world’s champion of champions titles. While he was certainly a lot of horse for an amateur rider, Hodge said they continued to work him as they had been. “They [Orr and David Rudder] are exceptional riders and they didn’t get in his way.They really let him be himself.” It seemed the more the horse worked, the better he got; and the following season Larry Hodge took over the riding duties, though he was lightly shown. In 2011, Hodge won the open five-gaited world’s championship with him and was reserve in the five-gaited world’s grand championship. He had already gathered quite a large fan club, and it seemed everyone was rooting for the powerhouse racking machine. In 2012, he was the five-gaited stallion reserve world’s


[outside his stall] he would literally just lick me until I left and then nicker at me. He was my best friend. I had mad respect for him and I always just tried to do him justice.” DeVore explained that he had always had bad feet, and to minimize any undue stress on them, she jogged him to keep his strength and endurance, and only rode him at shows once she got to know him well enough.“He would have given it all he had even if his legs were falling off,” she said. “He was a fire breathing dragon when you rode him, but in the stall, I would have put a baby in there with him.” While Ali is most certainly one of the most accomplished amateur riders in the country, she and Rich wanted to do what was best for their horse from the very beginning.“We had a long conversation about the horse and how he deserved the shot again at winning the gaited stake just because once you knew the horse and what he was about, it was like you felt like you owed it to him,” said DeVore.

champion and in 2013 he once again took home the title in the stallion stake and a reserve world’s grand championship. In 2014, still owned by Hamilton, Daniel Lockhart showed the stallion before preparing him for amateur rider, David Rudder. Paired with Rudder, they clinched the title in the five-gaited amateur gentleman world’s championship in their only appearance. It was soon after that Kalarama’s Ultimate Choice went to his forever home at DeVore Stables, under the ownership of Helen Rich and Ali DeGray. It was there that “UC”, as they fondly called him, won his last world’s championship titles. In 2015, Tammy DeVore and UC took home the five-gaited stallion stake on the green shavings and he was reserve world’s champion in the class in 2017. “Ali [DeGray] loves that division so much and I wanted to make sure she always had a great horse, and he was the best, so we bought him,” recalled owner, Helen Rich. “He was a wild man, and Tammy of course was training him and they just clicked together.” While the original plan was for Ali to show UC in the amateur fivegaited division, it was clear that Tammy had a special connection with the horse from the beginning.Their show ring presence was electrifying; and while Ali did ride him many times, Rich joked that the horse didn’t like anyone but Tammy on his back.“If Ali practiced on him then he would get mad,” she recalled laughing. “He loved Ali, and he loved me, and we could hug and kiss him all day long, but he only liked Tammy riding him.” While UC looked wild under saddle, with his long, black mane flying through the air, and the white of his eyes showing; on the ground he was anything but. In the stall he was a gentleman, pleasant and kind.The stallion lived in the very first stall at DeVore Stables, where he demanded attention from all of the passersby. “Whenever I would walk in the barn and he heard my voice, he would nicker for me,” said DeVore fondly. “When I went in the stall, he would grab ahold of my jacket and hold it in his mouth. He would hold it the whole time. If I put my face up to the bars

“I’ve never known a horse in my entire life that deserved that opportunity more. Ali was kind enough to let me continue to do that. He wasn’t easy, he was complicated. She had shown him at Chattanooga and did a really good job with him, but just needed to get to know him, and she was going to show him at Murfreesboro last year. That was my dad’s favorite horse and he pulled Ali aside and asked her if she would let me show him because he knew that was the last time he was going to get to see me show,” DeVore recalled, her voice cracking with the emotion of it all. “We were 100% behind the decision,” said Rich. “It was a no-brainer.” “Derrick showed Enchanted Kiss and I showed UC and I have a picture of my dad cheering for us that Jackie Hale took that I will cherish forever,” said DeVore. No one had any indication that it would also be the grand stallion’s last show. “We didn’t know at the time, but he had a tumor in his colon. He did his job at the show, but I knew something was wrong. He wasn’t himself.We got home and he got colicky three weeks before my dad passed away. I had gone to the doctor and had a tumor in my uterus and he went to the clinic for testing.” “Most horses in that situation would have been on their knees in pain, but he seemed just uncomfortable. They didn’t do surgery right away but called me when he seemed like he was beginning to show he was in some pain. They opened him up and discovered he had a tumor, it was a really difficult surgery and after surgery it was a week before he passed any manure. I had gone up there to see him in the clinic, two weeks before my dad passed away, and I went in the stall with him.That afternoon he started eating grass, and finally had his bowel movement, it may have been a coincidence, but I really think it helped him turn the corner.” After a long recovery, he finally got to come back home to DeVore Stables where it seemed he was continuing his recovery. He had another minor colic episode and ended up with a hernia. “We were waiting for him to get stronger before we went in to fix the hernia,” explained DeVore. “He was really doing good and acting like his old self so we sent him up during Pro-Am to repair the hernia.” Unfortunately, he experienced another severe bout of colic, resulting in a rupture, and although it was hard for everyone


involved in his life, the decision was made to put him to rest. With his passing, he leaves behind a following of fans both young and old. Always the underdog, it was clear to all those around him that he had the heart of a champion, and it seemed he was always in the running for the coveted world’s grand championship title. Everyone that met him recalled him fondly with words of description like: magnificent, spectacular, memorable, exciting, electrifying, kind, and more.The list could go on and on. Since his arrival stateside nearly ten years ago, UC also sired a small crop of foals each year. With over eighty registered get, his current three-year-old crop is his largest, with eighteen. His legacy will live on in this group of young horses. Some of his notable progeny include; Kalarama’s Fortune, Von Obie, Kalarama’s Bluegrass Max, Kalarama’s U.C. U.C., Queen of the Nile, Hello Holly, Queensbury Sabrina, reserve world’s champion Ultimate Blue, Shot of Patron, Jambo, reserve world’s champion, The Bay Lily and world’s champion Mix It Up. The Poil’s bred a few mares to him before he left South Africa and Kalarama Farm continued to breed him all along. It’s not often that a stallion can be at the top of his game in the show ring as well as breed horses right along with their training regime. “He was such a mannerly horse, in the barn and to ship, you would never know he was a stallion,” said Hodge. One thing that consoles those that Kalarama’s Ultimate Choice has left behind is the legacy of his future in his offspring. They

have frozen semen so he will continue to sire future show ring champions. “He has a future – there will be future with his offspring and we are very hopeful for that,” said Rich. “And right now, we are just so sad because he was a family member. I have a reputation for not selling my top horses, because I give back what they give us. It’s a hole in our lives, we miss him.” “He was as game as any horse that has ever walked this earth,” wrote Tammy on Facebook announcing his passing.“He faced his competitors with grit, determination, and a work ethic that was unmatched. We knew that UC was tough as nails, and over the past several months he proved that to us over and over again. Thank you to everyone who supported us on the fantastic ride we took with this horse, especially his farriers and our wonderful vets who worked so hard to get him back to himself over the past few months.To Lorenzo, his caretaker, thank you for always having UC in top order and being his constant friend and companion for the past four years,” said DeVore. “To everyone who loved UC, and all of the members of his ‘fan club,’ thank you for your support. Your cheers meant the world to us and we were so happy to have you riding along with us on this journey. To Helen and Ali, there aren’t words to say thank you for bringing UC into our lives. He was so blessed to have the two of you – the best owners any horse could ever ask for. To UC, thank you for the ride. See you on the other side and say hello to Dad for us.”


26

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

27


28

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

29


30

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

31


32

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

33


Adriaan showing Lee Roby at Prins Albert Show.

P T

By Denielle Dercksen

A DECADE OF DEDICATION

ADRIAAN ODENDAAL Everyone knows that success is not something to be achieved overnight. As a point of departure, success can be evaluated through different and diverse examples which motivate, inspire and set a trend for becoming one’s best self. That is exactly what comes to mind when sitting across from Adriaan Odendaal, listening to the stories of where he comes from, where he is today and what the future holds for him.

34

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


Adriaan showing War Sensation at Robertson Show.

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

35


Adriaan with Charmed And Bewitched at De Bosch Stables, Stellenbosch. Adriaan showing Bau Fortune at Bloemfontein Show.

Adriaan at age 5, driving his pony Duimpie at Lichtenburg Show.

P T

Adriaan and Francois showing The Judge at Bloemfontein Show. Winning Champion Senior Stallion in Hand.

A

driaan was born just over three decades ago in a town called Lichtenburg up in the Nor th West of South Africa. Along with his younger siblings, he spent his school years there, dreaming of becoming a farmer and taking over the reins from his parents, who still farm in the area today. A career as a game ranger was also an option, but this all changed on the day he got his first Saddlebred from Johan and Tersia Malan. As soon as he completed high school he managed to secure a position with Bill Schoeman in the United States where he begun building up his knowledge of the Show Horse industry. Over the next few years after he returned from the USA he gained extensive experience working at Green Acre Saddlebreds, for Fourie Lombaard, Charl Wilke and Angel’s View Stables. After Dirk Claassens, with whom he worked with at Angel’s View, moved to Bapsfontein, Adriaan was fully in charge of running a barn and training horses for the

36

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

first time. Petra Kleefisch asked Adriaan to come work for them for a few months abroard, this time in Germany. In traveling and working overseas Adriaan met a lot of people that he still has connections with today. Upon returning home, Adriaan joined Buck Ridge Stables, under the leadership of Elizka Jordaan. In 2010 my father, Francois Dercksen offered him a trainer position at De Bosch Stables in Stellenbosch. I remember the June school holiday of that year, our family was driving to Namibia when my dad told us that when we returned home, there would be a new trainer at De Bosch Stables. My sisters and I were so curious to find out who it would be, that we even watched old Bloemfontein Show dvd’s to see more about our new trainer. When we arrived home, we were thrilled to begin a journey with new trainer Adriaan. The past ten years with him being part of the De Bosch team exceeded all of our expectations. Adriaan has found the accomplishments of us, his three equitation riders, Denielle (myself), Madine and Anje


Adriaan with Madine Dercksen after winning the Three-Gaited Champion of Champions on Mighty Joe. Francois Dercksen and That’s My Way at Robertson Show.

Denielle, Madine and Anje Dercksen in their Protea Colours.

PB THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

Adriaan showing Guy Fox and winning the ASF Futurity. Photo by Ross Millin

most rewarding. We have all received both Three- and Five-Gaited Senior Protea Colours and competed at international level. Although Adriaan was not the biggest fan of Saddle Seat Equitation at first, he most definitely played a major role in realizing the dreams of the three Dercksen sisters. Adriaan married Marguerite in December 2017 in her beautiful hometown, Riversdale in the Western Cape. It then dawned on us why the Riversdale Show had been a favourite event in the show season for Adriaan! They met at a braai (barbecue) at Tulbagh Show a few years before, where they became friends and a while after that; really good friends. They plan to start a family in the future but for now they are happy spending mornings at the stables with their furbaby, Cooper. A couple of highlights that Adriaan treasure is Madine winning the Three-Gaited Champion of Champions on Mighty Joe, himself (Adriaan) winning the Three Year Old Fine Harness at Nationals with Dark Emperor and winning

the Gentleman’s Three-Gaited also at Bloemfontein with War Sensation. He is also grateful for the opportunity that he had being Senior Protea Saddle Seat Coach (gold medallists in 2016), winning the ASF Futurity twice and being awarded Equitation Trainer of the year three years in succession. In these different levels of participation and contribution, Adriaan has shown his versatile skills relating to horses as well as people. “The learning process never ends” is a philosophy that Adriaan lives by, particularly when it comes to horses. He believes that no matter how old you are or how successful you are, there is always room for improvement. This perspective is definitely something that pays off and reflects in his hard work and enthusiasm. He says he most probably learned the most from Elizka Jordaan and Dirk Claassens, as well as other trainers such as Bill Schoemann, Fourie Lombaard, Kevin Eltringham, Johan Malan and Smith Lilly, who says “Adriaan spent a week with us several years ago and impressed me and

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

37


Adriaan and Harlem’s Prince Charming winning the Five-Gaited Grand Championship at Parys Chrismas Fesitival.

Adriaan and Wicked Nite winning the Three-Gaited Grand Championship at Riversdale Show.

P T

Adriaan, Marguerite and Cooper.

everyone else at Mercer Springs with his riding ability, knowledge, curiosity, character and good humor. I am glad to count him as a friend, and have great respect for his horsemanship.” The biggest challenge Adriaan had to face was convincing himself that he would be good enough to be a horse trainer and to make a living out of it. His success story is an example of overcoming your fears and making your dreams a reality. Adriaan’s advice on how to be successful is to pitch up every single day, work hard and keep going.

are always well turned out and well schooled. He is one of the trainers who has a real passion for his horses. His skill as an Equitation trainer is among the best because his track record proves it, not only because of the rider but also because of how well schooled his horses are and the ability to put the combination together and make it work. He has in the past loaned a horse to a rider from another barn with which she won the Champion of Champions with! To me that shows what type of person he is and we must try and keep him in South Africa.” Says Kevin Eltringham.

“He is always neat and tidy and a good role model to the younger trainers. At the shows he is always the first at his stables and one of the last to leave after first raking the passage way himself. He is ready to learn from other trainers by attending their clinics and sometimes asking one to come to his stables to give their opinion on a problem. He tries to go to the United States regularly to keep up with the latest trends and learn from the best. To watch his horses at the shows is always a pleasure because they

From the outset, Adriaan knew that working with horses would be his life’s passion. We all know the saying that if your passion is your job, you will never have to work a day in your life. Adriaan takes on each day embracing his passion and making the most of it. By combining extremely hard work with his passion, Adriaan has earned the respect of a wide range of people. The best part is that it is just the beginning, and his future in the Show Horse arena is looking bright!

38

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

39


40

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

41


Bud at 20 years old.

Bud’s daughters, (Left to right) Karen Turpin, Janice Horne and Dakota Willimon. Photo by Avis

By Meghan von Ballmoos

ONE O F A K IN D

BUD WILLIMON T he name Bud Willimon needs no introduction. In the industry for over sixty years, this renowned farrier is universally known and respected. Based on statistics and reputation, he is the authority on shoeing world champions.Though there is no definitive way of counting, merely a quick survey across the industry would reveal that Bud has shod somewhere near a thousand world champions, along with countless winners at each of the historic American and South African shows over the past half-century. He has shod Saddlebreds, Morgans, Tennessee Walking Horses, and Standardbred race horses to victory in their respective breeds. His expertise has been instrumental in changing the course of its career for many a horse, and likewise, many a trainer. He has guided dozens of apprentices to become successful farriers in their own right. By all accounts, his work ethic is unparalleled and even now, at eighty three years old, he can outwork the best of them. Bud’s dedication to his craft is only surpassed by his devotion to the people and horses that call on him. He is a real family man and a friend to so many that it would be impossible to count. In fact, it would be fair to say that he is one of the most beloved and respected men in the show horse industry. But perhaps the most incredible truth about Bud Willimon (despite long ago earning bragging rights), is that you would not hear about his impressive accomplishments from him. Born on November 4, 1934 in Greenville, South Carolina, Bud was raised on his grandfather’s farm. Labor from horses and mules were primarily used for farming the cotton, oats and wheat cultivated on the thousand-acre farm. He developed an

42

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

affinity for the horses that were a part of everyday life. One of his favorite jobs was delivering the animals to the farm’s blacksmith shop, where he loved to watch and learn. His father owned a Saddlebred, planting a seed that became pivotal. During World War II, the US Government commandeered a part of the farm, using it as a military base and exposing it to heightened risk.Years later, Bud recalled the resulting nightly blackouts to avoid attack. As a result of the post-World War atmosphere and the burgeoning Cold War, most of his contemporaries expected to partake in the military. Naturally, Bud joined the Navy Reserves in high school. When he came of age, the Army came calling for the draft, but he was allowed to join the Navy instead. He was a typical young guy of the 1950s in most respects. A self-described “knucklehead,” he enjoyed cars and motorcycles. While in the Navy, he got hooked on horses when fatefully attending a show at Madison Square Garden, in New York City. He saw a gaited pony, Peck O’Trouble that “could slow gait and rack the best,” said Bud. “That’s when I decided I want to be in this business.” Not too long after his two year Naval service, he found himself grooming horses in Sandy Springs, Georgia for horse trainer, Jack Bullet and was barely making it. His weekly wages were so poor, he knew he had to make a change quickly. When he was offered a job working as an apprentice, by the premier farrier of the time, Robert H. New, Bud jumped at the chance. He fully embraced his new career, learning from Mr. New and developing his trade through experience. So, by necessity rather than design, Bud Willimon discovered his calling.

P T


Bud and his father, Robert, 1979.

Bud with Helen Crabtree at a clinic in South Africa, 1985.

Bud when he worked for Jack Bullet.

PB THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

Bud made a name for himself in the South, traveling extensively and shoeing anything that needed it. A close call with an ornery mule soon taught him to stick to horses, a policy he maintained over the years. He worked with many horses and was trusted by trainers as an all-around good horseman. In the 1960s, Jack Boyd hired him to get the Saddlebred stallion Special Society to the New York City harbor for export to South Africa. He safely delivered the “feisty” horse to a poorly thought-out box stall on the ship, feeling uncertain the horse would make it. Many years later, Bud learned that Special Society not only survived the long trip, but also became a very influential stud in South Africa. His winsome personality and perfectionist approach to work were his trademarks. He was always thinking and would talk to anyone. Big trainers began calling on Bud’s services. Around the late sixties, a customer of Bob Vessel’s offered him a job in South Africa and he accepted. He sold all of his belongings and prepared to leave the country, but the deal fell through at the last minute. Since he had already committed to a fresh start elsewhere, he moved down near Happy Valley Farm, of Rossville, Georgia. He became the regular farrier at Happy Valley for Sam Brannon. When the farm was downsizing and Brannon left, his workload there decreased. Meanwhile, Bud continued to acquire more accounts in Kentucky, including Don Harris, Charlie Smith, Debbie Foley and Ronnie Graham. Kentucky was a hub for the Saddlebred industry, constantly growing with Saddlebred barns. Don Harris convinced him he should relocate there. At specifically that time in the 1970s, gas

was scarce. “The main reason I moved to Kentucky is because, at that time, gas was becoming hard to get, and I knew I could walk from Shelbyville to Simpsonville (where all the barns were) when gas ran out. Of course, by the time I unpacked, you could find gas everywhere again,” said Bud, laughing. His business continued to grow rapidly, surprising even Bud himself with how quickly barns started calling on him. Trainers liked that they could count on Bud. He showed up when he said he would. “I always felt like I had half the battle won by showing up on time!” he told his apprentices. While many other blacksmiths weren’t dependable, Bud saw his word as his honor. If he said he was going to do something, he did it. By the late 1970s, Bud’s solid reputation and acclaim in the American Saddlebred industry earned him a trip to the Queen’s horse show in England— The Royal Windsor Horse Show, as official farrier for an exhibition of the breed. He joined Kim Skipton, who took Contracts Tinker Toy, Camille Whitfield with Elation, Bob Irwin and Lorri Berg took Bi Mi Fascination, and Sally Jackson took My Starlight Hour, while Mrs. Weldon took Caslon. He recalls it as “an amazing experience.” Over 25,000 people attended the fun, family event and remains a highlight in Bud’s mind. As any good horseman knows, a good performance horse starts with good feet. When everything is going well, it is easy to forget just how much impact it has on the outcome, but when things go poorly, the farrier is often the first phone call.

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

43


Bud shoeing.

From the onset, Bud understood his role in the process, but took it to another level to become the leading farrier in Kentucky. He did not believe in business cards, that a farrier’s quality of work will spread his name faster. A testament to his talent, word of his abilities travelled fast. His shoeing theory remains the same today, understanding that what works for one horse might not work for another. He pays close attention to the mechanics, looking at each individual uniquely and taking their conformation into account. In Bud’s book, first and foremost, the horse should be comfortable. He focuses on ensuring that there is both balance and support, with just the right amount of weight, so the horse can perform its gaits properly. He intuitively understands the importance of addressing those variables and how to do it in such a way that it improves the horse’s ability to perform. He is always thinking about how to help a horse reach its full potential. One of Bud’s longtime employees and a most successful farrier in his own right, Rudi Beneke, claims “the biggest difference about his approach is that he is always willing to try something new or out of the ordinary to try and correct a problem.”Trainers from around the country and across a variety of breeds have called on his skill and he remains one of the most sought after farriers in the United States. Though their first meeting was about twenty years earlier at The Celebration, Bud began shoeing for Raymond Shively in the early 1970s. Raymond defined the difference between other farriers and Bud. He said, “He doesn’t put his tools in the truck and forget about it. Bud is a person who will go home and sit up and think about things. He’s always thinking about something to do to make it better, he’s always trying. Bud’s not only a great blacksmith, he’s a pretty doggone good horseman.” Raymond

44

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

recalled the fine harness mare, Summerfield’s Dream Girl, that he and Bud collaborated on in the early eighties. “She went to her chin with one leg and below level on another! It took the two of us working together on it all winter. Once we eventually figured it out, she went on to win everything, including Louisville and the American Royal,” he said. Raymond has won 24 World Grand Championships in the Road Horse class. Bud has shod every single one. “People don’t understand that shoeing the Standardbreds is different. Bud has helped me a whole lot with the road horses.” Some years later, when Rudi was with him, he accompanied Bud to Raymond’s Delovely Farm many times and described his reflective ways. “He doesn’t settle,” said Rudi. “I remember driving home after very long days of shoeing at Delovely’s, he would always discuss some of the horses we shod and contemplate how he might shoe them differently next time or what he should have done different. His commitment to his trade is mind blowing.” By the early 1980s, Bud was shoeing for nearly all the big barns in the country. One of his oldest clients and faithful friends in Kentucky was Debbie Foley. She had recently hired a young graduate from Stephen’s College named Cindy Hinson. Cindy caught Bud’s eye and he was determined to get a date with the young beauty. Despite his charm, Cindy refused his advances, much to Bud’s chagrin. Debbie still remembers the funny story: After work one day, I looked out my window and saw Bud’s truck. I went out and said,’Bud! What are you doing sitting in my driveway?!’ He said, ‘Will you talk Cindy into going out with me?’ The next day I pulled her aside and said, ‘Now Bud’s showing up at my house. Will you please just go out with him?’ Cindy yelled ‘I’M NOT GOING OUT WITH THAT REDNECK!’

P T


PB THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

The crew having fun at the KY State Fair. Bud with shoes he manufactured, 1981.

Danny Cameron, Rudi Beneke, and Bud.

The couple got married not long after. All joking aside, Cindy and Bud were well-suited for each other. Their outgoing personalities, mutual love of horses and Southern upbringing made them a perfect match. Cindy and Bud have a daughter, Dakota, and Bud has two other daughters from a previous marriage, Karen Turpin and Janice Horne. He also has six beloved grandchildren. Despite being at the top of his game, Bud never became unapproachable. His remarkably long list of friends continued to grow. A friend since 1966, Euchee Matthews said, “I don’t care where you go or what you do, Bud will talk to you. I don’t know that he’s ever been at a loss for words!” In the early 1980s, he met South African, Charlie Bolton at Lexington Junior League. Charlie had come to the States to learn more about the breed he had come to love and promote in his home country. Bud’s characteristic friendliness and chatty nature proved to be an asset once again. Charlie and he struck up a close friendship, leading to a visit to the Bolton farm in Sunland, South Africa. Bud and his wife, Cindy, stayed with the family. Irene van der Westhuizen, Charlie’s daughter recalls the event fondly: We decided that his knowledge and his love of teaching could not be left untouched so we initiated two farrier clinics during his stay. His first was held at the Port Elizabeth show grounds and the second at Chaplain Stables with Chappie Scott in Tarkastad. The clinics were well attended, so much was taught in the short time Bud had available. It was the beginning of a new era for the South African Saddle Bred industry. Bud ended up spending a few extra days with Chappie Scott. Here he was

introduced to hunting and drinking beer, the South African way. On the same trip, the first of many, Irene laughingly recalls deciphering Bud and Cindy’s Southern accent. “My dad recalls Cindy saying ‘horyall’ every morning, not having a clue what it meant. A few mornings passed and my dad still not understanding what ‘horyall’ meant, he eventually asked Bud what Cindy was saying, it turned out, Cindy was saying, ‘How are you all?’” Despite a few words ‘lost in translation,’ the trip was a glaring success that led to many others and a connection between South Africa and the United States that has ultimately affected both industries immensely. Irene further described the fateful turning point: We feel Bud has had a tremendously positive impact on the South African Saddle Bred industry. He further nurtured and taught many South African farriers, continuing to teach them both on our home front and abroad over the next 35 years. Bud’s knowledgeable input, single handedly changed the farrier vision in South Africa. His professional insight combined with his love of teaching, allowed anyone willing to learn, access to his endless source of knowledge and his assistance. The South African connection continued in Bud’s life. He went on to forge many lasting relationships with aspiring farriers and horse trainers. A natural mentor, Bud helped a great many South Africans apprentice in the States- a number stayed to become successful farriers and trainers in America, while some returned home to become leaders in their field. Recognizing a kindred determination to succeed,

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

45


Part of a month trip in 2006.

Tarkastad, 2008.

Bud and Rudi went to South Africa in 2008 for two weeks.

Bud snatched up South African, Rudi Beneke as one of his protégés. Accomplished trainer, Mark Turner is also a South African expatriate, whose career was immeasurably affected by Bud. He established the connection between Raymond Shively and Mark, forever changing his life. “I don’t think there is anybody else ever that has been as instrumental in more people’s careers as he has been. I think helping people gives him more satisfaction than anything else in life. Our industry is definitely better because of Bud,” said Mark. Somewhere along the way, Bud created Southern Venture, a hauling company. Amazingly, he found time to hand build the trailers that regularly ship horses to shows all over the South and Midwest United States. Fortunately, he married well and Cindy runs that business proficiently. Throughout the years, Bud took many young farriers under his wing. Some merely tagged along for a few days or weeks to learn what they could from the now famous Bud Willimon, others got on the payroll and worked for him for a while. He was never begrudging with his time or knowledge. But it is clear that anyone working for Bud had better plan on trying to keep up with him, at the very least. Never idle, he could outwork anyone. Rudi even recalls many Christmases on which he would be punching 75 to 100 pairs of handmade shoes. Currently working for him, Dustin Gossage said, “Bud has always treated me like family and not just an employee. He will do anything with no hesitation to help someone in need. Bud is my biggest mentor as a farrier and I owe him everything for what he has taught me.”

46

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

Bud said there are too many men to mention of whom he is proud to have had the honor of teaching over the years. His right hand (and sometimes left hand) man is Mike Waddle, remarkably working with Bud for over 33 years. His loyal crew consists of John Gregory, Dustin Gossage, John Goodman, Justin Deviney, and Derrick Stephenson. Just to name a few among many are Marty Watts, David Walker, Danny Cambion, Paul Human, Mark Human, Rudi Beneke, Jeremy Wells, Mark Herman, Awie Viljoen, Karl Du Plessis, Rick McDowel, Brian Donnelly, Graham Pringle, Clay Merryman, Johannes Maasdorp and Ludi Woods. It seems that helping others is as natural to Bud Willimon as breathing. Nearly every person that knows him is quick to tell of a time that he came to their rescue. Often the help is horse related, sometimes not, but the common theme is that he will go out of his way for others. He is universally esteemed for his kindness, though word and action. Longtime friend and colleague,Todd Miles called him “a special human being.” He went on to say, “Two things about Bud. One: He’s the hardest working human being on earth. Two: Anytime. Anywhere. Bud will be there for you. He always goes beyond the call of duty for me.” Todd also revealed that, in a pinch, Bud,”can flat do some cooking!” After decades of friendship and over fifty years of championship titles, Debbie Foley and the Willimons maintain a great relationship. “His knowledge is just incredible. Bud forgot more in his sleep last night, than most farriers will ever know,” she said. “It’s not a job

P T


PB THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

Irene and her children with Bud and Cindy, 2006.

Bud making shoes.

Irene, Alta and Charlie Bolton with Bud in 2006.

for Bud. I can’t tell you how many times he has helped me.” One of her World’s Grand Championship winners, Callaway’s Annabel Allison, was “damn near impossible to shoe,” said Debbie. But Bud always managed to get the job done without a struggle and he never forgot to tighten the clinches one more time before the mare went to a show. She described one of the recent times he came to her rescue. It was during the Kentucky State Fair 2015. Debbie had just finished jogging HS Daydream’s Heads Up without a hiccup. When they unhooked him from the cart, the gelding was “broken-leg lame,” as Debbie described it. It happened to be the morning of the day he was to show in the Three Gaited Over 15.2 Stake. It was also 3:00 AM. One phone call and fifteen minutes later, Bud showed up to help. Every hour for about 18 hours until the horse went into Freedom Hall, he checked on that horse, determined that he would be sound enough to show. Not only did he show, but he won. He went on to win the World’s Grand Championship later that week too. “He will always go the extra mile, no matter what,” said Debbie. She credits Bud as a critical factor in her success as a trainer. “I could not have done what I’ve done in the horse business without him,” she said. Bud has seen more horses than most people can imagine and, combined with his skills as a horseman, he is an asset. Debbie Foley only half-jokingly claimed she would like to pay Bud to sit and watch horses work all day. Kalarama’s Daniel Lockhart said, “It always amazes me how he can watch a horse work and not only fix its shoeing, but also

give me advice on how to work it differently that might help as well. He has fixed so many horses for us over the years.” He continued,“He’s one of a kind.” Danny went on to describe their relationship, “Bud is like family to me and he’s one of my biggest mentors. There’s nothing he won’t do to help Kelly [Self] and me. He helped me pick out and buy my first truck.” Over sixty years of being in the business will give a person some perspective. Bud has watched the industry change over the years. The horses are a bit finer, their feet are smaller and not as strong. Shows are a little less fun and a little too focused on competition and winning at Louisville. “We need to bring up a whole new generation of horse enthusiasts. You will not change the habits of a 40 year old, but we should focus on the academy riders and help those trainers,” said Bud. Of course, he takes great pleasure in watching classes like last year’s gaited stake at Louisville with Tre Lee and Matt Shiflet ride at it. Good horsemanship— that’s what excites him. The common theme among his friends and colleagues is that Bud Willimon is the real deal. He is beloved by many and respected by all. He takes pride in his work. Among his contemporaries, he is incomparable and most would say a legend in his own time. His talent is undeniable and work ethic unparalleled. Yet his humility is perhaps most endearing. While some farriers keep count of every world champion they shoe, Bud keeps count of every friend he makes along the way. *Thank you to Kim Skipton for your great memory. THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

47


WGC CH IMPERATOR Painting by Andrea Hartmeyer Johns 1982

48

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


A S T O R I E D C A R E E R T H RO U G H T H E E Y E S O F T H E A RT I S T S

DON HARRIS IMMORTALIZED IN ORIGINAL ARTWORK

PB THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

Painting by Helen Hayse 1980 This piece depicts the 1978 duel, at Madison Square Garden, between Imperator with Don Harris aboard and WGC CH Belle Elegant with Ed Teater. “Perry won that night and he was just a junior horse.”

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

49


“ WA L T E R B R O W N WA S A G R E AT F R I E N D A N D WA S M Y ‘ C O A C H ’ ON THE RAIL. I CAN STILL SEE HIM WITH HIS ELBOWS UP ON THE RAIL, GIVING ME A DV I C E . ”

WGC CH SULTAN’S STARINA Painting by Walter L Brown ”Starina was once voted Three-Gaited Horse of the Century,” Harris stated. “I had her at the same time as Imperator and she dominated the three-gaited division in the 80’s.” She won the World’s Grand Championship twice with Harris ( 1983-1984) and went on to win four more times with Tom Moore. “Charlie Crabtree told me he had a white legged mare I needed to see. He couldn’t get her to canter so she had a good price tag on her. Roz eventually got tired of hearing about her so she said to go ahead and buy her. We taught her to canter in the long lines.”

WGC CH IMPERATOR Painting by Walter L Brown Imperator was a “once in a lifetime” horse who thrilled audiences with his signature slow gait. He began his profound career winning the Junior Five-Gaited Championship at the Kentucky State Fair in 1978. Harris piloted him to the Five-Gaited World’s Grand Championship in 1980, 1981, 1985 and in 1986 he became the oldest horse to ever win the title at 12 years old. He was Reserve in the big stake 4 times. He and Harris won the Gelding Stake all 8 years. Harris stated, “I believe he is the greatest gaited horse that has ever been.” 50

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

WGC CH IMPERATOR Painting by Walter L Brown Walter did this piece after a rare visit to the farm to see Perry.

P T


RWGC CH Giddy-Up-Go Painting by Walter L Brown Giddy-Up-Go remembered by Harris, “was one of the most popular horses that ever lived. He would go into Louisville every year undefeated and then would fail to win the stake. The most famous phrase about him was ‘The greatest gaited horse that never won the gaited stake.’” “If the World’s Championships had been at Rock Creek or Lexington, nobody could have beaten him. He loved to show outside.” “I had some nice horses before him, but he is the one who put me on the map.”

PB THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

WGC CH FINISTERRE’S GIFT OF LOVE Painting by Walter L Brown Gift Of Love dominated the 70s as she and Don were named the World’s Grand Champions four consecutive years. “I called her a ‘Saturday night horse,’” Harris reflected. “She would kind of coast through the qualifier, but when she heard a Saturday night crowd get behind her, it would really light her up. She won every time she went to New York (Madison Square Garden) and the crowd there always loved her.”

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

51


WGC CH IMPERATOR Painting by Helen Hayse 1981

P T

Gift Of Love Painting by Helen Hayse 1979

Abstract Art by 19 year old Taylor Collins

RWGC CH Giddy-Up-Go Painting by Linda White 1975 52

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


The original horse show program pages were used as the canvas for these drawings of Imperator, Gift of Love and Giddy-Up-Go. Renowned artist, Gwen Reardon created the artwork for Don Harris from 1976-1980.

PB INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE THE

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

53


WC Prize Contender “Prize Contender was one of my all-time favorites,” Harris said. This portrait of Prize Contender “was done by the artist between the qualifier and the stake at The American Royal in 1999. I thought it was remarkable she was able to complete it so quickly. She gave it to me on Stake night and she did most of the work right in front of our tack room.” In 1998 Harris and Prize Contender won the Stallion Stake at the Kentucky State Fair and were Reserve in the World’s Grand Championship. They finished their final season together winning the first $50,000 Gaited Stake at the American Royal in 1999. “Ed Gunn had been training him for his dad, Aaron Gunn, and even worked cattle on him,” Harris remembered. “They brought (Prize Contender) to Lexington and when I saw him, I couldn’t stay in my seat! It took a while before they would sell him, but we eventually got him bought.”

P T

WGC CH IMPERATOR Artist by Cynthia Hecht 1990

54

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


“A P I C T U R E I S A P O E M W I T H O U T WO R D S ” ~ H O R AC E

PB INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE THE

WGC CH IMPERATOR Artist Mary Waickman WGC CH Imperator retired in Freedom Hall during the World’s Championship 1991. This print was signed by Don Harris for the artist, Mary Waickman, who captured Perry’s final moments in the ring.

WGC CH IMPERATOR Painting by Mary Waickman Imperator moved to the Hall of Champions at the Kentucky Horse Park in August 1991 where he lived until his death in 1997. He is buried along the Memorials Walk of Champions with other notable horses including WGC CH Sky Watch and thoroughbred champions Cigar and Alysheba.

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

55


Quality Service from Dedicated Professionals Game capture and translocation service for Southern Africa

Basis of operations and contact details: General Manager Naboomspruit Thabazimbi Gauteng / Namibia Kimberley Kroonstad Graaf Reinet Gauteng / Namibia Vryburg

Dave Mouton Daniel Opperman MG van Greuning Ruan Roux Hendri Worthington Andries Steyn Louwrens du Toit Chris Smith Jaco v.d Merwe

083 269 8953 083 332 3916 083 658 0793 071 482 8182 079 525 7236 071 237 2321 079 494 0057 082 883 7574 079 525 7266

P T

Tina de Jager +27 (0)82 774 4777 56

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

www.bushveldgamecapture.co.za tina@bushveld.info


PB THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

Top quality genetic material is the focus of Valley Venture Stud, home to South Africa's finest Santa Gertrudis Cattle, American Saddlebred, Roan, Oryx and Sable Antelope. Family tradition, research and careful selection make us leaders in the field of stud breeding and we welcome you to enhance your breeding program with the progeny of our herds.

Tina de Jager | +27 (0)82 774 4777 | tina@bushveld.info THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

57


58

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

59


60

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

61


62

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

63


64

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

65


66

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

67


South African Show Circuit

Robertson PHOTOS BY FOTOJAN

2017 Champion Three-Gaited Child’s Riding Horse CLOVERLEAF NIGHT STAR & MICHAELA MOUTON

Grand Champion Five-Gaited WAR SPORTS & CAROL BADENHORST

P T

68

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


Grand Champion Single Harness Horse WGV WHISPERING SENSATION & PIERRE HUGO

Grand Champion Fine Harness VALLEY VENTURE GLOBAL APPLAUSE & JUNIOR HUGO FOR TINA DE JAGER PB INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE THE

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

69


South African Show Circuit

Robertson PHOTOS BY FOTOJAN

2017 Champion Five-Gaited Child’s Riding Horse MAN OF RAIN & LIZA GERBER

Grand Champion Three-Gaited UNDULATA’S MADE IN HEAVEN & JUNIOR HUGO FOR NEWLINE SADDLE HORSE STUD

P T

70

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


PB INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE THE

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

71


72

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

73


South African Show Circuit

Riversdale PHOTOS BY FOTOJAN

2018

78 Saddlebreds, 48 SA Boerperde, 22 Miniature horses and 44 Open Division horses made the record total of 192 horses which took part in the 150th Riversdale Show from 13-17 February 2018. The Regional Championships for the Saddlebreds, SA Boerperd and Miniature Horse were held at Riversdale, where we have become accustomed to having all four seasons of the year in one day! Luckily this year Mother Nature provided us with perfect showing weather. Thank you to the judges Sue Dittman and Wim Bester, as well as stewards Theuns Duvenhage, Jakes Jacobs, Jakkie Erasmus, Jan Kritzinger, Barend en Burta Dorfling for a job well done. The Riversdale Agricultural Society Show has a rich history dating back to 1868 when the first show was held on 29 February to 5 March. It was held on the Riversdale market square, which currently is the home of an old locomotive. The building on the market square was originally used to sell the farmer’s wool and ostrich feathers but later became the town hall. The first show generated a grand total of R37-14! In 1910 the show moved to the current show grounds. Over the years the venue has been adapted according to the requirements for a show which has become one of the most successful and largest agricultural shows in the Western Cape. For example, the ring originally had trees in the middle which were removed.

P T

Grand Champion Three-Gaited Child’s Riding Horse STORM CAPTIAN & ANJA JOUBERT

The valley of the Sleeping Beauty Mountain where Riversdale is located has many legends about the equestrian world. Many a champion horse or rider has started or has had their last preparation show for the National Championships at Riversdale Show. Riversdale Agricultural Society would like to thank all exhibitors of all breeds who participated and helped make this 150th show so memorable. To those men and women, many of them long passed away, as well as those of the present day, who have served the Society so faithfully as leaders, donors, committee members and exhibitors and who have done so much for our town and district, Riversdale salutes and thanks you.

2018 Show Comittee catching a ride

74

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


Champion Five-Gaited Child’s Riding Horse THAT’S MY WAY & ANJE DERCKSEN

Grand Champion Three-Gaited WICKED NITE & ADRIAAN ODENDAAL PB INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE THE

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

75


South African Show Circuit

Riversdale PHOTOS BY FOTOJAN

2018 Grand Champion Park Horse UNCLE SAM’S TIME AND AGAIN & FRANCOIS DERCKSEN

P T

Grand Champion Single Harness Horse FALCO YOUNG BOSS & WILLEM ROUX

76

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


Grand Champion Fine Harness Horse NEVER DOUBT ME & NICOLETTE DUNBAR

Grand Champion Five-Gaited Horse NITE OF CLOUDS & JUNIOR HUGO PB INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE THE

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

77


We take care of your truck, so you can take care of your business

From scheduled maintenance to guaranteed maximum uptime, a Volvo Service Contract keeps you on the road by reducing downtime and total cost of ownership, while improving operational control. It’ll also boost your bottom line. To find out more, visit volvotrucks.co.za

VOLVO SERVICE CONTRACTS 78

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

79


South African Show Circuit

Parys Chrismas Festival PHOTOS BY ELPITA PHOTOGRAPHY

PARYS CHRISTMAS FESTIVAL once again succeeded in completing the 2017 Saddle Horse Show Season in South Africa on an absolute high! Hosted at the spectacular Afridome Indoor Venue, all stables were filled to capacity: 330 top Saddle Horses, 24 excellent Hackney Ponies and 15 horses from other breeds were entered. We were privileged to also add the beautiful and talented Welsh Ponies to our programme this year, and for a first opportunity, they exceeded our expectations by entering 24 top quality Welshies. Junior Hugo, Carine Stefaan and CJ du Plessis were invited to judge and they really did an excellent job, succeeding in letting the best horses lead the round of honour every time, thus putting smiles on the faces of exhibitors as well as spectators. Johann Swanepoel made his final appearance as ringmaster at Parys, with Poy Coetzee and brother Spyker helping him to manage the arena. Dawie Lotter (also doing his final round, although we hope to convince him differently by next time) and DeVos Malan did the announcing, once again unequalled in their passion and style, while Wessel Vermaas and newcomer Chris Wilke expertly ruled the collecting ring. The Parys Committee would like to convey our appreciation and gratitude to all officials: your attitude and service were of the highest standard and contributed greatly to the success and standard of our show.

2017

BY TERSIA MALAN

sharing the very special Tribute to French Legionnaire with his retirement on Friday evening – don’t think there was a dry eye in the audience… We thank and salute all the Sponsors of our Grand Championships for 2017: Impondo Logistics (Tokkas van Heerden) was the sponsor of the Grand Champion Park Horse. Your support is of great value to the Saddle Horse Industry and to our show. SCANIA (Coenie Kaufmann) sponsored the ThreeGaited Stakes for the first year of hopefully many to come. Thank you for teaming up with the Saddle Horse Industry – we appreciate your support and much valued contribution tremendously. Heymans Kole (Gert Koch) this year put their name to the Fine Harness Stakes, and Gulfstream Energy supplied the extra fuel in the Single Harness Stakes. The Amateur Championships were sponsored by Junior Smith Trucking, Afridome, Ukuqala and Appledew Guest House, with the three Pleasure Horse Championships taken care of by National Brands and Dries Moolman Boerdery.

Parys Christmas Festival Committee, under chairmanship of Dries Moolman, herewith expresses sincere gratitude and appreciation to each and every sponsor , be it the sponsor of a Grand Championship or the sponsor of a qualifying class. That the committee, in this difficult economic climate, could still manage to host Parys Xmas Festival on such a high standard, is due to the unwavering support of our loyal sponsors. We cannot thank you enough! Thanks for sharing our passion for Saddle Horses and for enabling us to live out our dreams for this show. Our Premier Sponsor for the last few years, also the sponsor of the Five-Gaited Grand Championship, NOUWENS CARPETS, and by name, Luci Nouwens. We share your passion, dedication and love for Saddle Horses, and we thank you for helping us make things happen! Your support is unequalled, and very much valued and appreciated. Thank you. Thank you also for Grand Champion Three-Gaited Pleasure Horse BRIDGEWATER’S SHADES OF NITE & CARLA RIX Sponsored by National Brands

80

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

P T


Grand Champion Fine Harness Pleasure Horse SHAMROCK AIR FORCE ONE & AMANDA JOHNSTONE Sponsored by Dries Moolman Bdy

Grand Champion Children’s Five-Gaited Horse C’EST SI BON NO SURRENDER & CARLA RIX Sponsored by IXU / UMVUZO Health Grand Champion Amateur Three-Gaited Horse CLOVERLEAF ROCK-A-BILLY & WILLEM DE JAGER Sponsored by Afridome

PB INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE THE

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

81


South African Show Circuit

Parys Chrismas Festival PHOTOS BY ELPITA PHOTOGRAPHY

Grand Champion Fine Harness Horse SHOW ME ULTIMATE JOE & CHARLIE BROWN Sponsored by Heymans Kole

2017

P T

Grand Champion Fine Harness Hackney Pony HEARTLAND HOPE UPON HOPE & ALLIE DAVIDS Sponsored by Rovic Stables

82

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


Grand Champion Amateur Park Horse VALLEY’S STORMY SKY & WILLEM DE JAGER Sponsored by Junior Smith Trucking

Grand Champion Children’s Park Horse WILMAR SPACE SPIDER & NICOLE BESTER Sponsored by Human Auto Ford

Grand Champion Three-Gaited Horse VENTANA SUPREME’S RARE DREAMER & ELIZKA JORDAAN Sponsored by SCANIA

PB INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE THE

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

83


South African Show Circuit

Parys Chrismas Festival PHOTOS BY ELPITA PHOTOGRAPHY

Raising the Bar/ IXU Sport (Heinrich Rix) provided for the Five-Gaited Children’s Championship, Wilgekrans Game Reserve (Wim Bester) the ThreeGaited Children’s Championship, while Human Auto Ford (Jacques Strydom) took care of the Children’s Park Championship. Both the Amateurand Open Ladies Fine Harness Classes were once again sponsored by Moleine van Staden – Van Staden Qualygrow. This lady never fails to let our ladies feel extra special and spoilt. Van Staden Qualygrow also sponsored the Welsh Pony Championship and Rovic Stables supported the very exciting Hackney Pony Championship. All these sponsorships are of great value for our show and we definitely cannot do without your support.

Grand Champion Welsh Pony LLANDILO PACESETTER & MAILA SAMUELS Sponsored by Qualygrow

2017

We would like to convey a sincere thank you to all the sponsors of the qualifying classes! The unwavering support of each union member and saddle horse friend, is the reason why we can still host a great show like this! Saddle Horses are exceptional animals and those who own and love them are as well. Your attitude when help is asked for, is proof of this! You never disappoint, so thank you very much from us all. Raising The Bar/ IXU Sport /UMVUZO Health always comes to the table to help us to do a small “pay-back” to our grooms who put in so much effort in preparing our horses. Thank you for once again sponsoring the balls and kits and organising the very popular Grooms’ 6-a-side Soccer Tournament. The prelims were hosted in the arena on Wednesday evening before start of show, with the final game in peak hour on Saturday. The team from La Cola Stables was crowned well deserved victors this year, with Noble Equestrian Stables being the runners-up. Thank you to Heinrich Rix for sponsoring this event for our caretakers, who really do deserve a bit of fun and a lot of appreciation for all their effort with our horses. A special braai for all the caretakers was sponsored by JPMalan Boerdery and PEPSICO. DJ Vosloo supplied cold drinks and Simba chips. This was greatly appreciated by all. The Sponsor- and Exhibitor’s Function, catered for by La Oma Spitbraais, Vereeniging, was a lovely get-together in the beautiful new function hall on Thursday evening after the first day’s classes. The NGSU Equitation Team to compete at the SSSA Protea 2018 trials, was introduced at this occasion and colours awarded. A few items were expertly auctioned off by Wim Bester for fund-raising. Thank you to everyone who supported and contributed to this effort. Father Xmas visited in true VALTRAC style on Saturday morning and excited the children with small gifts for everyone. Perhaps each child/person should bring along a Xmas gift for a less privileged child with our next show? Once more the Lucky Draw Competition, where all horses’ show numbers are entered and with excellent prizes to be won, proved to be a hit amongst exhibitors, horse owners, and also spectators, with extra tickets to be bought for the draw. First prize, a 3-day Cruise for two on the MSC Sinfonia, was won by none other than our beloved Harold Poil.

Grand Champion Amateur Fine Harness Horse BRIDGEWATER’S NITE IN A MILLION & GARLAND POIL Sponsored by Ukuqala Energy 84

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

The planned date for our next Parys Christmas Festival is 6 - 8 December 2018. We invite you already to diarize this date and to make sure to be there! We need your support. We love your support! We appreciate your support.

P T


Grand Champion Single Harness Horse ANVIL’S RADJA & JOHAN BAKKES Sponsored by Gulfstream Energy

Grand Champion Five-Gaited Horse VALLEY’S HARLEM’S PRINCE CHARMING & ADRIAAN ODENDAAL Sponsored by Nouwens Carpets

PB INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE THE

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

85


South African Show Circuit

Parys Chrismas Festival PHOTOS BY ELPITA PHOTOGRAPHY

2017

Grand Champion Amateur Five-Gaited Horse JONAZELL VIVA LA VIDA & JACO VENTER Sponsored by Apple Dew Guest House

Grand Champion Park Horse JUHANTHA FRENCH WARRIOR & ELRA TONKIN-BIERING Sponsored by Impondo Logistics

86

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

MUCH APPRECIATION TO ALL OUR 2017 SPONSORS. Afridome Apple Dew Guest House Arnold Naude Ben Stapelberg Bethlehem Vurkkhysers Bospre Stalle Brenhindy Horse Carriers Casino Stalle Cecil du Plessis Chris & Jessica van Dyk Cloverfield Wines Crommico Saalperd Stoet Crystal Anvil Stalle Dale Brits De Bosch Stalle Diamond D Cattle Farms DJ Vosloo - Pepsico Dream Acres Equestrian Ctr Dries Moolman Boerdery Du Plessis Familie Trust El Shaddai Stalle Entyce Beverages Enviro Stroper Kontrakteurs Gulfstream Energy Heavy Duty Towing Heymans Kole Hoener Strydom Horse Shoe World Human Auto Ford Impondo Logistics JP Malan Boerdery Jabbies en Elra Lotz JoJo Stalle Junior Smith Trucking Junior Tonkin Jurijan Stalle Kosie Pansegrouw La Cola Stalle Lecani Saalperdstoet Malan Stalle Mountainview Stables MC Bergh National Brands Nel Precision Farming Noble Equestrian Stables Nouwens Carpets Power Sport Pretoria Saddlery RTB / IXU Sport / Reiviraz Stalle Rix Familie Trust Nam Rovic Stalle SCANIA Shaylee Familie Trust Show Me Stalle Simstone Truway Engineering Valentine Stalle Valtrac Van Staden Qualygrow Vetsbrands Ukuqala UMVUZO Health Wikus Lock Wim van Bergen Wilgekrans Game Reserve

P T


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

87


88

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

89


90

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

91


92

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

93


South African Show Circuit

Hope Town

PHOTOS BY REINHARDT OVERHEU

2018 Champion Children’s Park Horse SLENDER C & JAZELLE STRYDOM FOR HUMAN AUTO

Grand Champion Three-Gaited HEAT WAVE & KOOS MAHIFU

P T

94

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


Grand Champion Park Horse MAMMA’S CHOICE & PHILIP PIEK

Champion Three-Gaited Child’s Riding Horse HELLO BEAUTIFUL & JESSI WESSELS

Champion Amateur Fine Harness ST ANTHONY & CARL DU PLESSIS FOR CJ DU PLESSIS PB INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE THE

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

95


South African Show Circuit

Hope Town

PHOTOS BY REINHARDT OVERHEU

2018 Champion Five-Gaited Child’s Riding Horse STREET ASSIGNMENT & JESSI WESSELS

Grand Champion Single Harness UKUQUALA & CECIL DU PLESSIS FOR CJ DU PLESSIS

P T

96

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


Grand Champion Five-Gaited GIFT OF CLASS & KOOS MAHIFU FOR THE WIMCO STABLES

Grand Champion Fine Harness BARONS DESTRUCTION & CHRISTO PANERAS PB THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

97


98

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

99


100 THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

101


102 THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

103


104 THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

105


South African Show Circuit

Bethlehem

2018

PHOTOS BY FLAMING FIRE PHOTOGRAPHY

Bethlehem did it, again... Since the revival of the show 4 years ago, it boldly developed into a spectacular showcase , in which this year has set the standard to be beaten in the years to follow. Every event, every class and exhibitor was the example of excellence.. the food, good company, entertainment and judges showed to be all about the love of this outstanding sport. One of the highlights was the exhibitors dinner on Friday night hosted by Hannerine Naude and her mom Christine.. merging the food and decor, it was nothing less than joyful perfection.

The championships did not dissapoint in spite of heavy rain and stormy weather conditions, intimidating quite a few spectators, but it only displayed the determination of horse and rider alike. The Children’s classes was outnumbered with no less than 13 competitors in the Junior Equitation Test Class - good prep for Nationals. The Bethlehem Ciglers Show was made possible by generous sponsors and the comittee wants to thank each and everyone for supporting our show. It should definitely be marked as a highlight event on the calender every year.

P T

Grand Champion Three-Gaited BUSKO HEAD OF STATE & NIEL VALENTINE

Champion Three-Gaited Child’s Riding Horse WILMAR TIGER STAR & AMORE MOLLER

106 THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


Grand Champion Single Harness WAYUP DON ELDORADO & JOHAN MALAN

Three-Gaited Riding Horse Championship - All Breeds KLIPDRIFT OKALASH’S DREAM & JAN COETZEE

Grand Champion Five-Gaited Horse JABULA SKIPPER & NIEL VALENTINE

PB INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE THE

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

107


South African Show Circuit

Bethlehem PHOTOS BY REINHARDT OVERHEU

2018 Grand Champion Park Horse JUHANTHA FRENCH WARRIOR & ELRA TONKIN BIERING

P T

Champion Five-Gaited Child’s Riding Horse HOEFSLAG SHREK & CHRISTENE NAUDE

108 THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


Grand Champion Fine Harness Horse HARLEM’S GREAT BALLS OF FIRE & LUCI NOUWENS

PB INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE THE

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

109


South African Show Circuit

Uniondale PHOTOS BY PHILIP TIBS

2017

Grand Champion Three-Gaited Pleasure Horse VALLEY’S GLOBETROTTERS AFRICAN HEIR & STEVEN FERREIRA

Grand Champion Five-Gaited Pleasure Horse GREAT GLITTER & JEREMY BOUWER Grand Champion Five-Gaited Child’s Riding Horse BRIDGEWATER’S NAUGHTY NITE & TAMMY WILKE

110 THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

P T


Grand Champion Three-Gaited Child’s Riding Horse VALLEY’S RISING SONG & TAMMY WILKE

Champion Five-Gaited Natural Mane and Tail STORM’S LADY & JEREMY BOUWER

Grand Champion Single Harness Horse RADJA & JOHAN BAKKES PB INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE THE

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

111


South African Show Circuit

Uniondale PHOTOS BY PHILIP TIBS

Grand Champion Three-Gaited Horse MY LAST DUTCHESS & KIPPIE LOUW

2017

Grand Champion Fine Harness Horse RIVERDANCE & KAREN VAN GRAAN

P T

Grand Champion Five-Gaited Horse VALLEY’S RISING MUSIC & IRENE VD WESTHUIZEN

112 THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


PB INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE THE

Celebrating the life of

HAROLD POIL 1946 – 2018

A legend. A hero. A friend. The tributes for Harold came from far and wide, but each and every one had the same thread. Inspiration, passion, kindness. A brilliant horseman, an amazing teacher, a faithful friend. And a devoted and adored husband and father. To the man who touched so many people and left behind a legacy to be extraordinarily proud of ... RIP.

‘If you’re going to do something, do it right’ Harold ... on life

ENJA HELL OF A NITE • BRIDGEWATERS STAKE NITE THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

113


Harold was the definition of an all-round horseman, if ever there was one. He could shoe, out-vet most vets, grow feed, design tack, and drive and maintain his own trucks to get his horses where they needed to be. When it came to training, there was nothing Harold could not do from starting young horses, to keeping the seniors going, from fixing the broken to breeding the best ones. His greatest skill however was also what gave him the greatest joy, and that was in preparing a horse for someone else to ride and making it look as good for them as it would for him. If ever there was a person who could be said to be living his dream it was Harold, and in the process, he made dreams come true for countless others. Since immigrating to South Africa in 1975, Harold served the saddle horse industry on multiple fronts including: as trainer to horse, rider and apprentice; a breeder of distinction; and longstanding member and chair of multiple boards including the NSU, SA Saddle Horse Breeders Society, The National Horse Trust, SA Trainers Association, the SA Judges Society and ESSASA. For all of these efforts he was awarded a SA Saddle Horse Breeders Society Lifetime Achievement Award. Harold’s success as a trainer in South Africa is unparalleled and includes such notable achievements as being the only trainer to have won the coveted SA Saddle Horse Breeders Society Trainer of the Year Title for five consecutive years, winning hundreds of SA National and Regional Championship and Grand Championship titles across all divisions and all age ranges. He has won every one of the SA Grand Championship Division Titles multiple times, with horses including Nite of Roses, Rose Street, Kojak, Mr. De Gaul, Genghis Khan, Stepping High, Jim Dandy, Big Town, Delta’s New Dawn and Highland Goshawk. A truly versatile horseman, on the equitation front Harold has helped many a rider to their World Cup Gold Medal dreams, and is the only trainer ever to have produced four out of five rides in a national team. He is also the only trainer to have produced several consecutive time Champion of Champions winners. Young horses were a particular passion for Harold, as is evidenced by his more than 20 victories in the Three-Year-Old Five-Gaited Stakes. As a breeder, Harold made a phenomenal contribution to the saddle horse industry gene pool with his breeding programme incorporating, and indeed creating, multiple Broodmare Hall of Fame Mares and National Champion Sires, such as Bridgewaters Rose Street, Bridgewaters Stake Nite and, of course, Enja Hell of a Nite. Through decades of careful selection and management, Harold created the Nite Legacy, which currently holds all three coved SA Saddle Horse Breeders Society accolades, with Enja Hell of a Nite and his son, Bridgewaters Stake Nite, having secured his father’s former title of Junior Sire ... proving himself equal to following in his father’s bold hoofprints. Harold’s legacy is far more than these awards, the Nite Legacy or Harold Poil Stables. It lies in the lives of the horses and the people who he touched, and forever changed, along the way. To Harold, the greatest reward was enriching the lives of those around him, inspiring them to live up to their full potential. He was always willing to share his knowledge and in turn eager to learn something new. Harold was a fierce champion for justice, inclusion of all, growth of the sport he loved so much and of course, the welfare of horses everywhere.

‘Living the dream’ ... Harold ... favourite sayings

KRISMAR ROSE STREET PAGE 2 GARLAND’S NITE

114 THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

P T


PB THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

‘There is something about the outside of a horse that is good for the insideHarold of a... onman’ horses

Harold’s favorite quote, by Winston Churchill

‘Hey Babe From a ‘Show Stopper’ first win at Bloemfontein to an amazingly trained ‘Romantic Nite’, each high step, each low step and every single step in between has been a blue ribbon moment. I will hold onto our special memories for ever! Love you always’ Dejané • Babes

A few of Harold’s favourite things ... Horse : Hell of a Nite • Colour : Navy blue Sport : Rugby and boxing (aside from anything horses related, of course!) Attire : Cowboy boots, Wrangler jeans, snap button shirt ... and don’t forget the hat! Author : Dick Francis • Restaurant : Cassalinga Food : Never go anywhere without cheese and crackers. And Hellman’s Mayonnaise goes with anything! Meal : Garland’s Sunday pancake brunch with maple syrup and all the trimmings

‘Dad, I am so proud of you and all you have accomplished in life, but most of all I am proud of the person you are. You have set such an amazing example for me of what it is to be strong, hardworking, honest and loyal beyond measure, to value integrity and be compassionate and kind when and wherever possible. I am so amazed by all the things you have done and how many things you can do. You somehow always know how to ‘make a plan’ to get done what needed to be done and do it without complaint. Every day, that goes by I see more and more of you in me and I am so proud of that fact. I believe that it is the very fact that we are so much alike that makes us butt heads so much, but I also know that there is no pair more fiercely devoted, proud and protective of one another. I am so grateful for all of the opportunities that you provided for me in life, each accompanied with a life lesson in one way or another. You, who value my education so highly and are so proud of all the titles, do not even realise that the most important lessons I have learned in life are from your own school of wisdom. You taught me what it is to set goals and then pursue them with relentless discipline and determination, no matter what the obstacles to their attainment. To keep your chin up and keep trying no matter how hard things get, because anything worth doing takes hard work. You taught me the importance of loyalty, to be kind, and love freely without any expectation of reciprocation, because it’s the right thing to do. To always try to be the better person and let karma sort out the rest. That your word is your bond, and integrity is everything. You have shown me the importance of loving what you do and that ‘if you are going to do something, you need to make sure you do it right’. I cannot think of anyone who lived their passion more than you, nor anyone that did it with more precision. I am so fortunate to have been able to share your passion for all things horse and to learn to love them as much as you do. I am truly blessed to have had the chance to learn from you, who will always, unequivocally be the very best horseman there is in my eyes. I find that every time I put my feet in the irons, pick up the reins or even just find myself around horses, I feel the calm wash over me and I hear you clear as a bell with advice from all the long years on how to ‘do it right’. Horses, it seems, will always be the place where both you and I find peace, the place where I will always have you with me, and for that gift I will be eternally grateful. There truly are no words that can ever really say everything that needs to be said about you and the amazing Dad you are. But then again, as you always say, actions speak louder than words, so I know I don’t have to say much really because you and I, we have always had our own way of letting each other know. I know you always worry about me, because I am an only child, but you don’t have to worry. You have made me strong like you and I won’t let you down. I will make you proud, Dad. I will look after everyone and everything with just as much care as you ... after all that is who you raised me to be. All my love always.’ Books

SHOW STOPPER PAGE 3 ROMANTIC NITE THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

115


‘I would like to extend my sincere condolences to Dejane and Garland on the loss of Harold. He was one of my favourite uncles and my hero when I was a child. I have fond memories of tending to the horses and being uncles little helper at Newman Stables in Great Falls, MT. I also remember being taught the finer points of boxing at the young age of three or four. Uncle would stand me on the bed and would box until I tipped over. Harold would tell me ‘No tears here. Get back up. Dust yourself off and get back in the saddle.’ The other memory I have is when we picked up Harold at the VA hospital and returned him to Montana after his service with the Marine Corps in Vietnam. Harold gave me his military gear and that was a huge deal as a young child. This sealed the deal of Harold being my hero! In closing I say to you Semper Fi, God’s Speed ... thanks for being my Hero Uncle Hodge!!!’ Robert Spry

‘One of the things that comes to mind when I think of Harold is the poem he has up in his barn. I, the willing, Led by the knowing, Am doing the impossible, For the ungrateful, I have done so much For so long With so little I am now highly qualified to do anything, With nothing. Isn’t it so true? If you think about what Harold has done for the whole saddle horse industry in South Africa. All the riders’ lives that were changed by going to Harolds barn. All the young horses that were given a chance to become the best they could be, and also many other horses which he gave a second chance to after a less than ideal start. I remember Harold telling me that training horses was a form of art ... you get a horse and recognise its potential and then try and sculpt it into the horse you want it to be. And man, was he an artist in that sense as many of these horses and riders that

Harold worked with became South African champions and even world champions. I might not have been lucky enough to have been one of the Harold Poil Stables riders during my equitation career, but I have been lucky enough to have spent many hours in his barn working horses. Harold also helped me to get over my fear of driving horses in the cart, which has now become one of the things I love to do most, and led to me driving and winning many championships with a great Hackney mare called Sweet Smile, who Harold introduced me to when he fell in love with her while judging at Moorreesburg a couple of years ago. My whole journey with the horses has also led me to finding a second family in the Poils. There have been many hilarious moments shared ... even in times of despair, and one thing’s for sure, there aren’t many people who have got your back like this family has, and I’m truly grateful for that. Harold is greatly missed, but luckily he left everything in the hands of some strong women who I’m sure will do their best to keep the Harold Poil legacy going.’ Lindsay Owen

‘Brother Harold has joined Mom, Dad and three brothers and one sister, leaving three sisters to join the family that have gone before. Harold was the sixth sibling and I the seventh. Harold‘s nickname was Hodgy or Chubbs and I was called little Chubbs. Harold’s love of horses began at a very early age on the farm in Scobey Montana. After moving to Great Falls Montana, he found the Brookwood Stables and worked for Jack Newman. I remember many holiday dinners being held up – leaving 30 to 35 people waiting to eat – due to Daddy and Harold having to tend to the horses ... which took priority in Harold’s eyes. I was fortunate to visit Harold, Dejané and Garland twice and be a part of their life in South Africa ... it will remain in my heart and memory forever. We may have lived across the world but Harold will always be in our hearts forever.’ Love sisters Bonnie Lee Poil Egan, Karen Lorraine Poil Spry, Gladys Lucille Poil Cantrell.

BUBBLE AND SQUEAK PAGE 4 NITE IN A MILLION

116 THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

P T


‘Be a

thinking rider’

‘Harold Poil ... Tough as nails, with a heart of gold. Best brother-in-law anyone could wish for. Rest In Peace Harry.’ Cliff Retief

Harold ... on riding

PB THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

‘When I first heard the news that my Uncle Harold has fallen ill, my heart nearly stopped. I never thought that anything could ever happen to him. He was invincible, he was strong, he was a legend and he was my hero!! Uncle Harold and Auntie Dejané have been part of my life since 1990, when my parents (without my knowledge) moved my horses to Harold Poil Stables. At first I was petrified, but the first moment that I set foot at that barn I knew I was part of a new family, and I often referred to them as my ‘other’ mom and dad’! He was the man that changed my life and it would never be the same again. I won many Blue Ribbons and achieved many great things, which would never have been possible without my Uncle Harold! How do I ever show the gratitude for granting me this honour? He taught me perseverance, perfection, to work hard, to never give up, and when all the kids at the barn would sit around the dinner table, he taught us about life. I always knew that his love for me, and all the other kids, was unconditional and that nothing would ever change that, and I always knew he was just a phone call away! When I say that he changed my life, I do not only refer to my horse riding career, but to the impact that he and Auntie Dejanè had in making me a better person! Thank you for choosing me to be part of your life, and giving me the gift of love and the privilege of having such wonderful memories with you! My dearest Uncle Harold, you will be greatly missed ... your voice, your presence and you ... just being Uncle Harold! Auntie Dejanè and Garland, I know these past weeks have been very difficult, but thank you for the way that you have looked after and cared for Uncle Harold during his last days – he would surely be very proud of you! You are two amazing women, and I love you dearly!’ Minette Harmse

‘As I try to write this tribute today there are so many memories that come rushing back to me and it’s almost impossible for me to describe the influence that Harold had on my life and career. It was 25 years ago this week that I went to visit Harold in the hopes of learning from one of the great horsemen of our time. After spending a few days with him I asked what he thought about giving me a job. In typical Harold fashion he replied ‘Son, most of my grooms know more about training a horse then you do, but if you really want to learn, we can give it a shot’. And so started a friendship between us that has stood the test of time. In the world we live in today, there are so many grey areas and words like honour and loyalty seem to be used less and less. Harold Poil, however was a very straightforward person and understood those things so very well. Here are a few things I want to point out about my friend – Harold Poil. Harold was a brilliant horseman and loved everything about the American Saddlebred horse. This was evident not only in the countless champions that he trained but also in the impact that he had on the breeding business in South Africa. Harold loved his family – unconditionally. Dejané, we go way back and you can be so proud of the legacy that you and Harold created together. Garland,

your dad was so proud of you. I can’t think of a conversation we had in the last 15 years where he wasn’t bragging about the young woman that you have become. He loved to share with me all that you had achieved with your education. Harold was also a great teacher and I’m sure I speak for everybody who had the privilege of learning from him. He taught us so much more than just riding or training horses. Lastly, as most of you know, Harold was a loyal friend. If he liked you and believed in you he would fight for you with all he had. When my own father passed away 22 years ago I was a complete mess, and Harold simply refused to give up on me. That is the type of man that he was. For someone with humble beginnings who grew up on a ranch in Montana, survived the Vietnam War and with hard work and his special talent made it to the pinnacle of his profession, I want to say ‘Harold, it’s an honour and privilege for me to pay tribute to you today’. I love you.’ Neil Visser

‘Harold was like a father, not just to me, but to many people. He had a heart of gold and inspired people to reach their full potential. Harold, I hope you rest peacefully. It was an honour knowing you. You will ALWAYS be in my heart. Carla • Bugs Bunny’ Carla Rix

HIGHLAND GOSHAWK PAGE 5 GENGHIS KHAN THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

117


Thank you boet for the wonderful friendship, respect, support and fun times we shared from the third day after you arrived in SA. Thank you Harold for driving from Johannesburg to see me the night of my serious tractor accident. Thank you Harold for driving Lyni to the church and getting there 25 minutes late after stopping at the Royal hotel to buy my nervous bride a gin and tonic. You had me in a panic Boet! Thank you Harold for helping to form our son to the man he is and the rider he was ... attaining a bronze individually at the world cup in 1996. Harold you judged me first time at Queenstown where I rode America’s Hallelujah, a mare that only understood fast and forward. Tipping your hat you said ‘game mare you have ma’am - type that will rack till they drop.’ No one was more surprised than the operator when you placed us third in the five gaited championships in a

class of nine. Hallelujah did drop under me at Somerset show; fortunately neither of us was hurt. You sure knew a horse. Thank you Harold for suggesting we buy Bonanzer at 17. What a winning team he and Anton proved to be for the next five years. Thanks you Harold for allowing a very amateur rider like me, the thrill of winning the amateur class at Bloem on de Gaulle. With your only instructions being ‘give him his head!’ and ‘Just you float with him, Leenie, he will do the rest’. To crown it all you then went on to win the three gaited national champion stake at Bloem. Thank you Harold for training Capetonian and Anton to such perfection that they were poetry in motion. Thank you Harold for Little Prince that took Anton to great heights. Most of all thank you Harold for Rain Cloud alias ‘Harry’. After developing Parkinson’s I asked

you for a good show horse that I could manage. My only request was that the horse knows whoa !!!!! The pleasure and good this animal gives me and many other riders is immeasurable, winning the Champion Of Champions at Bloemfontein and many other classes. Our granddaughter Brigitte Lyn calls him her automatic horse ... he still respects Whoa and slams on the brakes. I remember how angry I was when you first entered Mr de Gaulle for the equitation qualifying class saying ‘Harold he will never equitate. You just smiled when they won a blue ribbon. You were right again. Dejané ... I know you played a major part in our and the horses lives. Thank you for that. We feel and pray for you and Garland. Harold ‘We can only thank God that he caused our ways to touch.’ Till we meet again at a heavenly show. RIP our friend. Len, Lyn and Anton Nel

‘Keep it simple, stupid’ Harold ... favourite sayings

‘I came to Harold Poil Stables 15 years ago to let one of the best trainers train my horse. What I got instead money could never buy. I met a icon who became my hero and ended up a father to me. He taught me to be the best I could be. Staying humble when I won, and being proud when I lost but gave it all I had. He taught me to never give up on my dreams, and made my dreams come true. I became part of a family where I was always welcome. When Harold asked you ‘how are you son’ he was really interested, and listened to the words you spoke and the ones that didn’t pass your lips. He knew you just as well as the horses he was training every day. He didn’t just love the horses, he loved the people too. Thank you for sharing your heart and soul so freely. You will live on in my heart and every hoofbeat I hear. The time we spent together could never be enough. I will always miss you dearly.’ Love Martin Du Venage

‘Dear Uncle Harold ... I would like to honour you for the father figure you were in my life and the many life lessons you tought me, which have stood me in good stead till today. You were tough, firm yet fair and kind, making me strive for excellence at all times. Your favourite sayings to us all were ‘excuses are like assholes, everyone has one’, ‘If you can’t take the pace don’t run the race’, and then ‘you did good Boetie’. You taught me there is a world of difference between riding a horse and horsemanship. Thank you for training Bonanza as a youngster, The Capetonian, Mr de Gaulle and Little Prince to such perfection that is was a pleasure and a great privilege to show them. Together we attained many blue ribbons and I remember how proud you were when I was awarded bronze at the World Cup 1966 in the individual scores with a very close margin. Your lessons with the rifle and knife sharpener were great too. I will miss your solid advice and ongoing interest in my life. Until we meet again. RIP. You simply were the best.’ Anton Nel

‘Harold Poil was a legend in his own time. To me he was one of the last great cowboys. One might say, correctly, that he was involved in the saddle horse industry, so why cowboy? The simple reason is that he embodied all of the good characteristics of a cowboy. He was a tough man, honest, dependable, dedicated, unselfish and brave. I was privileged to have been his client, attorney and his brother-in-arms. I have sat at his bedside and he at mine (he even smuggled a bottle of Bushmills into my ward). My family was close to Harold. He trained my son, Sebastian, to become a SA champion as well as a dedicated horse trainer. He would drop by unexpectedly to watch rugby on a Saturday afternoon and sometimes go home rather late! He was always there for us all. He introduced me to my old riding horse, Montana ... and as with every great cowboy, he could read a horse, anticipate every move and mould with the horse into a picture of perfection. So, whenever I see a great horse in the future, in full stride, in the barn or on some distant horizon, I will hear his laughter against the sky ... and I will remember him.’ Your friend Brian Alberts

‘Oomie, You tought me so much. Not just about horses, but about respect for all living beings, friendship, sticking to what you believe in, perseverance, not being too dramatic and skaapstertjies. Thank you for all the good times, all the advice and always making time for the children. I miss you but will never forget you.’ Anesta Engelbrecht ‘Harold, I will never forget your message when we saw each other for the last time at Parys. Look well after yourself my dear friend. Thanks for many years of friendship. You’re the best horse trainer that I know. I miss you. Andrew Vermaak ‘I will always remember Harold as a person who was a friend to all, who was never scared to voice his opinion or to stand up for what he thought was wrong. His input in the saddle horse industry was huge and will never be forgotten. He’s always been on the committee (and I cannot imagine it without him) as well as the SA Championships, where he was always leading the pack. As a horseman we will never forget him. Rest softly, dear friend. I appreciate you and I will miss you. Give my love to Biscuit, as you called him.’ Koekie de Villiers

I’M COMING PAGE 6 PATRICIAN LADY

118 THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

P T


PB THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

‘If I was any better, I’d be dangerous!’ Harold ... on himself

‘My memories of Harold are more of Harold as a friend, besides, of course, the great horseman that he was up until his very last day. We met in 1969 in Kentucky (a previous life for us both) and got to know one another well. Harold arrived in Kentucky as a Vietnam War veteran. Having recovered from a near fatal wounding in the war, he went to work for Garland Bradshaw in Danville Kentucky. As a young man in the American Saddle Horse Industry, Harold already displayed the grit, passion for horses and steely determination that was always part of his character. Not to mention that he could also be as stubborn as a mule and get carried away when he felt justice had not been served. Nevertheless Harold became a good friend and was happy to babysit my eldest daughter, Jennifer (Jay Jay), when needed. He used to drive her around to get her to sleep and tuck her inside his jacket against many a cold winter’s day. In return I held the torch at night when he wanted to gig frogs and tolerated the frogs’ legs jumping around in the frying pans. I also exercised patience for him checking his turtle traps en route when he was driving a group of us to one or other event. We remained friends from those early days and met up again in South Africa. By the time I started to attend horseshows, Dejané and Harold were a team and welcomed me into their lives. Although my children did not ride competitively, all three learned to ride

with the compliments of Dejané and Harold and have such fond memories of the times we spent with the Poils. Each of my daughters received a magnificent wedding cake delivered personally on their big days. Harold and Dejané taught me so much, they always had a very valid explanation for anything regarding horses, horsemanship and equitation. Their mutual expertise complimented one another completely and I know that Garland has inherited the wealth of their mutual experience. Always generous with information, there were no tricks up Harold’s sleeve besides logic and perseverance. One of the many, many things made very clear to me by Harold was his advice and practice that ‘for every inch of rein you take from a horse you give back three’. Besides all of Harold’s wins in the show ring, it is remarkable that he trained so many young horses that went on to succeed, besides preparing horses for so many amateur and junior riders to show and enjoy. Being a very generous man, Harold loved to help people where he could. He loved his life in the Magaliesberg, was known to suffer from and cause a great deal of frustration but loved his family deeply and I know their hearts are broken by his loss. I miss Harold. I wish I’d seen more of him in recent years and I will never forget the 20 minutes he took to sit next to me at Bloem Show last year and tell me that I was his ‘oldest’ friend.‘ Toppy Hunt

‘I was lucky enough to spend some time talking to Harold next to the ring at the Parys show just before he passed away. He played a big role in my horse training career. It started when I went to visit him in Graaff Reinet and spent a few days there, with him helping and guiding me. After that he organised for me to spend time with Garland Bradshaw and Mitch Clark, with whom I am still friends. Harold had me running scared at the Bloem show because he would jump on the jog bike with me to feel my horses mouth. If he was in the bridle he would tell me and show me how to correct the problem. That really motivated me to improve my skills. When I had health issues he would phone me and motivate me to get back in the saddle or jogging horses. I will miss him.’ Kevin Eltringham

‘I remember Harold with much love. I started riding with Harold and Dejané when I was a young girl, about 9. And he terrified me at first! I was much happier having my lessons with Dejané on Piper. He started calling me ‘Annie’ ... no-one else has ever called me that ... and I began to realise his kindness, love of horses, generosity of spirit and his absolute passion. And most of all, I came to realise and appreciate his superlative dedication and ability in getting the best out of both his horses and his riders. I can to this day remember and feel that wondrous feeling of getting it right on a horse and his reaction when you did. I also fondly remember him throwing his coffee cup at me because I wasn’t getting something right! To this day, he is one of my most memorable teachers and I still can hear his voice and his encouragement. Even though many years have passed since he trained me on a horse, his discipline and strong approach to getting it right stays with me. I wish my daughters had had the chance to meet him and learn from him.‘ Robyn Edmunds • Johannesburg

‘Harold was a true horseman in every way, which was one of his greatest assets. He was a master trainer and rider and a man who was always approachable and helped everyone when ever possible. I was so honoured that Harold took the time to come and watch and support me at some of my major shows. This just emphasized the kindness and respect Harold had for friends. The equestrian world has lost THE MAESTRO, but he has left many people full of knowledge and know-how. Till we meet again Harold, I will remember your kindness and friendship to Andre and I.’ Ronnie Lawrence ‘I first met Harold when I was a teenager and he was working for Garland Bradshaw. I was showing a gaited horse around the county fairs and whenever Harold saw me he would always offer some help. My best memory of Harold was in 1996 when I had a horse named Tamarack’s Lightning Strikes, with who I had won the 3-year-old World Championship the year before. As a junior horse he was giving me fits. Harold was over here with a horse that he had down at Kalarama with Larry Hodge that they were trying to sell. This was a couple of weeks before Louisville; Harold came by my farm a couple of days to visit and saw me working this horse and offered to give me some help with him. As we were getting ready to ship to Louisville, Harold told me he would help me with the horse at the show as long as

Kalarama didn’t find out. So Harold would organise to meet me out there every night between 2am and 3am in the morning to work the horse. He helped me every night and I won the junior stake with him. Our inside joke was ‘the enemy’ never found out. This story was ‘classic Harold’ ... always willing to go the extra mile to help a friend. I will never forget his kindness. When Dr Hemminger and his wife came to South Africa with me when I was judging a show, Harold took time away from his business during SA’s show season to take us to game farms and on a night safari. I know how it is to miss time from your business during show time, but Harold never thought twice, he just did it. Not only has the horse business lost a great horseman but the world has lost a great man.’ Debbie Foley.

BRIDGEWATERS DREAMY NIGHT PAGE 7 BRIDGEWATERS NITE OF ROSES THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

119


Memories from the

photo album

P T

Nicknames ...

Harold called Dejané Snuffie and Garland Books. Dejané called Harold Poodle, while Garland called him Lenny Penny or Poodle

MANDATE PAGE 8 SOUND OF MUSIC

120 THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


‘Your word is your bond’ Harold ... on life

PB THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

LADY LADORA PAGE 9 PRINCE LUCIANO THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

121


‘Don’t pray for an easy life. Pray for the strength to endure a difficult one. The hell of a legend left a legacy of gold. Sadly the one and only Harold Poil passed on to a better place. You have taught me and treated me like your own son. You have inpired many and helped even more. With a good heart and soul he has left us for all. All the best to Dejané Poil and Garland Lee Poil ... lots of love and support. No guts. No glory. No legend. No story.’ Yed Malan ‘Three generations of my family have known Harold Poil and interacted with him. My dad met him shortly after his arrival from America. I have known him since I was 14 years old. My sons, who were very fond of Harold, loved conversing with him. They enjoyed his young-at-heart spirit and from time to time took the Mickey out of him ... and he returned the favour. Harold was a real true friend to my children and myself. He had his own unique way of treating his friends. Age didn’t matter. To him it was just a number, although he was 71 years old he was ‘forever young’. From the time he set foot on South African soil, Harold had a huge impact on the American Saddle Horse industry. Although reserved, he was nice to everyone and was open-hearted. Whether having a good or bad day, it was obvious ... he was what he was. He never pretended. He gave an honest opinion whenever you asked for it, whether you liked it or not. To be competitive at the age of 71, and still be on a winning streak, was indeed remarkable. During the Brits Stokkiesdraai NGSU show, held in October 2017, he once again excelled with 22 winnings and two second places, with one being second against one of his own. People who didn’t know Harold personally, knew about him. As far as directions were concerned local people use Harold Poil Stables as a beacon ... ‘Take the Hekpoort road, pass Harold Poil Stables on your right-hand side and ...’ . Even at different show venues his stables were used as a point of direction to other stables. His reputation regarding his competitiveness is self-explanatory and very well known. What made him exceptional was that he trained horses to suit the riders. He made his clients champions. He surely made dreams come true. I will forever miss his voice. He used to call with a ‘Hi Honey, how you doing?’ When you leave this world in a better state than you found it, you have achieved your goal. But you, Harold, you have surpassed your goal. Whether it was at a show, a meeting, or socially, when he sided with you, you were on the winning team. We will miss his chuckle, we will forever refer to him as the expert, as the friend and confidant. The perfect loving gifted horseman. Our own Harold ... who will ever forget him, speaking Afrikaans with his American accent. He mastered Afrikaans because he wanted to be a true South African, proudly American. My kids once asked him if he ever considered going back to America. His words were ‘Hell no, I love you boertjies too much’. Harold would not have wanted friends and family to mourn him, he would have loved to be part of this celebration of his life. His pride was Dejané and Garland. We will support and love you two forever, thanks for being our friends.’ Johan & Moleine, Stephan & Johan (Jnr), Mornè & Marcel van Staden

‘If you have no foot, you have no horse’ Harold ... on shoeing

‘I was around nine years old when our family went on a vacation trip to Cape Town. We overnighted at a camp ground next to the fair grounds somewhere in the Karoo (Colesberg / Graaff Reinet). I was playing outside when I heard a commotion from the stables next door ... grooms running around, who soon faded out of memory as I laid eyes on the most magnificent creature I have ever seen. A Saddlebred stud got away from his groom, and was running loose, putting up the show of his life. Then I heard the voice of a not-so-happy man, as a bunch of people were frantically trying to catch this stud. My dad and I walked over just as the grooms got a hold of it and led him back to his stall. That’s the day I met Harold. Not that I can say I could understand a word that Harold said, but I understood his kindness as he was showing us horse after horse. That is the day when I fell in love with a saddlebred. And maybe a little with Harold too! Up until this day, I measure each horse by the memory of the incredible stud running loose at the fair grounds. I later learned he was a current SA Grand Champion. No surprise there! To this day I love sharing my passion for all things saddlebred, as Harold did for me many years ago. Little did I know back then how much I would learn from this incredible man, not only about horses, but also about life and kindness. Years later, as a grown woman, I had the pleasure of Harold working a stud for me, one I dearly loved. One hot summer day, after riding at

122 THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

Bridgewaters, Harold and my boys ended up swimming in their pool. In typical Harold fashion, who loved kids, he started playing with the boys ... pushing them back in the pool every time they tried to get out. Then, as Harold got out the pool, Jay-Cee pushed him back in. Harold was caught off guard and lost his balance, hitting the side of the pool and breaking his ribs in the process. Of course, I was highly upset and immediately started reprimanding my son. Harold, in much pain, came up for Jay-Cee and told me to back off, saying it wasn’t his fault. Now when Harold spoke, you listened! I will never forget the image of Harold comforting my son, while he himself was struggling to catch his breath. Then, 10 days later, Harold packed up his truck and went to a horse show. I sometimes wondered if this man was made out of steel. There are simply too many memories to share. Besides the knowledge he had for anything horse-related, kindness is what comes to mind when I think of Harold. The very first time I managed to beat a horse in the ring that was trained by Harold, he came and told me what a great job I had done ... words that felt as if they came straight from God himself. Yes, he had a temper. Who cares? He was always willing to help, to lead and to love. His sense of humour could make you feel better under the worse of circumstances. Harold, I salute you. You were a man’s man, simply the best. A legend and a friend. How lucky I am that you have touched my life.’ Alida Snyman • Wartburg • TN • USA

NO SURRENDER PAGE 10 VIVA TONITE

Oom Harold, ek gaan al jou smiles en hello’s mis. Hier is ‘ons song’ wat ons op Standerton gesing het. Ek weet dit was ook een van jou gustelinge. “On a warm summer’s eve On a train bound for nowhere I met up with the gambler We were both too tired to sleep So we took turns a-starin’ Out the window at the darkness The boredom overtook us, And he began to speak He said, “Son, I’ve made a life Out of readin’ people’s faces Knowin’ what the cards were By the way they held their eyes So if you don’t mind me sayin’ I can see you’re out of aces For a taste of your whiskey I’ll give you some advice” So I handed him my bottle And he drank down my last swallow Then he bummed a cigarette And asked me for a light And the night got deathly quiet And his faced lost all expression He said, “If you’re gonna play the game, boy You gotta learn to play it right You’ve got to know when to hold ‘em Know when to fold ‘em Know when to walk away And know when to run You never count your money When you’re sittin’ at the table There’ll be time enough for countin’ When the dealin’s done

P T

Every gambler knows That the secret to survivin’ Is knowin’ what to throw away And knowin’ what to keep ‘Cause every hand’s a winner And every hand’s a loser And the best that you can hope for is to die in your sleep And when he finished speakin’ He turned back toward the window Crushed out his cigarette And faded off to sleep And somewhere in the darkness The gambler he broke even But in his final words I found an ace that I could keep You’ve got to know when to hold ‘em (when to hold ‘em) Know when to fold ‘em (when to fold ‘em) Know when to walk away And know when to run You never count your money When you’re sittin’ at the table There’ll be time enough for countin’ When the dealin’s done You’ve got to know when to hold ‘em Know when to fold ‘em Know when to walk away And know when to run You never count your money When you’re sittin’ at the table There’ll be time enough for countin’ When the dealin’s done” Mirinda and Mariska Burger


PB THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

‘Touch, touch, and turn him loose’ Harold ... on riding

The reinsman and me. ‘As a young boy I grew up in the Karoo town of Richmond, which was at the time the heart of the South African Saddle Horse industry. It was exciting times as some of the greatest names in the industry farmed around the area. Bill Sieberhagen (Indiana Ace), Danny Theron (Supreme O Lee), Bennie van der Merwe (Vanity’s Highland Chief ) and a whole lot more were in the district, with Gerrit van Schalkwyk (Young Lover) in my hometown of Victoria West next door, and Mac Murdock (Young America) from nearby Steynsburg. There was Andre Maskell, Anton van den Heever and a few others, as young trainers ... all participating in the regional shows. We were lucky enough to ride from the legendry Frans van der Merwe stables on a few old boerperde that doubled as saddle horses from time to time. In attending the Graaf-Reinet show, we entered the collecting ring and I remember a heavy American accent having a fairly heated discussion with an ever-stumbling Vic Brummer about some issue. I asked Uncle Frankie who it was and he said ‘That is the new hardegat trainer Van Katbosch, an American soldier, and he is dangerous’. It was the first time I saw Harold Poil and, although not a big man, he seemed big and assertive. We were told he could work and gait a horse like no South African can. I then saw him work and ride horses at the local shows for a few years. A few years later he lost his stables at Katbosch due to a snowstorm and came to train horses from Middlemount, Bennie van der Merwe’s farm near Richmond, where he showed horses for a time before ultimately moving. Fast forward 30 years and I arrived at the Bloemfontein show after an absence of 20 years. My brother and I promised ourselves that we would again buy horses the day we can afford good ones

and pay for them ourselves. We had bred a stunning two-year-old mare and had it in training with Dirk Claasen, with high hopes. We knew very few people around the arena, so we sat on the grandstand and watched the show. In the qualifying class Harold Poil entered with a young colt he had bred, Bridgewaters Garland’s Nite ... he was superb and he won easily, we came second. Then came the stakes and Harold was winning all the way till close to the end when the horse just quit. He was devastated, he threw the whip and his hand to the ground as his horse left the arena. We won, I walked to him later and introduced myself. I asked about the colt and it was the first time I heard of the sire Hell of a Nite, who is now no less legendary than his owner, Harold. He still remembered my dad and invited me to come and see his horses when I had time. I only did that a few years later, but we slowly started, what I would call, a very good friendship, with him being the advisor and horse brain. I told him that we liked breeding more than showing horses and he never came short of giving me the best advise and time. As our friendship grew and I attended more shows, we started the normal tease and jokes and that remained to the last time I saw him. When I served on the board of the breeders, I would always sit close to him and at least once would hear that I look like a fool in my golden suit. He had many words for the suit, but best was that I looked like a honey bee. I was lucky enough to buy a few horses from him and he advised me on how to breed to his bloodline, but the best time I had was just to sit and talk while having a whisky. We would constantly tease the daylight out of each other, while he enjoyed cooking some steaks and discussing his concerns about our breed. I greatly admire all he told me and also how we should strive to protect and love children, how ordinary people love horses, that the sport should be for all walks of life, and that we should expand it and not keep it limited to the show ring. I have known many great men in the industry but none bigger than Harold. He has not just helped me with advice but also gave me many things to think about. At the Parys show 2017 he asked me to stop fighting with people I had a disagreement with. As I walked away I asked him if he now has become a priest and he smiled and said ... ‘You never know Tokkie, you never know ‘. It was the last time I ever saw my dear friend ... a true reinsman if ever there was one.’ Andries Tokkas van Heerden

‘Nothing can describe the loss of Harold’s passing. As words continue to fail me, this January we lost an incredible husband, father, friend and what so many of us would describe Harold as ... an inspirational role model. He touched many lives, we still feel his presence, however the loss has left us wondering if we should not reflect on what family stands for. My daughter grew up in Harold and Dejané’s home. Fond memories of school holidays on the farm, where laughter was the order of the day. Kids would follow him all day, whether it was feeding horses or playing in the hay, leaving Harold running around trying to get hay out of hair. Harold made sure our kids enjoyed life on the farm, where he taught them how to love and nurture animals. So selfless and unselfish, Harold and his family made everyone feel welcomed and part of his family ... always giving to so many, freely and so effortless. He was generous in everything he did ... giving his100 percent no matter the situation. How does one say goodbye? Harold you will be sorely missed, a part of our lives never to be forgotten. Please accept our sincere condolences, during this untimely loss.’ Natalie and Jessica

NITE AFTER NITE PAGE 11 LITTLE PRINCE THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

123


‘Pretty is as pretty does’ Harold ... on horses

‘Harold. No words can express the emptiness I feel without you here. You truly were one of the last great men I knew. And you will be with me forever. Your lessons and advice I will share with my son. Your sayings such as ‘Well get on with it’ and ‘Can you feel that’ will remain with me and give me comfort on sad days. I will miss our visits, chats and your ever-present helping hand. I hope I made you proud of the man I have become, and wish you were here to see the man I want to be. I never knew the feeling of a broken heart but now I do. You were a great man, a hero and now a Legend. You will never be forgotten. Rest well Harold, and RACK ON ...’ Sebastian Alberts ‘Grumpy old man that stole our hearts. The first time you meet him, would be like you’re building a sand castle and he’s the wind. Understanding him is like meeting your girlfriend’s parents for the first time, you’re so stressed that you can’t hear a thing. This man has a gift he can teach us all but he’s got only one rule, it depends if you want it enough to succeed or fall. This man has a secret that reaches and touches us all, he speaks a language to horses that his wife adores, his daughter appreciates but only horses understand. This old man can take any horse and make it the best it can be. After awhile you get to know him and realise this man has a heart of gold. I’ve seen him work horses and I’ve seen him fall but he’ll get up and make that horse the best of them all. Yes this old man has his favourite, so do we all, but I believe he’s got so much love to give, it touches them all. This man can’t go through this alone, he’s got a great support system that would move mountains for him alone. As we got to know him, we realised that when you’re the sand castle and he’s the wind, he’s preparing you to fall, but get back up ... achieve and win. Yes, at first you could not understand him at all, but after awhile you get so desperate for a word of wisdom, that you’ll hear him whisper on the other side of a wall. I know he’ll come and find me, so let me right a wrong, he’s not that old , because he’s young at heart, as you will be told. With this I write not just for myself but for every person’s heart you’ve touched – thank you for being a teacher on earth and teaching us this much. You are the person everyone needs in their life. You are like a breath of fresh air after a bad day, that has that glow that makes it go away. Thank you for being you, you’ve made a difference in everything you touch. We’ll be cheering you through life and next to the show ring. What more proof do you need, than what you’re doing is where you belong!’ Johan , Annelischa and Janlo Bakkes

‘An American in Africa!? In Hekpoort of all places! And speaking Afrikaans!! I met Harold shortly after starting my practice in Hekpoort way back in 1993. Like usual, he was always on the move. Always willing to help and go that extra mile. Even with his busy schedule he would have time to visit me in rehab and at home during my illness, motivating and encouraging me to recover – unaware of his own fate. He was a gentleman, straight to the point, with his own (sometimes unconventional) ideas. Everybody who’s life ever crossed Harold’s path will agree that he had a permanent and positive impact on us all. We have lost a caring friend; too soon did he pass on. I am going to miss his chuckling ‘Jou gat DURKY!’. To Dejané and Garland, we want to express our deepest sympathy. Please remember we are here when you need us.’ Dirk, Lunell, Pieter-Colés and Jan-Adriaan Lourens I visited South Africa and met Harold in June, 2017. I was fortunate enough to spend more time with him in November. In that short period of time Harold deeply impacted my life, both as a rider and personally. He was succinct, compassionate and effective in his instruction. I will forever understand what true horsemanship means. Thank you Harold. Aliya Magee

KAMAKAZI PAGE 12 AIR WOMAN

124 THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

‘I will always remember Harold as a person who was a friend to all, who was never scared to voice his opinion or to stand up for what he thought was wrong. His input in the Saddlehorse industry was huge and will never be forgotten. He’s always been on the committee (and I cannot imagine it without him) as well as the SA Championships, where he was always leading the pack. As a horseman we will never forget him. Rest softly, dear friend. I appreciate you and I will miss you. Give my love to Biscuit, as you called him.’ Koekie de Villiers

P T


PB THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

‘That would be useful’ Harold ... favourite sayings

‘Many years ago, Harold came to the Cape and arrived at our farm in a surprise visit. At the time I bred Persian cats and was on a walk with almost 30 cats running after me. I didn’t recognise Harold – not expecting him in a million years – and menacingly walked straight to up the person, cats in tow. You must understand that visitors to the cats need to make appointments, and needed to go through a de-germing process to protect any contamination from other catteries. Also, when you busy yourself in the cattery, very much like a horse stable, one looks and smells dreadfull in overalls covered in hair, fleasprays and anti-germicide. What a sight it must have been for Harold to walk into! Well, for once he had no words, while cats streamed around him, rubbing, meowing and one climbing up his pantleg to be cuddled! Have you ever seen Harold frozen to the spot, gaping, whereafter his limbs wouldn’t listen to his brain trying to back away from this onslaught? Yeah, that was one precious moment! After putting the cats back and retreating to the (safety) of the stables for coffee and talks, it took him a full 15 minutes to get back to his old self. He kept shaking his head and just looking at me like I was an alien. I so wish I had a photo of this Harold moment! The second great moment with Harold was at the Robertson show in Oct 1990. Harold visited both Tulbagh and Robertson with a truckload of showhorses, one huge two-year-old, which my mother and I watched carefully as he was my competition in the two-year-old 3g. Harold would ride this horse up to four times a day and we could not understand why. This went on from the Tuesday before the Tulbagh show and going over to Robertson continued. We were fascinated with the amount of time he spent on this huge horse - and it didn’t go well at all times. I showed a beautiful big two-year-old called Vanity’s Backchat, to be groomed for Esti Brynard as future show partner. We won the Tulb two-year-old class. I received a batch of lucerne on Tuesday before the Robertson show and, long story short, two horses foundered, one of which was Backchat. So the more we watched Harold the more we started thinking of buying this big horse as a replacement. We saw Gene walk up to Harold working the horse in the showring and we were convinced Gene wanted to buy the horse. My mother flew off her chair, careening around the corner to fetch her chequebook from the caravan. We very assertively speedwalked up to Harold and bought this horse for R42 000 – a bargain! Yes. His name was Sporting Streetfighter and little did we know how this horse would change our lives. Right after buying him we also found out that this was no party coming up. The sale, however, was done. Harold looked down, at my very exited enquiry to this horse’s work and temperament, then looked at me from under his brow, smiling on one corner of his mouth and said ‘Well, honey, he’s a good horse, but

you need to understand that this is one bold big sucker and you have to keep your thinking cap on cause he ain’t easy’. Yeah, right, I found out soon enough. So we send him back with Harold to show in the three-year-old 3g at Bloem. We brought Streetfighter home that year, and I discovered the unplugged meaning of training a horse. Harold helped me often. But that singular moment of looking in Harold’s face and seeing the challenge he knew was waiting, the doubt of whether I’d make it, the cunning sense that it just might work, the wry fact of him selling a horse to a girl he thought not entirely up to the enormity of this horse, and a softness close to regret – those emotions passing through Harold’s eyes and over his face ... that face followed me through the whole of Streetfighter’s career. And I still remember it so clearly to this day. The third moment of sharing with Harold was the 45 years we at Botha Stables spent as neighbours during the two weeks in Bloem. Many fights, many cigarettes and coffees, many discussions about training and horses, many comical, or serious, peace talks about things we did to each other, shared experiences of his years of showing in SA, walking on the wild side of those early days through his stories, cheerful greetings and till next year’s show hugs. Harold and us at Botha Stables shared many years of hard relentless competition and off showring antics and life-things. We will miss you and will keep you in our hearts through loads of memories. Rest in peace.’ The Botha family, Botha Stables Stellenbosch

‘When I think back on the short time I have known Harold, I realise that I am not only going to miss the greatest horseman I have ever met, but a man with a great general knowledge. I have such fond memories of the few times I had the privilege to visit the farm. I remember sitting in the living room, listening to stories of his life, history and any subject prompted by a movie on TV or a story on the news and only getting to bed in the early hours of the morning – much to Dejané’s frustration. On my last visit, John came into the office with an urgent problem ... some of the kids on the farm received some homework that needed Sir’s help. A working light must be built with a battery and a switch. After a quick look at the diagram provided by the teacher, Sir pointed out that the diagram was wrong as the switch was in the wrong place. After taking a count of how many kids had this project, we set off to the local electrician to get the necessary supplies and confirmation that the diagram was in fact wrong. Harold – you have been a dad, a mentor and a friend to so many people. You will be sorely missed.’ Francois van Aswegen and family.

I met a man some years ago. Heard he was difficult and full of show. Hesitant to expose my sweet young rider to this tough American horse provider. Soon my daughter adored this man, a meaningful compasionate relationship began. They shared moments only they would remember, and with his guidance beacame a world class contender. She will never forget the knowledge he shared, to attend every competition confident and prepared. His brilliance on horseback, his thinking never idle, two hands together, very proud, upright in his saddle. How much we will miss ‘how are you my kind?’ and ‘Now Carla, let him loose, let him run in the wind’. The Nites will forever have very special meaning connected to a man who saw his vision in dreaming. Hannelie Rix

‘Wishing Dejané and Garland peace, strength and happy memories’ Your Caxton family

SUMMER WONDER PAGE 13 STEPPING HIGH

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

125


On behalf of all of us involved in the National Horse Trust I would like to express our sadness at the news of the death of Harold Poil early in the New Year. We send our sincere condolences to Dejané and his family at Harold’s untimely passing. Harold joined the executive committee of the National Horse Trust 11 years ago as the Representative of the American Saddle Horse Association and made a significant contribution to our fundraising activities during that time. He was also instrumental in getting Dejané included in the publicity for the activities of the National Horse Trust for which we are all very grateful. Harold was obviously passionate about American saddle horses and indeed all equines and their welfare, and we will miss him at the National Horse Trust. We are proud to be part of the Open Day celebration, organised by Dejané and her daughter, celebrating Harold’s life. Ronnie Napier • Chairman • The National Horse Trust

‘Ons groet ‘n groot man. Wat ‘n voorreg om op hierdie manier afskeid te kan neem van so ‘n besondere en dierbare man. Vir ons gesin, het jy en jou gesin, soveel aangename en wonderlike herinneringe, dat ek met eerlikheid kan sê dat die tyd wat ons deel was van die Harold Poile Stalle, verseker ook van die opwindendste tye in ons lewens was. Die stempel, van jou en Dejané in ons dogter, Minette, se opvoedig en positiewe uitkyk op die lewe, is stewig en elke dag steeds sigbaar. Baie dankie! Die tye by die skoue, wat uitstekend gereël was deur Harold en Dejané, sal altyd ‘n baie spesiale plek hê in my hart. Sal nooit vergeet wat Harold eendag aan Adriaan en my gesê het terwyl ons so lekker saam geëet het by Bloemfontein skou. Hy het gesê: ‘Here lies my heart and my soul, between the horses but specially between my friends’. Baie sterkte aan Dejané en Garland, mag julle krag put uit die bron van ons Vader in die hemel. Baie liefde.’ Annatjie van der Westhuizen.

‘One man who touched so many lives. You were that constant support to so many people around you, you were strength to those that needed it, you gave guidance without us even knowing it, you had wisdom that we know we will always look for, and you believed and gave hope to so many. There will always be a huge emptiness in the lives that you touched and the people that loved you. You taught us never to give up and you always made time for everyone that needed you. You will be in our hearts forever and you are a legend that will live on forever.’ Carla, Jason, Gaby and Ethan Cato ‘Uncle Harold – you have and always will be one of my favourite people in the world. You and I became friends from the very first time you held me as a baby (especially when I wouldn’t let anyone else hold me), you always knew I would fight the odds and you always believed that I was strong no matter what! Thank you for sharing your love of horses with me and for allowing me to dream big when it comes to riding. You inspired everyone around you and I will always keep you close in my heart and I will never stop dreaming big dreams of horses, and I will keep making you proud. I will miss you so so much.’ Love Gaby Cato

‘We never got to spend a lot of time with Harold, but in 1994 we were invited to judge a show in South Africa and spent several days at their farm. Harold took us under his wing and we still to this day have wonderful memories of our time with him. We went on a private safari, spent the day at Sun City and toured through the countryside. Our favourite times were spent around the table talking horses ( of course), eating delicious food and drinking ‘much’ wine. Harold and Dejané teased me because I drank that ‘terrible sweet American style’ wine! We knew Harold well enough to understand how much he loved his family and how important he was to the saddlebred world. All of our conversations centred around horses, as that is what he loved more than life and we will always cherish the time we were lucky to have with this special friend. With love and respect’ Merrill and Bonnie Murray

‘Harold. A special man, husband, father and friend. You have been called home to join Our Father. A special man who was too kind for this world. You gave so freely. Even the horses and the horse world have lost one of the greatest trainers and lover of horses in this age. I received your giving so much. The world is poorer without you. Wish I had visited more often. Now your voice is forever still except in heaven, where you have joined the chorus of angels. I will miss you so much. Praying for God’s healing hand, comfort and strength for Dejané and Garland. May the Lord dry all your tears and know that Harold has gone home. Lots of love’. Elaine and Piet

‘Dear Harold ... You were a friend, a mentor and horseman of note. Thank you for all my tips, useful information and compliments. Ride the open fields of the universe, my friend, and receive your blue ribbon ... you will be missed but not forgotten.’ Frikkie Rothmann

‘The mare is as important as the stallion’ Harold ... on breeding

Harold’s more hidden talents ...

Harold could drive a big rig, and could fix anything – mechanical or otherwise ... including a jet engine! He could grow feed and put up grass bails (two at a time!) while running the tractor He was an excellent marksman (he was a marine core rifle expert), and a Vietnam veteran. He was a suprisingly good chef, particularly when it came to having a braai, and he made a mean blue cheese dressing. Harold could always, always make a plan! FIERY WONDER PAGE 14 MR DE GAULLE

126 THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

P T


‘It’s never the horse’s fault’

Harold ... on horses

PB THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

‘I say goodbye not only to a legendary horseman, trainer and mentor but to the incredible man that was my godfather. There are so many memories ... from days on the farm, at the stables and horse shows. One of my fondest memories was when my parents bought me Tai-Tai and our first show was at Warmbaths show. At home, Tai was not the most talented horse, and before my class Oom took me one side and said ‘Now Boetie, we are just going to get through the show and I promise we will find you a better one’. Well, when Tai came out of the stable and I got on him, he hit that big show trot that I have never felt and Oom just said ‘Oh damn Boetie, just hold on and try to keep up’. I will even miss it when I got those infamous calls that started with ‘Boetie, what trouble have you gotten into now?’ In one of our late night talks about life he said ‘When I’m having trouble with a horse and I go to bed and all I think of is how to fix it and I can’t wait to get to the barn in the morning to go and try out what I thought about the whole night, that is how I know I truly am living out my passion in life’. Words cannot actually describe all that you and your family have meant to me and my family.’ Love Willie ‘Harold and I started our friendship more than 40 years ago, when he taught me one of the most important things in life ... how to achieve the seemingly unachievable. Harold was the most inspirational man; whenever he wanted something difficult and I told him it couldn’t be done he would never hear the word ‘No’, ... he would tackle the problem, get everybody involved and find a solution. Impossible didn’t exist in his vocabulary. I still remember the day he walked into Sagorins in his cowboy attire with two saddles slung over each shoulder. That was the start of a great friendship. Harold always went the extra mile for his friends and colleagues, even helping me start up Solo Saddlers and developing many professional products over the years. Harold, your tenacity, larger-than-life personality and huge knowledge of horses will be sorely missed by many. I hope you are still shouting out instructions from up there.’ John Booth ‘Oom Harold Poil, my hart is vandag so seer ... ek kan nie dink dat oom weg is nie. My hoogtepunt as ek ‘n skou kom kyk het, was om oom, Dejané Poil en Garland Lee Poil eerste te gaan opspoor en hallo te sê en elke klas wat iemand van die stalle gery het, het ek ekstra hard ‘gecheer’. Dankie dat Karmia ook die voorreg gehad het om een keer oom se hande op haar hande te voel om te wys hoe sy die toom moet vashou. Oom is vir ewig in my hart, my hero en my legend.’ Michelle Eksteen

‘The Malans fondly remember … Harold Poil had always been ‘the well-known professional trainer”, whom Johan and I saw from a distance at our first shows and admired for the great horses that he brought to the ring – never really trying to get to know him better, as we thought he would be too ‘important’ for mere amateurs and home trainers like us … This was until that day in January 2008, when Harold unexpectedly phoned to convince me to take over the role of secretary for NGSU. Why I agreed, I still do not know, but I did – and the two of us became a formidable team and the best of friends, working side by side for the benefit of NGSU and the saddle horse industry in general. Harold and Johan soon became trusted friends, earning mutual respect and sharing several passions, like hunting, guns, army stories and farming, (although the language barrier often made for a good laugh!!) During these years I was privileged to get to know the man behind the ‘show perfectionist’ that everyone sees at our shows. I discovered that the ‘H’ in Harold also stood for ... • Honey, which he so often would call me – Harold himself being sweet and kind and deserving of that name • soft and caring Heart – a side which I was lucky enough to get to know • Hands-on in all aspects of horses – always willing to help with advice and to make a plan for any problem • open-Handed in his approach – never unwilling to help anyone in any crisis and at any time, just as long as it would be to the benefit of the horse and its well-being • Hot tempered (respectfully) cannot be left out – I remember with a smile now, how years of close friendship and trust allowed me to calm him to an extent by a mere hand on his arm during meetings – how I wish I could do that once more, Harold. Johan will surely miss Harold’s warm interest in his farming and all his plans, their shared

love of hunting and guns, and listening to all Harold’s stories of way back then. We appreciate and value Harold’s caring interest in De Vos and his role in making him a perfect announcer; we fondly remember Harold’s special bond with and love for Le Roux, the cultural knowledge and passion for the arts that the two shared (an interest that many a horse person never knew about) – Le Roux was also privileged to get to know the great person, Uncle Harold at home, and to share in some of their family times – the Malans will always fondly remember this. Harold – Although I was always pretending to be strict, the little general as you would say, I will sincerely miss your late entry for shows, done over the telephone if need be, and having to search for the right info at times – for you I would ‘kill a bull’, so doing this for you and filling in your forms was always a pleasure. Wish we could still do that a few more times, though. Wish I could answer my cell to your voice saying ‘Hello my kind’ in your mixed American Afrikaans once more … and ending the call with ‘ok my kind. Luv you …’ Your figure on the scooter and next to the arena at shows… never thought that a show could be held without you there. We surely will wipe a silent tear at shows. We will miss you more than words can say. We salute you Harold – you were one of a kind.’ Tersia Malan

‘One of the best, if not the best,, horseman I have had the privilege to know and respect ... Harold you will be missed! Not just at your farm or at shows – but everywhere. You have touched people and animals – especially horses – with your kindness and knowledge and were always ready to help. Being a legend doesn’t even begin to describe who you really were ... a friend, a mentor, a hero! A true horseman who loved his family more than life itself and was passionate about his purpose in life ... to train horses and riders to be better than what they ever thought they could be! Dejane and Garland ... no words will be able to comfort you at this really sad time, but I pray that all the amazing memories will help you cope and find a way to carry on. Remember there are many people praying for you with this huge loss. Thank you so much for sharing Harold with so many of us ... he touched so many lives and for that we’ll be grateful for eternity. Mr Poil ... Sir ... thank you so much for your kindness towards me, for your positivity and for all the advice on life, on being a horse trainer and on running my business ... I’ll never forget you. RIP Legend.’ Martin L Pienaar • Dream Acres EC • Bloemfontein

DELTA’S NEW DAWN PAGE 15 JOHN DOE THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

127


‘He could rack a horse truer than the true-blue sky’ Garland ... on Harold

P T

‘Breeding stock should be ‘good thinking’ horses’ Harold ... on breeding

BONANZA PAGE 16 SPRING BOY

128 THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

129


130 THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

131


132 THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


134 THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

135


136 THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

137


138 THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

139


P T

By Staff Writer

A LEAP OF FAITH

THE OPENING OF LEAD WAY FARM If you love what you do, you won’t work a day in your life. For many, this statement is difďŹ cult to relate to, but it certainly resonates with Andre van Schalkwyk. Over the past 15 years, Andre has built a solid foundation as a Saddlebred trainer. He has proven that hard work, determination, and a love for what you do can bring success in and out of the show ring. Recently, Andre opened his own training operation under the name Lead Way Farm. The business developed quickly with the support of some loyal customers and friends. With a focus on starting young horses and preparing them for the show ring, Andre is excited to grow his business with the same dedication he has displayed over the past 15 years.

140 THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


Andre at the Barn

PB THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

Andre, Caitlin and Lilly

A

ndre has been pursuing his passion for horses since he was a young boy in South Africa. While there, Andre was able to earn enough money to buy a horse of his own. After working with him and competing successfully in gymkhana, he sold the horse; which earned van Schalkwyk enough money to buy a plane ticket to the United States. While the Saddlebred was not the first breed he trained, Andre knew instantly that training was what he wanted to do. He began his Saddlebred career at Kalarama Farm, learning every aspect of caring for and working with the wonderful breed. His knowledge quickly expanded to handling and training as he went on to work with a few training barns in Kentucky. His love for a young horse grew while he was working with Dr. Albert Alexander, who gave him the opportunity to see a Saddlebred’s development from the day it is born. Most recently, Andre trained at Ventura Farm with trainer, Mike Hylton. While learning a lot during his time at Ventura, Andre says he was most impressed with Hylton’s eye for a young horse. He has had the opportunity to work with some exceptional horses, each owned by Susan Olcott, including: WC She’s My Sugarland, CC Commotion, WC Crackin Up, and most notably, WCC Diamond District

with his 2016 World’s Grand Championship win in the Junior Fine Harness division. Each horse along the way has had something to teach him, and each person and relationship have contributed to his achievements as a trainer. Opening his own training barn was a big leap of faith; one that has provided Andre the opportunity to spend more time with his wife, Caitlin, and two-year-old daughter, Lilly. “Seeing them at the barn enjoying the horses makes me happy”, says van Schalkwyk.The name Lead Way evolved out of a scripture given to Andre, Psalm 139:24. “See if there is any offensive way in me, and lead me in the way everlasting”. Staying humble has helped Andre remain focused on the things that are most important to him and is evident in the way he runs his business. The decision to step out on his own was made with a lot of prayerful consideration. When an opportunity to lease Elizabeth Deknatel’s barn at High Hickory Farm presented itself, he knew instantly that this was where he could begin building his training business. As word travelled that he was in full operation, Andre quickly outgrew the charming 10 stall barn; and timing worked in his favor.The facility on Todd’s Point Rd in Simpsonville that had housed Kismet Farm for the past several years became available. A

THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

141


couple of phone calls later and van Schalkwyk had found a new home for his Lead Way Farm. “It still feels like a dream come true. I’m really excited about it and blessed to be in such a beautiful place and great location”, expressed Andre. Each day presents a new opportunity to further develop his skills. Andre emphasizes that each horse is an individual, and needs to be trained as such.There are no cookie cutters, and patience is essential when working with young horses. Lynne Martin, a customer of Andre’s had this to say of him, “Andre is blessed with many amazing skills and abilities that include an innate ability to evaluate and work with each horse’s individual needs and abilities in order to develop and reach its highest potential. I do believe Andre is destined to be one of the very best in the Saddlebred world. Andre has those ‘magic hands’ that speaks to the horse – hands that every rider and horse dream of.” Andre believes in hard work, while at the same time, creates an enjoyable atmosphere in the barn. Anyone who has spent time around Andre can agree that he has an engaging personality and spark for life that makes for very few dull moments. As with many Saddlebred enthusiasts, Andre has developed

142 THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

a love for the breeding aspect of the industry. He is quick to tell you how a horse is bred and what his thoughts are on the bloodline. A customer of Lead Way Farm, Don Joliff explained, “I first met Andre four years ago, and was immediately impressed by his ability and talent with the Saddlebreds, especially the young horses. He encouraged me to breed a mare to Stonecroft’s My Treat.Two years following, the resulting colt, Briarhill’s Big Bad Woof, trained by Andre, has renewed our love of and interest in Saddlebreds, as evidenced by the number of horses we have placed with Andre.” As Andre looks to the future, his goal is to consistently develop young horses and continue building Lead Way Farm to become one of the premier training operations in the industry. Andre understands that a completed show horse is not going to happen overnight; it’s a process. Seeing young horses that he started advance to the show ring feels like an incredible accomplishment for Andre. Each new step of developing his business has proven that nothing great comes easy, but if passion, hard work, and determination are key ingredients to success, then there is a bright future for Andre van Schalkwyk and Lead Way Farm.


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

143


144 THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

145


146 THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

147


148 THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

149


150 THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

151


152 THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

153


154 THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

155


P T

156 THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

* Photos by Sandra Hall


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

157


158 THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

159


160 THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

161


162 THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

163


164 THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

165


166 THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE


THE INTERNATIONAL SHOW HORSE

167

Profile for SilverMane Media

International Show Horse May 2018  

International Show Horse May 2018 - Spring Edition

International Show Horse May 2018  

International Show Horse May 2018 - Spring Edition

Profile for johanblom
Advertisement