a product message image
{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade

Page 1

stride

the jogscotland magazine | Spring 2019

The I’m here movement is launched “I donated my kidney to a stranger” Kosgei’s incredible story Get plogging! Plus… the best spring running events for your diary jogscotland.org.uk

1


2 Our fun, friendly jogging groups are perfect for people who want to get active for the first time, or more experienced runners. Nobody is “too slow” to join jogscotland – total beginners welcome!

Mums on the Run helps mums enjoy the physical, social & psychological benefits of being active outdoors. You can take your wee one to class with you in the buggy too!

Running has never been so easy! Whatever your age, whatever your ability Morning, noon and night • Towns, cities, villages Parks, pavements, trails, woodlands, beaches, schools and workplaces For more information visit www.jogscotland.org.uk or call 0131 539 7341 www.facebook.com/JogScotty • www.twitter.com/jogscotland

jogworks

Our Junior jogscotland resource pack is full of games to help you show primary school age children that stride physical activity is fun! jogscotland magazine | Winter 2016

Encouraging employees to be more active makes good business sense. Jogworks can help avoid some of the physical and mental health issues affecting the workplace.


Meet the Jog Crew

Jo Stevens

Sue Gyford

Colin Hutchison

Angie Sutherland

Membership development officer

Digital communications and press officer

Head of Development

jo.stevens@ scottishathletics.org.uk 0131 539 7341

sue.gyford@ scottishathletics.org.uk 0131 539 7350

Coaching administrator (Jog Leader course bookings)

Carol Robison

Andrea Gavin

Laura Kirkland

Membership administrator

Community Strides coordinator

Community Strides coordinator

membership@ scottishathletics.org.uk 0131 476 7321

andrea.gavin@ scottishathletics.org.uk 07801 634 198

laura.kirkland@ scottishathletics.org.uk 07960 582 838

colin.hutchison@ scottishathletics.org.uk 07983 080 925

coaching@ scottishathletics.org.uk 0131 476 7328

Jog Scotty The Jog Dog! Mascot of jogscotland

Stride – the jogscotland members’ magazine Editor: Sue Gyford

Designer: Adrian Hallam, 3fiftysixmedia Ltd

Published four times a year by scottishathletics. Copyright©2019 Scottish Athletics Ltd. www.jogscotland.org.uk

www.twitter.com/jogscotland

www.facebook.com/jogscotty

jogscotland magazine

|

stride Spring 2019


4

Welcome! by Sue Gyford

Stride magazine | Spring 2019 First of all, a huge welcome to all our new members. The start of the year is always a busy time for jogscotland groups as everyone makes their new year’s resolutions. If you started with us this year, and you’re still up and running, congratulations! If you’ve slipped out of the habit, it’s never too late to get back to it. After all, the summer months will come around whether you’re running or not, so you might as well get started now, and by the summer you’ll be feeling fantastic – and so much fitter! One of the highlights of this year so far has been the launch of the I’m here movement, driven by our jog leaders (p8). For some time now, jog leaders have been taking SAMH’s online mental health awareness training, and they told us they’d like a way to show that they’d completed it. And so, I’m here was born. Scores of leaders have donned the I’m here badge, pledging to provide a listening ear for their joggers, and support people to overcome the barriers that can make it harder to get active. On the front cover, you can see Emily Morrison from Tain jogscotland taking her pledge, with the support of her group.

p8 p17

We’re also delighted to be holding a series of Get Togethers for jog leaders to meet one another and share ideas and experiences (p17). So keep telling us how we can support you with your amazing work, jog leaders – we’re listening! Lastly, I have to give special mention to Rachel Cox, whose amazing story you can read on page 12. Rachel’s a jogscotland stalwart, a member and leader over several years. But when we heard that she’d also donated a kidney to a stranger we were bowled over by her kindness and courage. Now she’s running London Marathon to raise money for Kidney Research – what a woman!

Sue Gyford, Editor

stride jogscotland magazine

|

Spring 2019

p12


5

Contents News and events 6 I’m here movement launched 8 The gift of life 12 Plogscotland 15 Jog leader get-togethers 17 Every day’s a school day 18 Drinking in the race experience 20 David Syme - Jogging along 23 Race directory 25 Just click on a title to go straight to the page!

Design: 3fiftysixmedia.com

sponsor and funder jogscotland magazine

|

stride Spring 2019


6

News and events

Quiz time The third annual Northeast JogScotland Quiz Night took place on 16 February, organised again by jog leader Alan Millar. The event at Mannofield Cricket Club in Aberdeen drew teams from jog groups including Nuffield, Airyhall, Queen’s Cross, Westhill, Hazlehead, Bridge of Don, junior parkrun and Rosemount. Winners were Bridge of Don’s Running Joke and a team called Some Random People. A fantastic £900 was raised for charity, to be split between Anthony Nolan and Sensationall, the charities chosen by the winning teams. With the event a sell-out, Alan says he’s already looking for a bigger venue for next year!

Rainbow Run Glasgow FrontRunners held their annual Rainbow Run on 17 February, marking LGBT History Month. Runners wore coloured shirts, each picking a colour based on their star sign to ensure the full rainbow was included. Each colour also represented different LGBT activists or icons, to highlight their contributions to LGBT rights, visibility or culture. They included LGBT equality activist Barbara Gittings, trans pioneer Christine Jorgensen and mathematician and computer scientist Alan Turing.

stride jogscotland magazine

|

Spring 2019


7

Big Night Out JogScotland Strathclyde Park & Ravenscraig decided to kick off the new year with their first ever JogScotland Big Night Out and Awards Ceremony. With entertainment and a buffet at Club 100, Motherwell, they sold 70 tickets, received ten awards nominations and presented a gift voucher and certificate to winner Willie Gordon, aka Turbo – with a wee gift for all the other nominees too. Best of all, they raised £300 for SAMH in the process!

Selfie search Buggy Fitness Group Dunfermline held a jog with a difference with their Selfie Search session in Pittencrief Park. The parents, with their little ones in buggies, followed clues that led them to selfie stations around the park, and then had to pose for pictures to prove they’d found them. Looking good, guys!

Plogscotland We’re delighted to be linking up with Keep Scotland Beautiful for their Spring Clean 2019, encouraging jog groups to get busy with a spot of plogging. Plogging is picking up litter while you jog, and can make a real difference to those paths and trails we all use. You can plog during your regular jog session, or set up a special event. So let out your inner Womble, grab a bin bag, and get plogging – turn to p15 to find out how to get involved. jogscotland magazine

|

stride Spring 2019


8

We’re delighted to have launched a new initiative to help overcome some of the barriers that mental health issues can pose to getting active with jogscotland.

We know our jog leaders already support their members’ mental health in many ways: Reassuring someone with anxiety before their first session, checking in on a jogger with a long-term mental health condition, or simply asking someone how their day was, and listening to the answer. The I’m here campaign offers a way to recognise that, and encourage people to feel comfortable speaking about mental health at their jogging group. Jog leaders from more than 70 jog groups have taken the I’m here pledge, to welcome mental health conversations at their jogging groups, and to help support people with mental health difficulties. Leaders who have taken the pledge wear an I’m here badge which they can use as a tool to start conversations with their members and show that they are open to chatting about mental health. It also shows that they have taken online mental health awareness training provided by our partners SAMH. The intention is not to turn jog leaders into trained counsellors, but to make them feel more confident to provide a listening ear, and know how to guide members to find more help if they want it.

stride jogscotland magazine

|

Spring 2019


9

During Pledge Week, beginning on 21 January, jog leaders posted videos and photographs of themselves taking their pledge on social media, added the I’m here facebook frame to their profile pictures, and followed through on the pledge with specific actions. All those taking the pledge:  ave taken online mental health awareness training provided by SAMH H (Scottish Association for Mental Health).  xplain to their joggers that the badge and pledge mean mental health E conversations are welcome at their group. Are actively open to those conversations.  use their social media platforms to share messages on mental health Will and physical activity.  do their best to support people with mental health issues to participate Will in their groups, listening to their needs and signposting them to further help if necessary. You can see some of the pledges via our Facebook and Twitter accounts. From now on, everyone who takes our jog leader course will complete the mental health awareness training beforehand, and will be presented with a badge on the day of the course. Current jog leaders who want to get involved can drop an email to jo.stevens@scottishathletics.org.uk. I’m here was launched at the jogscotland HQ in Edinburgh, with a number of Jog Leaders signing the pledge board. The launch event also heard from Alex McClintock and Adam Allison, who won the SAMH Mental Wellbeing Award at our annual awards. They are leaders at Jog Con, a group based at Perth Prison,

jogscotland magazine

|

stride Spring 2019


10

I’m here continued which helps inmates get active and improve their physical and mental health. They explained how the group had helped improve the self-esteem of participants and given them a focus on helping their peers. jogscotland membership development officer Jo Stevens said: “I am blown away at the response and support our leaders have shown for the I’m here pledge. At the initial launch of the campaign, I was hoping that 25 to 30 groups would sign up but we have far exceeded our expectations! It’s been very emotional watching the pledge videos, and our jog leaders have been taking the lead in talking about their own mental health. I am so proud of them and what I’m here has achieved.” jogscotland works in partnership with SAMH (Scottish Association for Mental Health) to promote the mental health benefits of jogging, and the I’m here initiative is part of the organisation’s action plan as a signatory to SAMH’s Mental Health Charter for Physical Activity and Sport.

So far, jog leaders from all these groups have taken their pledges – join them! Airdrie, Airyhall, Alness, Arbroath Road Runners, Ardler Ladies, Banchory Running Club, Bridge of Don, Buggy Fitness Group Dunfermline, Cambuslang, Edinburgh Frontrunners, Elder Park Buggy Runners, Crimea River Runners, StepWell - Run Well, Elgin, Ellon, Erskine Jogging Buddies, Forfar Road Runners, Fun 2 Run, Galavanters, Get Fit Falkland, GGC NHS, Glasgow Dental Hospital & School Runners, Glasgow Frontrunners, Haddington, Hazlehead, Inside Out, Isle of Harris, jb’s joggers, Jed Joggers, Insch, Kemnay, Mid Argyll, Stirling Striders, JogPKC, Isle of Arran, Kinross, Kintore Running Club, Penicuik, Run Livingston, Turriff, JogStewarton, Juniors Alford, Kick Start @ Calaismuir, Kinellar, Kirkcaldy Wizards, Let’s Go Linlithgow, Leven Las Vegas, Livi Loopers, Mums on the Run Killearn, Muir of Ord, Mums on the Run Inverurie, Newmachar Running Group, NMS, Peebles, Peterhead, Pink Laydeez, Plean, QEUH, Queens Cross Aberdeen, Ravenscraig/Strathclyde Park, Ready, Steady Go Pitreavie!, Royal Society of Edinburgh, Rubbish Runners, Run Livingston, Salsburgh, Selkirk Striders, Tain Joggers, TAYsmilers, Troon Tortoises, Victoria Park Road Runners, West Dunbartonshire.

stride jogscotland magazine

|

Spring 2019


11

What does the I’m here badge mean? The I’m here badge was created for us by design partners Brand Oath. Its colour links it to the SAMH logo. It’s a slightly imperfect circle, to reflect the fact that none of us, or our lives, are always perfect. The natural handwriting gives it a personal touch, and the fact the final line leads out of the circle and off the page shows that it’s travelling and moving towards something new.

jogscotland magazine

|

stride Spring 2019


12

The gift of life After years of working as a nurse to patients with kidney failure, jogscotland jog leader Rachel Cox decided she’d like to go one step further: She made the incredible step of becoming an altruistic kidney donor, giving one of her kidneys to someone she doesn’t know. Rachel, who jogs with Muirfield Marauders and Ron’s Runners, tells us her story…

I’ve worked at the John Lynch Renal Department at University Hospital Crosshouse for over 15 years as a renal nurse and a renal practice educator. That means I know only too well how hard life can be for people on dialysis and the difference a kidney transplant could make to their lives. Many people with kidney failure require dialysis - a life-saving treatment needed to remove waste products, extra chemicals and fluid from your blood when your kidneys don’t work well enough to keep you healthy. It means coming into hospital three times a week for the rest of your life - I know patients who had been coming in for treatment for 20 years. And although it prolongs life, people with kidney failure still have a high chance of dying younger. The minute you start dialysis, your body ages. If you are a 50-year-old man, you have a 50 per cent chance of being alive after five years on dialysis. Yet, if you have a successful transplant, there is a 97 per cent chance a kidney would still be working. A healthy person however, can lead a completely normal life with only one kidney.

stride jogscotland magazine

|

Spring 2019


13 Almost half of all kidney donations come from living donors, some who are ‘altruistic donors’ like me, and others donating to a friend or relative. That’s fantastic news because living donor transplants lead to better results for patients. There are, however, still currently more than 400 people on the transplant list in need of a kidney. It took a year of preparation - I had to have a whole range of tests, making sure I have better than average kidney function, that will give me a long, healthy life with just one kidney. I also had to convince my husband, Iain, who only agreed if I promised not to run more than 10 miles for a year afterwards, to give me a chance to recover. I never realised exactly what I had agreed to - it was the hardest thing, not doing longer runs. I was nervous, excited and terrified before the operation. I was extremely worried about pain - I heard it was worse for the donor, so feared for the worst, but knew the pain would be short-lived and the benefits outweighed the fear! The operation, in 2017, was a wee bit uncomfortable but it went very well. I was on stronger painkillers for only 24 hours, I was back running after four weeks and back at work after eight weeks. I started with a two-mile run and slept all afternoon, I was really tired but felt so happy. A few days later I entered the Ron’s Runners handicap race (just under three miles), but had been given a time more reflective of before surgery – I was nearly last but so happy to have completed it. I built up to ten miles, but I did lose my mojo - I didn’t have anything to strive for and I became disheartened. To find out more about organ donation, go to https://www.organdonationscotland.org/ continues over

jogscotland magazine

|

stride Spring 2019


14

Rachel Cox continued I took a lot of pleasure in seeing my Muirhead Marauders group achieve the 10K in October and that really woke up my passion for running again, seeing their amazing achievement made me think about what I was doing next. I hadn’t got into the ballot for the London Marathon, but I knew this was something that would challenge me and excite me – so applied through CrunCh (Charity Runners Clearing House) for a place with Kidney Research. From the moment I got confirmation of my place I started enjoying my training again – I now have a goal, a purpose. Will I achieve my best marathon time? Definitely not, but that isn’t what it is about. It is being the best I can be now, and to show with only one kidney I can still do these types of challenges. It’s hard work, but for me it’s worth every step, if it helps research new ways to prevent and treat kidney disease, and to support patients. I am also signed up for my first ultra this year, Run the Blades – 30 miles – and am looking forward to that. I didn’t donate my kidney to get anything out of it. I knew that it was unlikely I would hear from the recipient, but I like to think that maybe they are out there travelling around the world, running marathons or just enjoying time with their family. To think that they may be living their best life because of something I did makes me feel really happy. *With thanks to NHS Ayrshire and Arran. Sponsor Rachel at https://uk.virginmoneygiving.com/fundraiser-display/ showROFundraiserPage?userUrl=RachelCox17&pageUrl=1

stride jogscotland magazine

|

Spring 2019


15

Plogscotland! jogscotland groups around the country will be picking up litter as they jog – or plogging – during Keep Scotland Beautiful’s Spring Clean 2019. Why not join us and hold a plogging session yourself?

It’s easy to do – just add some bin bags to your regular jogging session, pick up litter from along your route, dispose of it at the end and feel even more satisfied than usual after your jog is over! Keep Scotland Beautiful is holding its annual Spring Clean during April and May 2019. They’re keen to get as many community groups, businesses, schools, individuals and other organisations to work together to help #CleanUpScotland. There are several themes during the Clean Up, and we’re proud to be a part of activities centring on Active Travel Week, along with cycling charity Sustrans, who will be organising clean-ups along Scotland’s National Cycle Network. Some jogscotland groups have already tried plogging – Ellon jogscotland held a Wombling Wednesday Treasure Hunt last year (pictured) and gathered so many bags of rubbish they had to stop and dispose of them mid-run so they could continue! Read more about their day in Stride. *What next? We’re asking jog groups to register, so we know how many groups take part. For more information, pop over to this form and give us your details or email jo.stevens@scottishathletics.org.uk. Lots of groups have signed up already! jogscotland magazine

|

stride Spring 2019


16

Fast, flat & friendly...

Sign up today! HELENSBURGH 10K Thursday 9th May 7.30pm

DUMBARTON 10K Thursday 16th May 7.30pm

SHETTLESTON 10K Sunday 26th May 10am

• Generous spot prizes • Goody bags • £6000 in prizes/£2000 is cash prizes • More Mile Series Technical T-shirts • Unique commemorative medals • Chip timing and real time results • Professional race organisation Enter now at www.entrycentral.com Website www.babcock10kseries.co.uk | Visit our Facebook page stride jogscotland magazine

|

Photography by Daren Borzynski Spring 2019


17

Listening to leaders! Our leaders have told us they’re keen to have more networking opportunities with each other, so in February we held our first Jog Leader Get Together in Camperdown Park, Dundee. After joining in with the parkrun, jog leaders gathered to hear updates on all things jogscotland, and a short talk from our retail partner DW Fitness First.

They signed the I’m here pledge board (see p8) showing that they will actively encourage mental health conversations at their group. They also took part in a discussion around breaking down barriers to participation, and then headed outside for some practical work. Our membership development officer Jo Stevens talked to the group about the importance of warm ups, ways to inject some fun into sessions, and the group had a go at playing some games from the junior jog resource pack. We’ve more Get Togethers coming up around the country - to register, please click here or email jo.stevens@scottishathletics.org.uk Edinburgh – 30 Mar, Caledonia House jogscotland HQ, 10.30-12.30pm Aberdeen – 27 Apr, Hazelhead Golf Club, 10.30-12.30pm Glasgow – 11 May, Glasgow Club, Crownpoint, 10.30-12.30pm Inverness – 8 Jun, Inverness Leisure, 10.30-12.30pm Fife – 22 Jun, Cosmos Community Centre, 10.30-12.30pm Borders – 21 Sept, Gytes Community Centre Peebles, 10.30-12.30pm

jogscotland magazine

|

stride Spring 2019


18

Every day’s a school day

We have a huge variety of people attending our jog leader courses, but recently we were joined by Isiah Kosgei, a Kenyan runner, physiotherapist and charity worker. Kosgei, as he is known to his many friends, recently travelled to Scotland to take part in the Baxter’s Loch Ness Marathon. Although not officially a jogscotland jog leader (that honour is reserved to those in Scotland!), we were glad to share with him some expertise that he’d be able to pass on to runners in Kenya. He also took part in parkrun and met several jogscotland groups. We were fascinated to hear his inspiring story. Kosgei grew up close to Iten in Kenya. Each day he packed his bag and made the long trip to school on foot. When the bell rang for morning lessons Kosgei had already covered several kilometres but he savoured every opportunity he could to learn. At the end of morning lessons Kosgei would return home for lunch due to a lack of catering facilities at his school before he returned for afternoon lessons. Repeating his journey at the end of the school day meant Kosgei was one of many East Africans brought up on low impact mileage from a very young age. In early secondary school financial constraints meant Kosgei was forced to leave school before his potential had been achieved. Kosgei worked to support his family. In his free time he developed a love for running

stride jogscotland magazine

|

Spring 2019


19 and trained with large packs in and around Iten, where he became a world-class long distance runner. This opened doors for Kosgei who was invited to compete in large city marathons where prize money dwarfed average salaries in Kenya. He achieved an incredible marathon personal best of 2:12, and is rightly proud of this achievement but is keen to point out that Kenya has many great athletes performing at this level. Kosgei became a regular on the big city marathon circuit performing the role of pacemaker on many occasions and with this income was able to fulfill one of his main ambitions in life. Upon (semi-)retirement and approaching his 40th birthday Kosgei enrolled in his local school to complete his high school education. Kosgei himself acknowledges the funny side - the image of a grown man returning to the place of children - but it was with great humility and determination that he finally achieved his dream of completing school. Using these qualifications Kosgei has trained to become a respected and trusted physio working with many top Kenyan and international athletes in Iten. Kosgei, though, has another job. With his earnings and using his contacts he has set up the impressive King David Academy in Segero, Kenya. It’s a school that funds young people through their education, providing meals through the day so youngsters can concentrate on their learning and take part in extra-curricular activities. Kosgei passionately believes that education is the key to a brighter future for these youngsters and now competes in marathons to fund the school and sponsor children. While in Scotland Kosgei was a participant on the jog leader course further demonstrating his continued thirst for new knowledge. Kosgei said: “The course was so interesting and of high class because it involved theory and practical work. The tuition was excellent and everyone on the course was happy to share their experiences”. On reflection there are many parallels between the role of pacemaker and Kosgei’s retirement plan. A pacemaker is a leader, a person we follow and entrust with our path, someone who will help you achieve your dreams through a selfless desire to help others achieve their goals. This is undoubtedly Isiah Kosgei pacing the next generation of young Kenyans on their journey. Kosgei would like to thank his friends across Scotland, particularly in Aberdeen and Glasgow for their hospitality and continued support of the King David Academy. You can hear more about Kosgei on the first edition of the new running podcast PodFast, coming this spring, a collaboration between the Runbetweeners @ runbetweeners and Colin Thomas @Performancerun1. by Kenny Taylor, with thanks to Colin Thomas jogscotland magazine

|

stride Spring 2019


20

Drinking in the race experience by Yvonne Millar, jog leader with Jog Peebles Pink Panters How often do you take your running gear on holiday and never use it? The Istrian Wine Run might be the answer.

Having decided on a walking holiday in Croatia, across the Istrian peninsula, I wondered if there were any runs in the area. Up popped the Istrian Wine Run on 1 September - sounded good for a holiday run. On race day, we joined the other runners and piled on to 10 buses for Brtonigla, the inland hill town where the half marathon would start. Lots of people were in fancy dress - hens, butterflies and a Stone Age couple complete with clubs. Most participants were from Croatia and the noise on the bus was incredible. The buses dropped us at the outskirts of the town and we all filed up the narrow winding lanes to the church square. Loud pop music and two tents filled with wines, fruit juices, water, cheeses, cold meats, biscuits and fruit welcomed us. A team of amazing dancers took us through some dance moves. I sipped a small glass of red wine, water and munched some hard cheeses and chatted to two ladies from Finland and a lovely girl, Martina, from Zagreb. She reckoned trail running and ultras were becoming very popular in Croatia. With nine stations, inclusive of the two at the start and end and one with only water in the middle, there was going to be a lot of food and wine on offer. The first of the marathon runners appeared at the edge of the square to huge cheers from the crowd. Green, purple, pink and orange powders filled the air, colouring people’s clothes and faces - it was 4pm - time to start. The sun came out, and I realised my hat or sunglasses would have been more

stride jogscotland magazine

|

Spring 2019


21

useful than my waterproof bobbing round my waist. Martina passed me and shouted “Go Scotland!” Soon we were at the first stop. Lots of food and drinks and four men playing folk music. I decided to forgo wine at the first three stops but always had water, pretzels and fruit. The sun then disappeared and I tried some white wine at the next stop. It was absolutely delicious, along with a slice of cantaloupe melon. I felt really great starting off for the next stage! The route was on quiet roads, through woods but most difficult were stretches through vineyards. The vines were hanging with beautiful black and green grapes but in between was the stickiest, claggiest red mud. Running uphill with huge boats of mud stuck round your trainers was almost impossible. The tar road after the first section was covered in heaps of red mud where everyone had tried to stamp it off. I did see one man slip full length into a huge puddle - but he quickly recovered! Soon it was easy running along coastal roads to the finish, fuelled by white wine. Picking up a glass of red for my husband, water and a medal, I emerged into the foam party and more loud music. I spotted Martina and she gave me a big hug as we danced in the foam. After a big plate of pasta and bread, I went off for a shower and returned for the prize giving at 8pm. The male and female winners of the marathon had to stand on stage on a huge weighing scale as boxes of wine were placed on the other side. Eventually they rose up in the air - and that was their prize - their weight in wine. I didn’t suffer a headache or any muscle soreness afterwards. It was nearly my slowest half marathon ever - but definitely the most fun. jogscotland magazine

|

stride Spring 2019


22

The importance of sports bras: Are you wearing the right one? Whether you’re a seasoned sprinter, a team sports fan or a weightlifting champion, you always need to ensure you have the right kind of sports bra. The importance of a sports bra cannot be underestimated: it’s one of the most vital pieces of exercise equipment you can have in your kit. As breasts are composed of tissue, they are mainly supported by just the skin and fragile ligaments, so they require extra support during repetitive or high impact activity. But not all sports bras are made equal. While a marathon runner will need a bra that can provide support against repetitive movements over a long period of time, someone doing a yoga class will need one that allows for more flexibility, which is why there are different types of sports bra for different activities. Before deciding on what sports bra is right for your activity, you need to ensure you know how to make sure your bra fits. Measurements will vary from brand to brand and your style of bra - you might even need a completely different size from your regular bra. However, there are some key things you should look out for in each bra: In this article, we’ll look at which sports bras you should choose for your favourite sporting activities, picking out some great products that will ensure you stay supported throughout any workout you choose. Read the full article here or visit www.dwfitnessfirst.com/inside-track/ Try your local DW Fitness First with a free 3 day guest pass

stride jogscotland magazine

|

Winter 2018

Shop in-store or online at DWSports.com


23

Jogging along by David Syme “What do you do in your free time, David?” If asked this by people I meet, I look them straight in the eye and say: “I enjoy running”. For most runners this simple statement brings a whole range of responses. Occasionally the response will be: “So do I!” and this will open the floodgates of bright-eyed conversation, when it might become known that one year they both ran the Auchenshoogle 10km race together. In fact the pair of them will probably be the last to leave, and as they say a fond farewell they will probably be arranging for a run together sometime soon. In my case, however, the usual reaction to “I enjoy running” is more likely to be: “Oh really…..!” accompanied by an eyebrow raised in surprise and followed by a change of subject. Sometimes, I suspect, they are surprised not because of my advanced years (mid-70s) but because of my shape. Non-runners have an image of someone who professes to like running based on the top athletes they see in the news; slim, tall bodies, determined faces, hard as gym bunnies. They consider me afresh, a man who has just said he is a runner. They see a person built like a frog, spindly limbs sticking out of a wide frame. Moreover I am tucking in to wine and mince pies as if there were no tomorrow. “He’s having a laugh” they think. The problem is that the image of super-athlete is preventing many people from taking up our sport. We are living longer, so we should stay fit longer. Many jobs nowadays mean sitting at a computer all day, static, but tiring. Until they try it, people don’t understand how refreshing a wee run after sedentary work can be. Running is a people’s sport and all shapes and sizes can take great pleasure from it. I am offering myself to become the new poster boy for Stride - for anyone swithering over the decision to take up the sport, one look at my lumbering frame and broad grin will tip the balance in favour of running. I can almost hear people say with a nod of the head: “If he can do it, so can I.” David has produced two collections of short stories about running world-wide: “Running Away From Home” and “Running Home and Away”. All proceeds from sales go to support Tong-Len UK, a charity for street children in Northern India.

stride jogscotland magazine

|

Spring 2019

jogscotland magazine

|

stride Spring 2019


3 GREAT RUN EVENTS FOR YOUR CALENDAR

SIMPLYHEALTH GREAT STIRLING RUN | 28 APRIL SIMPLYHEALTH GREAT ABERDEEN RUN | 25 AUGUST BANK OF SCOTLAND GREAT SCOTTISH RUN | 29 SEPTEMBER

stride

stirling

jogscotland magazine

|

Spring 2019


25

Race Directory There’s an event for everyone, go to events.scottishathletics.org.uk for full details. 24 March Crinan Puffer Gartmorn 6 31 March Alloa Half Marathon Moray Road Runners 10K 57th Tom Scott Memorial Road Races Roon the Park 5K (Dean Castle Country Park) 14 April Round The Houses 10K Run Livingston 10K and half

24 April Rons Runners Spring 5K 2019 27 April Run Balmoral 2019 (10K, 5K, with 1.5K and 2.5K Junior Races) 5 May BHGE10K Running Festival 7 May Holywood Stroll 5 Mile Race 8 May Troon Tortoises 10K & Kids Fun Run

jogscotland magazine

|

stride Spring 2019


26

9 May

26 May

Babcock Helensburgh 10K

Babcock Shettleston 10K

11 May

Castle of Mey 10K

Penicuik 10K Road Race

1 June

Loch Leven Half Marathon

Killearn 10K

16 May

16 June

Babcock Dumbarton 10K

Banchory 10K

Free parkrun events (5K) every Saturday at 9.30am Aberdeen Alness Aviemore Ayr Bressay Camperdown Crathes Castle Crichton Drumchapel Dunfermline Edinburgh Eglinton

Elgin Ellon Falkirk Fort William Ganavan Sands Girvan Prom Greenock Hay Lodge Hazlehead Inverness Kirkcaldy Kirkwall

Lanark Moor Linwood Livingston Loch Leven Lochore Meadows Meadowmill Montrose Perth Plean Pollok Portobello Ruchill

Springburn St Andrews Stonehaven Strathclyde Thurso Tollcross Troon Victoria Vogrie

Junior parkrun events (2K) for four to 14-year-olds every Sunday at 9.30am Barshaw Craigswood Dumfries Duthie

Helix Inverleith Jacks Road Loch Leven

Perth Prestwick Oval Rouken Glen Stirling

Find out more at parkrun.org.uk stride jogscotland magazine

|

Spring 2019

Strathmartine The Meadows Victoria, Glasgow


If you’re going to put yourself through hell, you might as well do it in heaven.

06.10.19 Marathon | 10K | 5K | Wee Nessie lochnessmarathon.com

GUARANTEED MARATHON ENTRY AVAILABLE NOW

Visit www.RewardMobileStore.co.uk or call 0121 238 6163


Walk, jog, run with jogscotland Get fit and have fun with our sociable, supportive jogging groups for all levels – beginners welcome! Affordable, friendly sessions with trained Jog Leaders.

Find your nearest group at www.jogscotland.org.uk/local-groups

Profile for jog scotland

Stride Magazine - Spring 2019  

The jogscotland magazine

Stride Magazine - Spring 2019  

The jogscotland magazine