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Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013 Editors: Henry Pretorius, Wanda Verster, Marga Viljoen Department of Architecture, University of the Free State


Table of Contents INTRODUCTION

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1989 MIRA FASSLER-KAMSTRA MIMICRY AND CAMOUFLAGE (INSPIRATION AND INTERPRETATION OF SOUTHERN AFRICAN ARCHITECTURE)

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1990 ROELOF UYTENBOOGAARDT TIMELESS IN ARCHITECTURE

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1991 GABRIËL (GAWIE) FAGAN ARCHITECT AND COMMUNITY

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1992 WILLIE MEYER THE THREE PASTS TO OUR PRESENT

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1993 GLEN GALLAGHER THE EXCLUSION OF CONCLUSION IN ARCHITECTURE

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1994 JACK BARNETT BUILDING THE BEST – THE NEW SOUTH AFRICA’S ESSENTIAL MISSION

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1995 HANNES MEIRING ARCHITECTURE - THE GREAT ADVENTURE

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1996 PANCHO GUEDES SEVEN MANIFESTOES

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1997 REVEL FOX REFLECTIONS ON THE MAKING OF SPACE

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1998 ADÈLE NAUDÉ SANTOS “NARRATIVE MAPS”: CONCEPTS AND CREATIONS

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1999 JACK DIAMOND PRACTICING SCALES

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2000 STANLEY SAITOWITZ EXPANDED ARCHITECTURE

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DESIGN & LAYOUT BY: © 2014 Department of Architecture, University of the Free State This book and all of the drawings contained in it are subject to copyright in all languages and countries throughout the world signatory to the Berne and Universal copyright convention. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form or by means of photo-copying, recorded or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the authors. This book is sold subject to the condition that it shall not, by way of trade or otherwise, be re-sold, lent, hired out, or otherwise circulated without the publisher’s prior consent in any form of binding or cover other than that in which it was published and without a similar condition being imposed on the subsequent purchaser. ISBN: 978-0-86886-825-7

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25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


2001 HENTIE LOUW ARCHITECTURE AND CRAFT: A WORKING RELATIONSHIP?

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2002 LOUIS KAROL 50 YEARS IN THE CITY

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2003 PETER BUCHANAN ARCHITECTURE OF THE EMERGENT EPOCH

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2004 PAUL MIKULA A GREAT BIG BOX CALLED ARCHITECTURE

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2005 BANNIE BRITZ STORIES … ARCHITECTURE … LIFE

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2006 DESIGNWORKSHOP: SA BORROWING SPACE AND TIME

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2007 JO NOERO THE EXPEDIENT AND THE ETHICAL, THE EVERYDAY AND THE EXTRAORDINARY

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2008 PRACTICE VAN DER MERWE MISZEWSKI ARCHITECTS (VDDMA) MS. ANJA VAN DER MERWE MISZEWSKI & MR MACIO MISZEWSKI VAN DER MERWE MISZEWSKI PROJECTS

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2009 WALLY PETERS MORE WAYS OF BEING AN ARCHITECT

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2010 JACO WASSERFALL NO GRAFFITI, PLEASE! STULTORUM CALAMI CARBONES MOENIA CHARAE

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2011 PETER RICH LEARNT IN TRANSLATION

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2012 STAN FIELD FOR THE LOVE OF ARCHITECTURE

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2013 KATE OTTEN ARCHITECTURE FOR EVERYDAY

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REFERENCES

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Introduction 25 SOPHIA GRAY MEMORIAL LECTURES AND EXHIBITIONS 1989 – 2013 DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE, UNIVERSITY OF THE FREE STATE

Prof. Paul Kotze School of Architecture & Planning University of the Witwatersrand

An introduction to this lecture and exhibition series has to, by necessity, be a partial review of its past, its role and possibly its future. It also has to be an acknowledgement to those who believed in it when nobody else did. It needs to reiterate appreciation for the twenty five laureates who were generous and positive enough to enthusiastically step up to the podium to present their work and their thoughts in this manner. When I think back to the staff meeting where this idea was first raised, I remain grateful to two erstwhile colleagues, Mr. Gert Swart and Mr. Jan Ras, who responded so warmly and enthusiastically in support thereof. Initially the idea was a simple one, and that was to make a contribution to an ‘academic week’ that the student body wanted to arrange.1 I cannot remember if this week ever took place however, the Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibition series still persists. The first invitee was Dr. Doreen Greig. She was an architect and architectural historian who trained at the University of the Witwatersrand. Amongst many publications, she produced books on South African architecture and Sir Herbert Baker. Sadly, she could not accept the invitation due to ill health. Subsequently the invitation was extended to Ms. Mira Fassler-Kamstra – another Wits trained architect who still practices in Johannesburg. She accepted the invitation despite knowing very little about the UFS School of Architecture and despite the fact that the idea was never tested before in South Africa. Fassler-Kamstra gloriously rose to the occasion. Her arrival was announced at the Old Presidency with a Scottish piped band and when she stepped into the building she, the diva for the evening, received a bunch of red roses from a student. She delivered her inspiring lecture with great professionalism in the flickering light of candles in a silver candelabra. The exhibition of her, and her erstwhile partner Mr. Marcus Holmes, was professionally and lovingly prepared – all

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framed and behind glass. This was done, despite the fact that it was only on show for one night. The other unseen hand behind the success was the organizational ability of Mr. Jan Ras. Not only is Ras capable of impressive organizational feats – he also imbues everything that he undertakes with a sense of effortlessness, wellbeing and finesse. The legend of what this lecture series was to become – was born to a small audience of approximately 40-50 people. Fassler-Kamstra delivered a professional and enlightening lecture and exhibition, like all the laureates after her. The sense of occasion and celebration organized by Ras (and later with the assistance of Mr. Kobus du Preez) completed the set pattern for the future. Not all of it was plain sailing. From the beginning there were also voices of dissent and criticism, from within the institution, the profession and from elsewhere. Questions were raised about why a (then) traditionally Afrikaans university should honour a person so far outside that cultural grouping. The same question was also directed towards the invitees – who were only invited on the strength of their architectural contribution and not for any other affiliation. To stand up to this criticism and to steadfastly believe in the possibilities of this endeavour, required much behind the scenes footwork and diplomacy. However, this kind of negativity and many other criticisms that were levelled against it over the years were overwhelmingly counterbalanced by the enthusiastic and positive responses of countless individuals, and no less by the twenty five laureates. What has been achieved should wholly be ascribed to their excellence and commitment, and to the continued organizational abilities of a new generation of staff and students at the UFS School of Architecture. That initial audience of between 40-50 people has in the meantime grown to an average of between 650 to 700 people. This is now the biggest public lecture of the University of the Free State and possibly

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


the largest public lecture on architecture in South Africa. The initial exhibition by Fassler-Kamstra and Holmes that was on show for one night has now developed into an exhibition running for two to three weeks in the Oliewenhuis Art Museum. Currently, this is the only art museum in the country that has an annual exhibition on architecture. There have approximately been twenty repeat showings of some of the exhibitions at other venues throughout South Africa. Fourteen articles appeared in the Journal of the SA Institute of Architects on the different architects, while the lectures were repeated nine times at other institutions. Catalogues of the exhibitions by Revel Fox, Peter Rich and Stan Field were published, while the lecture by Dr. Hentie Louw was published by the UFS as part of their Acta Architecturea series. Even a cursory search reveals that there exist many memorial lectures on architecture throughout the English speaking world, and surely in many other languages as well. In South Africa the Sophia Gray Memorial lecture series has been joined by the Rusty Bernstein Memorial Lecture since 2003; hosted by the School of Architecture & Planning of the University of the Witwatersrand; and the Milde McWilliams Memorial Lecture hosted by the School of Architecture at the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University. However, when all of these memorial lectures are seen in unison it would seem that the Sophia Gray series is unique in that it is one of the very few that is named after a woman and equally one of the few that is accompanied by an exhibition of the work of the laureate. Another characteristic that comes forward is that very few of these lectures get published. When I look back to the idealism expressed in the article In Memory of Sophia Gray, very little progress has been made to use the material gathered in this manner to form a basis of a national architectural archive. The material contained in the collections mentioned in the article, has grown considerably but no progress has been

made with even a national catalogue. In the same way very little analytical work has been done on the work of the laureates in order to broaden our collective understanding of relatively recent South African architecture or of South African born architects elsewhere in the world. In other words, very little of the work collected for this series has been translated into a historical and/or theoretical understanding of architectural development in South Africa. A nice exception to this is the way that the UFS School of Architecture uses this information to enrich their third year Architectural History course presented by Mr. Kobus du Preez. Two published interview sessions, the one with Prof. Adèle Naude Santos and the other with Dr. Jack Diamond, with Mr. Piet de Beer (erstwhile Editor of the Journal of the SA Institute of Architects) have been published. These follow the same pattern as those by Cook et al in the book Conversations with Architects as well as the book Talking Architecture by Rauterberg. However, none of the more in-depth biographical studies of the type to be found in Ballantyne’s book Architectures have been done despite the excellent opportunity that has been created by the series. Thus, the Sophia Gray series as a source of base information on South African architecture has remained relatively unexplored. Nevertheless, the series has done much to bring architectural excellence and the public together. The general public should be the ultimate beneficiary of quality architecture and this series could expose the public to the motivations and struggles of those seen to be the leading architects. When it was initiated it was also done mindful of the value that positive architectural role models could have in the development of the next generation of architectural professionals. Silently, one could only hope that this beneficial influence has occurred a multitude of times. If such transfers have occurred and if it has helped to change the perceptions of the next generations it would make all the effort that has gone into the Sophia Gray Memorial Lecture & Exhibition series worthwhile.

1 Read the two articles In Memory of Sophia Gray [Part 1] Journal of the South African Institute of Architects [September 1998] p 35-42, and In Memory of Sophia Gray [Part 2] Journal of the South African Institute of Architects [October 1998] p 43-47, for a more complete history of the lecture and exhibition series. Also refer to www.artefacts.co.za for a complete list of the laureates.

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1989 MIRA FASSLER-KAMSTRA

MIMICRY AND CAMOUFLAGE (INSPIRATION AND INTERPRETATION OF SOUTHERN AFRICAN ARCHITECTURE)

Born 7 November 1938 Education 1961: Bachelor of Architecture, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, Gauteng Projects featured House De la Harpe, Johannesburg, Gauteng (1976); Saheti Primary School and Nursery, Johannesburg, Gauteng (1971)

M

ira Fassler was brought up in an architectural environment where the Modern Movement of the 1930’s, New Eclecticism of the 1950’s, Gardens of Italy and Spain and the architecture of Ndebele and Cape Dutch constituted her early influences. With her husband, geologist Michael Kamstra, she visited Great Zimbabwe, German Missions (Marianhill), the Little Karoo, Victorian Veranda Farm Houses and Sotho Settlements, all contributing to her awareness of Southern Africa’s rich heritage. She worked for various leading architects, including Andre Hoffe, Hans Hallen, John Fassler and Willie Meyer. In 1971 she inherited her father, John Fassler’s practice. Mira combined her professional career with an academic one, lecturing at the University of Witwatersrand during 1977 and 1978. This university involvement continued on a part-time basis for many

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years as an external examiner for various schools of architecture in South Africa and presenting various national and international public lectures. The lectures include lectures at the Congress of South African Architects in Cape Town (1983) and Johannesburg (1985), the inaugural Sophia Gray lecture hosted by the Department of Architecture, University of the Free State in 1989 and International Union of Female Architects & Planners Congress on Housing in Washington, DC in the same year. From 1978 she worked in partnership with Marcus Holmes to establish Fassler Kamstra & Holmes Architects. Mira received numerous awards for work produced by herself and in various associations and partnerships. An exhibition of Mira Fassler Kamstra’s work was held in Bloemfontein at Die Ou Presidensie in 1988.

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


Selected Projects and Awards House Protti 1967 Remodeling of Central Campus Landscape Design 1971 at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, Gauteng Senate House at University of the Witwatersrand, 1971 Johannesburg, Gauteng Saheti Primary and Nursery Schools (phase 1) 1971 (Award of Merit, South African Institute of Architecture, Saheti Nursery School 1977) (Award of Merit, South African Institute of Architecture, Saheti Primary School 1978) House Bell, Johannesburg, Gauteng 1972 (Sandton Civic Award 1978) Children’s Centre for ISCOR, Vanderbijlpark, Gauteng 1974 House de la Harpe, Johannesburg, Gauteng 1976 (Award of Merit, South African Institute of Architecture 1981) Steel Worker’s Flats for ISCOR, Vanderbijlpark, Gauteng 1974 -1977

In Partnership with Marcus Holmes: Saheti Pre-Primary, Primary and High Schools (phase 2) 1979 -1980 (Architecture SA Project Award, Saheti High School 1980) SAHETI Campus Master Plan 1980 - 1982 Three Houses in Sixth Street, Orange Grove, 1986 Johannesburg, Gauteng (Award of Merit, South African Institute of Architecture 1987) Proposed Resource Centre – University of Bophuthatswana (Mmabatho Campus)

Landscape Design Central Campus, University of the Witwatersrand, 1969 - 1972 Johannesburg, Gauteng Saheti Nursery and Primary School, Johannesburg, Gauteng 1 973 - 1982

1989 Mira fassler-Kamstra Mimicry and camouflage (Inspiration and interpretation of a southern african architecture)

Publications Fassler-Kamstra, M. 1984. A Celebration of Sovereignity: the Government buildings of Mmabatho. Architecture SA (May/Jun). S.p. Fassler-Kamstra, M. 1985. John Fassler 1910 – 1971. Architecture SA (Jul/Aug). S.p. Fassler-Kamstra, M. 1988. Saheti School: Is a School a Small City? Is a Small City a School? Building Vol. 14. S.p.

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SAHETI PRIMARY SCHOOL AND NURSERY

Bedford View, Johannesburg, Gauteng | 1971

SAHETI School was first envisaged in the late 1930s by the Hellenic Community of South Africa and was only realized 40 years later - a private school built for the Hellenic Community of South Africa to nurture the classical heritage of Hellenism. A farm on the Johannesburg-Bedford view was acquired and a Greek Sporting club established low down near the river. The school was built further up the hill where trees and veld grass had continued to grow undisturbed for long before construction commenced. The funds and sponsors raised by the Greek community included ‘dalle de verre’ windows for the library; a marble fountain for the library court; oregano, lavender, rosemary and thyme; almond, cypress and plane trees and a pyramidal marble foundation stone to celebrate the trilingual and tri-cultural foundation of the school. The different design intentions included a design for a school of an uncertain number of children that could be easily altered to cope with changes in the education system; to evoke the Classical and Byzantine heritage of the Greeks in South Africa and to provide a stimulating environment with creative educational opportunities. These objectives were realized through modularly expandable cluster planning; tent-like terracotta tiled roofs that filtered light over the children and their work; the use of colour and geometry and indoor-outdoor relationships created from clusters of master and servant spaces organised around a series of outdoor courts. The project became significant in that it demonstrated an alternative approach to and a conceptual advance in the making of school complexes in South Africa.

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25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


Johannesburg, Gauteng | 1976 The House de la Harpe commission allowed Mira to explore the vernacular veranda farmhouse typology during a time when contemporary architecture was greatly influenced by the monumental and monolithic structures of Louis I Kahn. The clients’ memories of high-ceiling, verandah farmhouses led to the exploration of the possibilities inherent in traditional Colonial roof and veranda architecture. The site is located at the top of an indigenousness but suburban Bushveld, sloping across a dolerite outcrop in Morningside Manor, Sandton. The brief required a “Karoo-Victorian Farm-Townhouse”. Mira described the design as a lantern hanging off the chimneycum-gable wall with the mass counterbalanced by the floating roof and cantilevered verandah acting as a birdwatcher’s porch. The roofs were built up pitch by pitch to the chimney; a hierarchical climax in the design. The traditional dark interiors normally associated with 19th century farmhouses were addressed through the introduction of clerestory light into the interior.

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

1989 Mira fassler-Kamstra Mimicry and camouflage (Inspiration and interpretation of a southern african architecture)

HOUSE DE LA HARPE

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1990 ROELOF UYTENBOOGAARDT TIMELESS IN ARCHITECTURE

Born 23 June 1933; † 11 June 1998 Education 1961: Masters in Architecture and Masters in City Planning, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA; 1956: Bachelor of Architecture, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, Western Cape Projects featured House Uytenbogaardt, Kommetjie, Western Cape (1990); Werdmuller Centre, Cape Town, Western Cape (1973)

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oelof Uitenbogaardt has made a significant contribution to both the practice and education of architecture and city planning in South Africa.

After qualifying from the University of Cape Town (first class with distinction), Uytenbogaardt received the RIBA Prix de Rome (Rome Scholar) in 1957, so becoming the first South African architect to win this prize. The Kahn Scholarship and Penn Scholarship allowed him to further his studies under Louis I Kahn and David Crane at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. Already as a student, Uytenbogaardt tended to inspire: David Crane wrote to Uytenbogaardt’s father that “Roelof is perhaps the most talented designer we have ever graduated at this school”. His varied career also took him to Zambia where he worked as an architectural assistant at Koppel and Brown; to Rome; and

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after graduating from Pennsylvania in 1961, he was appointed as Chief Planning Designer at the Boston Redevelopment Authority. He returned to the US several times as visiting critic and guest lecturer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Harvard, and the Boston Architecture Centre. As architect and urban designer he practiced both on his own, and in partnership first with PJ Pelser; in the 1970s with Andrew Macaskill and Peter Schneider; and in the 1980s with Norbert Rozendal. Professor Roelof Uytenbogaardt’s academic career started with his appointment as an assistant Studio Master at the University of Cape Town when he returned to South Africa in 1963, and in 1985 he became Head of the programme in Urban Design and City Planning. He also served as the Head of Department, Deputy Dean, and Dean of the Faculty of Art and Architecture.

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1990 Roelof Uytenbogaardt Timeless in architecture

Selected Projects and Awards Shop Hugo van Zyl, Paarl, Western Cape 1963 (CPIA Bronze Medal, 1965) School for the Cape Provincial Administration, 1963 Parow, Cape Town, Western Cape Church for the Dutch Reformed Church, Welkom, Free State 1964 Bonwit Clothing Factory, Salt River, Cape Town, Western Cape 1968 (CPIA Bronze Medal, 1968) Gunners Circle retail centre, Epping, Cape Town, Western Cape 1970 Werdmuller Centre, Claremont, Cape Town, Western Cape 1973 House de Wet, Caledon, Western Cape 1975 Three court yard houses, Constantia, Cape Town, Western Cape 1975 House Uytenbogaardt (alteration and studio), 1975 Wynberg, Cape Town, Western Cape 180 units for the Chamber of Commerce, Belhar, Cape Flats 1976 Remembrance Garden, Seaforth, Simonstown, Western Cape 1977 University of Cape Town Sports Centre, Cape Town, Western Cape 1977 Urban design and 2 500 housing units, 1977 Mitchell’s Plain, Cape Flats, Western Cape Planning and urban design for 300 units in Belhar for 1978 Divisional Council, Cape Flats, Western Cape Steinkopf Community Centre, Steinkopf, Northern Cape 1978 House van Jaarsveld, Stellenbosch, Western Cape 1980 Sports complex and stadium, University of the Western Cape, 1981 Belville, Western Cape (Architecture SA Project Award 1982) Group housing project for 18 dwellings, Kuilsriver, Cape Flats 1982 Community Centre, Belhar, for Divisional Council, 1983 Cape, Cape Flats, Western Cape (Award of Merit, South African Institute of Architects 1987) Public Library, Hout Bay, Western Cape 1987 Urban scheme for District Six, Cape Town, Western Cape 1987 Hout Bay Post Office, Hout Bay, Western Cape 1988 25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

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HUIS UYTENBOGAARDT Kommetjie, Western Cape | 1990

The second private house of Roelof Uytenbogaardt and his wife Marianne Meyer (the first was in Wynberg, Cape Town), is located in the isolated seaside hamlet of Kommetjie, in the Cape Peninsula. The house was designed in partnership with Norbert Rozendal, in 1990. Intimate and private, the house nevertheless contributes to the urban realm of Kommetjie. Ilze Wolff (2014) describes the house as having “a restrained but playful use of materials”, resulting in a “highly crafted space”. Rozendal (1993) points out the Palladian and Japanese Temple architecture undertones of the strict geometry and symmetry of the structure. This results in a tiny footprint (8 x 6 m), that nevertheless accommodates two bedrooms and a bathroom on the ground floor, and a stair that leads to the generous living space and kitchen upstairs. When the aluminium framed glazing is opened, the entire first floor becomes a balcony looking out over the landscape and the sea. Wide timber eaves provide protection from the harsh elements. At ground level, the finely detailed and crafted construction consists mostly of coarsely textured clay brick and quarry tile, with bulky louvered timber windows. The formal plan form and elevations, combined with the unobtrusive materiality results in a building which is at once simple and sophisticated, a Modernist design deeply evocative of the surrounding landscape and sea at the southernmost tip of Africa.

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1990 Roelof Uytenbogaardt Timeless in architecture

WERDMULLER CENTRE

Claremont, Cape Town, Western Cape | 1973

Roelof Uytenbogaardt’s architecture was both revered and reviled. Arguably the best example of this dichotomy, is the Werdmuller Centre in Claremont, Cape Town (1973). Described as “[u]nloved by the public but adored by architects”, yet never awarded any architecture prizes, the Centre is nevertheless considered an icon of South African architecture. Ivor Prinsloo described it as showing “a fine understanding” of the work of the iconic Modernist architect Le Corbusier (Brink, 2011). Ilze and Heinrich Wolff (2012) have curated an exhibition on the Werdmuller Centre, describing it as having “a generosity towards the city and wonderfully intertwining spaces”. Originally designed to serve a vibrant and diverse community, the centre fell victim to the declaration of Claremont as a “whites only” area in 1969. The Claremont community it was originally designed for, preferred the small, intimate spaces and speciality shops of the souk (Wolff, 2012), and needed the shortcut that the Centre provided between the residential area and the station. Its replacement with a more affluent community, less dependent on public transport, removed the foot traffic it was designed to attract and serve. Despite admiration by architects, the Centre has therefore never been successful as a commercial enterprise and there is currently a controversial request for its demolition by its owners, threatening it with falling on the losing side in the “debate between preservation and progress” (Suter, 2011). Others hope that, similar to the Clocktower Precinct at the nearby V&A Waterfront, the building can be saved by putting it to a different, innovative use. The Sophia Gray exhibition of the work of Roelof Uytenbogaardt was later combined with work by Mira Fassler- Kamstra (1989 laureate) and Gawie Fagan (1991 laureate), at the Standard bank Gallery in Johannesburg. As a solo exhibition, Uytenbogaardt’s work was also exhibited at the SA National Art Gallery in Cape Town, the Port Elizabeth Art Gallery, in Windhoek, and at the Stegman Gallery in Bloemfontein. 25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

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1991 GABRIËL (GAWIE) FAGAN ARCHITECT AND COMMUNITY

Born 25 November 1925 Education 1952: Bachelor of Architecture, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, Gauteng Projects featured House Fagan - Die Es, Cape Town, Western Cape (1965); Castle of Good Hope, Cape Town, Western Cape (1969-2001)

Gawie Fagan grew up with a love of the sea, for sailing and for the Cape architectural heritage. After completing his studies he served from 1952 until 1964 as Resident Architect for (then) Volkskas Bank. He designed 50 new banks during this period with countrywide coverage, which aroused a strong interest in the subtle regional differences. His Cape Town practice, Gabriël Fagan Architects, started in 1964. It has always included conservation and restoration work; often in small country towns. This has developed an intimate understanding of vernacular architecture, so that lessons about sense of belonging, structural integrity, plasticity, proportion and scale were inherently part of his designs without being conscious references. In 1969 Fagan’s wife, Gwen, a historical researcher and landscape planner, joined his practice. Gwen still works alongside Gawie, researching and designing the landscaped gardens in new buildings and restoration projects. Gawie lectured design on a part – time basis at University of Cape Town from 1970 to 1972, and wrote a monthly column on architecture for Die Burger, a Cape Town daily newspaper, from 1984 to 1987. Apart from coauthoring Church Street in the Land of Waveren,1975 (recording the restoration of Tulbach), and being the photographer for Gwen Fagan’s book Roses at the Cape of Good Hope in 1988, Gawie’s love for sailing also won him the Trans-Atlantic Cape to Punta del Este yacht race in 1982. He received the South African Sport Merit Award for Navigation in the same year.

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Gawie Fagan has received numerous awards for his work. He is a Foundation and Honorary life member of the Vernacular Architectural Sociey; Member of the Architectural Heritage Committee, South African Institute of Architects since 1982; Member of the Council for the Environment; Member of the board of trustees of Cape Town Heritage Trust from 1988; and Life member of the Simon van der Stel Foundation. He achieved successful results through his concerns with Cape Town’s improvements that led to the establishment of the Victorian and Alfred development; stopping a freeway at Kirstenbosch’s entrance in 1972 and saving Sandy Bay from development in 1969. Fagan’s work is internationally recognised and numerous articles have been published in journals like Casa da Arbitare, The Architectural Review, AV and others.

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Skaaprivierplaas, Citrusdal (district), Western Cape House Patterson, Somerset West, Western Cape House Raynham, Cape Town, Western Cape La Dauphine – Restoration, Franschhoek, Western Cape (Award of Merit, South African Institute of Architects 1968) House 42 – Restoration, Tulbagh, Western Cape (Award of Merit, South African Institute of Architects 1973) National Monuments Council: Gold Medal Award Government House – Restoration, Cape Town, Western Cape (Award of Merit, South African Institute of Architects 1971) Ida’s Valley Housing, Stellenbosch South African Academy for Literature and Science: Gold Medal Award Cape Times Centenary Award for conservation House Luckhoff, Onrus, Western Cape Huis Swanepoel, Cape St Francis, Eastern Cape Tony Williams-Short Award for conservation Simon van der Stel Foundation:Gold Medal Award (Award of Merit, South African Institute of Architects 1983) House Neethling, Western Cape Salomonsvlei, Paarl district, Western Cape Boland Open Air Museum, Worcester, Western Cape (Award of Merit, South African Institute of Architects 1985) Bovenplaats - Jan Smuts’ Birthplace Restoration, Riebeek West district, Western Cape Cape Tercentenary Foundation Award for conservation Klein Constantia Winery, Constantia, Western Cape (Award of Merit, South African Institute of Architects 1987) Maritime and Shell Museum, Mossel Bay, Western Cape (Award of Merit, South African Institute of Architects 1989) South African Institute of Architects: Gold Medal of Honour Order for Meritorious Service: Gold (State President’s Award) ESKOM Energy Effective Design Award for Klein Constantia New Wine Cellar, Cape Town, Western Cape Fulton Award: Klein Constantia New Maturation Cellar, Constantia Valley, Cape Town, Western Cape

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

1966 1967 1968 1970 1973 1971 1975 1975 1977 1981 1981 1982 1982

1991 Gawie Fagan architect and community

Selected Projects and Awards Keurbos, Bishopscourt, Cape Town, Western Cape 1951 Volkskas Bank (now ABSA), Belfast, Mpumalanga 1954 Ladybrand, Free State 1958 Montagu, Western Cape 1959 Warrenton, Northern Cape 1959 Brandfort, Free State 1960 Between 1952-1964 Volkskas Bank (now ABSA), Calvinia, Northern Cape Christiana, North West Colesberg, Northern Cape Franschhoek, Western Cape Fraserburg, Northern Cape Hartswater, Northern Cape Humansdorp, Eastern Cape Kenhardt, Northern Cape Laingsburg, Western Cape Leeudoringstad, North West Lydenburg, Mpumalanga Messina (Musina), Limpopo Murraysburg, Western Cape Richmond, Northern Cape Riversdale, Western Cape Roodepoort, Gauteng Strand, Western Cape Sutherland, Northern Cape Warmbaths (Bela-bela), Limpopo Wellington, Western Cape Willowmore, Eastern Cape Winburg, Free State House Bertie-Roberts, 1965 Camps Bay, Cape Town, Western Cape House Gabriël Fagan – Die Es, Camps Bay, Cape Town, Western Cape

1983 1983 1984 1984 1984 1986 1989 1988 1989 1990 1991

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HOUSE GABRIËL FAGAN - DIE ES

Camps Bay, Cape Town, Western Cape | 1965

Built for, and largely by Gawie Fagan’s own family of six, the construction of this house commenced with the basement workshop. This allowed for all joinery and metal work to be manufactured on site. A narrowly pinched site between neighbours, falling steeply from the road, commands a beautiful view over a small reserve to the coastline and Atlantic Ocean. Violent south-easterly winds rake the site from the street side, so the house turns its back on wind and street, with openings only for the approach and the high mountain views through carefully positioned windows and skylights. The entrance is a processional passage ending on a platform where one is directed up by the hollow sound of the timber underfoot and by the magnificent view of the sea beyond. An open stair leading from this platform to the bedrooms suggests screening, before one descends a few more steps to the spacious living room. This living-dining-patio-kitchen area can be screened in various combinations, from an intimate dining room to a small auditorium. There exists direct correlation between roof and the cell-like separateness of each room on plan. The roof lifts elegantly to frame alternate western sea and eastern mountain views. Constructed of straight boards on edge, glued and nailed, covered by a waterproof membrane, the roof contours over the bedrooms form a syncopated rhythm over the large scale of the communal space, and present a formality to the grand view. From the street side, however, the reverse contours are more intimate in scale, suitable to the smaller space of the rear garden. The generous hearth is tucked off the main living space and truly forms the heart of the house, symbolized by the large chimney. The whole design is regulated in three dimensions by Gawie Fagan’s particular application of Hambidge’s ‘Dynamic Symmetry’ from the overall down to the details.

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1991 Gawie Fagan architect and community

CASTLE OF GOOD HOPE – RESTORATION

Cape Town, Western Cape | 1969-2001 The Casteel de Goede Hoop is the oldest surviving building in South Africa. Built between 1666 and 1679 and designed by Pierius Cool, this pentagonal fortification was declared a National Monument in 1936. An extensive, ongoing restoration and conservation programme was put in place. In 1969 Gabriel Fagan Architects were appointed by the Department of Public Works for their restoration project. It was probably not known at the time that this would be a thirty-three year project; almost the work of half a lifetime. This fortification is the embodiment of South African history that, while not always noble, provides unique challenges to the one tasked with restoring such an edifice. During the ongoing project the building was continuously occupied, first by the military and later functioning as a museum. The project was therefore always in the public eye and visiting international heritage specialists benefited from the information and knowledge garnered by the restoration team, partaking in the debate on the various restoration approaches and methodologies. Dr Gwen Fagan’s meticulous research and documentation of the process has ensured a record that will serve researchers and historiographers for generations to come. What is also ensured is that we have a clear reflection of the past.

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

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1992 WILLIE MEYER

THE THREE PASTS TO OUR PRESENT

Born 14 May 1935; †23 February 2006 Education 1961: Masters in Architecture, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA; 1959: Bachelor of Architecture, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, Gauteng Projects featured House Abalone, Plettenberg Bay, Western Cape (1966); RAU, Johannesburg, Gauteng (1967-1981)

W

ilhelm Olaf Meyer was born in Pretoria. As a youngster he developed a love for architecture while travelling and living in Europe and the USA. Willie spent time in the offices of Gerard Moerdijk, known for the Voortrekker Monument in Pretoria, before registering for architecture at the University of the Witwatersrand. In 1960/61 Willie enrolled in the master class of Louis I Kahn in the United States. He returned to South Africa and rejoined the practice founded by Moerdijk and collaborated in several design competitions. In 1966 he founded Wilhelm O. Meyer and Partners. The young architect was appointed as design leader for the new Rand Afrikaans University (RAU) project. Following RAU, Willie and Francois Pienaar received the winning entry in the international Pahlavi National Library competition for Tehran in 1978. The

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practice WO Meyer & Partners then changed its name to Meyer Pienaar and Partners. During 1977 Willie served as president of the Transvaal Provincial Institute of Architects and was a recipient of the Medal of Honour for Architecture by the SA Akademie vir Wetenskap en Kuns in 1980. He retired from practice in 1992. For a few years thereafter he taught at the University of Port Elizabeth and acted as an assessor of design competitions and awards.

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

1979-84 1980-81 1980-82 1980 1980 1981-86 1981 1981-85 1982 -85 1983-85

1992 Willie Meyer the three pasts to our present

Selected Projects House Meyer, Johannesburg, Gauteng Kenmauval Apartments, Pretoria, Gauteng 1961-62 RAU, Johannesburg, Gauteng (Meyer as partner in former Watson Partnership) (in association with Jan van Wijk and Partners) Grupels Court, Pretoria, Gauteng 1962-63 Lecture Theatre Extensions. (Meyer as partner in former Watson Partnership) Vaal Triangle Technikon, Vanderbijlpark, Gauteng - Botha Mansions, Pretoria, Gauteng Student Housing (Meyer as partner in former Watson Partnership) Technikon Northern Transvaal, Gauteng - Hostels, Phase I-V House Abalone, Wilhelm O Meyer, Plettenberg Bay, Western Cape 1962-65 Technikon Northern Transvaal, Gauteng - Academic Buildings Johannesburg Civic Centre, Johannesburg, Gauteng 1963 House Waddell, Plettenberg Bay, Western Cape (Meyer as partner in former Watson Partnership in association Medal of Honour for Architecture by the SA Akademie with Bryer and Partners) vir Wetenskap en Kuns Rand Afrikaans University, Johannesburg, Gauteng 1967-75 Extension: Johannesburg Art Gallery, Johannesburg, Gauteng (in association with Jan van Wijk & Partners) Everard Read Art Gallery, Johannesburg, Gauteng Christiana Vacation Spa & Urban Design: 1967-77 Premier Group Headquarters, Killarney, Johannesburg, Gauteng Transvaal Mineral Baths Board, North West Province (Coplan International Consortium) (In association with Glen Gallagher & Partners) The Marine Parade Holiday Inn, Durban, Kwazulu Natal Sanlampark Housing, Johannesburg, Gauteng 1968-75 Vaal Triangle Technikon, Vanderbijlpark, Gauteng - Library (In association with Glen Gallagher & Partners) Vaal Triangle Technikon, Vanderbijlpark, Gauteng Potchefstroom University for CHO, Potchefstroom, 1969-76 Campus Expansion - Classrooms, Laboratories, North West Province - student housing, Sports Facility, Cafeteria, Office Braamridge Head Office and Urban Centre, Johannesburg, 1971-75 Buona Vista Office Development, Verwoerdburg Gauteng (In consortium with Retco for South African Breweries) (now Centurion, Tshwane) Gauteng Germiston Civic Centre, Germiston, Gauteng 1982-86 Nasionale Pers Headquarters and Printing Press Potchefstroom University for CHO, Potchefstroom, 1973-78 Johannesburg, Gauteng North West Province. Educational, Psychology Building House Graham Beck - Robertson and Lecture Theatres House C Collecot – Sandton, Gauteng Potchefstroom University for CHO, Potchefstroom, 1973-79 Krugersdorp Civic Centre, Phase II North West Province. Biological Laboratories Phase I (Coplan International Consortium) Krugersdorp, Gauteng Potchefstroom University for CHO, Potchefstroom, 1973-75 Roodepoort Country Club, Johannesburg, Gauteng North West Province. Student Centre, Theatre and Old Mutual Office Building 959, Ferndale, Sports Complex (in association with Bannie Britz) Johannesburg, Gauteng Potchefstroom University for CHO, Potchefstroom, Sanlameerzicht Office Building Verwoerdburg North West Province - Sports Building and Cricket pavilion (now Centurion), Gauteng (in association with Bannie Britz) Grant Andrews Renovation & Extensions to Existing Showroom, House MacAdam, Plettenberg Bay, Western Cape 1973-74 Johannesburg, Gauteng Vaal Triangle Technikon, Vanderbijlpark, Gauteng - 1974-75 Zimbali Development for Hulett Tongaat, Kwazulu Natal New Student Housing Phase I (in association with Revel Fox Architects) Vaal Triangle Technikon Vanderbijlpark, Gauteng - 1975-77 Wild Coast Extensions, Kwazulu Natal, for Sun International Academic Extension, (Coplan International Consortium) Port Zimbali Resort and Urban Design, Natal North Coast, 1975 Market Theatre Precinct Project, Johannesburg, Gauteng Kwazulu Natal - Glen Anil lnvestments Dawn Park Housing, Boksburg, Gauteng (In association with Revel Fox and Partners) Sandton CBD Re-development (in association with Gallagher Sanctuary Vacation Village, Plettenberg Bay; Hill Samuel Bank Aspoas Poplak & Senior) Johannesburg, Gauteng Rectory Vacation Village, Plettenberg Bay Sawmill and Factory, Kempton Park CBD Development Phase I, Gauteng Plettenberg Bay, Western Cape - Kurland Estates Sanlam Office Development, Rosebank, Gauteng Potchefstroom University for CHO, Potchefstroom, 1976 Saficon, Rosebank Sanlam Sentrum Shopping Centre, North West Province: Biological Laboratories, Phase II Nelspruit, Mpumalanga Potchefstroom University for CHO, Potchefstroom, Office Development for Sanlam Nelspruit, Mpumalanga North West Province: Engineering Faculty Ruimsig Country Club for Roodepoort City Council, Gauteng University of Zululand, Kwazulu Natal - Lecture Theatre Complex The Willows - Housing Project - 33 Units (Phase 1), Mabopane Workers’ Housing, Tshwane, Gauteng Pretoria, Gauteng Woodmead Townhouses, Sandton – Hill, Johannesburg, Gauteng Alexandra Clinic - New Casualty Block, Johannesburg, Gauteng Montgomery Park Townhouses, Johannesburg, Gauteng Office Development. Rivonia, Johannesburg, Gauteng “The Studio” Offices, Rosebank, Johannesburg, Gauteng Toll Gates - Control Buildings and Booths House Bingle Kruger, Plettenberg Bay, Western Cape Housing Project Parkland. Midrand, Gauteng - 192 Units House Fihrer, Plettenberg Bay, Western Cape 1977 Standard Bank Gallery Building, Johannesburg, Gauteng Bophuthatswana Government Centre, Mmabatho Luxury Group Housing for Inveskor Faerie Glen, Government of Bophuthatswana Parliament Chamber, Pretoria, Gauteng, 135-Units High Courts & Ministries First National Bank, Bank City Project Johannesburg, Technikon Northern Transvaal, Gauteng - New Campus, Phase I Gauteng (Joint Project with Revel Fox, GAPS and RFB Architects) House N F Oppenheimer, Balmoral, Gauteng 1977-83 Moreleta Shopping Centre, Pretoria, Gauteng Soweto Communal Centre, Johannesburg, Gauteng - 1979 Alexandra Clinic, Johannesburg, Gauteng - New Casualty Block Edgars Development Plan Kempton Park Shopping Centre, Johannesburg, Gauteng Verwoerdburg CBD New Town Centre, (Now Centurion, Tshwane), Gauteng

1984-85 1984

1985

1986

1987

1988

1990 1992

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HOUSE ABALONE

Plettenbergbay, Western Cape | 1966

House Abalone was designed and built in 1966 for Willie’s parents (while he was in practice with Pienaar and Smit). For Willie this house symbolised a holiday spirit where architecture played along in an atmosphere of childlike joy and discovery of this exceptional site. The harder back side in concrete and masonry plaster work reflected the ridged back of an abalone shell. This protected and held the softer inner grain of the main level filled in with glass and timber which was in contrast to the back. With its back to the prevailing winds the house also provided privacy from the neighbours. The house extended its arms to three sides of the site around a central outside space. The contours of the small valley were echoed in the form of the house. The curve of the house continued in the curve of the bay up to Keurboom Bay at the foot of the Tsitsikama Mountains. The footpath from the beach extended upwards through the natural vegetation past an old ruin. This connected the visitor with a wall that formed the backbone of the house that ended in the tower with the crow’s nest. The nest was intended as a space for reflection and held an unexpected view of Robberg in a southern direction. Unfortunately this jewel that articulated sea and site in a playful manner was demolished to make way for a new development.

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25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


Johannesburg, Gauteng | 1967-1981 After convincing the founding rector Gerrit Viljoen that he could conceive of an architecture as an expression of an idea (’n gebou as ‘n uitdrukking van ‘n idee), the 31-year-old Willie Meyer was appointed design leader in a joint appointment with Jan van Wijk for delivering, within five years, a campus for the newly established Rand Afrikaanse University (RAU), today University of Johannesburg, Kingsway Campus. Francois Pienaar, partner in Meyer’s practice and fellow Pennsylvania graduate of the Master Class of Louis I Kahn, commented, “The calibre of Willie to debate architectural issues and to inspire further design options and intellectual discourse always became an irresistible temptation, however exhausting, frustrating and time-consuming it was”. Nevertheless, the project was inaugurated as planned in May 1975. The architectural historian Clive Chipkin labelled the campus “civic in scale and unprecedented since the Union Buildings” while colleague Hans Hallen labelled it “one of the most powerful images of a university of the 1960s”. Meyer delivered his Sophia Gray Memorial Lecture in the Boyden Observatory near Maselspoort. It remains one of the most memorable, not only for the icy-cold Bloemfontein night but also for his propensity for extensive detail as observed by Pienaar during the design process of his magnum opus.

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

1992 Willie Meyer the three pasts to our present

RAND AFRIKAANSE UNIVERSITY (RAU)

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1993 GLEN GALLAGHER THE EXCLUSION OF CONCLUSION IN ARCHITECTURE

Born 11 November 1935; † 10 April 2010 Education 1961: Masters in Architecture, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA; 1958: Bachelor of Architecture, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, Gauteng Projects featured House Gallagher, Johannesburg, Gauteng (1970); Sandton Library and Art Gallery, Johannesburg, Gauteng (1992)

G

len John Brown Gallagher worked in London and New York after completing his architectural studies at the University of the Witwatersrand where he was joint winner of the university’s AS Furner Prize for the most original design in all years. He received a design award in London at the Earls Court Furniture Exhibition for the best exhibit in all classes, while employed by Dennis Lennon & Partners in 1959. He subsequently completed his Masters degree under Louis I Kahn at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. On his return to South Africa in 1962, Glen joined in partnership with Willie Meyer and later with Manfred Hoffrichter and Dierk Volavsek. From 1979 he was a partner in the firm Gallagher Aspoas Poplak Senior (GAPS); and later GAPP after a merger with their Cape Town associates. His work has been published locally and internationally. He was invited to exhibit as part of a selected group of students’ work at the 1991 exhibition: “Legacy of Louis Kahn” in Philadelphia. Glen Gallagher’s services to the profession in South Africa are legion and he has, amongst many portfolios, served as President of both the Transvaal Provincial and South African Institutes of Architects; as alternate Councillor of the World Council of the International Union of Architects, and member of the Habitat Working Group of the International Union of Architects. He maintained membership of the Royal Institute of British Architects and defended South African interests during the years of isolation. Glen has also made a direct contribution to the education of young architects as design lecturer and visiting critic at national and international schools of architecture. His work has been repeatedly honoured by the profession through the peer reviewed Awards of Merit, as well as numerous other awards, including the Silver Medal of Excellence of the Institute of South African Architects (1993) for his service to the profession.

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25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

1993 Glen Gallagher the exclusion of conclusion in architecture

Selected Projects and Awards Hilton Hotel at Rockefeller Centre, New York 1960 (as part of 15 member team) Rand Water Board Corporate Headquarters, 1962 Johannesburg, Gauteng Robinson House, Linksfield Ridge, Johannesburg, Gauteng 1965 (Award of Merit, Institute of South African Architects 1969) Rob Ferreira Mineral Baths Resort, Christiana, 1965 North West Province (Award of Merit, Institute of South African Architects 1982) Gallagher House, Johannesburg, Gauteng 1970 Special Award for Design plus two Gold Medals, Witwatersrand Agricultural Society for the Design of an Exhibition for Murray pools, Rand Show Pamensky House, Sandton, Johannesburg, Gauteng 1972 (Award of Merit, Institute of South African Architects 1973) (Award of Merit, Sandton City Council for House Pamensky 1973) Sanlam Park Apartment Village, Gardens, Johannesburg, Gauteng (now called Norwood Village) In Association with WO Meyer (Award of Merit, Institute of South African Architects 1975) Protea Holdings Headquarters, Sandton, Johannesburg, Gauteng 1974 G.R. Bozolli Sports Pavilion, University of Witwatersrand, 1975 Johannesburg, Gauteng Rand London Headquarters, Johannesburg, Gauteng Second Prize, International Federation of Housing and 1978 Planning, Film Competition, Geneva, Switzerland Arandis New Town, Erongo Region, Namibia 1983 The Lanes and Church Square Precinct, 1986 Central Pietermaritzburg, Kwazulu-Natal (Project Award, Architecture SA 1988) Sandton Square Urban Design, Sandton, Johannesburg 1987 (in association with Meyer Pienaar & Partners) Ntshondwe Rest Camp, Ithala Game Reserve, Kwazulu-Natal Victoria and Alfred Waterfront, Cape Town, Western Cape 1988 (leader of team of core Urban Design consultants including Parker Prinsloo et al) BankCity Headquarters, Johannesburg, Gauteng (in association with Revel Fox & Partners, Meyer Pienaar & Partners, RFB Consulting Architects) Post Office and Office Building, Joubert Park, 1989 Johannesburg, Gauteng Sentrachem Corporate Headquarters, Sandton, Johannesburg, Gauteng Sandton Library and Civic Centre, Sandton, 1992 Johannesburg, Gauteng (in association with Meyer Pienaar & Partners) Park Hyatt Hotel, Rosebank, Johannesburg, Gauteng 1993 Silver Medal of Excellence, Institute of South African 1993 Architects for service to the Profession

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HOUSE GALLAGHER

Parktown North, Johannesburg, Gauteng | 1970 In his Sophia Gray lecture of August 1993 Glen had an extensive exhibition of projects and built works. Instead of including all this in his slides and lecture he decided to show only this loved family home. This summed up his humble beginnings and his love for architecture. This load-bearing masonry structure developed over time around the means and needs of the Gallagher family. The original cottage structure of a tennis court change room in plastered masonry with a corrugated iron pitched roof went through several alterations and additions before a major semi-facebrick addition was designed and constructed.

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25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


Sandton, Johannesburg, Gauteng | 1992 Sandton Library and Art Gallery were designed in keeping with Mandela Square as partial design generator. The form of the library is a triangular ‘pivot’ resulting from its location between Mandela Square and the Sandton Civic Forum that is still to be built. The library is positioned prominently over each of these squares that are not positioned orthogonally in relation to each other, which resulted in the shape of the building. The library includes, on its top floor, the mayor’s offices that are connected by a bridge to the existing civic offices in the building next door. The exterior is of facebrick, as required by the design guidelines. The guidelines also prescribed the height, and that the edge of all buildings facing the square should include a colonnade. Both elevations comprise classical, symmetrical, yet modern façades presiding over each of the squares. The influence of Louis I Kahn is visible. The building includes a multi-level central space, with natural light coming in from the top and contains public circulation in the form of a spiral metal ramp (designed by Arup) suspended from the roof. The Art Gallery occupies left over space between the library, the civic building and Mandela Square’s southern block. Access from the gallery to both squares and the library is by means of a covered walkway with an innovative lightweight roof structure. This project was designed in association with Meyer Pienaar & Partners.

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

1993 Glen Gallagher the exclusion of conclusion in architecture

SANDTON LIBRARY AND ART GALLERY

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1994 JACK BARNETT

BUILDING THE BEST – THE NEW SOUTH AFRICA’S ESSENTIAL MISSION

Born 7 December 1924; † 29 July 1996 Education 1946: Bachelor of Architecture, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, Western Cape Projects featured Welkom Civic Centre, Welkom, Free State (1955); Baxter Theatre, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, Western Cape (1968)

J

ack Judah Barnett received the Helen Gardner Scholarship on completion of his architectural studies at the University of Cape Town. His first employment was at the offices of Harrison and Abramowitz in New York, USA. He also worked for Kantorowich and Hope for whom he won the first of many competitions throughout his career; in this case the Harrismith High School. Winning the Herbert Baker Scholarship in 1949 entitled him to residency at the British School in Rome. While in Europe he attended the Berlin Youth Festival in East Berlin. In 1952 he married Naomi Shapiro in Tel Aviv. Jack worked as resident architect for the SA Jewish Appeal on the new town of Ashkelon in southern Israel. Between 1955 and 1957 he was appointed Studio Master at the University of Cape Town School Of Architecture. He won the Welkom Civic Centre competition in

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association with Kantorowich and Skacel in 1955. Other successful competitions that he took part in was for the Klerksdorp Civic Centre, the Roggebaai Fountain (during which time he was detained in terms of the state of emergency due to his Communist leanings), the Cape Provincial Administration Offices and Library in Kimberley and the New Municipal Offices in Pietermaritzburg. He was awarded the Gold Medal by the SA Institute of Architects in 1982. He dwelled on the fact that architectural competitions presented him (under a regime that was not favourably disposed towards his well known Communist leanings) with an opportunity to compete purely on grounds of merit for design projects. One of his firm convictions was (to quote from his Sophia Gray lecture): “Architects are the custodians of a vital tradition and although they may build for a specific client, in the cultural sense, they build for all.”

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


1994 Jack Barnett building the best - the new south africa’s essential mission

Selected Projects and Awards Harrismith High School, Harrismith, Orange Free State 1947 Various projects, Ashkelon, Israel 1952 Welkom Civic Centre, Welkom, Orange Free State 1955-1968 Klerksdorp Civic Centre, Klerksdorp, Transvaal 1960 (now North West Province) Roggebaai Fountain, Cape Town, Western Cape Cape Provincial Administration Offices and Library, 1961 Kimberley (now Northern Cape) New Municipal Offices, Pietermaritzburg (now Kwa-Zulu Natal) 1965 College of Music and Baxter Theatre, University of Cape Town, 1968-1977 Cape Town, Western Cape (ISAA Award of merit 1978) Jewish Cemetery and Funeral Chapel, Pinelands, 1972 Cape Town, Western Cape Cape Tercentenary Medal 1979 Gold Medal: South African Institute of Architects 1982 University Square and restyling of the Great Hall, 1988 University of the Western Cape, Cape Town, Western Cape Lecture Theatres, University of the Western Cape, 1989 Cape Town, Western Cape

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

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WELKOM CIVIC CENTRE Welkom, Free State | 1955 -1968

The Civic Centre by Kantorowich and Barnett in Stateway, Welkom is described by Doreen Greig as “A large and ambitious complex – perhaps too ambitious for a town which will, in all probability, have a limited life.” The Centre consists of an office block, a banqueting hall, a theatre and a clock tower (45 m high). It was built with the best of materials, with walls of dark coloured brick and covered with copper roofs. The theatre and tower are the most remarkable and unusual elements of this ensemble. The Ernst Oppenheimer Theatre was opened on 15 February 1968. The drive to build a theatre in this Free State mining town rather than the proposed city hall came from Mrs. Martie du Plessis, the wife of the Administrator of the Free State, Sand du Plessis. She had the pleasure of presiding over the opening ceremony which was also graced by Gé Korsten, who starred in the opening production of Bedelaarstudent. Internally, the Theatre has been lavishly finished with Yellowwood throughout and a magnificent crystal chandelier in the auditorium. In the foyer, two tapestries were designed by Cecil Skotnes and two more by Eleanor Esmond-White. These were woven in Aubusson, France by Pinton Frères.

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25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


University of Cape Town, Cape Town, Western Cape | 1968 The University of Cape Town received a legacy from Duncan Baxter in 1960 for the purpose of building a theatre. Jack Barnett and Leslie Broer were commissioned to design the theatre and to extend the College of Music. The Baxter Theatre complex comprised a new concert hall for musical and stage productions, a theatre seating 650 people and a third, smaller experimental theatre, The Studio. The foyer space between these three elements and the College of Music is the remarkable part of the project which turned a complex site to a dramatic advantage. The slope dictated that the seating in the auditoria run with the contours to reduce the cost of excavation. With the positions of the concert hall and theatre thereby fixed, the foyer was the design element that could be manipulated to connect the levels and different approaches to the building. The wall surfaces consist of a Stellenbosch brick “which has had its face removed prior to delivery on site, giving a rough texture in which joints between bricks are less conspicuous and the resulting walls more ‘monolithic’.” (Architect and Builder, Nov 1977) The decorative foyer ceiling is common to the interior and exterior and is immediately recognisable, bridging the inside-outside connection of the glazed enclosure. It also dates the design of the Baxter Theatre firmly in the 1970s.

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

1994 Jack Barnett building the best - the new south africa’s essential mission

BAXTER THEATRE

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1995 HANNES MEIRING

ARCHITECTURE - THE GREAT ADVENTURE

Born 11 October 1934; † 2 May 2010 Education 1958: Bachelor of Architecture, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, Western Cape Projects featured Extensions to the Houses of Parliament, Cape Town, Western Cape (1988); Conservatoire of Music for the University of Stellenbosch, Stellenbosch, Western Cape (1973)

J

ohannes Henricus (Hannes) Meiring was born in Potchefstroom. He spent his childhood in Stellenbosch. After graduating, Hannes entered into partnership with Gilbert Colyn. Hannes married Martie Retief. In 1962 he enrolled at the Akademie der Bildenden Künsten and the Technische Hochschule in Munich. During this time he also met another South African, Bannie Britz and his future wife Almut.

Back in South Africa the project that became the practice’s focus was the New Academic Hospital in Johannesburg (1968). Other major projects followed like the Trust Bank Centre in Cape Town (1971) and the Conservatoire of Music of the University of Stellenbosch (1973). Hannes Meiring is perhaps best known for his collections of free hand sketches that were published from 1972 onwards. The first of these were Kruger’s Pretoria that was followed by many more up to My Country in Line and Colour that appeared in 2004. As a reviewer once put it: “His lively, quirky drawings bring to life the character and joyful individuality of each structure that he studies.” His practice received a very public commission in 1984 in the form of the extensions to the Houses of Parliament in Cape Town. It remains one of the most visible and better examples of PostModernism in South Africa. The next year he was awarded by the SA Institute of Architects for House Ackermann and the restoration of the Erasmus Castle, both in Pretoria.

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25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


Selected Projects and Awards New Academic Hospital, Parktown, Johannesburg, Gauteng 1968 Trust Bank Centre, Cape Town, Western Cape 1971 Conservatoire of Music for the University of Stellenbosch, 1973 Stellenbosch, Western Cape Simon van der Stel Foundation - 1985 Heritage South Africa: Gold Medal Extensions to the Houses of Parliament, 1988 Cape Town, Western Cape Restoration of the Erasmus Castle, Pretoria, Gauteng 1989 House Ackermann, Pretoria, Gauteng 1989 Medal of Honour for Architecture by the 1989 SA Akademie vir Wetenskap en Kuns

1995

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

1995 Hannes Meiring architecture - the great adventure

Four Merit Awards for restoration and architectural design from the Transvaal Institute of Architects in 1989 and 1993. Refurbishment of the Municipal Train Sheds, Pretoria, Gauteng

Publications Meiring, H., Allen, V. 1972. Kruger’s Pretoria. Cape Town: A.A. Balkema Meiring, H. 1977. Boukunsskatte van SA. Kaapstad: Human & Rosseau Meiring, H., Van Huyssteen, T. 1979. Stellenbosch te voet. Kaapstad: Tafelberg. Meiring, H., Jonker, A. 1980. Pretoria 125. Kaapstad: Human & Rosseau Meiring, H., Van Huyssteen, T. 1983. Hart van die Boland Deel 1. Kaapstad: Tafelberg. Meiring, H., Van Huyssteen, T. 1985. Hugenoteland. Kaapstad: Tafelberg. Meiring, H.,Van der Waal, G.M., Grutter, Jonker, A.1985 Early Johannesburg: its Buildings and People. Cape Town: Human & Rosseau. Meiring, H., Van Huyssteen. T. 1993. Footloose in Stellenbosch: a visitor’s guide Cape Town: Tafelberg, Illustrations for Sanlam’s 2002 calender Meiring, H. 2004. My Country in Line and Colour. South Africa: Fernwood Press.

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Government Lane 1964 Addition 1987 Addition

1910 Addition

1885 Original Building

1964 Addition

Parliament Street

EXTENSIONS TO THE HOUSES OF PARLIAMENT Cape Town, Western Cape | 1988

The Parliament Buildings in Cape Town have a long history of extensions which started with Charles Freeman winning the competition with a grand design that included a central dome and copulas in 1874. His designs for the Metropolitan Methodist Church (1876) in Cape Town and NG Kerk (1886) in GraaffReinet are amongst his best known work. His prizewinning design for the Parliament was revised and simplified by HE Graves (1875 – 84). The Building had also since then been enlarged in 1909 and 1965. Following the 1984 referendum giving limited franchise to the Coloured (House of Represent-atives) and Indian (House of Delegates) communities, the government set about immediately constructing the parliamentary buildings to accommodate them. Hannes Meiring and partner Jack van der Leck (project leader) received the commission to adapt the building once more in 1984. Briefly, provision had to be made for a large assembly chamber which could accommodate all three Houses of Parliament. The Post-Modernism of the 1980s in South Africa informed the design of the extensions. According to Meiring: “Externally the building had to match the original building, closely following the delicately balanced appearance of its ‘classical Victorian’ style, featuring the Corinthian Order of the Italian Renaissance. The interior incorporated a much more exciting version of Post-Modernism, transferring directly from Victorian to African eclecticism.”

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25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


University of Stellenbosch, Stellenbosch, Western Cape | 1973

The new building for the Department of Music at the University of Stellenbosch had to be a phased development which is unusual. This resulted in a structure that consists of four separate structural zones which had been adapted to fulfill the different requirements. The first priority was for the teaching of small groups and music practice rooms which had to include organs. Phase one of the building became the south east corner of the completed building in the form of three fingers spreading towards the north, east and south. The second phase included the Fismer Hall, a rehearsal hall which is the working heart of the whole complex, which was followed by the library and the auditorium. The architects considered brushed terrazzo as an exterior finish for the building, but when the budget was under pressure, that was replaced by white paint on plaster. The painted finish also fitted in better with the many Cape Dutch Revival buildings on the campus. The visible lower roofs are copper clad. Eventhough the auditorium in the complex was the last of the priorities, it is the most visible part with a cantilevered transparent foyer on three sides. It has served its ‘town meets gown’ function remarkably well for over the past 30 years.

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

1995 Hannes Meiring architecture - the great adventure

CONSERVATOIRE OF MUSIC

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1996 PANCHO GUEDES SEVEN MANIFESTOES

Born 13 May 1952 Education 1953: Escola Superior de Belas Artes, Porto, Portugal; 1950: Bachelor of Architecture, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, Gauteng Projects featured Saipal Bakery, Maputo, Mocambique (1952); Smiling Lion Apartments -O Leão que Ri – Maputo Mozambique (1958)

“I

claim for architects the rights and liberties that painters and poets have held for so long.” – Pancho Guedes

Amancio Guedes was born in Lisbon Portugal and was only seven years old when his family relocated to Mozambique. He was educated in Lorenço Marques (now Maputo) and later graduated from the University of the Witwatersrand in 1950. He quickly established a practice and worked with a tireless enthusiasm for the next twenty five years, changing the architectural landscape of Mozambique. His work was a sudden shift in the Modern and LateModern tradition that many professionals had become comfortable with. He challenged the status quo not only in the sense of an architect as independent artist, but also in the sense that his work did not fit the rationalist functionalist bill. Forced to depart Mozambique in 1974 due to the political turmoil, he was cast adrift, but his legendary reputation earned him an invitation for the vacant Chair of Architecture at the University of the Witwatersrand. Working at a university gave him numerous opportunities to travel, lecture and exhibit his work. He toured widely, all the while accumulating a vast array of artistic and architectural inspiration. He was a visiting professor at the University of California in Los Angeles in 1981, served on several AA (London) juries and attended the first Team 10 meeting. His success as an architect is clear when his ability to solve functional puzzles and integrate beautifully imagined spaces is examined. His work is personal, sculptural and exuberant. It draws from a broad eclectic vocabulary, from the South American flair introduced to Modernism by Oscar Niemeyer to the vernacular and the historic influence of Portugal, so similar to Gaudi but more true, and raw. (Cook 2012:online) He uses the expressive tones of earlier movements and the African Art of the context to create completely new forms and architectural idioms. He now resides in Portugal. In 2010 a retrospective of his body of work was held at the Museu Coleccau Berardo in Lisbon, Portugal was opened by Sir Peter Cook and attracted over 48 000 visitors. A prolific artist, architect and educator Pancho Guedes continues to inspire generations of architects who strive to make their own unique mark. “Pancho was difficult, absolutely brilliant, totally committed to his art, infuriatingly partisan yet also generous, spellbindingly erudite and supremely talented, a truly great architect capable of turning his hand to almost any architectural problem and issue with an almost contemptuous ease.” – Jo Noero (In Viva Pancho 2003:22)

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25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


Visiting Professorships & Exhibitions Technion, Haifa 1988 U.C.L.A. Los Angeles 1982 University of Queensland, Australia 1980 Exhibition: AA London 1979 Exhibition: Biennale di Venezia 1976 Selected Projects Pancho GUEDES has designed many private residences and apartments, omitted from this list Prometheus Apartments, Lorenço Marques 1953 (now Maputo, Mozambique) Saipal Bakery, Lorenço Marques 1954 (now Maputo, Mozambique)   Smiling Lion Apartments, Lorenço Marques 1956 (now Maputo, Mozambique) Service Station, Komatipoort (South Africa) 1961  Sagrada Familia Church, Machava (Mozambique) 1964   Church of St James the Great, Nyamandhlovo 1965 (Rhodesia, now Zimbabwe) Church of Santa Ana da Munhuana, Lorenço Marques 1966 (now Maputo, Mozambique)   Police Widows and Orphans Savings Bank Building 1967 Lorenço Marques (now Maputo, Mozambique)   College of Nossa Senhora da Conceicão, Inhambane (Mozambique)   San Jose de Llanguene Convent, Lorenço Marques 1968 (now Maputo, Mozambique) The Clandestine Nursery School, Canico, Lorenço Marques 1969 (now Maputo, Mozambique)   Congregational Church, Choupal (Mozambique) (with Pedro Guedes) Church of the Twelve Apostles, 1971 Gala Massala, Maputo (Mozambique)  Waterford School, Mbabane (Swaziland) 1972  Church of San Cipriano do Chamanculo, Lorenço Marques 1974 (now Maputo, Mozambique)   Nurses’ Hostel, Chicumbane, Gaza (Mozambique)   Post Office School, Ihambane (Mozambique)   Hotel and Farm School, Estevel, Boane (Mozambique) 1975  Tota Standard Building, Porto Alexandre (Angola)   Regentes Agricolas School, Vila Pery (Mozambique) Casal dos Olhos (The eye House), Eugaria, Sintra Portugal. 1972-1990 City Centre square project, Johannesburg, South Africa 1981

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

1996 Pancho Guedes seven manifestoes

Projects list from 1981-1996 unavailable

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http://www.guedes.info/drawings/

SAIPAL BAKERY

Maputo, Mocambique | 1952

This unique building, an example of one of Pancho Guedes’ early works, was designed soon after he completed his studies at the University of the Witwatersrand and before his first journey to Europe. His flair for challenging accepted forms is already evident. He proves that the use of curves and rounded edges can create spaces that are both striking and elegant. The composition of the section is complex but cohesive. Calling to mind the elegant concrete curves of Niemeyer’s Belo Horizonte church, Guedes nonetheless added his unique stamp to the design, breaking free from the constraints of even the Brazillian modernist approach and still injecting an elegant Gaudi inspired organic element. The roof is a double curve of formed reinforced concrete and one of Guedes’ designs that has survived Mozambique’s tumultuous past in remarkably good condition.

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25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


http://www.guedes.info/drawings/

Maputo, Mozambique | 1958

This building is perhaps Pancho Guedes’ most notable design and forms part of what he calls Stiloguedes or ‘GuedesStyle’ his ‘royal family’.(Green 2006:online) This apartment block, characterized by the use of spikes and complex rounded curves, both on section and elevation, was the design that made the international community sharply aware of this anomaly on their radar. The elements that are present in all the buildings Guedes fits into this category are evident here. From the complex compositions of spiky and shell roofs, murals and sculptural space, this building clearly represents the monarchy of stiloguedes. The influences of the artist’s he so admires are clear in his paintings and no less so in the that of the section of this building. It brings to mind those who influenced the young student, Picasso, Miro and Dali as well as early influences of Riviera and Oroxo (Green 2006:online). The plan of this apartment block is deceivingly simple and straightforward but the spatial resolution is sculptural, voluptuous and imaginative. Guedes’ plans are always drawn from the logic of concrete construction and it is clear in this case as well. The spans are sensible and columns evenly spaced, even in its eccentricity these buildings are strongly grounded in the reality of construction (Green 2006:online, Cook 2012: online). Even facing long years of neglect and the disruption of the civil war, the building has survived remarkably well, even if it has gained a scruffy patina of age. The strong yellow colour shines through the layers of dirt and the mural on the west façade and the ‘smiling lion’ to the north is still intact to complete the composition of the building that it named.

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

1996 Pancho Guedes seven manifestoes

SMILING LION APARTMENTS -O LEÃO QUE RI

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1997 REVEL FOX

REFLECTIONS ON THE MAKING OF SPACE

Born 20 September 1924; † 13 December 2004 Education 1993: D Arch (Honoris Causa) awarded by the University of Natal, Kwazulu Natal; 1969: Masters in Architecture & Regional Planning, University of Cape Town, Western Cape; 1948: Bachelor of Architecture, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, Western Cape Projects Featured Cape Provincial Administrative Building, Cape Town, Western Cape (1984); UCT Gradute School of Business, Cape Town, Western Cape (1991)

R

evel Fox was born in Durban and grew up in harbour towns and cities such as Port Elizabeth, Luderitz and later Cape Town. He went on to study architecture, considering it in part as a ‘soft option’. He completed 18 months of study at UCT before joining the army midway through his second year. He was shipped off to Italy as part of the Papa Britz special service battalion. It was here in Italy during the War that his interest in space, the urban environment and the human condition in built surroundings was sparked. After returning from the War he completed his studies with renewed focus. With a career that included time in Mozambique and Sweden, he set up practice in Worcester and later moved to Cape Town. One of his important early commissions was the new Deanery in Upper Orange street (1960). He would go on to complete several residential projects, as well as larger buildings such as the UCT School of Ballet (1962, 1964, 1973), UCT faculty of Education (1969) and the BP Centre (1973). His work reflected both his African heritage and the influences of European styles. He met the challenge of specific problems in

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the South African context such as the need for mass housing and dealing with urban planning in the post-apartheid era. His massive contribution to South African architecture and urbanism earned him several prestigious awards, ranging from the South African Institute of Architecure’s Award for his outstanding contribution to architecture in South Africa in 1977. In 1994, he was awarded the South African National Monuments Council’s Gold Medal for his contribution to conservation in South Africa. Through his teaching, the mentoring of students in his office, and his work in the profession at large, he had a significant influence on the many South African architects practicing today. He has made a definitive mark on 20th Century architecture and his work continues to be relevant to practicing architects and students alike. According to Fox, Vitruvius’ dictum concerning firmness, commodity and delight is still valid: firmness implies much more than just structural stability, commodity extends well beyond the provision of adequate space, and delight, so often neglected, is the dedicated striving after the grace and beauty that lifts the spirit and gladdens the heart.

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


Morgenster Restoration, Somerset West, Western Cape 1982, 1997 Tannery Park, Rondebosch, Cape Town, Western Cape 1984 Bertram House Restoration, Gardens, Cape Town, Western Cape Cape Provincial Administration Office Building, Cape Town, Western Cape (Award of Merit, SAIA, 1984; Fulton Award for excellence in the use of concrete, 1983) St George’s Mall, Cape Town, Western Cape 1986 House Odes, Whale Rock Apartmentts, Clifton, 1963,1971, Cape Town, Western Cape 1986 House Rupert, Onrus, Cape Town, Western Cape 1986 Anglovaal House, Johannesburg, Gauteng 1987 Durban Central District Planning, 1982-1988 Durban, Kwazulu Natal Peninsula Technikon, Belville South, Cape Town, Western Cape 1989 (Clay masonry Award, clay brick association 1990) Portswood Ridge, Waterfront, Cape Town, Western Cape 1992 Graduate School of Business, Waterfont, 1992 Cape Town, Western Cape House Moodie, Oranjezicht, Cape Town, Western Cape 1992 House Bauman, Higgovale, Cape Town, Western Cape 1993 Groot Constantia Restoration, Constantia, 1994 Cape Town, Western Cape Albion Spring Housing and Offices, Rondebosch, 1995 Cape Town, Western Cape Steenberg Golf Estate and Clubhouse, Steenberg, 1996 Cape Town, Western Cape (Prix d’Excellence: Rural Properties, International Real Estate Federation 1998) Retief, Ehrmann and Boyd Houses, Steenberg, 1996 Cape Town, Western Cape (1982) Rebuilt 1997. All Saints Church, Durbanville, 1997 Cape Town, Western Cape Bankcity, Johannesburg, Gauteng 1997 Alphen, Constantia, Cape Town, Western Cape 1997

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

1997 Revel Fox reflections on the making of space

Selected Projects & Awards House Wilson, Worcester, Western Cape 1954 Fox and Ross Houses, Worcester, Western Cape 1955 House Droomer, Worcester, Western Cape Meerlust Restoration, Faure, Western Cape 1959 House Giannelos, Camps Bay, Cape Town, Western Cape The Deanery, Oranjezicht, Cape Town, Western Cape 1960 Esselen Park High School, Worcester, Western Cape 1961 Valggemanshuis, Higgovale, Cape Town, Western Cape House Le Roux, Llandudno, Cape Town, Western Cape 1962 House Robinson, Higgovale, Cape Town, Western Cape UCT School of Ballet, Rondebosch, Cape Town, Western Cape 1 962,1964, 1967 House Vlok, Bishopscourt, Cape Town, Western Cape 1963 Montebello Apartments, Newlands, Cape Town, Western Cape 1967 (Bronze Medal, Cape Provincial Insitute of Architects 1968) House Fishcer, Milnerton, Cape Town, Western Cape 1967 House Faure, Bloubergstrand, Cape Town, Western Cape House Scott, Constantia, Cape Town, Western Cape 1968 UCT Faculty of Education, Rondebosch, 1969 Cape Town, Western Cape EOAN Group Cultural Centre and Joseph Stone Auditorium, 1969 Athlone, Cape Town, Western Cape (Bronze medal, Cape Provincial Institute of Architects 1969) Franschoek School Hostel, Franschoek, Western Cape 1971,1979 Early Learning Centre, Athlone, Cape Town, Western Cape 1972 BP Centre, Cape Town, Western Cape 1973 Kanetvlei Homestead Renovation, Sandhills, Cape Town, Western Cape Marina da Gama Demonstration Houses, 1974 Muizenberg Cape Town, Western Cape Cullinan Holdings Office Building, Olifantsfontein, Gauteng 1976 Shelter Housing, Valhalla Park, Cape Town, Western Cape 1978 Mitchells Plain Urban and Dwelling unit design, Cape Town Federal Theological Seminary, Imbali, KwaZulu-Natal 1980

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CAPE PROVINCIAL ADMINISTRATIVE BUILDING Cape Town, Western Cape | 1984

This building was designed in response to a somewhat awkward brief in terms of bulk and accommodation for what was to be essentially a massive office block. The program did not have functions to address the sensitive street frontage. The building successfully addresses both the program and the context. The form is solid and the planning pragmatic in terms of the needs of office space in the 1980s. The solid mass is rendered more sculptural through the use of wellproportioned and deep Bris Soleil. These elements elegantly introduce both functional shading and the reduction of the bulk of the complete form. At ground level the same sculptural quality of the concrete is employed to create a lively street edge. The modernist references to Le Corbusian design are not selfconscious. The building placed its stamp on the urban fabric of Cape Town without making any grandiose statements. Office blocks are by nature not the most elegant of typologies, but in this case Fox showed his flair for incorporating sensitive contexts, his interest in the urban fabric, elegant Modernist elements and a difficult brief to create a solution to the problem that could easily have scarred the face of a well-loved area of Cape Town. The detailing is done with a unifying precision, attention and skill that completes the sculptural quality of this concrete icon.

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25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


UCT GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

Waterfront, Cape Town, Western Cape | 1991

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

1997 Revel Fox reflections on the making of space

The Industrial Breakwater Prison building was to serve as the new site for the UCT graduate school of business. The V&A waterfront development was under way and although there was concern about the separation of the site from the main campus, the benefits of the site outweighed the distance from Rondebosch. The brief demanded accommodation for visitors, conferences and numerous other activities related to an academic institution. The original prison could not contain all these functions and the design of the two flanking buildings was necessary. In order to respond to the sensitivity of the original and to keep it as the visual focal point both flanking buildings are modest, unadorned and respectful in scale. An inner ring to the Prison courtyard accommodates further office space without changing the exterior facade. The simple rhythm of window spacing and light finishes speak the same language. The two additions neatly form the bookends to the central prison building. Here the additions are simply new punctuation to a wellknown statement. Fox’s flair for understated elegant additions is clear in this design.

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1998 ADÈLE NAUDÉ SANTOS

“NARRATIVE MAPS”: CONCEPTS AND CREATIONS

Born 1938 Education 1968: Masters in Architecture & Master of City Planning, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA; 1963: Masters in Architecture in Urban Design, Harvard, Cambridge, Mass., USA; 1961: Bachelor of Architecture, Architectural Association, London Projects featured House Stekhoven, Newlands, Cape Town, Western Cape (1972); Rowan Lane Housing, Kenilworth, Cape Town, Western Cape (1973)

P

rof. Santos’ career combines professional practice, research, and teaching. Alone and with associates in South Africa, Philadelphia and San Francisco, Santos has been in private practice for more than forty years. She won numerous international design competitions, citations and awards. Following a holistic approach her work is concerned with the creation of social and contextual responsible design. The built environment, she upholds, should satisfy not only functional requirements but also the human spirit. Her work comprises varied typologies and scales in diverse social-economic groups, cultures and countries. Santos regards her practice as research based and is especially concerned with dwelling units. Her academic career includes professorships within the graduate programs of UC Berkeley, Harvard, Rice University, and the University of Pennsylvania (UPenn), chair of the Department of Architecture, UPenn and founding Dean of the School of Architecture at the University of California, San Diego. Prof. Santos devotes her academic research towards housing, construction and urban planning and design.

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25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


National competition for Inner City Infill Housing for Harlem, New York, third place award Adèle Naudé Santos Architect studio and offices, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA SDC Guest House, Ninomiya, Japan SDC Corporate Headquarters, Tokyo, Japan Ritch / Zoe Studio, Ritch/Zoe Street Studios, San Francisco, California, USA Albright Center for the Arts, Albright College, Reading, Pennsylvania. USA Albright College Natatorium, Albright College, Reading, Pennsylvania. USA Institute for Contemporary Art, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. USA Parthena Award. Granted by the California Women in Environmental Design annually to recognize one woman who has made outstanding contributions to the profession Spirit of San Diego Award, created and conferred by the Mayor of San Diego to honor the Centre City East Study Winner of the San Diego Centre City Development Corporation’s Directors’ Award as recognition for outstanding service to the City for the Centre City East study AIA San Diego Presidential Citation for creating a unique vision and insight for the San Diego region Inducted into the College of Fellows of the American Institute of Architects Yerba Buena Gardens Children’s Center, Moscone Convention Center, San Francisco. , California, USA Franklin/La Brea Housing, Los Angeles, California, USA Dairi Nishi Apartments, Kitakyushu, Japan Kadota Housing, Kitakyushu, Japan

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

1987 1988 1988 1989 1990 1990 1991 1993

1994

1995 1996 1998 1995 1996 1998

1998 Adele Naude Santos narrative maps: concepts and creations

Selected Projects and Awards House Naudé, Cape Town, Western Cape 1967 (Bronze Medal of the Cape Institute of South African Architects, 1967) Wheelwright Traveling Fellowship, Harvard University, 1968 Scott Road Apartments, Cape Town, Western Cape 1971 Iona Street Apartments, Cape Town, Western Cape 1971 House Stekhoven, Newlands, Cape Town, Western Cape 1972 House Shear, Simon’s Town, Western Cape 1972 Rowan Lane Houses, Kenilworth, Cape Town, Western Cape 1973 Rice University Research Grant to study the tribal villages 1975 of the Tswana in Botswana Staff houses, National High School, Swaziland 1976 Complex for the National Baptist Church of Southern Africa, 1976 Mbabane, Swaziland Master plan for the University of Botswana, 1978 Lesotho and Swaziland campus, Gaborone, Botswana Teleimage of Dallas offices and studio, Houston, Texas, USA 1980 “The Invisible City #1” won a certificate of award from 1980 the Southern Educational Communications Association (SECA) Grant from the Texas Committee for the Humanities to do five programs for PBS Channel 8, Houston. Grant from the Texas Committee for the Humanities to do a one hour film summarizing the five part series. Beach Street Lofts, Boston, Massachusetts. USA 1981 Levine and Bosco Residence, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA 1982 Naudain Street Loft, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA 1984 National Endowment for the Arts Grant 1984-1985 to study Open Space Choice for Blighted Inner City Neighborhoods: A Philadelphia Case Study Hillside Housing Competition for Cincinnati, Honorable Mention 1985 International Competition for City Visions, Honorable Mention 1986 International Competition for the design of the Pacific Center for the Media Arts for Hawaii Loa College, first place award

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HOUSE STEKHOVEN Newlands, Cape Town, Western Cape | 1972 with A.P. de Souza Santos

Sited on a small peninsula shaped plot between two neighbouring houses, House Stekhoven had to accommodate a large family, optimise climatic orientation and exploit northwest vista towards Table Mountain, a small stream and large existing oak trees. Locational constraints dictated a linear design on two levels. Anonymous white walled façades towards the street and adjacent houses secure privacy and articulate the unspoiled morphology. The private frontage is dramatically contrasted with that of the public approach by opening the interior to the garden and a mountainous view. These glazed north-western elevations are protected by a continuous undulating loggia. Apart from the sheltered verandas provided by the loggia it moreover mediates inside and outside. The raw concrete loggia not only expresses the relationship with the mountain profile as it extends interior spaces to the landscape but also communicates internal spaces to the outside. In one instance, as the loggia drifts past the vertical circulation shaft, it curves inwards. This concave reaction articulates the separation of the main bedroom from those of the children and designates a common upstairs living area. Concerned with the mountain, the stream and privacy, the compactly planned bedrooms, on the upper storey, stagger in relationship to each other. The resulting corner window affords both views and creates the feeling of being alone in an individual domain. A small niche next to the chimney, protruding on the exterior blank public façade, forms a warm seat for the children looking which out to the river. The second level loggia provides direct access to the garden through a spiral staircase. As an example of late 20th Century South African Modernism, House Stekhoven’s formal expression is based on a deep concern of the Cape climate and natural context.

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25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


ROWAN LANE HOUSING Kenilworth, Cape Town, Western Cape | 1973 with A.P. de Souza Santos

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

1998 Adele Naude Santos narrative maps: concepts and creations

An extensive estate with a mature garden was replanned in order to incorporate a dense group of five single-family houses. The development was not to intrude upon the privacy of the original residence towards the south of the site. The site, located in an exclusive residential area, sloped northwards and opened to mountain vistas north and west. Placing a new access road east-west across the site adjacent to a row of old oak trees, allowed separation between the existing and five new wedge shaped plots. The plot shapes formed a narrow public frontage to the road while allowing wide frontages on the garden and the northern view. The architects conceptually regarded the five houses as an extension of the landscape. All established trees were retained while the houses, each responding to particularities of topography and vegetation, were designed with planted roofs. From the private restricted scale on the public frontage, the linear arranged houses utilised the natural fall of the site by stepping the volumes down in relation to the slope. Moving down from the road through the houses the garden and the mountains come into sight. Once in the lower garden the upper level can again be reached through stepped ramps, turning away from the view, each leading to a private solarium. Set ordering principles, functional layouts, orientation and a restricted pallet of building materials govern all five houses and informs a common theme. The nature of each plot, a concern for privacy, care for individual places and connection to the landscape ensured variation within the theme and conferred a distinct internal and external character on each house. Living areas and entry sequences were specifically designed to emphasise difference. Internal spaces were designed with comfort in mind and well-articulated by the use of light and vistas. This series of houses is fixated on the relationship between building and natural setting and the interplay of spaces which influenced an otherwise modernist outlook.

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1999 JACK DIAMOND PRACTICING SCALES

Born 8 November 1932 Education 1962: Masters in Architecture, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA; 1958: Master of Arts degree in politics, philosophy and economics, University of Oxford, UK; 1956: Bachelor of Architecture, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, Western Cape Projects featured Jerusalem City Hall, Jerusalem, Israel (1990); Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts, Toronto (2006-), presented at the Sophia Gray lecture.

“I

t is the architectural counterpart of turning swords into ploughshares, and spears into pruning hooks.” J. Diamond.

After graduating with a Masters in Architecture from the University of Pennsylvania, where he accepted a lecturing position, Jack Diamond was employed by Louis I Kahn. In 1964 Diamond founded the Master of Architecture programme at the University of Toronto. He lectured at Harvard, Princeton and the University of California, Berkeley and held appointments at York University in Toronto and Texas. Honorary doctorates include Engineering from Daltech and in Law from the University of Toronto. He is a recipient of the University of Cape Town ViceChancellor’s medal. His lecture tours have included Australia, the United Kingdom, Italy, the Czech Republic, New Zealand and South Africa. Practicing architecture since 1968, Jack Diamond has become renowned for his sensitive interpretation of site and context across a wide range of building types, from civic and residential to performing arts and academic projects. His interest in urban reform and the complex, interdependent relationship between architecture and the city has influenced his architecture, publications and his engagement with diverse public agencies. The firm Diamond Schmitt Architects, of which Diamond is a founding member, explores architecture in the service of a larger urban order and has been the recipient of numerous national and international awards for design and sustainability. Currently the firm, which has been named one of the 50 Best Managed Companies in Canada, has projects in six countries worldwide.

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25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

1999 Jack Diamond practicing scales

Selected Projects and Awards York Square, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 1969 Ontario Medical Association Building, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 1970 Roy Foss Motors Building, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Dofasco/Ibis Steel Manufacturers’ Housing, 1971 Hamilton, Ontario, Canada Housing/Union Building, University of Alberta, 1972 Edmonton, Canada Union Facilities, University of Maryland, Baltimore, USA Rideau Street Mall, Ottawa, Ontario 1974 Innis College, University of Toronto, Canada 1975 Student Housing, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada 1976 Citadel Theatre, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Dundas-Sherbourne Housing, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Gerhard Street Public Library, Toronto, 1977 Ontario Beverley Place: Hydro Low-Rise, High Density Housing Block, Toronto, Ontario, Canada St. Michael’s Lands Multiple Housing, Forest Hill, 1978 Toronto, Ontario, Canada Alcan Smelters & Chemicals Ltd., Montreal, Quebec, Canada 1979 Woodstock Library and Art Gallery, Woodstock, Ontario, Canada 1980 Fellow, Royal Architecture Institute of Canada 1980 Betty Oliphant Theatre, National Ballet School of Canada, 1982 Toronto, Ontario, Canada Village Gate Departments, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 1983 Burnshalle Offices’ Training Facility, North York, Ontario, Canada Royal Opera House Competition, Covent Garden, London, UK 1984 Japan Restaurant Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Four Seasons hotel Head Offices, Donmills, Ontario, Canada YMCA of Metropolitan Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Arcadia Housing Cooperative, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 1985 Hotel Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv, Israel 1986 Jessie’s Centre for Teenagers, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Student Social Centre, McMaster University, 1987 Hamilton, Ontario, Canada Simplicity House, Mustique, Israel 1988 Toronto Arts Award for Architecture 1989 Jerusalem City Hall, Jerusalem, Israel 1990 Richmond Hill Public Library, Richmond Hill, Ontario, Canada 1994 York University Student Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Earth Science Centre, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada Honorary Fellow, American Institute of Architects 1994 Doctor of Engineering (Honoris Causa), Daltech 1995 Officer of the Order of Canada 1996 Awarded Fellow, Toronto Society of Architects 1998 Order of Ontario 1998 Regent Park Community Health Centre, 1999 Toronto, Ontario, Canada Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts, Toronto, 2006 Ontario (Presented at Sophia Gray 1999)

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JERUSALEM CITY HALL Jerusalem, Israel | 1990

The 3.4 hectare site of the Jerusalem City Hall contained relics dated since Herodian times. The municipal complex is sited near the 1949 demarcation lines between West Israeli and East Jordanian Jerusalem and stresses accessibility from all directions of the municipal city. The design was founded on the notion of unity, which the architects gave expression in the form of a main plaza, Safra Square, which had to consolidate existing and added buildings, form a civic meeting place and create a common ground for the different functions housed in the complex. More importantly, the square was conceptualised as a bridge crossing the historical no-man’s land which signifies conflict and division; formed where the walled Old City encounters the new western Jerusalem. This development constituted a civic campus, rather than a city hall, united around a central plaza. The mixed programme included a multistorey municipal building, consolidating municipal offices previously distributed over 30 sites throughout the city, a new office block, commercial shops and cafes. Opening to both East and West Jerusalem through Safta Square, the campus connects the halves of the divided Jerusalem and hopes to construct a common municipal centre for all of the city. Safra Square opens into gardens, courts, minor plazas and a city park. Designed on an east-west axis, the plaza is contained to the east by a stage pavilion, which frames the Mount of Olives. The south-western end of the plaza flows into a palmed court, a city park, another smaller plaza under vine leaf trellises, cafes, and shops, accentuated in an aqueduct with running water. The new fits respectfully within the 4000 year old context. The stereotomic character of the Jerusalem vernacular is respectfully addressed, without sacrificing programmatic functionality. Giant colonnades and analogous proportioned smoked glass infill panels, unlock the solidity of traditional stone buildings. Alternating stone bands on the colonnaded façades are combined with screens and structural steel which address the old and the new.

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25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


FOUR SEASONS CENTRE FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS Toronto, Canada | 1999, 2006 -

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

1999 Jack Diamond practicing scales

Located on the southeast corner of University Avenue and Queen Street West in Downtown Toronto, the design of the Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts faced contextual challenges. University Avenue, a major north-south road, is laid out as a boulevard. The boulevard is flanked by numerous important institutions and several memorials, statues, gardens, and fountains, giving it a ceremonial character. The late Palladian style Osgoode Hall, housing law courts and associated institutions, faces the opera house to the north. The specific portion of Queen Street West, a major east-west thoroughfare, is known as a centre for broadcasting, music, fashion, performance, and the visual arts. Occupying an entire block, the Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts had to express the vibrant character in this district. The dramatic entrance to the opera is via the five storey glassed wall City Room which extends the length of the structure on University Ave. Seeking to create a sense of transparency and openness, this entrance hall forms a link between the city and the opera. The opera house is designed to make accessible an art form that has long been considered elitist. In addition to serving as the lobby of the opera house, the city room can serve as an informal recital and reception hall. In the same manner a substantial window on Queen Street West exposes the activities of the rehearsal studio to onlookers creating a democratic, open and engaging space within the city and with Osgoode Hall, north. The low volumetric topology of Osgoode House relative to the surrounding high rise buildings informed the design of the opera house. The Four Seasons Centre is a building in harmony with its context and innovative in design. It has excelled in providing audiences an acoustic and theatrical experience among the very best in the world.

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2000 STANLEY SAITOWITZ EXPANDED ARCHITECTURE

Born 16 May 1949 Education 1977: Masters in Architecture, University of California, Berkeley, USA; 1975: Bachelor of Architecture, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, Gauteng Projects featured The Catherine House, Fook Manor, Schoemansville, Gauteng, South Africa (1976); Transvaal House (Brebnor House) Halfway House, Gauteng (1977)

S

tanley Saitowitz is a Professor of Architecture at the University of California and has taught at a number of schools including Harvard University, University of Oklahoma, Southern California Institute of Architecture, UCLA, the University of Texas, and the University of the Witwatersrand. His book, ‘Stanley Saitowitz – Architecture at Rice 33’ published by Rice University, Houston, and Princeton Architectural Press, New York, received an AIA International Architecture Book Award for Monographs in 1998. Apart from his Academic career Saitowitz has practiced Architecture since 1975. Awards obtained by his firm include: the American Institute of Architects Award in 1998 with the Henry Bacon Medal for Memorial Architecture as well as the Boston Society of Architects in 1997 with the Harleston Parker Award. His Transvaal House at Schoemansville in 1976 was declared a National Monument by the National Monuments Council of South Africa in 1997.

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25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


Fifth Street Corridor, Columbus, Indiana, USA Capp Street Project, San Francisco, California, USA Ann Hatch Residence, San Francisco, California, USA Thousand Oaks Elementary School, Berkeley, California, USA Menorah, Jewish Museum, San Francisco, California, USA Potrero Lofts, San Francisco, California, USA Potrero Lofts 2, San Francisco California, USA Quady Winery Phase 2, Madera, California, USA Department of Parking and Traffic Offices, San Francisco, California, USA Fabrications, Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, Ohio, USA Lafayette Lofts, San Francisco, California, USA Business for Social Responsibility Offices, San Francisco, California, USA Pete’s Coffee Structure, Stanford University, California, USA Third Street Lofts, San Francisco, California, USA Sorokko Residence, Mill Valley, California, USA Jenjoy Gallery, San Francisco, California, USA Oxbow School, Napa, California, USA Harbor Village Restaurant, International Terminal, San Francisco, California, USA Sorokko Gallery and Loft, Green Street, New York, NY, USA Up A Tree Treehouse, Stryborg Arboritum, San Francisco, California, USA Second Street Lobby, San Francisco, California, USA Congregation Beth El Synagogue Campus, La Jolla, California, USA Goldberg Residence, San Francisco, California, USA 1146 Mission Street Housing, San Francisco, California, USA BSR Offices, San Francisco, California, USA Sundelson Residence, Berkeley, California, USA Lieff Apartment, San Francisco, California, USA

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

1993 1994 1995 1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2000 Stanley Saitowitz expanded architecture

Selected Projects House at Schoemansville, Transvaal (now Gauteng), South Africa 1976 House Remodeling, Palo Alto, California, USA 1977 House at Halfway House, Transvaal (now Gauteng), South Africa Speculative House, Fourways, 1981 Transvaal (now Gauteng), South Africa Whistle Clothing Store, La Jolla, California, USA Monte Vista News, Speculative Offices, 1982 Cupertino, California, USA Cal West Medical Offices, Fresno, California, USA The Auditorium, Wurster Hall, U.C. Berkeley, California, USA Creative Croissants Store - San Diego, California, USA 1983 Quady Winery, Madera, California, USA Reading Room, Haviland Hall, U.C. Berkeley, California, USA ‘Succah’ Jewish Community Museum, San Francisco, USA 1984 Peninsula Sinai Synagogue Interior, Foster City, California, USA 1985 Universe City, University Art Museum, Berkeley, California, USA Speculative House: Tiburon Shores Lot 8, California, USA 1986 J. Higby Restaurant, San Francisco, California, USA California Museum of Photography, Riverside, California, USA McDonald House, Stinson Beach, California, USA 1987 Di Napoli House, Los Gatos, California, USA Saitowitz House Remodel, London, UK Whitman Victorian Remodel, Pacific Heights, California, USA 1988 Byron Meyer House, Napa, California, USA 1989 Mill Race Park, Columbus, Indiana, USA, 9 Structures 1990 Denenberg Gallery, San Francisco, California, USA S.F. Embarcadero Promenade, California, USA 1991 Holocaust Memorial, Boston, Massachusetts, USA Nellie Sororro Gallery, San Francisco, California, USA Goldberg Remodel, Berkeley, California, USA 1992 Richard Barnes House and Studio, Bernal Heights, San Francisco, California, USA Columbus Bus Shelters, Columbus, Indiana, USA

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THE CATHERINE HOUSE

Fook Manor, Schoemansville, Transvaal (Gauteng), South Africa | 1976

(Sketch paintings for the Catherine house formed part of Stanley’s dissertation in 1974.) The interior of this bright and tall shed is one single and large volume cluttered by a number of platforms interconnected by flights of stairs and ladders. The only separate part of the house is the kitchen wearing a quite redundant roof inside the house and protrudes outside to contain some of the fittings and mark the main entrance. There is a mobile dining chariot which traffics between the kitchen and wherever the Catherines wish to eat within the large north facing downstairs or in the garden. Stanley called it a dining car. Large areas of small paned windows and walls of two kinds of bricks encloses the shed. The brickwork create illusions of recessions in the facades. The double storey northern glass wall slides open. There is an interior fish pond around which a fragment of a tropical jungle grows. The interior of the house is partly flooded with daylight through huge translucent roof areas and glazed gable ends. The house of Fook Manor remembers many things: old factories, Goff’s houses, cheap churches, dolls’ houses and most of Chareau’s “Maison de Verre”; not so much because of any actual derivation or inspiration, but because of its childlike intensity and its joyous madness.

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25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


THE BREBNOR HOUSE

(Transvaal House), Halfway House (now Gauteng), South Africa | 1977

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

2000 Stanley Saitowitz expanded architecture

Quite unlike the Ndebele house from which Saitowitz drew so much of his inspiration, it is almost an antithesis of the Ndebele pattern. Metallic, almost industrial, its substrate of brickwork is left raw and its steel is exposed. Devised by intellect and constructed with considerable Western ingenuity, ambitious in its fight against gravity, the house allies itself to an outcrop of gigantic boulders whose rounded solidity it almost mocks by its paper-like openness and spiny assembly. The roof of the house reminds of distant hills and clouds that heave past and behind one another. This is elegantly captured in an economical structural system which re-tropes the standard bow truss, first into a double “bow-tie” truss, and then back again into two separate ones “going” in contrary directions and belonging to different roof planes. The metal of the roofs is cut so that the remainder profile of one panel is the beginning of another. A channel on the porch around the house tracks the drip line of the eaves above in order to catch rain water. Indoors, floor levels follow and evoke terraced contours. Views from the living area are captured seemingly through omissions in the skeletal wall structure. In an extraordinary reversal of the normal layout of bathrooms, the fixtures array radially off a central exposed plumbing stack. In all a brilliant piece of design whose elements and themes echo in Saitowitz’s work to this day. There is very little done here in the way the Ndebele would do it. Saitowitz was after something else: a certain self-possession that imitates that of indigenous population, a feeling of the right to be on that landscape and to address it directly.

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2001 HENTIE LOUW

ARCHITECTURE AND CRAFT: A WORKING RELATIONSHIP?

Born 10 February 1947 Education 1976: Doctor in Philosophy, Oxford University, UK; 1974: Masters in Philosophy, Newcastle University, UK; 1971: Bachelor of Architecture, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, Gauteng

H

endrik (Hentie) Louw grew up on a farm in the northwest Cape Province, on the borders of the Bushmanland, Namaqualand and the Hantam. He qualified as an architect at Pretoria University, before leaving for Europe in 1972 to study, travel and practise. He worked in architectural offices in South Africa, Germany and England, mainly on hospital design and housing (including for Carl Jooste and Steyn & Rousseau, Pretoria; Ralph Erskine, The Byker Redevelopment Project, Newcastle upon Tyne), but decided to pursue an academic career instead. He studied architectural history under Bruce Allsopp at Newcastle University (1972-4) and Sir Howard Colvin at Oxford University (1974-6) before settling with his family in Newcastle upon Tyne, England, where he taught design, theory and history at the School of Architecture, Planning & Landscape, Newcastle University. His academic career is divided between architectural education and historical research and publication. Architectural education soon became a vocation to him. In the Department he played an active role over four decades across the whole spectrum, teaching at all levels of the curriculum and in a range of subject areas, from the design studio to academic lecture courses, as well as participating in degree course management and research supervision at postgraduate and undergraduate level. A sponsored public exhibition and national symposium: ‘The post – World War II Achievement : Architecture & Public Art in Britain since 1945’, held in Newcastle in 1994, resulted from a research project conducted with a team of architectural students. He studied the subject’s pedagogy and promoted architectural education in the national and international arena through the Council for National Academic Awards (CNNA) and the RIBA in Britain, and the

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European Association for Architectural Education (EAAE) abroad. He was a regular participant as chairman, speaker and exhibitor at conferences and workshops on the subject in the UK as well as on the Continent. He organised the EAAE Forum VIII: ‘Architectural Education in Europe and the Third World’, held in Newcastle in 1983 and served for 12 years, 1984 – 96, on the administrative board of the EAAE, respectively as Secretary, Editor, Vice-President and, eventually, President (1993-5). As an academic historian, specialising in architectural and construction history, he engaged regularly with various academic bodies in Britain and abroad as a speaker, participant, committee member, organiser of events and contributor to academic journals. He served as a member of the executive committee of the Society of Architectural Historians of Great Britain (1984-7) . For the SAHGB he organised two of their annual symposia: In 1987: ‘The Relevance of Architectural History’, and in 2001: ‘The Place of Technology in Architectural History.’ The latter was a joint event with the CHS. Hentie Louw’s research interests span the fields of architectural history, construction history, history of technology and material culture of the post-medieval era in Western Europe and its former colonies. He specialises in historic window design and related industries: woodwork, metal work and glass making; publishing mainly in academic journals. Since retirement he has been concentrating his efforts on completing the two books that will bring all these various interests together: one on the origin, development and global distribution of the sash window; the other, comparing fenestration practices across Western Europe during the Renaissance and Baroque periods.

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


Books and Chapters in Books: 1993 Farmer, B. And Louw, H (eds.) C ompanion to Contemporary Architectural Thought, London and N.Y: Routledge, 673 pp. A major encyclopaedia containing 100 commissioned essays on various aspects of architecture. 1993 ‘The sash window as a Harbinger of an Age of P rogress and Enlightenment’, Chapter 52, p p.300-308 in Farmer and Louw, Companion to Contemporary Architectural Thought Diverse Papers & Reports: 1982 Aspects, 20: ‘Art and Architecture.’ A report on joint, Art and Architecture student projects r un with a colleague during the academic year1981/2. 2pp. 1983 Architectural Education, 2, pp.63-70: ‘ Europe and the Third World: Parallels and Contrasts.’ A report on the VIIIth EAAE Forum held at Newcastle upon Tyne. 1983 Open House International, 8 no.2, pp.4-6: ‘ Architectural Education in Europe and the Third World.’ 1984 Proceedings of the VIIIth EAAE Forum, Newcastle upon Tyne, March 1983, 190pp (Editor). 1986 EAAE 10th Anniversary Publication: T he Making of an Architect – Where do we go from here? pp. 91-6: ‘Practice and Theory in Architecture and its Educational Systems.’ 1991 Architecture SA: May 1991, pp.32-3: ‘ Contrasting Styles, Common Goals: Architectural Education at the Cross Roads.’ 1992 The Work of the RIBA Visiting Boards over the period 1984-91. Commissioned report done for the R oyal Institute of British Architects. 1995 Proceedings ICOMOS UK Bath Conference, pp.3-9: ‘Historic disputes English Carpenters and Joiners.’ 1995 Proceedings Istanbul Technical University Education Conference, April 1995, pp.17-28: ‘Architectural Education in a Changing World.’ 1996 Joint editor of Issue 1 of Stoa, a refereed journal on architectural education launched by the E uropean Association for Architectural Education. 1997 The National Systems of Higher Education in Europe: Report by the EAAE supported by EC Conv. DGXXII, pp. 287- 314: ‘Architectural Education in Britain.’ 1998 EAAE Transactions on Architectural Education No, 2: Architecture and Teaching/ Epistemological Foundations, pp. 91-100: ‘Shadowed Substance: An Epistemological Doodle B oard for Students, Teachers and Practitioners of Architecture.’ 1998 Proceedings ARCC/EAAE Conference, R aleigh, N.C., April 1998, pp. 191-8: A Window on Reality: S ome reflections on the place of history in architectural research, practice and teaching.’ 1984- Regular reviews and comment on educational issues as editor of the EAAE Newsheet 1984-1992. Occasional book reviews and letters to newspapers magazines and academic journals.

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

2001 Hentie Louw architecture and craft: a working relationship?

Publications Refereed Papers: 1981 Architectural History, 24, pp 1-23: ‘Anglo-Netherlandish architectural interchange c.1600 – c.1660.’ 1983 Architectural History, 26, pp.49-72: ‘The Origin of the Sash-window.’ 1984 Architectural History, 27, pp.503-9: ‘A Description of some Royal and other Great Houses in England: Extracts from the Journal of Abram Booth, a Dutch Envoy to England, 1629- 30.’ 1987 Architectural History, 30, pp. 45-50: ‘New Light of Ramsbury.’ 1987 Construction History, 3, pp.31-54: ‘ The Rise of the Metal Window during the early industrial period in Britain, c.1750 – c.1830.’ 1989 Archaeologia Aeliana, 5th Series, XVII, pp.93-115: ‘ Of “Ancient Rights & Privileges”: Demarcation disputes between the Companies of Joiners and Housecarpenters, Millwrights and Trunkmakers of Newcastle upon Tyne, c.1580 – c.1740.’ 1989 Construction History, 5, pp.3-30: ‘Demarcation Disputes between the English carpenters and Joiners from the Sixteenth to the Eighteenth Centuries.’ 1990 Architect’s Journal, 4 July, pp.44-53: ‘Colour Combinations: External paint colours on historic buildings in England, c.1580 – c.1840.’ 1991 Construction History, 7, pp.47-68: ‘Window glass making in Britain, c.1660 – c.1860 and its architectural impact.’ 1992 Construction History, 8, pp. 21- 54: ‘The Mechanisation of Architectural Woodwork in Britain from the late-Eighteenth to the early- T wentieth Century, and its Practical, Social and Aesthetical Implications. Part I: The Period c.1790 – c.1860.’ 1993 Construction History, 9, pp. 27-50: ‘ The Mechanisation of Architectural Woodwork in Britain from the late-Eighteenth to the e arly-Twentieth Century, and its Practical, Social and Aesthetic Implications. Part II: Industrial Progressc.1860 – c.1915.’ 1995 Construction History,11, pp. 51-72: ‘ The Mechanisation of Architectural Woodwork in Britain from the late-Eighteenth to the early-Twentieth Century, and its Practical, S ocial and Aesthetic Implications. Part III: The Retreat of the Handicrafts.’ 1996 Construction History, 12, pp.19-41: T he Mechanisation of Architectural Woodwork in Britain from the late-Eighteenth to the e arly-Twentieth Century, and its Practical, Social a nd Aesthetic Implications. Part IV: The End of an Era.’ 1996 Macmillan Dictionary of Art: Entry for, ‘Gable, Decorative.’ 1998 Architectural History, 41, pp.82-130: ‘A Constructional History of the sash window, c.1670 – c.1725.’ Part I: Industrial Organisation.’ (with Robert Crayford). 1999 Architectural History, 42, pp.173- 239: A Constructional History of the sash window, c.1660 – c.1725’ Part II: ‘Fabric & Technique.’ (with Robert Crayford).

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2002 LOUIS KAROL

50 YEARS IN THE CITY

Born 10 July1928 Education 1952: Bachelor of Architecture, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, Western Cape Projects featured V & A Victoria Wharf, Cape Town, Western Cape (1992); Cape Sun Hotel, Cape Town, Western Cape (1984)

“F

ew architects in Cape Town command as much respect, and amongst some of his competitors, unease, as Louis Karol. Along with his commercial acumen and force of personality, he has had the wisdom to cultivate a stable of formidable designers, who are supported by an extremely efficient office. His projects are usually large, commercially successful and visually strong: sometimes stunning.”- Rory Birkby, 1998

He arrived in South Africa as an 8-year-old immigrant in 1936. He established his practice immediately upon graduating with distinction from the University of Cape Town in 1952. Louis joined the Institute of South African Architects in the same year and has gone on to become a defining figure in the South African architectural profession. Louis Karol is the founder of Architecture SA and has served as chairman of its editorial board. His practice has been the recipient of no less than seven Institute awards, as well as the international FIABC Prix d’ Excellence of Victoria Wharf at the V&A Waterfront, built on the same spot where he first arrived in South Africa. He has worked with a passion for quality, and for delivering longterm commercial sustainability and architectural craftsmanship within a genre typified by disposability. Louis is equally passionate about the architectural education and development of his staff, with an in-house training and bursary programme for underprivileged students that has been in existence since 1981. Although his firm’s commissions have spanned several cities and countries, its most substantial body of work has been in Cape Town, where Louis Karol buildings have helped to shape the developing city ‘s skyline and streets. Louis’ practice has been fiercely committed to the Cape Town city centre, where there remains barely a block that has not been touched by the practice in some way. Louis Karol’s oeuvre such as the Golden Acre (1976) and Victoria Wharf (1992 ongoing) have sought to re-integrate a city torn apart by apartheid and transport planning. Louis Karol’s practice has been a consistent force for Cape Town’s inner city reinvestment and urban regeneration. Cape Town’s resurgent city centre and V & A Waterfront are what they are today, due in no small measure to Karol’s benevolent influence.

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The Good Hope Clinic Cape Town, Western Cape 1994 Ahadha’am, Israel 1994 Wynberg Medical Centre, Cape Town, Western Cape 1995 Parade Concourse Refurbishment Cape Town, Western Cape 1995 Liberty Life (22 Long Street), Cape Town, Western Cape The Perm (Several Branches in Gauteng) Johannesburg, Gauteng Holiday Inn Garden Court, Sandton City Johannesburg, Gauteng Cape Grace Hotel, Cape Town, Western Cape 1996 (Conde Naste Reader’s Choice Award for Best Hotel in the World 2000) Victoria Wharf Extension, Cape Town, Western Cape 1996 Everard Read Gallery (Interiors), Cape Town, Western Cape Anglovaal Johannesburg, Gauteng BP Centre, Durban (Citation from the City of Durban 1997) Table Bay Hotel (Architects of Record), Cape Town, Western Cape 1997 Hyde Park2, Johannesburg, Gauteng Ra’anana Synagogue Ra’anana, Israel Holiday Inn Garden Court, Waterfront Cape Town, Western Cape 1998 Kirstenbosch Restaurant (Interiors), Cape Town, Western Cape 1999 Uct Upper Campus Project, Cape Town, Western Cape 2000 Metrorail Control Centre, Cape Town, Western Cape Bar Ilan Psychology, Israel Airport Sun Inter-Continental, Johannesburg, Gauteng Sandton Convention Centre, Johannesburg, Gauteng (Gauteng Institute of Architects Award of Merit 2001) (Fulton Commendation) Sparrebosch Golf Clubhouse, Knysna Heads, Western Cape Arabella Country Estate (Interiors), Cape Town, Western Cape 2001 Birmingham Airport, Birmingham, Uk (Outsourced) Boe Clocktower Precinct, Cape Town, Western Cape Clocktower Retail, Cape Town, Western Cape Sandown Mews (Phases 1& 2), Johannesburg, Gauteng Essex College, Essex,Uk (Outsourced) Queen Elizabeth Square, Glascow, Scotland (Outsourced) Dubai Apartment Tower, Johannesburg, Gauteng Pinewood Park Pinelands, Cape Town, Western Cape 2002 Nedcor Nedbank Foreshore, Cape Town, Western Cape Megawati Park, Eskom, Johannesburg, Gauteng 2003

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

2002 Louis Karol 50 years in the city

Selected Projects and Awards Wynberg Synagogue Extension, Cape Town, Western Cape 1952 Shops and Flats Fish Hoek, Cape Town, Western Cape 1952 Herzel Hall- Muizenberg, Cape Town, Western Cape 1958 Albion Mill, Cape Town, Western Cape 1959 St. Martini Gardens, Cape Town, Western Cape 1960 Mobil House I No. 2 Long Street, Cape Town, Western Cape 1968 Nedbank Foreshore, Cape Town, Western Cape 1973 Gardens Shopping Centre, Cape Town, Western Cape 1974 Rondebosch Shopping Centre, Cape Town, Western Cape 1975 Caltex, Cape Town, Western Cape 1976 Shell House, Cape Town, Western Cape 1977 Golden Acre, Cape Town, Western Cape 1978 Consolidated Diamond Mines Windhoek, Namibia, 1979 Gardens Commercial High School, Cape Town, Western Cape 1980 (SA Institute of Architects Award of Merit 1979) D.F.Malan Airport Control Tower, Cape Town, Western Cape 1982 City Park Hospital, Cape Town, Western Cape 1983 Cape Sun Hotel, Cape Town, Western Cape 1984 11 Diagonal Street, Johannesburg, Gauteng Arthur’s Road Synagogue Mikveh, Cape Town, Western Cape 1985 Lta Headquarters Johannesburg, Gauteng Mobil Court (Now Engen Court), Cape Town, Western Cape 1986 Goldfields Of South Africa, Johannesburg, Gauteng 1987 (SA Institute of Architects Award of Merit 1988) Herzlia Middle School, Cape Town, Western Cape 1988 Reeva Forman Headquarters, Johannesburg, Gauteng Kenilworth Centre, Cape Town, Western Cape 1989 Southern Life Refurbishment, Cape Town, Western Cape (SAPOA Building Merit Award 1992) Rosedon House, Cape Town, Western Cape 1990 Victoria Wharf Shopping Centre, Cape Town, Western Cape 1992 (FIABCI International Prix d’Excellence 1994) Brumalake, Johannesburg, Gauteng Ashkelon Shopping Centre, Israel Safmarine House, Cape Town, Western Cape 1993 (SA Institute of Architects Award of Merit 1995) (Fulton Commendation 1994) Hutton Court, Johannesburg, Gauteng Herschel Sports Centre, Cape Town, Western Cape 1994

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V&A WATERFRONT

Cape Town, Western Cape | 1992

The development of the waterfront has proved to be one of the most influential projects on the Cape Town urban pattern in recent years. This development transformed the city’s edges and created an area that competes with the best water front spaces globally. Although the building has strong Post-Modern references to Victorian architecture, it works well in this commercial application. The use of open steel structures and large glazed facades create an open warehouse. This 20th Century reinterpretation of a harbour storage facility links the design back to its site. The references are direct, but suited to the program of these types of buildings. The centre has a light open quality and harks back to the height of Victorian architecture. This project among others have contributed to the improvement of reintegration and upgrading of the Cape Town urban fabric.

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25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


CAPE SUN HOTEL

Louis Karol proves his skill and flair for the commercial projects that make up the bulk of his considerable oeuvre. Completed in 1984 the Cape Sun hotel became a landmark in the Cape Town skyline, with an understated Post-Modern quality, that establishes a sense of a heavy permanence through the sculptural handling of the facades. A typical commercial high rise hotel, the building draws together all the traditional elements required of these structures; restaurants, conference facilities and accommodation in a clever plan arrangement. The angled geometry breaks away from the existing urban grid and the various complex elements of the program are brought to a complete solution. The hotel forms part of the firm’s continuing investment in the urban structure of the Cape Town CBD. It does not retreat from the street to form an island, rather the proud entrance welcomes visitors and with the use of one of the first glass walled observation elevators in Cape Town, ads to the sense of elegance and presence a visitor to the city requires. The elevator shaft serves as a defining line for the main form that flows from it. The main mass of the building forms a frame for the glazed accommodation floors. The various elements are arranged as parts of a whole, forming a complete image greater than the sum of the parts.

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

2002 Louis Karol 50 years in the city

Cape Town, Western Cape | 1984

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2003 PETER BUCHANAN

ARCHITECTURE OF THE EMERGENT EPOCH Born 16 October 1942 Education 1968: Bachelor of Architecture, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, Western Cape

A

fter graduating, Peter Buchanan worked with two leading Cape Town architects: Gabriel Fagan (1969-70); and Revel Fox and Partners (1970-71). In 1972 he moved to London and worked until 1976 for Halpern + Partners on commercial and planning projects. From 1976 until 1979 he worked for Sidell Gibson Partnership master-planning the extension of the city of Arak in Iran. In 1979 he joined The Architectural Press as an editor and writer on the Architect’s Journal and The Architectural Review, becoming Deputy Editor of the latter in 1982. Since 1992 he has freelanced as a writer, exhibition curator and consultant in environmental design and planning. He curated two exhibitions for The Architectural League of New York: Renzo Piano Building Workshop: Selected Projects in 1992 (for which he also wrote the catalogue) and Ten Shades of Green in 2000, both of which travelled extensively over several years. In 2000-01 he was a consultant to the Greater London Authority’s Planning Decisions Unit and its Spatial Development Strategy. When an editor, he wrote copiously for The Architectural Review and Architect’s Journal, including entire special issues of the AR on the Netherlands, Spain and Northern Switzerland (and later the Kansai International Airport) and edited a commemorative issue on Le Corbusier. Many of his articles in AR and AJ were republished in

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other languages and he has written for journals in the Netherlands, Spain, France, Germany, Poland, Italy, USA, Canada, Japan and South Africa. He has been an editorial advisor to many journals and was on editorial boards of Architecture + Urbanism (Japan), Daidolos (Germany) and Harvard Design Magazine (USA). Besides writing the catalogues to the exhibitions for which he was curator, he has contributed essays to other catalogues, including on Aldo and Hannie van Eyck and Thomas Herzog, and to several monographs on contemporary architects. His books include the five volumes (each in six language editions) of Renzo Piano Building Workshop: Complete Works (Phaidon Press) and Ten Shades of Green (W W Norton). He has featured on BBC radio programmes on James Stirling, Iannis Xenakis and Le Corbusier and television appearances have included programmes on Santiago Calatrava (BBC) and Kansai International Airport (Discovery Channel). He has been studio tutor, visiting critic and lecturer at various universities, master classes and summer schools and given public lectures in many countries, including the UK, Spain, the Netherlands, Denmark, Norway, Finland, France, Switzerland, Croatia, Poland, Portugal, Japan, USA, Canada, Brazil, Argentina, Peru, Mexico, Curacao, South Africa and Uzbekistan.

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


Essays include 1983 ‘Oh rats: Rationalism and Modernism’, Architectural Review, April ‘With due respect: Regionalism’, Architectural Review, May 1984 ‘Only connect: Regionalism’, Architectural Review, Oct ‘City as natural habitat versus city as cultural artefact’, Architectural Review, Dec 1985 ‘The Netherlands: observations on a man-made land’, Architectural Review, Jan ‘Community’, Architectural Review, April ‘Housing: a possible public realm’, Architectural Review, Oct ‘Community’, Architectural Review, April ‘Housing: a possible public realm’, Architectural Review, Oct 1986 ‘Spain: the Poetics of Modernism’, Architectural Review, May 1987 ‘Corb: master of a misunderstood Modernism’, Architectural, Review, Jan ‘La Tourette and Le Thoronet’, Architectural Review, Jan ‘Auch: organs of the body politic’, Architectural Review, July 1988 ‘What city? A plea for place in the public realm’, Architectural Review, Nov 1989 ‘Aalto Opera House, Essen’, Architectural Review, June ‘What is wrong with architectural education? Almost everything’, Architectural Review, July 1991 ‘Swiss essentialists’, Architectural Review, Jan ‘Pacific Rim and Planetary Culture’, Architectural Review, Aug Issues of The Architectural Review edited and written in their entirety by Buchanan 1985 The Netherlands, Architectural Review, Jan 1986 Spain: the poetics of Modernism, Architectural Review, May 1990 Forum fellowship, Architectural Review, Feb Making places in Spain, Architectural Review, July 1991 Northern Switzerland, Architectural Review, Jan 1994 Kansai International Airport, Architectural Review, Nov

2003 Peter Buchanan architecture of the emergent epoch

Selected Work Peter Buchanan has published tens of books and hundreds of articles and essays in many international journals, catalogues and books. Here is only the briefest selection. Books (All volumes published in English, French, Italian, German, Japanese and Chinese editions) 1993 Renzo Piano Building Workshop, Complete Works: Volume one. London: Phaidon. 1994 Renzo Piano Building Workshop, Complete Works: Volume two. London: Phaidon. 1996 Renzo Piano Building Workshop, Complete Works: Volume three. London: Phaidon. Renzo Piano Building Workshop, Complete Works: Volume four. London: Phaidon.

Issues edited and substantially written by Buchanan 1983 AA now, Architectural Review, Oct 1987 Le Corbusier centenary, Architectural Review, Jan 1992 Barcelona transformed, Architectural Review, Aug

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

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2004 PAUL MIKULA

A GREAT BIG BOX CALLED ARCHITECTURE Born 31 May 1940 Education 1967: Bachelor of Architecture, University of Natal, Kwazulu Natal Projects featured Vukani Museum, Eshowe, Kwazulu Natal (2001); BAT centre, Durban, Kwazulu Natal (1993)

P

aul Mikula enrolled at the University of Natal School of Architecture in 1961 and started his first practice Paul Bill Studios between 1963 and 1965. During 1967-89 he lectured part time at various institutions and held exhibitions both locally as well as abroad. In 1967 BDG (Building Design Group) Architects was founded by Paul Mikula, Bryan Lee, John Edgar, Brian Kearney, Tony Wilson and Peter Seward. In 1970 branch offices were located in Lesotho, Swaziland and Johannesburg. Paul left BDG in 1977. He took up the position of development director of the Urban Foundation of Natal where he worked with communities and ran a studio with many university students and ex- BDG colleagues. During the Urban Foundation period he travelled to Europe and India and did several presentations and talks at universities in England and Germany. He left the Urban Foundation in 1986 but remained a director. Paul opened a private architectural practice with Robert Johnson in 1984-1987, and a development and communications consultancy with Alan Mountain. During this period they did a major reconstruction and urban renewal project in Austerville Durban. Mikula Vines Associates Architects and Town Planners, and AMV Project Managers with Georgio Antoni and Simon Vines were founded in 1987.

to serve all artists. In 1992 they established ACCESS, a completely multidisciplinary firm where communities could access expertise for all their requirements, be they architectural, educational, medical, training, or others. Paul Mikula is director of various foundations, music and art centres, as well as a trustee to development and arts trusts.

In 1989 they got a commission to design the Gamalakhe Teachers Training College job and started Architects Collaborative cc with Yusuf Patel, Kevin MacGarry, Andre Duvenhage and Bryan Lee as associated architect. Until 1989 Paul Mikula had been teaching, talking and examining on and off at Natal, Cape Town and Wits Universities, with occasional visits to Bloemfontein and Port Elizabeth. In 1983 together with Bryan Kearney and Rodney Harber, Paul produced a book on traditional Hindu Temples in South Africa based on the research done for his Master’s thesis. In 1991 Hugo Bartel, a good friend, died and left his fortune to the arts and engineering company to be administered by Paul Mikula. In 1993, Paul and Jenny Whitehead built the BAT Centre

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25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


Extended housing 1972 to 2004 Pendennis gardens, Barbeito flats, Silverton mews, Cobblestone mews Sunningdale, Teambuild house Mikula, Fernglen, Townhousing Eshowe, Skyhouses Point

Neighbourhoods 1973 to 1977 Sunningdale, Briardale village, Mitchell’s plain competition

Suburbs, Urban rural planning (and building, upgrading, renovating and project managing). 1979 to 1991 Amatikwe Inanda, sites and community facilities, Inanda new town A, planning, regulations, building procurement yard, instruction Austerville, replanning barracks and blocks upgrade, building procurement, training, infill, Urban foundation, Umlazi, kwaMashu, Inanda, planning frameworks, skillstraining, community advice centres, Cato crest development plan, Waterloo development plans, project management, housing facilitation, community facilities, schools, mud building yard and prototype Bridge city development plan, new town centre, urban housing.

Community facilities 1972 to 2002 Ladysmith presbytarian church, Own offices Julia road Abalindi welfare centre, Relocation of Canelands temple, Verulam temple, Tongaat community centre competition, Pinetown library competition, YMCA Kwa Mashu, Isandlwana high school, planning and orientation centre, Gamalakhe college of education, Own cedar road offices, dolls house competition, Kwa Mashu, nhlakhanipho high and mseleni high school, Heroes monument competition, Bat centre, café fish, U.N.D. centre for the creative arts, Phansi museum, Adventure playground Manzini, Musgrave church, Vukani museum Eshowe.

Co-authors of projects led by Mikula John Edgar, Bryan Lee, Brian Kearney, Tony Wilson, Colin Savage, Kevin Macgarry, Peter Smoor, Yusuf Patel, Andre Duvenhage, Jo Noero, Dennis Jordan, Rob Johnson, Dennis Claude, Jenny Whitehead, Bruce Stafford, Peter Malifane, Alan Mountain, Peter Wilkinson.

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

2004 Paul Mikula a great big box called architecture

Selected Projects Houses 1965 to 1995 Houses Mikula, Lazarus, Marian, Sukkuma, Shoba, Ramkisson, M.Reddy, J. Reddy , Griffith, d’ Avice, Sutherland, Dr. Timol., D. Timol, E Schmidt, J. Hawke, C. Bestall, Burgess, Wilson, T. Lazarus , Charles, C.Lazarus , Levy, Tshabalala, Mikula

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VUKANI MUSEUM

Eshowe, Kwazulu Natal | 2001

The Vukani Museum forms part of the Eshowe Museum Village situated in the small colonial town of Eshowe surrounded by indigenous forest and now set in the familiar canelands of KwaZulu Natal. An extensive collection of artefacts including intricately woven baskets, clay pots and platters produced by craftspeople in KwaZulu Natal forms part of the exhibition within the museum. The building typology is sympathetic to the content en draws its design from the geometrically-derived patterns and shapes found in the artefacts. The vernacular ‘rondavel’ of the Oyaya area and the ‘indlunkhulu’ commonly found in the local rural homesteads inspired the primal geometric plan lay-out of a circle within a square. The circle plan is given direction through an east-west axis that forms a strong datum for the pedestrian movement patterns of the complex as a whole with Fort Nongqayi at the heart of the complex. In the museum a narrow strip of daylight that filters through the apex of a square, slightly pitched corrugated iron roof aligns with the datum of the site strengthening the axis that forms the entrance to the museum. Strategically positioned windows provide indirect natural light illuminating the artefacts in ever changing washes as the day progresses. The construction of the building is displayed with direct and simple detailing expressing the nature of the material. The trabeated gum-pole structure carries a square roof that shelters a cylindrical drum and the delicate nature of the artefacts within. Carved Zulu traditional geometric motifs on the supporting columns is the only form of decoration allowing the artefacts to properly form the focus of attention. The building displays a rational design with a multivalent layering of meaning. The complexity of the design is reflected in the humble appearance where form becomes function.

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25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


THE BAT CENTRE

The chosen site for the Bartel Arts Trust Centre is a landbound naval training establishment sited in the north-east sector of Durban harbour with views over the bay of Natal celebrating the arts and Durban. It is well located to serve the resident population of the Esplanade and the workers of the harbour. On a site that is dominated by an industrial scene of cranes, ships and trains the building challenges the site by facilitating a cultural and sociological experiment. Ordinary, cheap, recycled materials were used to create a building that is not superficial but breaks the stereotypical modernist tendencies and delivers a structure that is rich in meaning and open for interpretation. The building reflects the South African search for identity that allows for a multicultural melting pot and to create the spaces to allow for experimentation and change. Detailing on the building is robust and reveals the building process which formed part of the easy to follow trainee approach. The honesty of the structure and the experimental, creative problem solving reflects the inherent essence of the building as a whole. Huge painted facades facing the ocean change every few years in a major painting festival. The BAT Centre stands proud and true in front of the high-rises of the Esplanade as a monument that facilitates change through the celebration of art.

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

2004 Paul Mikula a great big box called architecture

Durban, Kwazulu Natal | 1993

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2005 BANNIE BRITZ

STORIES … ARCHITECTURE … LIFE

Born 30 Junie 1935; † 27 March 2013 Education 1991: Masters in Urban Design, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, Gauteng; 1960: Bachelor of Architecture, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, Gauteng Projects featured Secretariat for Bophutatswana Government, Mmabatho, North West Province (1978-1983); House Britz, Bloemfontein, Free State (1998)

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fter qualifying, Bannie Britz travelled and gained work experience in Munich and London. On his return, he practiced on his own in Pretoria from 1968 to1969 and in Johannesburg until 1977. Britz formed several professional partnerships: in 1977 with Michael Scholes; they were joined by Sidney Abramowitch in 1988 - the partnership then known as Britz Scholes Abramowitch. In 1990 it expanded into DSADH: Britz Scholes Abramowitch du Toit Hoffe. Between 1972 and 1992, seventeen built building projects and one urban design project by his various partnerships received Awards of Merit from the Institute of SA Architects (Linning, 2013). At the time it was the highest number of Institute awards any South African practice had received. In 1992 Britz and his wife Almut moved to Bloemfontein, where he became Professor and Head of Department of Architecture at the University of the Free State. His interest, and large influence on the design of the UFS campus is obvious from the title of his 1993 inaugural lecture: “Wat om met die blou Mercedes aan te vang - oftewel riglyne vir die toekomstige beplanning van die kampus” (What do we do with the blue Mercedes - guide lines for future campus planning). During this period he obtained a Masters in Urban Design. He also practiced professionally as Bannie Britz Architect and Urban Designer.

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25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

2005 Bannie Britz stories...architecture...life

Selected Projects and Awards House Marshall, Benoni, Gauteng 1974 Sport Building & Cricket Pavillion, Potchefstroom, 1975 North West Province House Smith-Verster, Melville, Johannesburg, Gauteng 1975 House Rorke-Scholes, Melville, Johannesburg, Gauteng 1977 Lutheran Church, Parkhill Gardens, Germiston, Gauteng Nederduitse Gereformeerde Kerk, Fochville, North West Province 1979 Secretariat for Bophuthatswana Government now the Legislature for North West Province Province (with Michael Scholes), Mmabatho, North West Province House Rosmarin, Houghton Estate, Johannesburg, Gauteng 1980 Potchefstroom University Student Centre, 1981 Potchefstroom, North West Province House Butler, Westcliff, Johannesburg, Gauteng 1982 House Hilewitz, Athol, Johannesburg, Gauteng 1983 Studio and Gazebo of St Margaret’s / House A Nieman Smith, Parktown, Johannesburg, Gauteng 1984 (SAIA Award of Merit 1985) Offices for Britz & Scholes Architects, 1986 24 Chatou Road. Melville, Johannesburg, Gauteng House Monyemore, Ikageng, Potchefstroom, North West Province 1990 House Britz, Bloemfontein, Free State 1998 (SAIA Award of Merit)

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SECRETARIAT FOR BOPHUTATSWANA GOVERNMENT Mmabatho, North West Province | 1978-83

The Secretariat building which forms the centrepiece of a much larger urban intervention, has received both awards and accolades in the South African architectural press. In 1984 Mira Fassler Kamstra called it “a celebration of sovereignty”, and it was published in a 1985 UIA International Architect edition on Southern Africa. Mmabatho (“mother of the people”) was the capital of Bophutatswana, one of the now defunct homelands created by the Apartheid government for the indigenous peoples of South Africa. The building was designed to evoke traditional Tswana architecture. The plan form of the civic complex is centred around a formal urban square. Surrounding the square are successive layers of building, gardens and a row of wild olive trees; all contained by a massive circular facade which is in turn punched with large circular openings. In addition to the reference to local cultural architecture, and Britz’s love for the genius loci, the influence of Aldo van Eyck can be seen in the response to social needs, and that of Louis I Kahn in the formal plan form of the complex. Britz (1985) also points out the influence of Herman Hertzberger’s Centraal Beheer headquarters in the cellular layouts of the offices. An important design requirement was for a “Third World” building that requires little operational energy and maintenance within the harsh landscape. Ironically, this resulted in a building that complies with the requirements of contemporary sustainable architecture. A stepped section form provides selfshading; louvered windows and shaded walkways reduce air conditioning; and simple construction in locally sourced clay brick means that in summer the building interior is up to 4°C cooler than outside. The 600m long circular building also uses clearly defined walkways and ramps rather than lifts, making it even more energy efficient. After the reincorporation of Bophutatswana into the Republic of South Africa in 1994, the building became the office of the Legislature of the North West province.

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25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


HOUSE BRITZ

The house forms part of a small “urban ensemble” of existing house, new house-cum-office, and garagecottage. The circular forecourt serves the professional studio, the main house and a small cottage. The new house, although located on what is nominally a panhandle site, is positioned close to, and facing the street. On the semi-public side the building presents a formal and private façade, while its positioning allows it to form a screen for a private garden space behind. The house is constructed of load-bearing facebrick, roofed with corrugated steel. Rather than the typical Free State low-pitch galvanized corrugated iron, Britz used an oxblood-red barrel roof. The interior of the house is characterized by a simplicity of material and space. The high and somewhat bland exterior is articulated through the use of a contrasting dark band in the facebrick façade, and the recessed courtyard wall being plastered and painted. The clay facebrick exterior is followed through with clay quarry tile floors inside. High plastered walls stretch through double volumes to the tongue-and-groove pine lining of the barrel vaults. Round windows in the curve of the vaults and vertical slits in the corners of spaces wash the interior with soft light. In this serene environment, the triangulated timber treads of the “samba” stair provides a glimpse of Bannie Britz’s personality: often stark and formal, yet with a sparkling sense of humour available to those who bothered to look for it.

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

2005 Bannie Britz stories...architecture...life

Bloemfontein, Free State | 1998

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2006 DESIGNWORKSHOP: SA BORROWING SPACE AND TIME

Andrew Makin Born 16 June 1964 Education 1989: Bachelor of Architecture, University of Natal. Durban, Kwazulu Natal Janina Masojada Born 28 October 1963 Education 1989: Master of Architecture MIT, Boston, USA Projects featured The Constitutional Court, Johannesburg, Gauteng (2004); Electric Ladyland Offices, Kloof, Kwazulu Natal (2000)

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esignworkshop:sa (previously OMM Design Workshop, led by Andrew Makin and Janina Masojada) claims to convert minimum resources into maximum performance. Aiming to bring substantial advantage to project objectives, and therefore also to the client, more than what physical environments can be, designworkshop:sa focuses on what they can do. Designworkshop: sa’s achievements in this regard are highlighted by the new Constitutional Court Building of South Africa (procured through an international design competition), Singita Lebombo & Sweni Lodges (voted Conde Naste best hotel in the world), and the redesign of B&Q Plc. UK retail reformat (at the time, a £4.5bn/ annum UK based DIY business). They have received several Regional Awards of Merit, National Awards of Merit and National Awards for Excellence, the highest accolade from the South African Institute of Architects.

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25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


Selected Projects & Awards The New Constitutional Court Building of South Africa, 1998 Johannesburg, Gauteng First prize in international competition, and project appointment [Joint submission and award with Urban Solutions] Invited Design competition, ‘selected architects’, 1998 Melrose Arch Johannesburg, Gauteng mixed-use development Winning scheme and project appointment Nelson Mandela Centre for African Culture, Port Louis, Mauritius 2000 First prize in international competition [Joint submission and award with Urban Solutions] Kwa-Zulu Natal Institute for Architects Award of Merit: 2001 New Holiday House at Prince’s Grant Golf Estate Kwa-Zulu Natal Institute | South African Institute of Architects 2001 Award of Merit : New offices for Electric Ladyland in Kloof, Kwazulu Natal South African Institute of Architects Award of Merit: 2001 New offices for Electric Ladyland in Kloof, Kwazulu Natal South African Institute of Architects Award for Excellence: 2002 New offices for Electric Ladyland in Kloof Architectural Design Competition for the Africa Peace Centre 2003 [ACCORD] Co-commended Architectural Ideas Competition : Cato Manor Interactive 2003 Cultural Centre Second prize winner Qb award for interior design for public buildings: 2004 New Constitutional Court, Johannesburg Gauteng Gauteng Institute & South African Institute for Architects Award 2005 of Merit: New Constitutional Court, Johannesburg, Gauteng Mpumalanga Institute & South African Institute of 2005 Architects Award of Merit : New Lodges for Singita Lebombo + Sweni, Kruger Park, Mpumalanga South African Institute of Architects Award for Excellence: 2006 Constitutional Court, Johannesburg, Gauteng South African Institute of Architects Award for Excellence: 2006 Singita Kruger Park, Mpumalanga KwaZulu Natal Institute for Architects Award of Merit: 2007 Dunkirk Gatehouse, Homeowners & Club House Dunkirk Estate, Salt Rock, Kwazulu Natal Border Kei Institute & South African Institute of Architects 2007 Award of Merit: Igoda View House, East London, Eastern Cape Eastern Cape Institute & South African Institute of Architects Award 2007 of Merit: New Beach House at Plettenberg Bay, Eastern Cape

Exhibitions and Publications he Architectural Review : Special Issue_South Africa March 1995 T 1995 Architectural Association Invitation Exhibition: Public Architecture 1995 and Settlement - Architectural practice in SA, A.A. London AA Files, London 1996 The Architectural Review Centennial Publication 1996 Cape Town 2004 International Olympic 1996 Bid Competition Awards exhibition ‘Blank’ 1998 Rotterdam Institute of Architects 1998 international touring exhibition Sep Architectural Record USA 1999 Practice exhibition at Natal Society for the Arts gallery 2000 SA Public Law Journal, Vol. 16 No 1, 2001 2001 Aug I Fall Tatler UK I Blue Print UK I Town and Country USA 2003 Berlin Sharp City Exhibition 2005 Invited to present the Sophia Grey Memorial 2006 Annual Lecture and Exhibition New Hotels 3 2006 Contemporary South African Architecture 2006 in Landscape of Transition Light on the Hill: The Building of the Constitutional Court 2007 of South Africa by David Krut Publishing The Architectural Review Special Issue South Africa June 2007 2007 The Architectural Review July 2007 2007 Arquitectura Viva 112 2007

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

2006 Designworkshop SA Janina Masojada and Andrew Makin borrowing space and time

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THE CONSTITUTIONAL COURT Johannesburg, Gauteng | 2004

The emblem of the South African Constitutional Court in Johannesburg is a tree with its canopy shading and uniting the people gathered under it. It is a physical representation of the concept of Ubuntu or ‘African humanness’ summed up in the Nguni proverb, ‘A person is a person because of other people’ that became the conceptual proposition that underpins the design of the Constitutional Court Building. President Thabo Mbeki’s official opening of the building on Human Rights Day, 21st March 2006 culminated a process beginning in 1995 when the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa was inaugurated as the highest authority of the land and the first eleven justices were sworn in as the first generation of Constitutional justices. At the time accommodated in temporary office space, the intention was always to move to a purpose-designed facility that not only satisfied the functional requirements of the institution but also inherently represented its values and status. Now known as Constitution Hill, the site selected for the building is located on the northern slope of the Old Fort colonial prison complex in Johannesburg. According to freedom struggle legend Justice Albie Sachs, the Fort is considered as the Robben Island of the main land. The site was carefully selected to represent the fundamental transformation from an authoritarian regime to a constitutional democracy. Although demanding, derelict and difficult to integrate with the city, the site was also accessible, prominent and highly symbolic. The Hill stands wedged between the vibrant African city which central Johannesburg has become and the historic division of a poor black city ... towards Soweto, and the rich, “white” suburbs to the north. We are at the very centre of South Africa’s major metropolis. The Old Fort is on the highest point of the Witwatersrand watershed: the rain that falls in the area flows to the Atlantic and Indian oceans down the northern and southern sides of this ridge. The Constitutional Court will stand at the confluence of these human and natural environments. 74

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


Kloof, Kwazulu Natal | 2000

The client desired an innovative, unconventional, robust, versatile building in which to accommodate a wide range of businesses. A detail survey of the plants and trees, plus the existing house, pool and garden structures was the first task. The building is designed in, around and between these elements giving it an established character, with what came first not always clear. A horticulturist was involved up front to advise on those very few trees which could be removed either because they were alien or near the end of their lifespan, and the buildings were slid into the unoccupied spaces between the remainder. In some cases, the buildings are cut away to accommodate trees, which form an integral part of the elevation design, their shadows casting intricate patterns onto the simple building surfaces. Each building has a loggia, a mediating zone between the outside public areas and the office areas inside. These zones are reception areas, social spaces, themselves offering a range of possible activities, from film projection, to stage, to patio lounges. The extent of double volume internal space in the 12m wide and varying length buildings can be reduced or enlarged with lightweight floors as required. A hard wall with punctured openings faces the traffic and parking area, forming the protective external perimeter to the courtyard. The internal perimeter of the courtyard is an outside circulation verandah, with the full glass and steel curtain wall shaded either by orientation, or stretched fabric blinds. Variations to the ends of each building respond to the particularities of the site condition, the entrance marked by the transparent courtyard facade wrapping around to form the external perimeter. Raw and direct construction materials are undisguised with finishes, resulting in a cost-effective, robust, warm, sensuous environment that defers to space, tactility, vegetation and light for its appeal and character.

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

2006 Designworkshop SA Janina Masojada and Andrew Makin borrowing space and time

ELECTRIC LADYLAND

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2007 JO NOERO

THE EXPEDIENT AND THE ETHICAL, THE EVERYDAY AND THE EXTRAORDINARY

Born 20 December 1950 Education 1994: commended Hon. Doctor of Science, University of Brighton, UK; 1980: Master of philosophy in architecture University of Newcastleupon-Tyne in the UK; 1977: Bachelor of Architecture, University of Natal, Durban, Kwazulu Natal Projects Featured St Paul’s Anglican Church, Johannesburg, Gauteng (1985); House Sapieka, Cape Town, Western Cape (2001,2007)

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n a tribute written to Professor Jo, Archbishop Desmond Tutu describes his architecture as an architecture that lifted the spirits of people during a time of oppression. Since the early 1980’s

Professor Jo Noero has been in practice and has completed over 200 buildings. His architecture often reflects the sociopolitical concerns of South Africa and has received numerous national and international awards including the Lubetkin Prize from UK, Erskine Prize from Sweden, 16 National Awards of Merit for outstanding design, 15 Project Awards and two Awards of Excellence - all from the Institute of South African Architects. Noero’s work has been exhibited in many places including the Venice Biennale, Maxxi National Museum of Contemporary Art and Architecture in Rome and Museum of Modern Art in New York. Extensively published, nationally and internationally, Jo has also

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lectured on his work in the United Kingdom, Portugal, Norway, Sweden, Finland and the United States of America amongst many other countries. Noero was elected a Fellow of the Academy of Science in South Africa in 2002. Heinrich Wolff joined Noero from 1998-2012 to form Noero Wolff architects. While managing an extremely busy and practice, his academic career is also respected throughout South Africa and the rest of the world. He was appointed the Director of the School of Architecture and Planning at UCT from 2000 to 2005 and is currently a Professor of Architecture at the same university. From 1995 to 2000 he was appointed as the Norman Moore Professor of Architecture at Washington University in St Louis in USA.

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


Institute of South African Architects Velocity Film Studios, Rivonia, Johannesburg, Gauteng (National Award of Merit for Outstanding Design, South African Institute of Architects 1997) Professor Alexander Petrie Award – Outstanding Contribution to the Arts and Humanities – University of Natal Tramway Road Housing, Sea Point, Cape Town, Western Cape (Architecture South Africa Project Award, South African Institute of Architects 2003) House Sapieka, Hout Bay, Cape Town, Western Cape (Architecture South Africa Project Award, South African Institute of Architects 2001) Day Care Centres 1 & 2, Delft, Cape Town, Western Cape (National Award of Merit for Outstanding Design, South African Institute of Architecture 2005) Additional Theatre to the Baxter, University of Cape Town Rondebosch Campus, Cape Town, Western Cape House Freedberg, Hout Bay, Cape Town, Western Cape (Architecture South Africa Project Award, South African Institute of Architects 2007) 24 Alfred Street, Cape Town, Western Cape House Westhead, Hout Bay, Cape Town, Western Cape Philippi Housing, Philippi, Cape Town, Western Cape (Architecture South Africa Project Award, South African Institute of Architects 2007) House Turok, Noordhoek, Cape Town, Western Cape International fellow, Royal Institute of British Architecture Red Location Museum, New Brighton, Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape (World Leadership Award for Public Architecture 2005, Lubetkin Prize – Most Outstanding Building Outside the EU 2006, Royal Institute of British Architects International Award 2006, Award of Excellence, Institute of South African Architects 2007, and National Award of Merit for Outstanding Design 2007)

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

1995

1997 2001

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2006 2007

2007 Jo Noero the expedient and the ethical, the everyday and the extraordinary

Selected Projects and Awards House Nkwe, Pimville, Soweto, Gauteng 1982 (National Award of Merit for Outstanding Design, South African Institute of Architects 1984) (Architecture South Africa Project Award, South African Institute of Architects 1984) St Paul’s Church, Jabavu, Soweto, Johannesburg, Gauteng 1984 Alexandra Housing, Alexandra, Johannesburg, Gauteng 1986 Lenasia Low-income Housing, Lenasia, Johannesburg, Gauteng Three Prototypical rural churches, Jouberton, Potchefstroom & 1987 Sebokeng, North West Province House Nxumalo, Alexandra Township, Johannesburg, Gauteng 1988 House Godfrey Pitje, Daveton, East Rand, Gauteng 1989 Mediation Centre, Westcliff, Johannesburg, Gauteng House Tutu, Soweto, Johannesburg, Gauteng 1989 Duduza Resource Centre, Duduza, East Rand, Gauteng (National Award of Merit for Outstanding Design, South African Institute of Architects 1993) Soweto Careers Centre, Johannesburg, Gauteng 1990 (National Award of Merit for Outstanding Design, South African Institute of Architects 1993) (Award of Excellence, South African Institute of Architects 1994) Funda Community College, Diepkloof, Johannesburg, Gauteng 1990 (National Award of Merit for Outstanding Design, South African Institute of Architects 1993) Dormitory Block, Jabavu, Soweto, Johannesburg, Gauteng 1990 Florida and Khyalami Office, Roodepoort & Midrand, Gauteng 1991 (National Award of Merit for Outstanding Design, South African Institute of Architects 1993) Multi-Sports Centre, Gugulethu, Cape Town, Western Cape 1992 (National Award of Merit for Outstanding Design, South African Institute of Architects 1995) House Fisher, Johannesburg, Gauteng 1994 J. Noero Nominated for the Carlsberg Prize by the 1995

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ST PAUL’S ANGLICAN CHURCH Jabavu, Soweto, Johannesburg, Gauteng | 1985

St Paul’s Church in Jabavu, White City, Soweto was a place where the diplomatic staff and ambassadors from many countries used to meet in Soweto ostensibly for prayer but at the same time to make contact with those people involved on struggle activities during the eighties. Focus inside the circular plan form is on a centralized altar. The quadrant behind the altar is used as an outside altar. On important religious occasions the service is conducted simultaneously in three different languages and the three quadrants of the church allow three priests to address three sections simultaneously in the three different languages. The existing community center opens out onto a large courtyard which is enclosed on three sides. The church forms the fourth side and the outside altar allows services to accommodate as many as three thousand people. The church provides a monumental scale to an important road intersection in Soweto. The drum of the church is 12 meters in height and the entrance is marked by four large circular columns which exaggerate the sense of monumentality. The church has two scales – an urban monumental scale which corresponds to the entrance and a smaller and softer scale which opens out onto the courtyard behind. The interior is simply treated. Above the altar lies a large ring-beam and box gutter which ties the roof structure together. This space is 15 meters in height and is topped by a small aedicular “house” which is in effect the roof-light. The circular form was chosen because it is not only cost effective but allows for intimate contact between the priest and the congregation. The church was built by utilizing local labour under the supervision of the architect – the local priest Father David Nkwe purchased all materials and acted as project manager – in this way the church was built at a very low cost.

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25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


HOUSE SAPIEKA

House Sapieka - sitting adjacent to another Noero Wolff residential building, House Freedberg -comprises three phases each of which was autonomous in that nothing was planned for other than the work that was at hand during the time of construction. The design has been described as homage to the Anglo-Swedish Architect Ralph Erskine’s notion of ‘pragmatic functionalism’. The original residence of 150 square metres overlooks Hout Bay Harbour and consists of a single living, dining and kitchen area and two bedroom suites in which the study doubles up as visitor’s accommodation. Spaces were organised around a north facing courtyard that provides protection against the South Easter and to accommodate primary views towards the harbor and Chapman’s peak in the east, and secondary views to the north and west. The courtyard that surrounds the building on three sides opens to these secondary views over dramatic scenery of a nature reserve behind the house. A cranked roof that drops to allow northern light into the court scales the house to the neighbours and mimics the mountains landscape in the background. The plan is unconstrained by the roof geometry. It can assume a form independent of the conventional orthogonal geometry associated with this type of building. A series of angled walls locate the house on the site so that it is parallel to the front, as well as to the south boundary. This strategy locks the house into a geometric relationship with the site, which in turn binds it to the site.

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

2007 Jo Noero the expedient and the ethical, the everyday and the extraordinary

Hout Bay, Cape Town, Western Cape | 2001; 2007

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2008 PRACTICE VAN DER MERWE MISZEWSKI ARCHITECTS (VDDMA) MS. ANJA VAN DER MERWE MISZEWSKI & MR MACIO MISZEWSKI VAN DER MERWE MISZEWSKI PROJECTS

Anja van der Merwe Miszewski Born 7 December 1960 Education 1986: AAGrad dip, London, UK; 1984: Bachelor of Architecture, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, Western Cape; 1981: Bachelor of architectural studies, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, Western Cape Macio Miszewski Born 17 January 1961 Education 1986: AAdip hons, London, UK; 1983: Bachelor of architectural studies, University of Cape Town, Cape Town Western Cape Projects featured Highveld House, Gauteng (2008); Tree House, Cape Town, Western Cape (1999)

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an der Merwe Miszewski Architects (Pty) Ltd was founded in 1991 by Anya van der Merwe and Macio Miszewski. VDMMA has completed a wide range of building types, including educational, cultural, commercial, retail, restoration & residential projects - including group housing, apartment buildings and individual residences. The company has received numerous awards, including SAIA Awards, (South African Institute of Architects, regional and national), SAPOA Awards (South African Property Owners Association), SAISC Awards (South African Institute of Steel Construction), The Fulton Award, as well as various media awards. VDMMA has been recognised internationally, including the prestigious AR+D award hosted by Architectural Review Journal (London) - in ‘recognition of excellence in executed designs’, the World Architecture Award for the Best Building in Africa/Middle East and the Chicago Athenaeum / European Centre for Architecture Award 09 for ‘architectural excellence’. The Tree House was voted the “Best Building in South Africa” in a public opinion poll hosted by VISI Magazine and CTICC1 was voted Cape Town’s “favourite building” by KFM Radio listeners.

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Publications include features in books, journals and periodicals. Publishers include Phaidon, Rizolli, Architectural Review (London), Wallpaper, Casamica, te Neues; Haüser and others. The Nov/Dec 2008 edition of Architecture South Africa focused on the practice and its Sofia Gray Memorial Lecture and Exhibition. VDMMA is a member of the Green Building Council of South Africa and has been involved in a variety of energy efficient design projects. The practice also continues to contribute to academic life. Directors regularly participate as external examiners or visiting lecturers at a variety of institutions nationally. A holistic approach addresses all aspects of the project, including interiors and landscaping, from commencement through to completion. The central binding philosophy of the practice concerns a shared dedication to the pursuit of excellence in design – to weld together appropriate design within carefully established financial parameters. The goal is to best interpret the unique requirements of each client, brief and site, through creativity and inventiveness, formally striving towards the creation of an architecture which suggests timeless simplicity and elegance.

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


Selected Projects and Awards “Everite” National Design Competition 1992 for the design of a House Awarded First Prize (163 national entries) Bishop Diocesan College Molteno Library Extension, 1993 Rondebosch, Cape Town, Western Cape Kirstenbosch Botanical Gardens Outdoor Performance Stage 1993 Kirstenbosch, Cape Town, Western Cape PFG PILKINGTON Flat Glass Design Competition 1994 “Extend Your Horizons” Headquarters Building, Midrand, Johannesburg, Gauteng Awarded Second Place (98 entries) Sun House, Tamboerkloof, Cape Town, Western Cape 1995 (Award of Merit, South African Institute of Architects 1997) 163 Bree Street Restoration of Grade 1 Listed Building, 1996 Bree Street, Cape Town, Western Cape Rosedene Hotel, Oranjezicht, Cape Town, Western Cape Bishops Diocesan College, New Music Facility, Rondebosch, Cape Town, Western Cape Montebello Design Centre & Office Park, Newlands, 1997 Cape Town, Western Cape Simonsig Wine Estate, Restoration / New Buildings, Stellenbosch, Western Cape SA Museum Langebaan Museum Complex & Conservation Museum, Western Cape Cape Nature Conservation Information Centre, SA Museum, “Die Kelders”, Gansbaai, Western Cape Tree House, Oranjezicht, Cape Town, Western Cape 1999 (Award of Merit, South African Institute of Architects 1999) (UK Architectural Review, International design competition: awarded joint first prize) (World Architecture International Competition – first place: Best Building in Africa and Middle East 2001) Cliff House, Higgovale, Cape Town, Western Cape 1991 (Project Award, South African Institute of Architects 1999) Bracken Ridge Housing, Plettenberg Bay, Western Cape Cape Town City Council Electrical Sub-Station Claremont, Cape Town, Western Cape Convention Centre with FA Architects, Coen Steytler Ave, 2000 Cape Town, Western Cape (National overall winner, South African Institute of Steel Construction 2004) (SAPOA National Award) (Award of Merit, South African Institute for Civil Engineering) (Award of Merit & Award of Commendation, South African Institute of Architects 2006) (Best of Cape Town Awards 2008) Ingwe Wine Farm, Somerset West, Western Cape (Project Award, South African Institute of Architects 2001)

Beach House 4, Clifton, Cape Town, Western Cape Masibambisane Senior Secondary School, Delft, Western Cape Mahebourgh Waterfront Regeneration of 19th Century Waterfront, Mauritius Apartments Bantry Bay, Cape Town, Western Cape 2001 Bungalow 96, 98, 99 and 100, The Ridge, Clifton, 2002 Cape Town, Western Cape Bishops View, Kalk Bay, Cape Town, Western Cape Forest House, Fernwood, Newlands, Cape Town, Western Cape Cape Town City Council Electrical Sub-Station, Muizenberg, Cape Town, Western Cape Hilton Weiner & Jenny Button, Retail Interiors, Canal Walk, 2003 Cape Town, Western Cape Commercial Mixed Use Development, Green Point, Cape Town, Western Cape Bridge House Higgovale, Cape Town, Western Cape 2004 (Project Award, South African Institute of Architects 2003) Hilton Weiner (x2) and Jenni Button, Retail Interiors, Johannesburg & Pretoria, Gauteng Lighthouse Apartment Building, Greenpoint, 2005 Cape Town, Western Cape Maison House, Franschoek, Western Cape (Project Award, South African Institute of Architects 2007) Franschhoek Wine Cellar & Accommodation, Franschhoek, Cape Town, Western Cape De Beers HQ, Johannesburg, Gauteng Courtyard House, Newlands, Cape Town, Western Cape 2006 The Desmond Tutu Peace Centre, with DSA Architects, Cape Town, Western Cape 3½ Beach House Residential Clifton, Cape Town, Western Cape 2007 Penthouse Rocklands, Seapoint, Cape Town, Western Cape Droom House, Rouzelle, Worcester, Western Cape Mountain House, Oranjezicht, Cape Town, Western Cape Boutique Hotel,”Klawervlei”, Stellenbosch, Western Cape Jenni Button, Hilton Weiner, Urban Degree, Retail Interiors, Sandton City, Johannesburg, Gauteng Wine Cellar, Restaurant & Residential, Stellenbosch, Western Cape Highveld House, Gauteng 2008 (Regional Award for Architecture, Gauteng Institute for Architecture 2009) (Best Residential Design, South African Institute of Steel Construction) (Chicago Athenaeum/ European centre for Architecture, International Architecture Award for Best New Global Design) Boxhouse, Higgovale, Cape Town, Western Cape V&A Waterfront Development New Basin Urban Design Study V + A Waterfront, Cape Town, Western Cape Gondwana Game Lodge, Barrydale, Western Cape Sanbona Wildlife Reserve, Barrydale, Western Cape

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

2008 Practice van der merwe miszewski Anya Miszewski and Macio Miszewski van der merwe miszewski projects

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HIGHVELD HOUSE

Cradle of Humankind, Gauteng | 2008

The design concept for the Highveld House was generated by the site in its landscape and the brief. The landscape is the South African Highveld, the area being the “Cradle of Humankind”, which is a World Heritage site. The site for the house consists of a collection of diverse environments; an oak forest, open meadows and poplar groves, a river, lake and weir, a white stinkwood forest, a koppie environment and open veld. The brief called for a heightened sense of ‘integration with the landscape’. An elevated site was chosen; allowing long views to the distant hills, at the threshold of where the white Stinkwood Forest meets the open veld. The house is conceived of as a series of “pavilions and courts” arranged between two horizontal planes – the floor and the roof. These planes are located in the forest, but also at the edge of the veld, and elevated above natural ground by a ‘random and/ but measured’ forest of skew columns. The planes and columns are set out on grids for structural purposes. However, the plane grids and column grid are discordant. The indoor and outdoor spatial arrangement of the house is arranged between the two horizontal planes, in and around the ‘forest’ of tree like columns. The enclosure is transparent; terraces project both into the forest and over the open veld. The landscape and the building overlap.

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Higgovale, Cape Town, Western Cape | 1999 A commission to design a house on the slopes of Table Mountain in Cape Town created an opportunity to test the architects’ concerns and searches for contextual responsiveness and connectivity. The site, adjacent to a valley and stream, has a canopy of magnificent spreading umbrella Pines. These trees, majestic and sculptural, provided the primary reference and ultimately the structural concept for the house. Five tree-like structures anchor the roof to the ground and provide shelter for the functions gathered under. These trees are surrounded by an entirely separate lightweight transparent steel and glass enclosure supported on a heavily rusticated stone base. The design of the house incorporates themes of narrative, of layering and of expressed threshold. Nestled within the forest, Tree House occupies a narrow, wooded, steeply sloping site on the edge of a mountain stream. The structure supporting the roof is independent of the enclosure: tree-like supports anchor the roof to the ground below, while the glass and steel envelope is supported separately on a heavy base. The roof, a composite timber crate and lightweight slab, is deliberately separate from the perimeter edge and is accentuated by the continuous ribbon window at eaves level. Loads transfer via the timber “branches� to a steel column, bolt fixed at ground floor level. Timber as a service-orientated material is repeated in functional elements such as the fireplace enclosure and ventilation panels within the glass-box. In contrast, the north end is predominantly glass to connect the interior with the forested outside space. The vertical circulation, linking the three levels and giving access to the roof, are elements which are highlighted to emphasize their function within the overall structure. The main spiral stair is wrapped in a lightweight sheath and top-lit by an overhead skylight.

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

2008 Practice van der merwe miszewski Anya Miszewski and Macio Miszewski van der merwe miszewski projects

TREE HOUSE

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2009 WALLY PETERS

MORE WAYS OF BEING AN ARCHITECT

Born 10 June 1948 Education 1981: Dr-Ing. Hannover, Germany; 1974: Master of Science (Environmental Conservation) Heriot-Watt, Edinburgh, UK; 1972: Bachelor of Architecture University of Natal, Durban, Kwazulu Natal

“Y

ou’re next”, said the Head of Architecture of the University of the Free State. Perplexed, I enquired what the telephone call was about, before reaching for a chair and pleading for time to consider.

Being elected to the regional committee of my profession, it was suggested that I succeed as editor of KZ-NIA Journal in 1982, which lead to my avocation. By 2009 I had compiled and edited 100 issues.

After some rumination, I concluded that the stage of my career might be ripe for reflection, and wishing to oblige, fortunately Corobrik came to the rescue, and the exhibition could be funded. I chose as my theme More ways of being an architect to capture my threefold oeuvre as an academic, editor and architect.

While academia got priority, of my limited works in practice, I believe my best are the gardens of remembrance, each designed for the particularities of its site.

My full-time academic career began at my alma mater in 1976 where, uniquely, I rose through all ranks from lecturer to senior professor (then University of KwaZulu-Natal) before having emeritus status conferred. 21st Sophia Gray Exhibition 2009

Having reached the mandatory retirement age at UKZN, I was most fortunate that I could resume my career at the University of the Free State in 2010. Walter Peters, Bloemfontein, May 2014

KZ-NIA Journal | Issue 3/2009 | Vol. 34 | ISSN 0379-9301

100 100 issues KZ-NIA Journal

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25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


Principal Completed Research The built environment of Namibia. Peters, W. 1981. Baukunst in Südwestafrika 1884-1914.

The architecture of Helmut Stauch. Fisher, R, Le Roux, S & Maré, E (Eds). 1998. Architecture of the Transvaal.

Blockhouses of the Anglo-Boer SA War. Journal of the SA Institute of Architects, May/June; July/Aug; & Sept/Oct 2003.

Encyclopaedia entries Encyclopaedia of vernacular architecture of the world, 1987. Brockhaus Enzyklopaedie, 1999. Das Afrika Lexikon, 2001. SA Dictionary of Biography, 1987.

Small town conservation, editing of published student projects. Lüderitz (1979); Rhodes (1987 & 1998); Victoria West (1991); De Bult, Carnarvon (1991); Wakkerstroom (1995 & 2001); Richmond 2013 (with JL du Preez).

Honours 1989: Institute of SA Architects’ Architectural Writers and Critics Award “in recognition of a distinguished contribution to architectural criticism and/or writing”. 1993: Floating Trophy of Ladysmith Historical Society for Survey of Buildings of Architectural and/or Historical Interest.

2004: SA Institute of Architects’ Medal of Distinction “in recognition of an outstanding contribution through distinguished service to the profession and for architecture”.

2006: Amafa aKwaZulu-Natali Heritage Award “for the promotion and conservation of the built environment of KwaZulu-Natal”.

2009 Wally Peters more ways of being an architect

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2010 JACO WASSERFALL

NO GRAFFITI, PLEASE! STULTORUM CALAMI CARBONES MOENIA CHARAE

Born 30 January 1959 Education 1999: PhD, King’s College, Cambridge, UK; 1982: Bachelor of Architecture, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, Gauteng Projects featured Franco Namibian Cultural Centre, Windhoek, Namibia (1999); Ernest & Young Corporate Head Office, Klein Windhoek, Namibia (2008)

D

r Jaco Wasserfall is the founder and managing director of Wasserfall Munting Architects based in Windhoek, Namibia. He was born in Otjiwarongo and is a fifth generation Namibian of German and French descent. After receiving his B.Arch from the University of Pretoria in 1982, he taught for a short period before obtaining a post-graduate scholarship to the University of Cambridge, United Kingdom, in 1985. He married his wife Christel in King’s College Chapel early the following year, and resided in Cambridge until his return to Namibia some four years later, upon choosing to engage in private practice while remaining active in academia. Dr Wasserfall was a principal in the firm Architext until 2004, when he formed his own practice, Jaco Wasserfall Architects: the name of the practice was changed to Wasserfall Munting Architects in 2009 after he was joined by Paul Munting.

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His passion for design and architecture is reflected not only in the work of the practice, but also in his ongoing commitment to architectural education. Among other local awards and recognitions, Dr Wasserfall has received NIA Awards of Excellence for the Franco-Namibian Cultural Centre, Windhoek, in 2002. Dr Wasserfall’s work has been widely published locally and internationally, and exhibited in several locations around the world. He has been instrumental in the establishment of Namibia’s own fledgling school of architecture at the Windhoek Polytechnic, and continues to perform a range of examination, accreditation and system review functions at celebrated institutions around the world.

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


2010 Jaco Wasserfall no graffiti, please! Stultorum calami carbones moenia charae

Selected Projects 1990-2010 Villa Wasserfall Restoration and Refurbishment, 1994-2010 Windhoek, Namibia Mayne Residence, Windhoek, Namibia 1995 Eykcmann Residence, Aris 1998 Franco Namibian Cultural Centre, Windhoek, Namibia 1999 (in association with Charles Delamy) (Award of Excellence, Namibian Institute of Architects 2002) Namlex Chambers, Windhoek, Namibia 1999 Trustco Corporate Head Office, Windhoek, Namibia 1999 New Restaurant for Hotel Heinitzburg, Windhoek, Namibia 2000 Wasserfall Munting Offices Refurbishment, Windhoek, Namibia 2004 Guthenberg Plaza Refurbishment, Windhoek, Namibia 2006 Ernest & Young Corporate Head Office, 2008 Klein Windhoek, Namibia (Award of Excellence, Namibian Institute of Architects 2010) Offices for BĂźhrmann & Partners, Klein Windhoek, Namibia 2009 (Award of Excellence, Namibian Institute of Architects; Didalo Minosse International Prize (Special Commendation) in Vicenza, Italy

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FRANCO – NAMIBIAN CULTURAL CENTRE Windhoek, Namibia | 1999

The Franco-Namibian Cultural Centre is located in a cultural precinct on the edge of the Windhoek CBD, the site is hemmed in by streets on three sides. Its distinct features had a profound impact on the design concept, viz. an old German house that had to be preserved, a pronounced slope and a geological fault that runs alongside Robert Mugabe Avenue and intersects the site, underpinning two distinct orientation axes – north-south and east-west. The most critical design consideration was that of inside-outside space. Courtyard configurations are well established in Namibian vernacular typologies, but they serve primarily to enclose and defend. They were thus deemed irreconcilable with the aims of the FNCC, viz. to acknowledge the country’s independence by creating an approachable facility that attracts attention, and encourages exploration and participation by passers-by. The site was therefore treated like an urban stage, with external activities displayed to the passing viewer on a tilted platform (formed by the sloping site towards Robert Mugabe Avenue). Internal activities were elevated to an equal level of exposure as those without. The old house therefore became an object of display both culturally and functionally (as Café des Arts). The transparent elongated box (containing the internal activities of the centre) responds well to the context by assuming a single-storey scale along Schützen Street and a more public scale along Robert Mugabe Avenue. Its juxtaposition with the old house celebrates the multicultural diversity of Namibia – old and new. A minimalist approach was taken in the selection of materials, details and finishes: exposed structural elements are used alongside unadorned concrete, steel and glass. The facades are appropriate responses to different combinations of internal function, external conditions and overall architectural language.

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25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


ERNEST & YOUNG OFFICES Located in a decentralised commercial node in the suburb of Klein Windhoek, the Ernest & Young complex’s design expresses the unique qualities of the organisation – innovation, unconventionality and progressiveness – in a manner that challenges traditional relationships between culture, environment, structure and space. The site is bordered by streets on three sides and surrounded by hills and low-density residential development; it also slopes down to a small watercourse. Views onto the site from its surroundings dictated a sensitive approach to form-giving, scale, site planning and the use of materials. Namibian vernacular architecture served as an abstract for the new building. This is manifested in a spatial organisation emulating the traditional Ambo homestead, with its centralised circular meeting space or olupale, and in the juxtaposing of old and new, both in the making of form and the use of materials. The central space with its conical shape, whilst reminiscent of traditional shelter is truncated in a contemporary fashion, while the rigidity of the rectangular office blocks is contrasted with the organic forms of the cone and the curved stonewall. The inter-play of organic and manufactured, and of opacity and transparency, creates a dynamic visual and sensory experience. Legibility was a key design consideration from the outset: a strong circulation axis leads the visitor along a shaded entrance walkway to a reception area, where glimpses of the olupale and the building’s interior are introduced. The walkway also serves as a visual barrier, separating the lower-lying staff parking area from the generously landscaped space which embraces the public face of the building. A clear hierarchy of space from public to private is maintained without introducing physical barriers: the prominent circulation axis terminates in a system of ramps, intersecting the double-volume cone or ungulum that forms the heart of the complex. 25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

2010 Jaco Wasserfall no graffiti, please! Stultorum calami carbones moenia charae

Windhoek, Namibia | 2008

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2011 PETER RICH

LEARNT IN TRANSLATION

Born 20 March 1945 Education 1991: Masters in Architecture, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, Gauteng; 1973: Bachelor of Architecture, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, Gauteng Projects featured The Mennel Pavilion, Johannesburg, Gauteng (1992); Mapungubwe Interpretation Centre, Mapungubwe National Park, Limpopo (2009)

P

eter Rich is dedicated to the creation of authentic contemporary African architecture. He is a founding Partner of Light Earth Designs, a collaboration based in the UK and Rwanda, set up to develop sustainable technological solutions for the developing world.  Peter Rich was also mentor at Global Studio Istanbul, 2005, and Local Convenor for Global Studio Johannesburg 2007 & 2008. Rich has explored his vision of an African genius loci through his sketch books and his built work; his contribution to the architectural profession over more than three decades has deservingly been recognized. He is the recipient of 16 Awards of Merits, the Gold Medal from the South African Institute of Architecture in 2010 and has received numerous International Awards including the World Architecture Festival - WAF 2009 World Building of the Year for the Mapungubwe Interpretation Centre. It was at the University of the Witwatersrand where he later held a lecturing position and where the major influence of Pancho Guedes is credited to having been instrumental in arousing his interest in

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the African continent, its people and their aesthetic pursuits, making Peter one of South Africa’s foremost authorities on the subject. Through the lessons learnt from the modest African vernacular and his engagement with grassroots communities, combined with a thorough Modernist background, Peter Rich was increasingly able to distil and develop an architectural language pertinent to the socio-economic circumstances of the African continent – unique both in interpretation and implementation. He is a most deserving laureate and is praised for his exceptional architectural insight, his creative output, his continued teaching commitments (currently mostly abroad) as well as his contribution to Africa’s architectural legacy. He teaches and lectures extensively across the World, regularly organizing exchanges between students from the US and Europe to Africa.

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


Awards 1974 1982 1986

1991

1992

1994 1995 1996 1997 1997 1999 2000 2000 2001 2002

2003 2003

House Janse van Rensberg, Bloemfontein, Free State Bopitikelo Community and Cultural Center, Molatedi, North West Province (World Architecture Awards, under the auspices of RIBA) (Best public / cultural building in the region African and the Middle East) (National Award of Merit, South African Institute of Architects) Bushbuckridge boulevard and transport interchange, Mpumalanga Rwandan Statehouse, Kigali, Rwanda Mapungubwe Interpretation Centre, Limpopo (The World Building of the Year, World Architecture Festival, 2009) (The World Building, Culture Category Winner, World Architecture Festival, 2009) (David Alsop Sustainability Award, British Structural Awards, The Institution of Structural Engineers, Britain, 2009 ) (Holcim Award for Sustainable Construction, Acknowledgement Prize, Africa / Middle East) (World Architecture Forum Awards, organised by Architectural Review and Architectural Record– Shortlisted for Best Cultural Building Worldwide 2009) Orbit Fet College Hospitality Centre, Rustenberg, North West Province Thematic Masterplan for Axum, Ethiopia Sustainable Shells, awarded in collaberation with Michael Ramage. The Earth Awards, London, Citygate Refurbishment for FR-2 offices Naperville, Chicago, USA International Prize for Sustainable Architecture, Silver Medal The Earth Awards, Built Environment Category winner

2005 2005

2008 2009 2009

2010

2010 2011 2011

2011 Peter Rich learnt in translation

Selected Projects and Bloubergstrand Housing, Cape Town, Western Cape Westridge House, Parktown, Johannesburg, Gauteng Elim Shopping Centre, Elim, Northern Province (National Award of Merit, South African Institute of Architects 1992) Kemp House, Natures Valley, Western Cape (National Award of Merit, South African Institute of Architects 1992) Mennell Pavilion, Melrose, Johannesburg, Gauteng (National Award of Merit, South African Institute of Architects 1992) New Centre Urban Housing, Johannesburg, Gauteng Orange Farm Shopping Centre, Orange Farm, Gauteng Alexandra Shopping Centre, Wynberg, Johannesburg, Gauteng House Klein, Natures Valley, Western Cape Impala Platinum Headquarters, Johannesburg, Gauteng Lekgophung, North West Province House Klein, Cape Town, Western Cape Bwanari Lodge Development, Madikwe, North West Province Mandela’s Yard Museum, Alexandra, Johannesburg, Gauteng Makuleke Cultural Centre and communitybased lodge, Makuleke, Limpopo Bakgatla Moruleng Heritage Centre, Saulpoort, North West Province Bisho Leadership Centre, Bisho, Eastern Cape House Kennedy, George, Western Cape (National Award of Merit, South African Institute of Architects 2003) (Award of Commendation, The Cape Institute of Architects) (National Award of Excellence, South African Institute of Architects 2003)

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THE MENNEL PAVILION

Melrose, Johannesburg, Gauteng | 1992

A number of residential commissions allowed Rich to experiment with and develop a particular architectural language in different contexts. All these residential projects demonstrate a commitment to clearly defined external space and also show the adoption of spatial ideas learned from the rural vernacular. Mennel Pavilion consists of a pool house and library built in the garden of a house in a central Johannesburg suburb. The siting of the pavilion allows for a series of simple and well-defined courtyards – outdoor rooms that encourage flexible, open-plan living. The concept of outdoor living and the sequential build-up of space is implicit in the African spatial model. The building is a fusion of the ideals of Modernism with local traditions and culture, rooting the building in its climate and landscape. The building reads as a simple Mies-inspired structure made of exposed steel and glass. The pavilion is refined and rigorously detailed with a sophisticated yet understated use of the steel and glass, establishing a sense of place and a hierarchy of spaces in this otherwise mundane backyard. Two overlapping roof planes structure the building in space; these define and ritualize the entrance walkway as an architectural promenade, with the separate volume of the main building housing a bar and wine cellar. Sliding glass doors, fixed glazing and planar curvilinear walls allow for the integration of inside and outside space, connecting and screening one outdoor room from the other. The pavilion is far more than a refined Modernist artifact. It becomes a cultural statement by combining Modernism with local traditions and endeavors to further strengthen a uniquely South African Architecture.

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25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


MAPUNGUBWE INTERPRETATION CENTRE

The Mapungubwe Interpretation Centre is sited at the confluence of the Limpopo and Shashe Rivers and located within the Mapungubwe National Park. It was therefore important, given the complex local politics that no overt references were made to any one local group; in effect, this meant that Rich could not engage in any community consultation and so he turned to the wonderfully dramatic landscape of the park for inspiration. A groundbreaking collaboration with engineers based at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Boston and the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg led to the adoption of a catenary vaulted structural solution – domed organic forms that simply expressed the forces found in nature. Innovative computational analyses proved that large spans could be achieved using relatively low-strength soil tiles built in thin layers. The hand-pressed, air-dried soil tiles were made by local women as part of a clientinitiated, poverty-relief project. Through the invention of a simple bent-timber guide-work system, local low-skilled workers could be involved in constructing the seemingly complex forms. The resulting vaulted structures are thin, structurally efficient, inexpensive and extremely sustainable. The internal exhibition spaces are archaic and cavelike. The textures of the finishes and exposed tiled soffits are imperfect, skin-like, and celebrate the beauty of nature and the handmade. On approach, the stone-clad vaulted roofs blend in with the rocky topography. At the same time, and in sharp contrast, the thin edges of the arched structures are revealed and the vaults seem to soar and ‘billow’ out of the earth. This revolutionary vaulting technology has been specifically developed with the intention of application in developing-world contexts, where labour-intensive construction using low-skilled local people and materials is economical, sustainable and can have a positive effect on livelihoods.

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

2011 Peter Rich learnt in translation

Mapungubwe National Park, Limpopo | 2009

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2012 STAN FIELD

FOR THE LOVE OF ARCHITECTURE

Born 15 December 1943 Education 1968: Masters in Architecture, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; 1967: Bachelor of Architecture, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, Western Cape Projects featured House Miller, Sandton, Gauteng (1972); Ubuntu Centre, Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape (2007)

S

tan Field has practiced in three countries where his work has been widely acclaimed. He launched his practice in South Africa in the early 70’s – his first project, the Miller House – won the National Award of Merit. Stan had a thriving practice in Johannesburg before moving to Israel, where he was appointed Chief Architect to the City of Jerusalem in 1978, and a partner at Moshe Safdie’s office. Stan opened his own office in Palo Alto, California in 1990, where his work has seen local, national, and international acclaim. Stan’s work is infused with his own infectious optimism and commitment to the ability of architecture to inspire and transform. His projects have included large scale planning projects, master plans, urban and town planning projects, institutional buildings, custom residences and residential developments, design guide-lines, wineries, religious buildings, and most recently, The Ubuntu Centre in South Africa. In 2006 Stan formed Field Architecture with his son Jess. The work and designs are born of an inter-generational dialogue that is optimistic, deeply caring, and highly motivating and aims to transmit this attitude and vibe to everyone involved in a project from clients, to consultants, and down to the craftspeople working on the job site. They believe that architecture, in its highest capacity spans generations. It is an attitude towards building that must be at once relevant and timeless.

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He captured his own approach to architecture in an essay that he wrote for Architecture SA in May/June 2005: The thin horizontal bands of white marble that Louis I Kahn embedded in the Dhaka Assembly Hall are to his architecture as the five lines of music are to the markings of ‘existence’ about which a work or piece is played. And the expression of this gives the work ‘presence’. In the case of music, the written score, the diagram, is the encoded algorithm around which numerous interpretations can be expressed. With Architecture, the composer and the expresser are one and the interpretation belongs to all. In the same way that a musical interpretation can only exist in the ‘now’, so too an architect’s inspiration does not linger in the confines of the conscious mind, to be distilled and sanitized by all that has gone before…inspiration can also only exist in the ‘now’. Field Architecture’s commissions in the United States, South Africa, Israel and South America have garnered numerous international awards. These include multiple Progressive Architecture (P/A) Awards, AIA Awards and the prestigious Fulton Award. World Architecture News recently named Field Architecture one of “the leading lights of architecture in the 21st century.”

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


Goldman Residence, Palo Alto, California 1997 Kaplan Residence, Sea Ranch, California 2001 Sculptor’s Residence,Skyline Boulevard, California 2002 The Reeds Houses, Kwazulu Natal 2005 (Honour Award, American Institute of Architects, San Mateo Chapter 2005) Negev Desert Sustainable Master Plan, Negev, Israel 2006 Ubuntu Community & Health Center, Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape 2007 (Honour Award, American Institute of Architects, San Mateo Chapter 2008) (Honour Award, Progressive Architecture) (Fulton Award, Concrete in Architecture 2011) (Regional Award for Architecture, South African Institute of Architects) (Award of Excellence, South African Institute of Architects 2012) Pan African Parliament (competition entry), 2009 Johannesburg, Gauteng Cebalo Residence, Atherton, California Karoo Wilderness Center, Karoo, Northern Cape 2010 (Progeressive Architecture Award, Citation 2011) Waterfall Residence, Calistoga, California Chabad Synagogue, Palo Alto, California 2011 Electric Vehicle Factory and Showroom, Honolulu, Hawaii Kol Emeth Synagogue, Palo Alto, California 2012

2012 Stan Field for the love of architecture

Selected Projects and Awards Miller House, Sandton, Gauteng 1972 Germiston Civic Center (competition entry) Germiston, Gauteng Kaminer Residence, Sandton, Gauteng 1973 Kramer Residence, Johannesburg, Gauteng Five Houses Gallo Manor, Sandton, Gauteng 1974 U-Nit Residence, Bedfordview, Gauteng 1975 Cassim Residence, Johannesburg, Gauteng 1976 Mitchell’s Plain Low Income Housing (competition entry), 1977 Cape Town, Western Cape Docrat Residence, Johannesburg, Gauteng Haas Promenade, Jerusalem, Israel 1979 Bet El Multi-Residential, Northern Jerusalem, Israel 1983 French Hill Synagogue, Jerusalem, Israel Bayit B’Israel Master Plan 112 Condominiums, Jerusalem, Israel 1985 Givat Haradar Multi-Residential, Jerusalem, Israel Yitzchaki Residence, Jerusalem, Israel Mamilla Multi-Family Houses and Commercial, Jerusalem, Israel 1988 Ramot Synagogue, Jerusalem, Israel 1989 Zulman Residence Remodel, Palo Alto, California 1992 Holocaust Memoral, Los Gatos, California 1994 Old Adobe Residence, Los Altos Hills, California 1995 Blue Oaks Master Plan, Portola Valley, California Chabad Center, Palo Alto, California 1996 Pacific Fertility Clinic, Los Angeles, California

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MILLER HOUSE

Johannesburg, Gauteng | 1972

Stan Field’s first significant commission after returning to South Africa was the Miller House at Khyber Rock, north of Johannesburg. Field was confronted with a boulder-strewn koppie when he arrived on site. To develop a clear understanding of what the site had to offer he spent nights sleeping under the stars and fashioned an elaborate model of the site on which every rock was beautifully carved out of wood, even naming the rocks. Field Architects describe the house as “a dance of structure and walls that swept and curved around and between the rocks, not touching anything”. The architecture became a dialogue between natural and man-made formation. No boulder would be moved and no built structure would touch them, as both shared and vied for the common support of the ground. Though the influence of Louis I Kahn is still present in the house at Khyber Rock, the plan bore little resemblance to Kahn’s rigor when designing the plan for any building. For Stan this was a liberating moment in his career. He developed a respect for land form, which then became a recurring influence in his work. The intent of the architectural formation would be expressed through a distinctly man made geometry in juxtaposition to nature’s organic shapes, where the deep spaces between the two become the counter form giving shape to the shadows. By preserving some of the boulders inside the house the same effect was achieved by celebrating organic shape inside a manmade geometric surround.

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UBUNTU CENTRE

With the design of the Ubuntu Centre in Port Elizabeth the site and the landscape again formed a significant influence in his work. As with the Miller house he spent many hours on the site, walking and talking with the local residents. He recorded the foot traffic that was present and mapped the desire paths that was formed by locals crossing the site. The building serves a community of roughly 400 000 people and by respecting existing movement patterns that was present on site the building gained a central position within the community, be it a humble presence in the way that it forms itself around the community’s flow patterns. He then used this documentation to assist in a designing a building that you ‘go through’ rather than ‘go to’. This remains an effective strategy to embed a building into the psyche of a community. It respects the preferences and choices of a community and adds to it by becoming real in the spaces that was left void by prior use. By accommodating functions like the Aids Clinic in previously void spaces, but right next to existing movement patterns, facilities that tend to be obscured by prejudice and stigmatization becomes accessible to a community without the negative impact on the individual who visits them. Field Architects strived to provide the community with the best that was on offer and believe that no building should offer anything less.

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

2012 Stan Field for the love of architecture

Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape | 2007

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2013 KATE OTTEN

ARCHITECTURE FOR EVERYDAY Born 28 March 1964 Education Bachelor of Architecture, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, Gauteng. Projects featured Women’s jail, Johannesburg, Gauteng (2002); Lulu Kati Kati, Johannesburg, Gauteng (2005)

K

ate Otten graduated from the University of the Witswatersrand, Johannesburg, with 100% in Architectural Design, against the backdrop of violent struggles against Apartheid oppression. The darkness of the time profoundly influenced her work, which weaves together materials, light, and landscape in a process of ‘crafting’, to create places that feed and nurture the human spirit. Kate believes that buildings have an emotional presence – ‘fulfilling the emotional and spiritual needs of the users is as important as creating a functional space.’ As an architect, she creates an overall template which allows a looseness within which the detail of the building is allowed to

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emerge on site. This allows for an ‘economy’ in building which she believes is relevant to the economic reality of South Africa details are sophisticated but use simple materials and techniques, opportunities for innovating on site are made possible and a relatively unskilled workforce can be empowered to be part of the building process. Kate is an active member of several professional bodies, involved in architectural education as an assessor/examiner, and remains deeply passionate about promoting the contribution of women to the profession. Her work has been widely published and has won numerous awards locally and internationally.

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013


Community Library, new community library, Tembisa, Ekurhuleni, Gauteng Love Shack, one room getaway, Utopia, Magaliesburg, Gauteng Gabriel’s Garden, 2005, new home office, Westcliffe, Johannesburg, Gauteng (Architecture + Cityscape Award, Dubai, Commercial / mixed use built Category) (Gauteng Institute for Architecture, Regional Commendation) Lulu Kati Kati, new residence and cottage, Melville, Johannesburg, Gauteng (Architecture + Cityscape Award, Dubai, Residential Category & Leisure Category) Community Library, new community library, Olifantsfontein, Ekurhuleni, Gauteng (Regional Finalist, Gauteng Institute for Architecture) Fourth Avenue Investments, conversion of 2 x houses to shops on a high street, Parkhurst, Johannesburg, Gauteng (Architecture + Cityscape Award, Dubai, Commercial / Mixed-use Built Category (Merit Award for Architecture Gauteng Institute for Architecture) (Merit Award for Architecture South African Institute of Architects) (Plascon Prism Award, Commercial category) The Fort, restoration and adaptive re-use of the Old Fort, Constitution Hill, Johannesburg, Gauteng Palliative Care Centre, research, training and out-patient palliative care centre, Chris Hani Baragwaneth Hospital, Soweto, Johannesburg, Gauteng Matcboxology, office interior, Parktown North, Johannesburg, Gauteng (Project Award, South African Institute of Architects) Kings Walden Lodge, boutique hotel, Agatha Mountains, Tzaneen District, Limpopo No 3 Kotze street, JV with Lemon Pebble, conversion of historic hostel into half-way house, Hillbrow, Johannesburg, Gauteng Community Clinics, level 1 clinic, Tamaho, Reiger Park and Alra Park, Ekurhuleni, Gauteng House Omisore, residential alterations & additions, Parktown North, Johannesburg, Gauteng (Regional Commendation, Gauteng Institute for Architecture) Fourth Quater, new shops and offices, Parkhurst, Johannesburg, Gauteng Somerset House, new office building, Kigali, Rwanda Anglo Re-Invention, 2012, part of winning competition entry built, JV with Mashabane Rose Architects, refurbishment to existing office building and existing heritage building, Johannesburg, Gauteng House Blount, new residence, Inanda, Johannesburg, Gauteng House Wagner, residential alterations & additions, Parkview, Johannesburg, Gauteng

25 Sophia Gray Memorial Lectures and Exhibitions 1989-2013

2004 2005

2006

2007

2008

2009 2010

2011

2012

2013

2013 Kate Otten architecture for every day

Selected Projects and Awards House Grant-Marshall, residential alteration & addition, 1990 Benmore, Johannesburg, Gauteng FAG, new warehouse and office alterations, City & Suburban, Johannesburg, Gauteng Metal Box, new warehouse & offices, Spartan, 1991 Johannesburg, Gauteng Hunta property, new warehouse, Clayville, Johannesburg, Gauteng Casa Baba, residential alteration & addition, Melville, Johannesburg, Gauteng House Baard/ Lund, residential alteration & addition, 1992 Kensington, Johannesburg, Gauteng Hunta property, new warehouse & offices, Crown mines, Johannesburg, Gauteng House Staude, residential alteration & addition, Melville, 1993 Johannesburg, Gauteng (Award of Merit, South African Institute of Architects) Studio Siopis, new art studio, Melville, Johannesburg, Gauteng Stannic Offices, new offices, Bramley, Johannesburg, Gauteng 1994 House Leigh, residential alteration & addition, Parkhurst, Johannesburg, Gauteng Writers Studio, Parktown, Johannesburg, Gauteng 1995 Studio Rowe, new photographic studio, Sandton, Johannesburg, Gauteng Profit Plan, conversion of house to offices, Melville, 1996 Johannesburg, Gauteng House Ingpen, new residence, Hartebeesport Dam, Tshwane, Gauteng Court House, 3 new houses, Sandhurst, 1997 Johannesburg, Gauteng MATEP centre, art therapy centre, Mofolo South, Soweto, Johannesburg, Gauteng. (Cityscape Architectural Review Award Winner of Community Building Category) Cabanga, conference and training facility, Northwold, 1998 Johanesburg, Gauteng 1999 Craft Market, multi-tenant craft market, Rosebank, Johannesburg, Gauteng Green Kitchen, residential additions & alterations, 2000 Parkview, Johannesburg, Gauteng House Nhleko, new holiday residence, Pringle Bay, Cape Town, Western Cape International House, new students’ residence, 2001 University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, Gauteng (Architecture + Cityscape Award, Dubai Housing and Residential Category) House Maritz, new holiday residence, Misty Cliffs, 2002 Cape Town, Western Cape Women’s Gaol, new offices and living museum space in historic jail building, Constitution Hill, Johannesburg, Gauteng (Regional Commendation, South African Institute of Architects) Kate’s Barn, new home office/studio, 2003 Melville, Johannesburg, Gauteng

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WOMEN’S JAIL: NEW OFFICES AND LIVING MUSEUM SPACE IN HISTORIC JAIL BUILDING Constitution Hill, Johannesburg, Gauteng | 2002

The Women’s Jail was built in 1909 and is a fine example of English prison architecture of that era. It is better known, however as a place where women anti-apartheid activists were unjustly imprisoned. The prison was closed in 1982 and subsequently occupied by the Traffic Department and Civil Co-operation Bureau – an Apartheid government organisation notorious for their brutal harassment and murder of political activists. The walled precinct of the Women’s Jail has, through this project, been in part restored and in part adapted for re-use as exhibition and office space. Two new office buildings have also been integrated. As testimony to the Jail’s transformation from a place of oppression and brutality to a place where human dignity is restored, the new office buildings house the Commission on Gender Equality and other Human Rights Commissions. One of the challenges of this project was how to do justice to the claims of the past and yet acknowledge the needs of the present and the future. The horror of the prisoners’ experiences, the injustice of Apartheid laws and the silencing of protest, had to be felt in the remains of structures and amplified through the architecture. It was not only architectural history that was at stake here but the history of human beings, their lives distorted within these spaces. The striking contradiction of the architecture of the jail – a semblance of grace despite its history - had to be revealed. This design enhances the cultural significance of the site. It provides an eloquent platform for the voices of the women who in previous decades were silenced. Architecture, rather than being a passive heritage artefact becomes a prompt for renewal, without compromising the respect due to the past.

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LULU KATI KATI

‘Lulu kati kati’, Swahili for ‘pearl in the middle’ is a jewel of a house on a left-over sliver of land at the end of the high street, a site too steep to be a road, located in the middle of suburban Melville, Johannesburg. The site measures 8m at the top and 12 m at the bottom. It has a 22, 5° fall across its length. The house is on three levels, each with its own character: entered at street level, at the mid-level of the building, and proceeding through a courtyard of tall, indigenous trees, alongside a pond and across a bridge, the house is organised to fit the site. This mid-level is a continuous horizontal space suspended in the landscape. Cooking, living and eating occur here, opening onto a large balcony organically worked into the branches of the tree; sleeping areas are accommodated at the top level. Here the roof floats above high level windows lifting your focus towards the sky; and below, the bottom level is cave-like, anchored to the rock and the earth. The rock face is incorporated into the internal space. This level has a bathroom, kitchenette and large playroom opening onto a patio, stone terraced garden, ponds and a bio-pool. The house is suspended from 6 massive gum poles between the high street and the Melville koppies beyond; situated between the natural rock face and an 80 year old Dombeya tree. Building and landscape are intertwined. The design incorporates natural lighting, ventilation, heating and cooling. Solar energy is used to heat domestic water and for space heating in winter. Re-claimed, recycled and on-site materials are used as well as local labour and skills. The sun-screens are made from invader plants; insulation and privacy screens from recycled plastic cut into plant-like forms. Rain water is collected, circulated and filtered through ponds and a reed bed to the bio-pool.

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2013 Kate Otten architecture for every day

Melville, Johannesburg, Gauteng | 2005

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REFERENCES 1989 Mira Fassler Kamstra pp 8-11

Murray, N. 2010. Architectural Modernism and Apartheid modernity in South Africa: a critical enquiry into the work of architect and urban designer Roelof Uytenbogaardt, 1960 - 2009. Unpublished PhD Thesis, Faculty of Art and Architecture, University of Cape Town.

Contributor Jan-Hendrik Nel

Rozendal, N. 1993. House Uytenbogaardt, Kommetjie, Cape. Architecture SA, September/October: 14-17.

Photo References All images provided by Architect

Suter, E. 2011. A sound in the urban forest. Property Magazine, Western Cape Issue, December / January: 34 – 35. Online. Available at: http://issuu.com/ andreamn/docs/wc_decjan_2011. Accessed 16 May 2014.

Text Refrences Artefacts, 2014. Online. Available at: http://www.artefacts.co.za/main/Buildings/ archframes.php?archid=2095&countadd=1. Accessed on 24 April 2014.

1990 Roelof Uytenbogaardt pp 12-15 Contributor Annemarie Wagener

Wolff, I. 2009. Werdmuller Centre – an artefact of an ephemeral context. In South African Journal of Art History, Vol 24(1): 75-86.

1991 Gawie Fagan pp 16-19

Photo References Page 12. Uytenbogaardt, R. 1990. Watercolour of thesis proposal. Sophia Gray exhibition

Contributor Martie Bitzer

Page 13 & 14. Wolff, Heinrich and Ilze. 2014. House Uytenbogaardt.

Photo References

Page 14. Plans, sections and elevations sketches. In Rozendal, N. 1993. House Uytenbogaardt: Kommetjie, Cape. Architecture SA September/October. pp. 14-17.

Page 16. Fagan, Gwen. ca. 1965. Gawie Fagan on site, die Es.

Page 15. Wolff, Heinrich and Ilze. 2014. Werdmuller Centre exterior.

Page 18. Fagan, Gwen and Gawie. ca.1965. Die Es interior and exterior views including street elevation.

Page 15. Uytenbogaardt, R. Circa 1973. Conceptual sketch showing the elevated Claremont Boulevard on the right. UCT Manuscripts and Archives, Roelof Uytenbogaardt Papers.

Page 18. Moore, Heather. 2014. Bottom two interior photos.

Text Refrences

Page 19. Fagan, G. Castle restoration.

Artefacts.co.za. 2014. Uytenbogaardt Roelof Sarel. Online. Available at: http:// www.artefacts.co.za/main/Buildings/archframes.php?archid=2099. Accessed on 16 May 2014.

Page 19. Pretorius, H.B. 2014. Castle exterior views.

Brink, B. 2011. Subjugated South African buildings: the Bonwit Clothing Factory in Cape Town and the Peri-urban Areas Health Board Building in Pretoria. South African Journal of Art History, 26(3): 1 - 26.

Text References

Brink, B. S.a. Roelof Sarel Uytenbogaardt (1933-1998): Architect and Urban Designer. Online. Available at: http://uir.unisa.ac.za/bitstream/ handle/10500/5804/Biography%20-%20Uytenbogaardt%20Roelof%20 Sarel%20June%202012.doc?sequence=1. Accessed on 12 February 2014. Lillie, A & van Graan, A. 2013. Impact assessment report regarding a proposed development: Werdmuller Centre, Erf 54472, Cape Town. Online. Available at: http://www.docomomo.com/pdfs/events/ heritage/070619_094150_034842_105055_13018%2020131111%20 Werdmuller%20Centre%20-%20Impact%20assessment%20report%20-%20 Draft%20for%20comment%20by%20IAPs%20%283%29.pdf. Accessed on 12 April 2014.

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Wolff, H & Wolff, I. 2012. The significance of failure. Online. Available at: http:// www.wolffarchitects.co.za/category/research/heritage-research/. Accessed on 12 April 2014.

Page 17. Moore, Heather. 2014. Chimney detail die Es.

Page 18. Fagan, G. 1965. Elevation, die Es.

Page 19. Fagan, G. Detail sketch.

Artefacts, 2014. <http://www.artefacts.co.za/main/Buildings/archframes. php?archid=2121> Fagan, Gawie & Fagan, Gwen, 1975. Church Street in the Land of Waveren. Cape Town: Tulbagh Restoration Committee Fagan, G. 1985. Gabriël Fagan. Architect’s House, Camps Bay, Cape Town, in Beck, Haig (ed). UIA International Architect : Southern Africa (Issue 8): 48-49. Adjusted from Gabriel Fagan in UIA, 1985: 48 The above includes excerpts from the Award of excellence citation, 2002

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1992 Willie Meyer pp 20-23

1994 Jack Barnett pp 28-31

Contributor

Contributor

Gerhard Bosman

Kobus du Preez

Photo References

Photo References

Page 20. Meyer, W.O. 1961 Section Sketch RAU. From the UFS Department of Architecture and Urban and Regional Planning Design library

Page 28. Barnett, JJ. 1968. Baxter theatre watercolour. Sophia Gray exhibition 1994.

Page 20. Photo, RAU. From the UFS Department of Architecture and Urban and Regional Planning Design library.

Page 29. Viljoen, W. 2014. Baxter theatre roofscape.

Page 22. House Abalone. Source: Bosman, G. 2014. Provided by UFS Dept of Architecture.

Page 30. Barnett, JJ. 1968. Photo and 3D sketch of Welkom Civic Centre. Sophia Gray exhibition. 1994.

Page 23. Meyer, W.O. Concept Sketch.

Page 30. Venter, Z. and Vorster, N. 2014. Detail exterior of Welkom Civic Centre.

Page 23. Meyer, W.O. Ca 1961. Scale Model of RAU. From the UFS Department of Architecture and Urban and Regional Planning Design library.

Page 31. Barnett, JJ. 1968. Baxter theatre Section. In Architect and Builder. Nov 1977.

Page 23. Photos, RAU. From the UFS Department of Architecture and Urban and Regional Planning Design library.

Page 31. Viljoen, W. 2014. Baxter theatre exterior.

Text References Artefacts, 2014. Meyer, Wilhelm Olaf. Online. Available at: http://www.artefacts. co.za/main/Buildings/archframes.php?archid=2112&countadd=1. Accessed 3 June 2014.

Text References Artefacts, 2014. Barnett Jack. Online. Available at: http://www.artefacts.co.za/ main/Buildings/archframes.php?archid=2220. Accessed on 3 June 2014. Barnett, J. 1987. University Centre. Architecture SA, Jul/Aug

Meyer, W.O. 1967. Huis Plettenbergbaai, Kaap. South African Architectural Re cord. Dec. 1967.

Barnett, J. 1991. Professional Contrasts. Architecture SA, May/Jun

Francois Pienaar and Chris Malan of CO- ARC Internation Architects Inc. for the write-up and contribution.

Dubow, N. 1996. Jack Barnett, architect. Architecture SA, Sept/Oct

1993 Glen Gallagher pp 24-27

Barnett, J. 1994. Personal Curriculum Vitae

Japha, D. 1987. New Buildings at UWC: Filling the Vacuum? Architecture SA, Jul/Aug 1973. College of Music. Architect and Builder, September

Contributor

1982. Gold Medal for Cape Town architect. Architect and Builder, January

Gerhard Bosman

Greig, D. 1971. A Guide to Architecture in South Africa. Cape Town: Timmins. p. 224

Photo References Page 24. GAPP architects,1992. Sandton Library roof light. Page 25. GAPP architects,1992. Sandton Library Arcade on West facade. Page 26. Bosman, G. 2014. House Gallagher Models Page 26. Gallagher family. 2014. House Gallagher exterior. Page 26. ca. 1970. Sketch plan house Gallagher. Page 27. Gallagher, G. 1992. Sandton Library floor plan. Provided by GAPP architects

1968. Welkom â&#x20AC;&#x201C; capital of the Orange Free State Goldfields. Johannesburg: Felstar. p. 125 2013. The Ernest Oppenheimer Theatre Revived! Promag, fourth quarter. p. 3 Hartdegen, P. 1988. Our Building Heritage: an illustrated history. Halfway House: Ryll. p. 281 1977. Baxter Theatre, University of Cape Town. Architect and Builder, November. p. 2 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 9

Page 27. GAPP Architects, 1992. All photos. Text References Artefacts. 2014. Gallagher, Glen John Brown. Online. Available at: http://www. artefacts.co.za/main/Buildings/archframes.php?archid=2148. Accessed on 10 June 2014

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1995 Hannes Meiring pp 32-35

Text References

Contributor

Bell, M 2010. Online. http://www.artefacts.co.za/main/Buildings/bldgframes. php?bldgid=8289&archid=2352 – Accessed: 25 June 2014

Kobus du Preez

Cooke, J. Amancio Guedes (1925-) in UIA International Architect Issue 8. 1985. p.61

Photo References Page 32. Viljoen, W. 2014. Entrance to Stellenbosch Conservatoire of Music. Page 33. Viljoen, W. 2014. Window detail of Stellenbosch Conservatoire of Music. Page 34. Pretorius, H.B. 2014. Sketch of siteplan. Page 34. Parliament interior and exterior views. In Architect and Builder. April 1988. Page 35. Pretorius, H.B. 2014. Interior sketch of Stellenbosch Conservatoire of Music.

Cook, P. 2012. Pancho Guedes. In Architectural Review. 27 March 2012. On line <http://www.architectural-review.com/archive/pancho guedes/8628204.article> Green, C. 2006. AMÂNCIO D’ALPOIM (PANCHO) GUEDES: a biographical essay. Online Available from: http://www.guedes.info/abcontfram.htm. Accessed: 25 June 2014 Guedes, Lonka and Pedro. [Eds] 2003. Viva Pancho. Johannesburg: Total Cad Academy

Page 35. Viljoen, W. 2014. Exterior of Stellenbosch Conservatoire of Music.

1997 Revel Fox pp 40-43

Text References

Contributor

2005. Book Reviews, Designing Ways, July, issue 67, p. 120

Jan Ras

2010. Obituaries, Architecture South Africa, p. 5

Photo References

Greig, D. 1971. A Guide to Architecture in South Africa. Cape Town: Timmins. p. 96

All images provided by Revel Fox and Partners also available in: Fox, J. (ed). 1998. Revel Fox: reflections on the making of space. Catalogue

Beck, H. (Ed.) 1985. Munnik Visser Black Fish. Parliamentary precinct, Cape Town (1984 – 85). UIA

Text References

Fletcher, B. 1987. Sir Banister Fletcher’s a History of Architecture, 19th ed. (Ed: Musgrove, J.) London: Butterworth. p. 1198 International Architect, Issue 8. p. 8

Fox, R. Quoted from the Sophia Gray memorial lecture. 28 May 1997. (In Fox, J (ed). 1998.) Artefacts. 2014. Revel Fox. Online at: http://www.artefacts.co.za/main/Buildings/ archframes.php?archid=2140 Accessed 30 May 2014

1988. Extensions to the Houses of Parliament. Architect & Builder, April. p. 2 – 7

Fox, J. (ed). 1998. Revel Fox: reflections on the making of space. Catalogue (pp.142-143)

1996 Pancho Guedes pp 36-39

Award Committee citation, Architecture SA, November 1985

Contributor

1998 Adèle Naudé Santos pp 44-47

Wanda Verster

Contributor

Photo References

Jako Olivier

Page 36. Bell, M. 2012. Smiling Lion exterior.

Photo References

Page 37. Stoffberg, M. 2012. Smiling Lion exterior. Page 38. Pict 12. Saipal Bakery - L. Marques (Maputo) - the section dreams the elevations. Page 38. Bell, M. 2012. Saipal Bakery exterior. Page 39. Pict 17. Smiling Lion - L. Marques (Maputo) - 9 studies for side elevation. http://www.guedes.info/drawings/ Page 39. Bell, M. 2012. Smiling Lion roofscape. Page 39. Stoffberg, M. 2012. Smiling Lion detail exterior.

All images provided by Santos Prescott Architects also available at http://www.santosprescott.com Text references Adèle Naudé Santos, 2010, CURRICULUM VITAE, Available from: <https:// architecture.mit.edu/sites/all/files/.../user/Santos_CV_2010.doc>. [1 May 2014]. Adèle Naudé Santos. Available from: http://sap.mit.edu/people/deans_office/ adele_naude_santos. [1May 2014] House Stekhoven. Available from: http://santosprescott.com/project/house stekhoven/. [1 May 2014].

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OH14 Adèle Naudé Santos and Antonio De Souza Santos – Interview, 2013. Avalable from: <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VPJNRCRNBK8>. [1 May 2014].

2001 Hentie Louw pp 56-57 Contributor

OH14 Adèle Naudé Santos and Antonio De Souza Santos – House Steckhoven 04 , 2013. Avalable from: <http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=ayQ6WS2vDuU>. [1 May 2014].

Hein Raubenheimer

OH14 Iain Low interview, 2013. Avalable from: <http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=OhyjnNaeQVk>. [1 May 2014].

All text provided by Hentie Louw.

OH14 Adèle Naudé Santos and Antonio De Souza Santos – Rowan Lane and Intro 01, video, Open House Architecture, 12 Jun 2013, viewed 1 May 2014, <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ayQ6WS2vDuU>

2002 Louis Karol pp 58-61 Contributor

Principles. Available from: http://santosprescott.com/principals/. [1 May 2014]

Jan Ras

Rowan Lane Houses. Available from: http://santosprescott.com/project/rowan lane-houses/. [1 May 2014].

Photo References

Text References

Page 58. Louis Karol Associates. ca. 1985. Cape Sun Hotel. Page 60. Louis Karol Associates. ca. 1992. V & A Wharf.

1999 Jack Diamond pp 48-51

Page 61. Louis Karol Associates.1984. Cape Sun hotel Elevation.

Contributor

Text References

Jako Olivier

Beck, Haig (ed) 1985. UIA International Architect Issue 8: Southern Africa.

Photo References All images and sketches provided by Jack Diamond. Text References Abel Joseph Diamond, 2012. Online. Available at: http://www.thecanadianency clopedia.ca/en/article/abel-joseph-diamond/. Accessed on 10 June 2014. The Toronto Star, June 22, 1999, Tuesday, Edition 1, Curtain Rises On City’s Op era House Design, Byline: Christopher Hume. Online. Available at: www. thestar.com/. Accessed 10 June 2014

Architect’s notes, 2014. Louis Karol Architects

2003 Peter Buchanan pp 62-63 Contributor Zack Wessels Photo and Text References Ten Shades of Green. Online. Available at: http://www.tenshadesofgreen.org/. Accessed on 16 June 2014.

2000 Stanley Saitowitz pp 52-55

Architect’s notes.

Contributor Hein Raubenheimer

2004 Paul Mikula pp 64-67

Photo References

Contributor

Page 52 & 53. Saitowitz, S. 1976. Brebnor House.

Zack Wessels

Page 54. Saitowitz, S. All images.

Photo References

Page 55. Saitowitz, S. 1977. Brebnor house plan.

All images by Paul Mikula.

Page 55. Wagener, A. 2007 and bottom right Saitowitz, S. 1977. Text References Guedes, A 1980. Catherine House 1976. In Architecture SA, Winter. Benedikt, M. 1993. Stanley Saitowitz’s Transvaal House. (Unknown Publication)

Text Refernces Vukani Museum. 2014. Online. Available at: http://eshowemuseums.org.za/ index.php/vukani-museum/. Accessed on 16 June 2014. Wilson, A. 2006. Vukani Museum, KZN. Architecture South Africa. May-June, p.26-29. Architect’s notes 2014

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2005 Bannie Britz pp 68-71

2007 Jo Noero pp 76-79

Contributor

Contributor

Annemarie Wagener

Jan-Hendrik Nel

Photo References

Photo References

All images are form the Bannie Britz Collection at the UFS Department of Architecture

All images provided by Jo Noero.

Text References

Text References Architect’s notes

Artefacts.co.za, 2014. Britz, Barend Johannes (Bannie). Online Available at:: http://www.artefacts.co.za/main/Buildings/archeframes.php?archid=2123. Accessed on 12 April 2014.

2008 Practice Van der Merwe Miszewski Architects (VDMMA) pp 80-83

Brink, B. Framing the role that South African architects played in supporting or opposing the apartheid state. Online. Available at <http://unisa.ac.za/> Accessed on 12 March 2014.

Contributor

Britz, BJ. 2009. Front piece: Sophia Gray memorial Lecture 2005 Edited Version. Architecture SA: Journal of the South African Institute of Architects Special Edition, July - August: 7 - 14

Photo and Text References

Britz, Bannie. Bannie Britz and Michael Scholes. Secretariat for the Bophuta tswana Government, Mmabatho, 1978-83. In Beck Haig (ed.). 1985. UIA International Architect: Southern Africa. Issue 8: 30-31.

Henry Pretorius

All images and text provided by VDMMA

2009 Walter Peters pp 84-85

Linning, S. 2013. Commemorating three great lives. Architecture SA: Journal of the South African Institute of Architects, 61, May/June: 5.

Contributor

2006 Designworkshop: SA pp 72-75

Photo References

Walter Peters

Page 84. Peters, W.H. KZNIA journal covers 1982-2009.

Contributor Rudolf Bitzer

Page 85. Du Preez, JL. 2009. Blockhouses at the Sophia gray memorial exhibition. 2009

Photo References

Text References

Page72. Buckland, A. Constitutional Court Exterior 1.

Peters, W.H. 2014.

Page73. Buckland, A. Constitutional Court exterior 2. Page 74. Designworkshopsa. 2004. Constitutional Court Plan. Provided by Practice Page74. Buckland, A. All photos of the Constitutional Court. Page 75. Designworkshopsa. 2000. Electric Ladyland site plan. Provided by Practice

2010 Jaco Wasserfall pp 86-89 Contributor Henry Pretorius Photo References

Page 75. Jardine, R. Electric Ladyland waterfeature view.

All images provided by Jaco Wasserfall (Wasserfall Munting Architects)

Page 75. Gilbert, D. 2000. Electric Ladyland detail exterior and interior photos.

Text References

Text References

All text by Jaco Wasserfall as in Architecture SA. Architect’s notes.

Designworkshop:sa CV and architects’ notes, 2014 Artefacts, 2014. http://www.artefacts.co.za/main/Buildings/bldgframes. php?bldgid=7712. Accessed on 16 June 2014

Fisher, R.C. 1992. Visual lexicon of the South African dwelling. Unibook: Cape Town Moneo, R. 2002. Mansilla + Tunon: A Declaration of Intent. 2G. 27: p4-6

Artefacts, 2014. http://www.artefacts.co.za/main/Buildings/bldgframes. php?bldgid=7714. Accessed on 16 June 2014 106

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Wasserfall, J. 2010. Ernest & Young Offices, Windhoek. Architecture SA Nov/ Dec. Pp. 12-17 Wasserfall, J. 2010. Franco â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Namibian Cultural Centre, Windhoek. Architecture SA, Nov/Dec 2010. Pp. 38-39

2011 Peter Rich pp 90-93 Contributor Martie Bitzer Photo and Text References All images and text provided by Peter Rich.

2012 Stan Field pp 94-97 Contributor Rudolf Bitzer Photo and Text References All images and text provided by Stan Field.

2013 Kate Otten pp 98-101 Contributor Philippa Tumubweinee Photo and Text References All images and text provided by Kate Otten.

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